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Five Favorite Breakout Players
As a fantasy baseball manager, you can’t help but smile at some of the player splits that show up in April. When else can Chris Shelton shock the world with his inability to maintain the 120-homer pace he set in April of 2006? When else can a platoon player with a career .235 average suddenly challenge for the batting title by hitting .450 in the first month? And just think about all the pitchers over the years with sub-one WHIPs that became waiver wire mainstays by mid-May, never to be active in your fantasy lineup again. While most players’ quick starts can be taken with a grain of salt, you must keep in mind that for every Chris Shelton-wannabe, a diamond in the rough could be emerging, ala Curtis Granderson. Here are five players who I believe to be legit performers that you should feel comfortable with keeping in your lineup, even in shallow leagues for the rest of the season.

Nate McLouth (OF, Pit) – After opening the season with a 19-game hit streak, McLouth has went hitless in Pittsburgh’s last three games. Those who jump ship, however, will be kicking themselves at the end of the season, as McLouth has the skills to be a valuable asset to both the Pirates and your fantasy team all year long. Tabbed by his teammates as the player most likely to break out in 2008, I wouldn’t be surprised to see the lefty end up as a 25/25 guy while batting over .300. While he has only two stolen bases at the moment, it should be noted that he has logged five attempts. The fact that he’s been thrown out more than he’s reached safely is a fluke, as McLouth went a combined 32-for-34 in stolen base attempts in 2006 and 2007.

Casey Kotchman (1B, LAA) – Kotchman is another lefty I like in 2008. The 25-year-old has always been able to get on base, but has been criticized for a lack of power. After recording just 11 home runs in 437 at-bats in 2007, Kotchman has already belted six homers in a mere 78 at-bats this season. Batting sixth in the loaded Angels lineup, Kotchman will be an RBI monster and has a great chance to knock in over 100 runners over the course of the year.

Cliff Lee (SP, Cle) – Lee will not be Danny Almonte in the LLWS lights out all year, you simply cannot ignore how good he's been thus far. In case you haven’t noticed, Lee has won all four of his starts, has given up just one run and two walks and has logged at least eight innings and eight strikeouts in his last three games. If he can pitch even close to the way he has been for the rest of the season, he’ll be well-worth a spot on your squad.

Micah Owings (SP, Ari) – Owings went largely ignored among the fantasy nation on draft day this year, despite posting a very respectable 4.30 ERA and 1.284 WHIP in his 2007 rookie campaign. As good as the Diamondback hitters have been thus far on their own, it helps even more so that they play nine batters against eight whenever the skilled-hitting Owings takes the mound. At the ripe age of 25, Owings will compile respectable strikeout numbers while posting a solid WHIP and with the ability to go deep into games and pick up wins. He will be a solid contributor both this season and for many years to come.

Johnny Cueto (SP, Cin) – Sure, he's been on everyone's early-season favorites list so far following his stellar first two games of the season. Cueto has came back to earth and has lost the faith of more inexperienced fantasy owners in shallow one-year leagues. As a 22-year-old flyball pitcher, having his home games at the frightening Great American Ball Park Cueto will certainly experience his ups and downs throughout the year. If you’ve seen this guy when he’s on, however, you can’t help but be reminded of a young Pedro Martinez, and as long as he can stay healthy, his WHIP will remain low and he has the talent to garner a strikeout per inning all season.



Posted by Danny Goldin at 4/25/2008 1:08:00 PM

Comments (4)

Behold the Future
The next generation in watching a baseball game is here. Nintendo has introduced a wireless service fans can access with their Nintendo DS systems at Safeco Field that provides stats, scores, video highlights, radio coverage, food and beverage service and more. The most interesting feature is "Pitch Effect, which allows viewers to see the trajectory of each pitch and get information on the speed and placement of each ball thrown."

Imagine the possibilities with that one. If I was a manager, I'd have that in my dugout. When an ump blew a call, I'd take it out there to the plate and stick it in his face. How could he deny he botched it?

Seems like a no-brainer to create a fantasy feature. Or at least make it Internet-compatible, so you can check your league online.

Posted by Jason Thornbury at 4/24/2008 6:16:00 PM

Comments (4)

MLB Notes
It’s too late in most leagues, but Felipe Lopez needs to be picked up. Thursday marked the seventh straight start for him, so he’s now entrenched in the lineup. He’s not going to help your batting average, but there’s some solid stolen base and power potential from the middle infielder. RFK really limited Lopez over the past two years, so there’s some upside here.

Pitching with a damaged shoulder and soon to turn 41 years old, John Smoltz has been as good as ever this season. A 31:6 K:BB ratio over 23 innings with no homers allowed is about as dominant as it gets. A favorable schedule has helped, and he’s going to remain an injury risk, but fantasy owners might as well hold onto Smoltz and enjoy the ride.

David Ortiz is having an awful year, but he is on pace to still finish with 135 RBI.

In this installment of the clueless Joe Torre, did he really have Andruw Jones batting second and Nomar Garciaparra hitting cleanup Wednesday? I really think Major League Baseball managers might collectively be the dumbest profession in the United States. Want another example? Charlie Manuel decided to bring Cole Hamels out for the eighth inning Wednesday even though he had already thrown 118 pitches. I’m also not too big on Lou Piniella’s decision to skip Rich Hill’s turn in the rotation for inferior options like Jason Marquis and Ryan Dempster.

How is Barry Bonds unemployed right now? This is a national crisis and an outrage that deserves an inquest.

It’s pretty obvious Jeremy Bonderman is pitching with an injury. I was down on him entering the year, and he’s been even worse than I feared. Issuing 21 walks through 27.1 innings is staggering. Expect a DL-stint to arrive shortly.

Lance Berman is unconscious right now, batting .325 with six long balls and four steals. He’s also drawn seven walks to just one strikeout over the last seven games. He’s not going to suddenly steal 30 bases, but the Astros are running wild this year, so a career-high in the category should be expected. With an improved lineup also around him, Berkman is in line to obliterate last year’s numbers.

Jimmy Fallon to replace Conan O’Brien once he takes over for Jay Leno? Get ready for Chevy Chase, Part 2.

The Vikings and Chiefs trade looks win-win to me. Minnesota’s defense is going to be a force adding the league’s best pass rusher in his prime next to the NFL’s best interior. That team is a quarterback away from winning the NFC. Of course, quarterback is the most important position in football. I also applaud Dallas’ decision to go after Pacman Jones. Sure, there’s plenty of risk involved, but any time you can get a top-5 defensive player for a fourth rounder, you do so. When on the field, Jones is more valuable than any player in this year’s NFL Draft.

I’m beginning to think Francisco Liriano isn’t 100 percent recovered from his Tommy John surgery.

I would say that Brett Favre becoming the next cover boy of “Madden” would solve the jinx problem, but there’s always the chance he comes back. Still, it’s pretty fitting.

I’m not saying I predicted Manny Corpas losing the closer’s job mid-April, but last year’s 6.6 strikeouts per nine innings didn’t exactly scream dominant stopper. The .260 BABIP and .85 strand rate did, however, suggest he was lucky. He’ll turn it around, but this is another example of how fluid closing situations become because of small sample sizes.

Look Look. There’s a picture of Chris Liss and me on ESPN.com. How exciting!

Morgues should be preparing for Gary Sheffield’s arrival, because he looks just about done. At age 39, his body is simply failing him. That said, American League pitchers beware, the rest of this Tigers lineup has officially awoken.

Might as well take a flier on Eric Hinske. His .327/.403/.727 line can’t be taken too seriously, but remember, the former ROY was a pretty good prospect back in the day. And after what Carlos Pena did last year in a similar situation in Tampa Bay, Hinske can’t be completely ignored. He might be a pretty good asset against right-handers this year.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 4/24/2008 5:21:00 PM
Comments (12)

Mock Draft
I’m fully aware this is an exercise in futility, but I just can’t help myself. The following is what I predict will happen not what should happen during the NFL Draft this weekend. And I’m only going top-15, which is a crapshoot enough as is.

1. Miami Dolphins: Jake Long – A done deal.

2. St. Louis Rams: Glenn Dorsey – A trade is possible here, but Dorsey seems like the safest and best player in this draft. Adam Carriker would then move to end.

3. Atlanta Falcons: Chris Long – Now this could ruin the rest of my mock if Atlanta goes Matt Ryan instead. Long hasn’t really even been linked to the Falcons, but they certainly could use the defensive help, and Atlanta feels they can address the QB situation in Round 2. Still, ownership may push for Ryan here.

4. Oakland Raiders: Darren McFadden – Especially if Michael Bush returns healthy, Oakland has quite possibly the deepest RB corps in the league right now. However, there isn’t a lot of money tied up in the position, and Al Davis is enamored with speed. Make no mistake, Davis has final say and personally makes all the Raiders’ draft selections. He can’t help himself and takes McFadden.

5. Kansas City Chiefs: Ryan Clady – Kansas City is after players who can start right away and has done a nice job compiling numerous picks in a deep draft class. They might address defensive line here after dealing Jared Allen, but they have a bigger need on the offensive line, and Clady can help immediately.

6. New York Jets: Vernon Gholston – Gholston is all about upside with eye-popping measurables. However, he’s also been accused of being a workout wonder. He set the Ohio State record with 14 sacks last season, but he recorded seven in two games (Michigan and Wisconsin), disappearing in many others. The Jets will look at what the Giants did to stop division rival Tom Brady and the Pats last year and address the D-line, but there’s some bust potential here.

7. New England Patriots: Branden Albert – One of the biggest risers in this year’s draft, Albert can play any position on the offensive line and will turn into the better pro than Ryan Clady, which means he’ll naturally be drafted by the Patriots. He was only moved to guard at Virginia because D’Brickashaw Ferguson was playing left tackle. New England could go Sedrick Ellis here, but you can be sure they’ll take a lineman either way.

8. Baltimore Ravens: Matt Ryan – Ryan may or may not turn into a franchise quarterback, but Baltimore can’t afford not to find out. Ryan might slip a bit, but there’s no way he takes a Brady Quinn type plunge. There are too many teams in need of QB help, with Baltimore at the top of the list.

9. Cincinnati Bengals: Sedrick Ellis – After losing Chris Henry and soon to lose Chad Johnson, the Bengals may have gone WR here, but there really isn’t one worthy of being selected this high. Rashard Mendenhall is another option, but after getting consistently burned with early RB selections in the past, Cincy addresses their weaker side of the ball and takes Ellis.

10. New Orleans Saints: Leodis McKelvin – The Saints really want Sedrick Ellis but will settle for McKelvin instead. New Orleans is desperate for help in the secondary.

11. Buffalo Bills: Devin Thomas – He might be a bit of a reach, but the Bills have never shied from drafting based on team needs (see: Donte Whitner). Wide receiver is a glaring need, and Thomas has the size and speed the offense is missing.

12. Denver Broncos: Rashard Mendenhall – I know, the Broncos never take a runner this high, and I’m certainly not saying they should, but this is a team that hasn’t had an elite RB since Clinton Portis left in 2003. Mendenhall fits the Broncos’ system perfectly; a patient back whose style is one-cut and go, which is ideal for their zone scheme. Fantasy owners salivate.

13. Carolina Panthers: Derrick Harvey – Harvey has been linked to Carolina so often, maybe it’s a case of smokescreening. For now, I’ll take it at face value and predict the Panthers select the defensive end from Florida.

14. Chicago Bears: Jeff Otah – The Bears have an aging defense and need serious help at quarterback, wide receiver and running back. While taking a running back also makes sense here, offensive line is as big of a need, and the team can address the RB position later on.

15. Detroit Lions: Jonathan Stewart – There’s a strong chance Detroit takes Jerod Mayo instead, but the Lions typically have a hard time passing on offensive skill positions. Stewart underwent toe surgery this offseason, but he should be fine for the season and could ultimately turn out to be the best back from this year’s class.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 4/24/2008 3:04:00 PM
Comments (2)

Weekly Call for Free Agent Suggestions
Justin Masterson pitched well against the Angels today, and while this is probably a one-time start for him, we'll cover him. Please submit any other names you'd like to see us cover for potential free agent pickups in your league. The articles will be up by 1:00 pm PT on Sunday.

Posted by Jeff Erickson at 4/24/2008 12:21:00 PM
Comments (1)

Fantasy Focus Thursday: Rany Jazayerli
Rany joins us to talk about his work at Baseball Prospectus, as well as his new blog, Rany on the Royals.

Posted by Jeff Erickson at 4/24/2008 1:44:00 AM
Comments (0)

Mets Observations
After watching a number of Mets’ games this season, a number of things have become clear:

1. Angel Pagan is an excellent player with an excellent future. He seems to have a great idea of what hitting is all about, has an excellent batting eye, has good speed and has shown the potential to become an excellent defensive player.

2. The idea that Pagan should become a bench player upon Moise Alou’s return is ridiculous. The Mets’ offense or lackthereof does not have the luxury of losing one of it’s better hitters. And as of today, Angel Pagan is one of the team’s better hitters.

3. When Alou returns, Willie Randolph should simply rotate all four of the team’s outfielders in and out of the lineup based on matchups. Furthermore, it is extremely likely that Alou will get injured sometime soon and it’s much better to keep Pagan fresh and confident than to bury him on the bench. Carlos Beltran and his .230 or so average should not be immune to getting a weekly day off.

4. Ryan Church or Angel Pagan should be the team’s permanent number 2 hitter. The ridiculous contract that the Mets handed to Luis Castillo in the offseason is looking even more ridiculous today than it did when it was handed out. Reyes will benefit most from having a gap/power hitter hitting behind him than he will benefit from having a light hitting, bunt specialist behind him. Reyes does not need someone to bunt him to second and he doesn’t need to get to second to score on a double. Whenever Reyes is on first base, the number 2 hitter receives a ton of fastballs. Certainly Church or Pagan can do more with fastballs than Luis Castillo.



Posted by David Martorano at 4/23/2008 10:55:00 AM
Comments (0)

Reds Fire Wayne Krivsky
The Reds fired GM Wayne Krivsky today, less than four weeks into the season. Many observers thought that this move would happen at the end of the year, as Reds CEO Bob Castellini brought in his buddy Walt Jocketty over the offseason as an "adviser."

I don't necessarily question the move itself - Krivsky's track record with the Reds is a mixed bag, some very good (Brandon Phillips for nothing, Jeff Keppinger for less than nothing), some not-so-good (Mike Stanton to a multi-year deal, Austin Kearns and Felipe Lopez getting dealt to the Nats, though Darryl Thompson is making that trade look less bad). It's the timing of the move that makes no sense. Why now? Why not when Jocketty was hired? Why not at the end of the season?

Castellini's quote is somewhat disturbing if it weren't so transparently dissmebling:

"(Krivsky) gave it his all. He's a good guy," Castellini said. "We're not winning. We haven't started well. It was time."

Really, you're really going to base this on 21 games this season? Please....

I worry about what happens to the rest of the organization, in terms of scouting and development. The Reds actually have a good farm system right now. Jocketty has never really presided over a great system in St. Louis.

Posted by Jeff Erickson at 4/23/2008 10:13:00 AM

Comments (3)

MLB Notes
Josh Hamilton is going to be an absolute force this season if the early returns are any indication. After striking out 22 percent of the time last year, he’s all the way down to 12 percent this season. Moreover, after posting a .222/.296/..292 line against lefties in 2007, he’s mashing southpaws this year (.400/.435/.600). He hasn’t even begun taking advantage of hitter-friendly Ameriquest Field either, posting an OPS nearly 150 points higher on the road. Hamilton is also enjoying batting in the middle of Texas’ lineup, as he’s on pace to drive in 154 runs. Don’t be surprised if he’s a top-20 fantasy pick next year.

Those in deeper leagues, go ahead and pick up Adam Lind. With Frank Thomas jettisoned, Lind should get all the starts against right-handers as soon as he’s recalled, which is imminent. He posted a 1.092 OPS as a 22-year-old in Triple-A in 2006 and is slugging .630 there this season. Lind struggled in the majors last year, but he got valuable experience in the process and did knock in 46 runs in just 290 at-bats. He’s worth grabbing.

Like Fox News, Microsoft Works and delicious fastfood, a healthy Rich Harden has officially become an oxymoron.

I’m trying to sell Cliff Lee right now. The former prospect put together a quality season in the big leagues back in 2005, and injuries can be partially blamed on last year’s disaster, but anyone who thinks he’s suddenly a top-30 fantasy pitcher is going to be disappointed. The 20:2 K:BB ratio is awesome, but an incredibly easy schedule has really helped out. No one thinks he’s going to maintain a 0.40 ERA, but the .90 strand rate and unfathomable .154 BABIP reveals someone even luckier than whoever marries Natalie Portman. I have no doubt Lee can finish with the second best numbers of his career in 2008, but he gives up too many flyballs and will never have higher trade value than now.

If you’re a Chad Cordero owner, and you can get a six-pack of Sierra Nevada for him in a trade, I’d do that deal five minutes ago.

Carlos Delgado is done. There are at least 20 other first basemen I’d rather own in fantasy leagues. It’s not really the .206 batting average that scares me; after all, his 14:10 K:BB ratio is actually quite decent, but his .294 slugging percentage is downright grotesque. Four extra-base hits in 72 at-bats won’t get it done. At age 35, there’s very little reason for optimism. His current swing often looks like he forgot to take the donut off the bat at the on-deck circle.

I would say Matt Morris is pitching poorly, but that would be an insult to poorly. Five homers allowed over 20.2 innings? How about a hideous 8:6 K:BB ratio with a 9.15 ERA and 1.98 WHIP? Because of his obscene contract, the Pirates are likely to stick with him. There’s a very real possibility he loses 20-25 games this season if given the opportunity.

Memo to restaurants: If your caesar salad doesn’t contain anchovies, it’s not a caesar. No menu item gets more consistently butchered than the caesar salad.

Corey Patterson may already be falling out of favor in Cincinnati, as he’s found himself on the bench during four of the past six games. Even more distressing was the fact that two of those games came against right-handed starters. Funny thing is, he’s actually playing much better than the numbers suggest. He’s sporting a superb .933 contact rate with a .10 walk rate. His .135 BABIP is simply unheard of, but with Jerry Hairston Jr. now up, Patterson’s luck better turn around fast.

Is Joe Torre really batting Nomar Garciaparra third? Torre has officially gone from right guy in right situation, to a bit overrated, to now a full-fledged liability.

Chase Utley is flat-out punishing the baseball. Only an injury prevented him from winning the MVP award last season, and there appears to be no stopping him this season. Of his 28 hits this year, a whopping 18 have gone for extra bases. Teammate Pat Burrell is another nominee for player of the month.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 4/22/2008 6:02:00 PM
Comments (16)

Types of Fantasy Players
In the interest of fun, I decided to take a close look at one of the most competitive fantasy leagues that I’m in. The purpose of my focus was to study the various distinct personalities in the league and to create general categories of fantasy players.

The following is my list:

1. The architect- The architect is a steady, conservative owner. He prepares well for his drafts and believes in his players like parents believe in their children. As a result, he does not trade often. The only trades you will see him make are either out of necessity or are extremely one sided in his favor. He stays prepared throughout the season and add/drops effectively. The architect typically qualifies for the playoffs.

2. The Fantasy All Star- The All Star takes his hobby extremely seriously. He prepares well for his drafts and drafts well as a result. He also stays on top of things during the season and add/drops like a champ. He is a vicious trash talker and enjoys knowing that he is better than most/all of the competition. His one drawback is his slight insecurity when it comes to making trades. He fears ever losing out on a trade. As a result, he passes up on certain trades because of that fear.

3. The Renegade- The renegade does not prepare well for his draft and drafts poorly as a result. He also does not stay on top of things during the regular season and is not a top add/dropper. His main strategy to compensate for his lack of fantasy education is to constantly insult the entire league with blatantly unfair trade offers. The thinking behind such a strategy is to catch an owner at a vulnerable moment and to rob him blind. The other strategy is to create the impression that he knows nothing about fantasy sports, which can help in reasonable trade talks. The renegade generally has a positive influence on fantasy leagues. He is constantly angering owners, generating buzz and making things interesting.

4. The Sleeping Tiger- The sleeping tiger drafts well and stays on top of things during the regular season. His strategy is to be on top of things and to lay low. You will rarely see him talk trash or bring attention onto himself. As a result he is able to make lots of successful trades because owners do not see him as a threat.

5. The Salesman- The salesman does not waste his time with draft preparation or in season education. He knows a lot about sports and is able to draft and add/drop relatively effectively as a result. His main strategy is to get people on the phone and to make them do things that are not in their interest. People are quick to pin the “cheater” tag on this owner because they do not understand how he benefits from so many one-sided trades. What they fail to realize is that he is a first class talker/negotiator and uses his skills to the fullest.

6. James Dean- This owner has a great time playing fantasy sports and does whatever he wants. If every respected fantasy site projected player x to have a terrible season, this owner would find a reason to put that player on every one of his teams. He embraces risk and is always willing to make a big trade. He is also always looking to talk trash and get under people’s skin. James Dean is an asset to a fantasy league because of his activeness and willingness to make moves. His downside is his reckless style of operation, which sometimes leads to bad fantasy decisions.

7. The Fantasy Guru- The guru takes pride in the amount of quality information that he uses to his advantage. He drafts well and is a first class add/dropper. He embraces risk and is always looking to make trades. His philosophy is that the more trades he makes the better; because in the end his fantasy ability will allow him to get the better of most trades. His weakness is his honesty and generosity. He is always willing to provide honest answers to his fellow owners and to trade fairly. The results are that sometimes he cannot make trades with other unscrupulous owners and the other obvious result is that the information he so freely provides, does not serve his interests well. His other drawback is his ego. Sometimes the guru makes moves just to create a stir and to let people know that he is unfazed by conventional wisdom or the general consensus of fantasy sites. Such boldness sometimes results in bad fantasy actions.

Posted by David Martorano at 4/22/2008 7:41:00 AM
Comments (6)

Fantasy Focus Monday: Will Carroll
We'll have our usual focus on injuries. Please let me know if there's a player you'd like me to ask about. We'll definitely cover both A-Rod and Chipper, Jimmy Rollins, Rafael Soriano, Placido Polanco, Travis Hafner and Ben Sheets.

Posted by Jeff Erickson at 4/20/2008 9:56:00 PM
Comments (4)

MLB Notes
Matt Cain has been dropped by 5,899 teams in Yahoo Leagues. Whaaat?! I’m as frustrated with the 23-year-old as anyone, but these leagues are either as shallow as Paris Hilton, or people are acting a bit rash, no? Cain posted a 23:17 K:BB ratio last April and a 5.28 ERA during the first month of the 2006 season. He’s going to be just fine.

Nick Blackburn is a nice story and the 4:1 K:BB ratio is very good, but few can sustain success with such a low strikeout rate (4.26 K/9 IP). The other shoe will drop.

Even though I was high on him entering last season and typically recommend targeting last year’s scrubs, Travis Hafner scared me entering 2007 and so far, he’s done nothing to ease my concerns. Maybe there wasn’t a hidden injury curtailing his power last year after all, because his slugging has dropped all the way to .394 this season. Considering his strikeouts have increased and his walks decreased, there’s plenty of reason to worry.

Like a butterface, Rickie Weeks’ stats look great until you come across his batting average.

Bengie Molina scored from second base on a single Sunday for the first time in two years. Staying with the Giants, Jonathan Sanchez has to be owned in all deep leagues. He’s likely to be inconsistent and pitches for a terrible team, but the 26 strikeouts in 20 innings means he has to be taken seriously. A career mark of 9.7 K/9 IP is no joke.

I’m going to go ahead and say it. “Forgetting Sarah Marshall” is better than both “Knocked Up” and “Superbad.”

Rafael Furcal looks fantastic this season. He’s taking the opposite approach to his walk year than Andruw Jones did. His bat speed is back, and he’s walking at a greater rate than he ever has before, also chipping in four steals already. All those injuries from last season are officially behind him, and Furcal looks like a top-40 fantasy player.

Julio Lugo, on the other hand, looks dreadful. A decent second half last season (rightfully) gave fantasy owners hope for the 2008 campaign, but he looks as lost as ever, already committing an unacceptable six errors in the field. The Red Sox can’t put up with a poor defending, sub .300 OBP shortstop who is getting caught on 50 percent of his SB attempts much longer.

I’m beginning to think the Lakers got the better end of the Pau Gasol deal.

Typically not a fan of Emo, I simply cannot get “I Will Possess Your Heart” by Death Cab For Cutie out of my head.

Sunday was a microcosm of the current state of Chipper Jones’ career; two more hits raised his MLB-leading average to .458, but he also left the game with a strained quad. Despite turning 36 years old later this week, Jones is currently one of the three best hitters in baseball. It would be interesting to see what he could do with 600 at-bats.

Is it too early to start a Conor Jackson for MVP campaign? I say no.

Top-5 Late Night Hosts: 1. David Letterman 2. Conan O’Brien 3. Jimmy Kimmel 4. Craig Ferguson 89. Jay Leno

Randy Wolf is going to be a major fantasy asset for as long as he stays healthy this season. Before an injury derailed him last year, Wolf posted a 71:19 K:BB ratio over 66 innings during April and May, with a 3.40 ERA and a 1.19 WHIP. He still walks too many batters to be a big help in the WHIP department, but since Petco really helps his biggest weakness – allowing homers since he gives up so many flyballs – and he’s in baseball’s best division for pitchers, a big season could be in store. However, since he can’t be counted on to stay healthy, he might be an excellent sell-high in 2-3 weeks.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 4/20/2008 6:36:00 PM
Comments (18)

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10/6/2013 - 10/12/2013
9/29/2013 - 10/5/2013
9/22/2013 - 9/28/2013
9/15/2013 - 9/21/2013
9/8/2013 - 9/14/2013
9/1/2013 - 9/7/2013
8/25/2013 - 8/31/2013
8/18/2013 - 8/24/2013
8/11/2013 - 8/17/2013
8/4/2013 - 8/10/2013
7/28/2013 - 8/3/2013
7/21/2013 - 7/27/2013
7/14/2013 - 7/20/2013
7/7/2013 - 7/13/2013
6/30/2013 - 7/6/2013
6/23/2013 - 6/29/2013
6/16/2013 - 6/22/2013
6/9/2013 - 6/15/2013
6/2/2013 - 6/8/2013
5/26/2013 - 6/1/2013
5/19/2013 - 5/25/2013
5/12/2013 - 5/18/2013
5/5/2013 - 5/11/2013
4/28/2013 - 5/4/2013
4/21/2013 - 4/27/2013
4/14/2013 - 4/20/2013
4/7/2013 - 4/13/2013
3/31/2013 - 4/6/2013
3/24/2013 - 3/30/2013
3/17/2013 - 3/23/2013
3/10/2013 - 3/16/2013
3/3/2013 - 3/9/2013
2/24/2013 - 3/2/2013
2/17/2013 - 2/23/2013
2/10/2013 - 2/16/2013
2/3/2013 - 2/9/2013
1/27/2013 - 2/2/2013
1/20/2013 - 1/26/2013
1/13/2013 - 1/19/2013
1/6/2013 - 1/12/2013
12/30/2012 - 1/5/2013
12/23/2012 - 12/29/2012
12/16/2012 - 12/22/2012
12/9/2012 - 12/15/2012
12/2/2012 - 12/8/2012
11/25/2012 - 12/1/2012
11/18/2012 - 11/24/2012
11/11/2012 - 11/17/2012
11/4/2012 - 11/10/2012
10/28/2012 - 11/3/2012
10/21/2012 - 10/27/2012
10/14/2012 - 10/20/2012
10/7/2012 - 10/13/2012
9/30/2012 - 10/6/2012
9/23/2012 - 9/29/2012
9/16/2012 - 9/22/2012
9/9/2012 - 9/15/2012
9/2/2012 - 9/8/2012
8/26/2012 - 9/1/2012
8/19/2012 - 8/25/2012
8/12/2012 - 8/18/2012
8/5/2012 - 8/11/2012
7/29/2012 - 8/4/2012
7/22/2012 - 7/28/2012
7/15/2012 - 7/21/2012
7/8/2012 - 7/14/2012
7/1/2012 - 7/7/2012
6/24/2012 - 6/30/2012
6/17/2012 - 6/23/2012
6/10/2012 - 6/16/2012
6/3/2012 - 6/9/2012
5/27/2012 - 6/2/2012
5/20/2012 - 5/26/2012
5/13/2012 - 5/19/2012
5/6/2012 - 5/12/2012
4/29/2012 - 5/5/2012
4/22/2012 - 4/28/2012
4/15/2012 - 4/21/2012
4/8/2012 - 4/14/2012
4/1/2012 - 4/7/2012
3/25/2012 - 3/31/2012
3/18/2012 - 3/24/2012
3/11/2012 - 3/17/2012
3/4/2012 - 3/10/2012
2/26/2012 - 3/3/2012
2/19/2012 - 2/25/2012
2/12/2012 - 2/18/2012
2/5/2012 - 2/11/2012
1/29/2012 - 2/4/2012
1/22/2012 - 1/28/2012
1/15/2012 - 1/21/2012
1/8/2012 - 1/14/2012
1/1/2012 - 1/7/2012
12/25/2011 - 12/31/2011
12/18/2011 - 12/24/2011
12/11/2011 - 12/17/2011
12/4/2011 - 12/10/2011
11/27/2011 - 12/3/2011
11/20/2011 - 11/26/2011
11/13/2011 - 11/19/2011
11/6/2011 - 11/12/2011
10/30/2011 - 11/5/2011
10/23/2011 - 10/29/2011
10/16/2011 - 10/22/2011
10/9/2011 - 10/15/2011
10/2/2011 - 10/8/2011
9/25/2011 - 10/1/2011
9/18/2011 - 9/24/2011
9/11/2011 - 9/17/2011
9/4/2011 - 9/10/2011
8/28/2011 - 9/3/2011
8/21/2011 - 8/27/2011
8/14/2011 - 8/20/2011
8/7/2011 - 8/13/2011
7/31/2011 - 8/6/2011
7/24/2011 - 7/30/2011
7/17/2011 - 7/23/2011
7/10/2011 - 7/16/2011
7/3/2011 - 7/9/2011
6/26/2011 - 7/2/2011
6/19/2011 - 6/25/2011
6/12/2011 - 6/18/2011
6/5/2011 - 6/11/2011
5/29/2011 - 6/4/2011
5/22/2011 - 5/28/2011
5/15/2011 - 5/21/2011
5/8/2011 - 5/14/2011
5/1/2011 - 5/7/2011
4/24/2011 - 4/30/2011
4/17/2011 - 4/23/2011
4/10/2011 - 4/16/2011
4/3/2011 - 4/9/2011
3/27/2011 - 4/2/2011
3/20/2011 - 3/26/2011
3/13/2011 - 3/19/2011
3/6/2011 - 3/12/2011
2/27/2011 - 3/5/2011
2/20/2011 - 2/26/2011
2/13/2011 - 2/19/2011
2/6/2011 - 2/12/2011
1/30/2011 - 2/5/2011
1/23/2011 - 1/29/2011
1/16/2011 - 1/22/2011
1/9/2011 - 1/15/2011
1/2/2011 - 1/8/2011
12/26/2010 - 1/1/2011
12/19/2010 - 12/25/2010
12/12/2010 - 12/18/2010
12/5/2010 - 12/11/2010
11/28/2010 - 12/4/2010
11/21/2010 - 11/27/2010
11/14/2010 - 11/20/2010
11/7/2010 - 11/13/2010
10/31/2010 - 11/6/2010
10/24/2010 - 10/30/2010
10/17/2010 - 10/23/2010
10/10/2010 - 10/16/2010
10/3/2010 - 10/9/2010
9/26/2010 - 10/2/2010
9/19/2010 - 9/25/2010
9/12/2010 - 9/18/2010
9/5/2010 - 9/11/2010
8/29/2010 - 9/4/2010
8/22/2010 - 8/28/2010
8/15/2010 - 8/21/2010
8/8/2010 - 8/14/2010
8/1/2010 - 8/7/2010
7/25/2010 - 7/31/2010
7/18/2010 - 7/24/2010
7/11/2010 - 7/17/2010
7/4/2010 - 7/10/2010
6/27/2010 - 7/3/2010
6/20/2010 - 6/26/2010
6/13/2010 - 6/19/2010
6/6/2010 - 6/12/2010
5/30/2010 - 6/5/2010
5/23/2010 - 5/29/2010
5/16/2010 - 5/22/2010
5/9/2010 - 5/15/2010
5/2/2010 - 5/8/2010
4/25/2010 - 5/1/2010
4/18/2010 - 4/24/2010
4/11/2010 - 4/17/2010
4/4/2010 - 4/10/2010
3/28/2010 - 4/3/2010
3/21/2010 - 3/27/2010
3/14/2010 - 3/20/2010
3/7/2010 - 3/13/2010
2/28/2010 - 3/6/2010
2/21/2010 - 2/27/2010
2/14/2010 - 2/20/2010
2/7/2010 - 2/13/2010
1/31/2010 - 2/6/2010
1/24/2010 - 1/30/2010
1/17/2010 - 1/23/2010
1/10/2010 - 1/16/2010
1/3/2010 - 1/9/2010
12/27/2009 - 1/2/2010
12/20/2009 - 12/26/2009
12/13/2009 - 12/19/2009
12/6/2009 - 12/12/2009
11/29/2009 - 12/5/2009
11/22/2009 - 11/28/2009
11/15/2009 - 11/21/2009
11/8/2009 - 11/14/2009
11/1/2009 - 11/7/2009
10/25/2009 - 10/31/2009
10/18/2009 - 10/24/2009
10/11/2009 - 10/17/2009
10/4/2009 - 10/10/2009
9/27/2009 - 10/3/2009
9/20/2009 - 9/26/2009
9/13/2009 - 9/19/2009
9/6/2009 - 9/12/2009
8/30/2009 - 9/5/2009
8/23/2009 - 8/29/2009
8/16/2009 - 8/22/2009
8/9/2009 - 8/15/2009
8/2/2009 - 8/8/2009
7/26/2009 - 8/1/2009
7/19/2009 - 7/25/2009
7/12/2009 - 7/18/2009
7/5/2009 - 7/11/2009
6/28/2009 - 7/4/2009
6/21/2009 - 6/27/2009
6/14/2009 - 6/20/2009
6/7/2009 - 6/13/2009
5/31/2009 - 6/6/2009
5/24/2009 - 5/30/2009
5/17/2009 - 5/23/2009
5/10/2009 - 5/16/2009
5/3/2009 - 5/9/2009
4/26/2009 - 5/2/2009
4/19/2009 - 4/25/2009
4/12/2009 - 4/18/2009
4/5/2009 - 4/11/2009
3/29/2009 - 4/4/2009
3/22/2009 - 3/28/2009
3/15/2009 - 3/21/2009
3/8/2009 - 3/14/2009
3/1/2009 - 3/7/2009
2/22/2009 - 2/28/2009
2/15/2009 - 2/21/2009
2/8/2009 - 2/14/2009
2/1/2009 - 2/7/2009
1/25/2009 - 1/31/2009
1/18/2009 - 1/24/2009
1/11/2009 - 1/17/2009
1/4/2009 - 1/10/2009
12/28/2008 - 1/3/2009
12/21/2008 - 12/27/2008
12/14/2008 - 12/20/2008
12/7/2008 - 12/13/2008
11/30/2008 - 12/6/2008
11/23/2008 - 11/29/2008
11/16/2008 - 11/22/2008
11/9/2008 - 11/15/2008
11/2/2008 - 11/8/2008
10/26/2008 - 11/1/2008
10/19/2008 - 10/25/2008
10/12/2008 - 10/18/2008
10/5/2008 - 10/11/2008
9/28/2008 - 10/4/2008
9/21/2008 - 9/27/2008
9/14/2008 - 9/20/2008
9/7/2008 - 9/13/2008
8/31/2008 - 9/6/2008
8/24/2008 - 8/30/2008
8/17/2008 - 8/23/2008
8/10/2008 - 8/16/2008
8/3/2008 - 8/9/2008
7/27/2008 - 8/2/2008
7/20/2008 - 7/26/2008
7/13/2008 - 7/19/2008
7/6/2008 - 7/12/2008
6/29/2008 - 7/5/2008
6/22/2008 - 6/28/2008
6/15/2008 - 6/21/2008
6/8/2008 - 6/14/2008
6/1/2008 - 6/7/2008
5/25/2008 - 5/31/2008
5/18/2008 - 5/24/2008
5/11/2008 - 5/17/2008
5/4/2008 - 5/10/2008
4/27/2008 - 5/3/2008
4/20/2008 - 4/26/2008
4/13/2008 - 4/19/2008
4/6/2008 - 4/12/2008
3/30/2008 - 4/5/2008
3/23/2008 - 3/29/2008
3/16/2008 - 3/22/2008
3/9/2008 - 3/15/2008
3/2/2008 - 3/8/2008
2/24/2008 - 3/1/2008
2/17/2008 - 2/23/2008
2/10/2008 - 2/16/2008
2/3/2008 - 2/9/2008
1/27/2008 - 2/2/2008
1/20/2008 - 1/26/2008
1/13/2008 - 1/19/2008
1/6/2008 - 1/12/2008
12/30/2007 - 1/5/2008
12/23/2007 - 12/29/2007
12/16/2007 - 12/22/2007
12/9/2007 - 12/15/2007
12/2/2007 - 12/8/2007
11/25/2007 - 12/1/2007
11/18/2007 - 11/24/2007
11/11/2007 - 11/17/2007
11/4/2007 - 11/10/2007
10/28/2007 - 11/3/2007
10/21/2007 - 10/27/2007
10/14/2007 - 10/20/2007
10/7/2007 - 10/13/2007
9/30/2007 - 10/6/2007
9/23/2007 - 9/29/2007
9/16/2007 - 9/22/2007
9/9/2007 - 9/15/2007
9/2/2007 - 9/8/2007
8/26/2007 - 9/1/2007
8/19/2007 - 8/25/2007
8/12/2007 - 8/18/2007
8/5/2007 - 8/11/2007
7/29/2007 - 8/4/2007
7/22/2007 - 7/28/2007
7/15/2007 - 7/21/2007
7/8/2007 - 7/14/2007
7/1/2007 - 7/7/2007
6/24/2007 - 6/30/2007
6/17/2007 - 6/23/2007
6/10/2007 - 6/16/2007
6/3/2007 - 6/9/2007
5/27/2007 - 6/2/2007
5/20/2007 - 5/26/2007
5/13/2007 - 5/19/2007
5/6/2007 - 5/12/2007
4/29/2007 - 5/5/2007
4/22/2007 - 4/28/2007
4/15/2007 - 4/21/2007
4/8/2007 - 4/14/2007
4/1/2007 - 4/7/2007
3/25/2007 - 3/31/2007
3/18/2007 - 3/24/2007
3/11/2007 - 3/17/2007
3/4/2007 - 3/10/2007
2/25/2007 - 3/3/2007
2/18/2007 - 2/24/2007
2/11/2007 - 2/17/2007
2/4/2007 - 2/10/2007
1/28/2007 - 2/3/2007
1/21/2007 - 1/27/2007
1/14/2007 - 1/20/2007
1/7/2007 - 1/13/2007
12/31/2006 - 1/6/2007
12/24/2006 - 12/30/2006
12/17/2006 - 12/23/2006
12/10/2006 - 12/16/2006
12/3/2006 - 12/9/2006
11/26/2006 - 12/2/2006
11/19/2006 - 11/25/2006
11/12/2006 - 11/18/2006
11/5/2006 - 11/11/2006
10/29/2006 - 11/4/2006
10/22/2006 - 10/28/2006
10/15/2006 - 10/21/2006
10/8/2006 - 10/14/2006
10/1/2006 - 10/7/2006
9/24/2006 - 9/30/2006
9/17/2006 - 9/23/2006
9/10/2006 - 9/16/2006
9/3/2006 - 9/9/2006
8/27/2006 - 9/2/2006
8/20/2006 - 8/26/2006
8/13/2006 - 8/19/2006
8/6/2006 - 8/12/2006
7/30/2006 - 8/5/2006
7/23/2006 - 7/29/2006
7/16/2006 - 7/22/2006
7/9/2006 - 7/15/2006
7/2/2006 - 7/8/2006
6/25/2006 - 7/1/2006
6/18/2006 - 6/24/2006
6/11/2006 - 6/17/2006
6/4/2006 - 6/10/2006
5/28/2006 - 6/3/2006
5/21/2006 - 5/27/2006
5/14/2006 - 5/20/2006
5/7/2006 - 5/13/2006
4/30/2006 - 5/6/2006
4/23/2006 - 4/29/2006
4/16/2006 - 4/22/2006
4/9/2006 - 4/15/2006
4/2/2006 - 4/8/2006
3/26/2006 - 4/1/2006
3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006