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Rick Sutcliffe
Rick Sutcliffe pops into the Padres' radio booth completely wasted:

http://www.gaslampball.com/story/2006/5/11/11485/5817

Enjoy...

Posted by Jeff Erickson at 5/12/2006 11:02:00 AM

Comments (6)

It's Not About the Babe
Dayn Perry of Baseball Prospectus has a column on Foxsports.com suggesting that sentimentality has made Babe Ruth's numbers more impressive than they actually are. And, thus, no tears should be shed when Barry Bonds passes Ruth's home run mark.

Bottom line, though, it's not about Ruth losing his spot on the home run list. That's not what drives baseball fans crazy. It's about Bonds climbing the list when he's done so on an uneven playing field.

Yes, there are factors in every era that effect the numbers one way or another. But all players in those eras are subject to the same factors. That's not the case in the steroid era (which is also why Perry was off base in a 2003 article for Reason magazine when he wrote, "As for baseballís competitive integrity, steroids pose no greater threat than did other historically contingent 'enhancements,' ranging from batting helmets to the color line.")

As to whether Ruth is overrated, Perry makes three points:

1. Yankee Stadium's 295-foot porch to right

Fair enough to a point, except that Ruth hit more career homers on the road than at home and hit more road homers in his prime, from 1923 (Yankee Stadium's first year) to 1932 ( count them here), including in 1927 when 32 of his then-record 60 homers came on the road. Safe to say, he was dominant everywhere, not just at Yankee Stadium.

2. Racism of the era

Again, fair to a point, but every player in the pre-integrated era had this advantage. Players must be judged against what they did in their eras. Ruth towered over his era. (Check out how many years he led in OPS.)

Bonds, always a great player, did not tower over his era until recently. From '86-'99, he hit 1 HR every 15.3 at-bats; from '00-'05, he hit 1 HR every 8.2 at-bats. That's astounding. (Oh, and he did that at an age when one would reasonably expect his numbers to deteriorate, not rise to among the all-time greats.) Wonder what caused that?

3. Ruth's ignored moral failings (booze, food, women) vs. Bonds'criticized moral failings ("alleged cheating")

But Ruth gourging himself on hot dogs did not effect other players or the game's history. Steroid use among even a few places a burden on other competitors to keep up. On Stephen A. Smith's ESPN show in March, for example, Mike Schmidt said he probably would have used steroids. Smith asked why, when Schmidt was already hitting 35-45 homers a year without steroids. Schmidt replied that if he was hitting 35 on naturally ability and another guy was hitting 55 on the juice, he would have felt compelled as a competitor to keep up. Therefore, while Ruth's failings were personal, Bonds' have been felt across the game.

It's a fair argument to say 714 in 2006 means more than 714 in Ruth's time. But not that way Bonds has done it. Allegedly.

Posted by Jason Thornbury at 5/11/2006 7:17:00 PM

Comments (4)

Scab-Effect on Minor Leaguers
Interesting look in the Hardball Times at the effect of scab umps in the minors. Apparently, the replacement umpires, tabbed from local amateur leagues, are indeed biased toward home teams. Minor league managers have complained all year about the umps, but this seems to document that visiting batters are getting shorted at the plate. For example, in the Pacific Coast League, home team batters have a K/BB ratio of 1.82 while visiting batters have a K/BB ratio of 2.50.

The question then becomes how should this ump-effect be considered when evalutating players, if at all? And if the umpire strike continues the whole season, does this essentially taint a year's worth of minor league stats?

This would seem to be a good spot for Bud Selig to wield his weight, to whatever degree he can. I'm not sure just exactly what the MLB Commissioner can do (maybe not much) in a battle between the Association of Minor League Umpires and the Professional Baseball Umpire Corporation, but he can at least put pressure on the both sides, or at least the umps, who voted down a proposal their own negotiators recommended unanimously they should accept.

Nod to Salon's King Kaufman blog.

Oh, and for the best scab-ump debacle, and the hilarious play-by-play from a highly enraged local radio guy, listen to the the May 3 Oklahoma RedHawks vs. Round Rock Express radio link. Fast forward to about 1 hour, 48 minutes and listen to the highjinks ensue.

Nod to USSMariner for that.



Posted by Jason Thornbury at 5/11/2006 3:28:00 PM

Comments (0)

Ichiro
While it's well known in our circles that a contact machine like Ichiro will never generate as many runs created per game as the big boppers like Jim Thome and Adam Dunn, Ichiro's skill set is far more unique.

The guy broke the single season hits record, and he's *averaged* 226 hits a year. The guy has a career 36 percent hit rate on balls in play (30 percent is league average) because he gets down the line so fast, and he's got Vlad Guerrero's arm on a 5-9, 172 pound frame.

There are a lot of big power guys who get on base, and those are the ideal players to have if you want to score a ton of runs. But the Thomes, Dunns, Giambis, Delgados are all pretty similar. There skill sets are incredibly valuable, but not remarkable. The degree of difficulty of what they do is less than that of what Ichiro does, even if the easier feat is the more valuable.

If you want to build a team, go with the big boppers. But some feats of baseball artistry transcend their mere contribution to winning - hitting in 56 straight games is no better for your team than hitting in 30 straight, going 0-for-1 with two walks, and then hitting 25 straight, but the degree of difficulty makes it great. Similarly, hitting .400 with an OBP of .430 isn't any better than hitting .300 with an OBP of .450 (something that Todd Helton does every year), but it's still something that we appeciate because of how difficult it is to do.

Winning is the foremost goal, and while Ichiro might not contribute as much as Thome on that front, his artistry is more unique - and that might be more important and better for the sport.



Posted by Chris Liss at 5/10/2006 3:45:00 PM

Comments (2)

Not Two of a Kind
Prince Fielder turned 22 years old this past Tuesday. What's amazing to me isn't the .333 batting average or the 919 OPS. After watching him play for a little more than a month, what's amazing to me is the way that Fielder looks more like a five year veteran than a rookie. Fielder approaches every aspect of the game - hitting, fielding, baserunning - with a naturalness and confidence that makes it look like he's done them all at the major league level a thousand times before. There doesn't appear to be any thinking involved, he just knows what to do. This shouldn't come as too much of a shock, considering that he really has been "playing" on major league fields since he was a youngster and his dad was the pro. But it does clash with the actions of another youngster on the Brewers, Rickie Weeks.

I've seen just about all of the Brewers' games that have been broadcast this season, and one thing that really stands out is the lack of baseball "instinct" that Weeks displays. "Instinct" may not be the correct word, and I'm sure stat guys will shudder at it's use, but everything that Weeks does on the field appears to be forced. He's a tremendous athlete, the fastest guy on the team and probably has the fastest hands through the strikezone. The problem is that everything he does looks like the first time he's ever done it. He currently leads the majors with 10 errors, most of which are throwing and catching. He has a very hard time recognizing a curveball or offspeed pitch, which contributes to his 29 strikeouts in 105 at-bats. He looks to me like a guy who can rip up the minors solely with his athleticism, but can't quite do it in the majors.

I really hope that this is just a learning process for him, that the game will slow down for him at some point, and he'll realize his full potential. He only turns 24 later this season so there is still plenty of time left. Right now I wouldn't put him in the "can't miss" category, like I would with Fielder.

Posted by Herb at 5/10/2006 11:46:00 AM

Comments (1)

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3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006