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Age of Love
I’ve come to a realization recently – no one gets caught up in the hype of young baseball players more than I do. Take a look at this list of disappointing youngsters:

Carlos Quentin – Maybe the shoulder injury is to blame, but a .210/.299/.350 line is about as bad as it gets. So bad he’s currently in Triple-A. But worst of all, he was a last-minute no show on Chris Liss’ radio show, demonstrating complete disregard for tact and decorum. Future outlook: Go ahead and write off 2007, but he’ll be fine, especially with Chase Field at his disposal. However, he probably only possesses 25-homer type power.

Conor Jackson – The 28:38 K:BB ratio is impressive, but he’s been an overall disappointment. Future outlook: He doesn’t figure to ever reach much more than 20 homers, but with a nice OBP, he could be a threat to score 100 runs while projecting as a No. 2 hitter.

Chris B. Young – My preseason favorite to win the NL ROY, Young hasn’t been a total bust with 14 HRs and 11 SBs, but the rest of his counting stats are down, and the .232 BA is ugly. Future outlook: Still very bright. He plays a terrific center field and should be a 25/25 or even 30/30 type at his peak. A great “post-hype sleeper” target entering fantasy drafts next year.

Stephen Drew – Notice a theme here? Imagine how tough the Diamondbacks will be once these kids start reaching their potential. With the surname Drew, injuries figured to be a problem with the young shortstop, but it’s been production instead. Future outlook: With 25-homer upside, Drew can be a very valuable middle infielder for years to come, it’s just going to take a little longer than most anticipated.

Homer Bailey – I’m staying away for the rest of 2007. Look at the numbers. Even while in the minors this season, the ERA was fine, but the strikeouts weren’t there. Combine that with poor command and a hitter’s park as home, and you are going to get some unsightly results. Future outlook: Not sure if the Kerry Wood comparison is apt, and I’d certainly rather have Yovani Gallardo or Tim Lincecum, but Bailey will eventually settle in as a nice No. 2 starter in the big leagues, with ace potential.

Alex Gordon – 79 strikeouts in 313 at-bats. That pretty much sums up Gordon’s lackluster rookie season. Sometimes it just takes a while for it to click. I don’t view him any worse than I did before the season started. Future outlook: A fantasy monster. Gordon combines big time power with the ability to swipe 20 bases from a corner infield spot. If held at gunpoint, I’d rather Ryan Braun moving forward, but it’s awfully close.

Kevin Kouzmanoff – Kouzmanoff isn’t exactly that young, but he is in terms of major league experience, and many expected much more out of the third basemen this season, myself included. A power-hitting right-hander who strikes out a lot is far from an ideal fit for Petco, but Kouzmanoff is a better player than he’s shown so far. Future outlook: Petco Park limits his upside, but he’ll be a serviceable CI in fantasy leagues next season.

Kevin Slowey – There’s nothing left for him to prove in the minors. Now, it’s just a matter of finding out if he’s a “quadruple-A” player or not. My money is on “yes,” unfortunately. He allowed 13 home runs in 37 big league innings this year, an unfathomable amount. While that can largely be chalked up to bad luck, Slowey strikes me as an Anthony Reyes/Dave Bush type, with a lot less upside. He’s always around the strike zone, so his WHIP will be solid enough with so few walks allowed. But with an average at best 88-89 mph fastball, he’s going to be eminently hittable. Future outlook: I’m not optimistic he’ll ever be much of a big league pitcher.

Matt Cain – Remember, Cain is still just 23 years old, younger than teammate Tim Lincecum. Cain’s stuff is legit, there’s no doubt about that. However, his decrease in strikeouts this season (6.6 K/9 IP this year, 8.45 K/9 IP last year) is a major concern, especially when you factor in his horrendous control (4.47 BB/9 IP). People say his record (3-11) is unlucky, but his ERA (3.87) is equally as lucky considering his poor peripherals. Future outlook: He’ll be a stud – he had a stretch last season in which he allowed just one run over 40 innings – so try to get him at a discount next year.

Felix Hernandez – He hasn’t been terrible, but a 1.42 WHIP isn’t what many were looking for. Especially after he started the season with back-to-back gems. Maybe an injury is partially to blame, but the King is very hittable when balls are put into play for some reason. His .354 BABIP is literally the worst in all of baseball. And that number was .322 last year as well. However, he’s getting more ground balls and walking fewer batters, so there is reason for optimism here. Future outlook: At least two, and maybe three or four Cy Youngs.

Tim Lincecum – Are we entirely sure Lincecum isn’t really 16 years old? Good god, he looks like he just passed his driver’s test. Anyway, after a rough June (7.71 ERA, 1.75 WHIP), he’s responded with a terrific July (1.86 ERA, 0.98 WHIP). There will likely continue to be bumps in the road (mainly, command issues) but the 10 K/9 IP reveals the makings of a future ace. With a two-seam fastball that reaches 98 mph (unheard of) and AT&T Park behind him, there’s a lot to like here. Future outlook: In a keeper league, I’d draft him in the first round.

Of course, there’s Justin Verlander, Hunter Pence, etc., who played extremely well right out of the gate, but for the most part, the allure of upside and potential hasn’t been worth the risk when it comes to youngsters these days. It’s just too bad Ryan Braun and Yovani Gallardo are doing so well for me, making it all the more likely I’ll be drafting Justin Upton too early next year.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 7/20/2007 10:54:00 AM
Comments (3)

MLB Notes
For all the Ervin Santana home/road splits talk, Wandy Rodriguez actually puts him to shame. On the road this year, Rodriguez has a 7.45 ERA and 1.66 WHIP. At home, he posts a 1.81 ERA and 0.92 WHIP. He’s obviously more valuable in daily leagues.

Do you realize David DeJesus is on pace to score 120 runs this season? Also, Billy Butler looks awfully good hitting in the middle of that lineup. The opposite is true when he’s holding a glove, however. As bad as Kansas City is perceived, their current lineup is probably better than 75 percent of the N.L. teams.

I’ve underrated Aaron Harang long enough. He’ll always give up too many homers to post a sub-3.50 ERA, but his WHIP is solid because he limits base on balls, his strikeout rate is very strong and he pitches deep enough into games to usually finish with nice win totals. Not only was Harang the only pitcher in MLB history to lead his league in wins and Ks and not win the Cy Young award last year, he didn’t even receive a single vote.

Remember when all of those ESPN pundits picked Bobby Crosby as their MVP choice for the 2006 season? Good times. At least he had injury excuses in the past. This year, he’s stayed relatively healthy but simply can’t hit. A .272 OBP? Are you kidding me? His OPS is nearly in the 500s. Speaking of talented players failing to live up to expectations – Daniel Cabrera, you’re on deck.

I would be willing to bet Adrian Beltre’s 2004 season is one of the greatest outliers of someone’s career in the history of major league baseball. Let’s take a closer look by comparing numbers from that season with the second highest totals throughout the rest of his 10-year career: he had 23 more homers, 32 more RBI, hit .44 points higher and slugged .152 points better than his second best marks during his decade of playing. We can all thank Beltre for perpetuating the “contract-year” theory more than it’s true significance.

This just in: Chase Utley is very, very good. Since May ended, he’s batting .380 in 163 at-bats. After previously struggling a bit against lefties, Utley has posted a 1.014 OPS against southpaws this year, terrible news for the rest of the league.

A funny thing happened to Dontrelle Willis on the way to stardom – he never got there. He’s basically unusable in fantasy leagues right now. In 95 innings against right-handed hitters this season, Willis has walked 47 batters and served up 15 homers. That simply won’t get it done.

Watching Andrew Miller pitch, it’s clear he’s going to be special. Like all young hurlers, there will be ups and downs (specifically control with Miller), but he’s a highly coveted commodity in keeper leagues right now. Lefties are a combined 2-for-34 with 16 strikeouts against him. The Tigers are going to have one of the very best front ends of a starting rotation for many years to come.

If you’re not watching “Flight of the Conchords,” you’re missing out on the next great comedy. “Scott Baio is 45 and Single” is terrific as well, but for totally different reasons.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 7/19/2007 10:07:00 AM
Comments (10)

What's more important than Rotisserie?
Manager Willie Randolph in discussing why he started Jose Valentin, who has been mired in a 4-for-42 slump, for a second straight day Tuesday said, "You want to give a guy an opportunity after the break to get going. There's other things that go into play. There's defense. There's big picture, the long haul. ... It's not just about Rotisserie stuff." Didn't Randolph get the memo that there is nothing more important than Rotisserie stuff (tongue firmly implanted in cheek).

Posted by Jan Levine at 7/18/2007 6:06:00 AM
Comments (0)

Slic Vic
No, not that Vick. For not getting the acclaim as many others, Vic Martinez may be one of the best roto guys out there based on position. .323/17/75 with 49 runs is decent even for an elite outfielder, and he's a catcher.

Posted by SHOE at 7/17/2007 9:02:00 PM
Comments (3)

Second Half Predictions
The following are 10 fearless predictions for the second half of the major league baseball season:

1) Delmon Young will be a monster – It’s already starting. After a .310 June, Young has posted a line of .391/.408/.500 during July. The K/BB ratio is still ugly, but the slugging is continuing to improve, and he’s also showing a greater propensity to run. Don’t forget just how good of a prospect he is.

2) Yovani Gallardo will be a difference maker in your fantasy league – The Brewers want to limit his innings, understandably, but Ben Sheets is already hurt, and the back-end of the rotation isn’t that great to begin with. Gallardo, meanwhile, has been fantastic – just one HR allowed, 27 Ks over 28.2 innings and has a great offense supporting him.

3) Pedro Martinez will have a triumphant return to the mound, Chris Carpenter will not – Carpenter’s condition appears to be arthritic, and it’s almost time to write him off until 2008. Martinez, on the other hand, has seen his rehab progress seamlessly. Remember, it wasn’t Tommy John surgery, so while he won’t be back firing 95 mph fastballs, Martinez is crafty enough to get by on a lot less. You could get a pretty effective 50 innings out of him before it’s all said and done. R.I.P. Pedro’s little friend.

4) Chris Burke will be worth using again in deep fantasy leagues – One of the bigger busts through the first half of the season, Burke is finally set to get more playing time again, at least when Houston is on the road. The fact the Astros put a personal accomplishment (Craig Biggio’s 3,000 hits) before team goals is one of the worst stories of the 2007 season. Maybe a move back to his original position at second base will help get Burke’s bat going. He can get on base, has decent power and can run well.

5) Jeremy Guthrie will come crashing back down to earth, while Jered Weaver will pitch like an ace – Guthrie has been one of the biggest surprises over the first half, posting a remarkable 0.99 WHIP in 105.2 innings. A former first round pick, this Stanford product is due for a major correction in ERA, with an unsustainable BABIP and pitching in the AL East. Send him packing. Weaver, meanwhile, has a disappointing 1.42 WHIP after walking one fewer batter while pitching 50 fewer innings this season compared to last. The injury suffered in spring training got him off to a slow start, as he’s been really good since May ended. Go get him.

6) Rocco Baldelli will return to Tampa Bay’s lineup on September 1st – Before his first at-bat, his hamstring will literally fall off the bone while taking practice swings in the on-deck circle. He’ll never be heard from again.

7) Albert Pujols will crush 25 homers after the All-Star break – If you were able to buy him 85 cents on the dollar one week ago, congratulations, because that opportunity is now gone.

8) Alex Rodriguez will become the first right-handed Yankee ever to reach 50 homers, while also knocking in 165 runs - The AP will consequently give the MVP Award to Magglio Ordonez, who finishes with 25 home runs for the first place Tigers.

9) Carlos Zambrano will be one of the three most valuable fantasy pitchers from here on out, while Johan Santana wins the pitching triple crown.

10) The NL rookie class is so good, Hunter Pence will finish third in the ROY voting, behind runner-up Tim Lincecum and winner Ryan Braun.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 7/17/2007 9:35:00 AM
Comments (1)

A Giant Mistake
I’m not only the RotoWire beat writer for the San Francisco Giants, but I’m also a Giants fan (remember those terrible “I’m not just the president of the Hair Club for Men, I’m also a member” commercials? I digress). When writing articles for this blog, I attempt to neither narrow my scope by talking specifically about a favorite team or whine. I’ll be breaking both rules with the following.

Not only is Brian Sabean a poor fit for a team that has to begin focusing on the rebuilding process, but to reward mediocrity by re-signing the GM to a two-year contract extension sends a poor message throughout the franchise. Sabean had his uses, architecting three Giants teams that won division titles, including a pennant, between 1997 and 2003. However, San Francisco went 75-87 and 76-85 over the next two seasons and stood 38-48 at the All-Star break this year.

Hey, you can’t be a winning team in major league baseball every season, but in this case, pointing to Sabean’s decision-making reveals an awful lot of cause and effect. The A.J. Pierzynksi for Francisco Liriano, Joe Nathan and Boof Bonser deal has been dissected ad nauseam, but there’s an argument there that it’s the worst trade in the history of professional sports. Then he went and traded for Randy Winn (admittedly, Jesse Foppert didn’t pan out) and proceeded to sign a right fielder with a career OPS of .764 to a $24 million contract. Last year, he sent an emerging young arm by the name of Jeremy Accardo to the Blue Jays for Shea Hillenbrand, who is not only terrible but also had just got into a fist fight with his manager – something tells me Toronto shouldn’t have had too much leverage in trade talks. Accardo, by the way, has a 2.63 ERA and 39 strikeouts in 37 innings this year while pitching in the AL East. Imagine what his numbers would look like pitching at AT&T Park. At least San Francisco doesn’t need bullpen help.

The only reason Juan Pierre isn’t wearing a Giants’ uniform is because the Dodgers only slightly outbid them. And do I even need to mention the Barry Zito deal? I admit, I thought they’d at least get a couple of good years out of him, but all signs pointed to him being in decline (sinking K rate, rising BB rate), and the fact of the matter is that it was the richest contract ever handed out to a pitcher that was at least two-three years too long.

The theory behind trading the future for immediate returns wasn’t necessarily wrong – in fact, it made plenty of sense with Barry Bonds presenting a short window of opportunity to “win-now” – but the execution of said theory has been an utter catastrophe. Actually, I’m not sure why Bonds’ presence and a team built around youth have to be mutually exclusive.

Until this year, the Giants signed mediocre player after mediocre player (Michael Tucker) to almost purposely avoid draft picks. And when they did have an early selection, they chose with signability (read: dollar signs) as the No. 1 priority (see: Hennessey, Brad).

The Giants say they will rebuild by striking a balance between younger position players, who are developed through the farm system or acquired in trade, and free agents. Fair enough, but the writing is also on the wall that Bonds won’t return next season, and something tells me he’ll be a nice scapegoat. Having Tim Lincecum and Matt Cain around gives at least a glimmer of hope for the future, but it really is a shame how the team wasted so many prime years from the greatest hitter to ever live. Bonds has come to the plate this year with 199 runners on base, good for 132nd in the league. I guess that’s what happens when you sign Rich Aurilia (.286 OBP) to be your No. 3 hitter.

Sabean just doesn’t seem like the right fit for a team that should be focusing on three years from now. Judging from a recent interview in which he proclaimed the Giants aren’t out of it and are unlikely to be sellers at the trading deadline, I’m not optimistic.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 7/17/2007 9:34:00 AM
Comments (3)

Beating the Book
On the weekend before the All-Star break, ESPN.com's Jonah Keri and I went to Vegas for the weekend. His purprose was to write an article about betting baseball games; mine was to tag along and gamble.

Jonah went 6-1 against the book and 0-1 against me, while I went 7-1 against the book and 1-0 against him. And with the exception of the game I bet against him, we both did it exclusively on underdogs. Keep in mind, this isn't like betting NFL underdogs with the spread - it's like going 7-1 on underdogs with the money line. How did we do it? A few explanations.

1. We were lucky.

A little bit. I won the game against him when the Tigers shoddy bullpen held up, and the Tigers got to Jon Papelbon. In another game, Curtis Granderson's home-run saving catch preserved a Nate Robertson win over Daisuke Matsuzaka. But most of the teams we backed won handily - Jason Simontacchi's Nationals (+160) led nearly the whole way against the Brewers, Sergio Mitre's Marlins (+160) won easily in Dodger Stadium against Derek Lowe, Tim Lincecum (+105) won in St. Louis against Braden Looper, though the Giants almost blew it, Todd Wellemyer (+130) won 7-0 over Barry Zito, Felix Hernandez (+125) won 4-0 over Rich Harden (as if he were going to last more than three or four innings!) and Kyle Davis (+130) won easily over Greg Maddux in San Diego, though Bob Wickman put a scare in me.

2. Fading the Herd

In almost all these cases, it was fairly obvious where most of the money would be going - who's going to bet Davies against a name pitcher like Maddux at home? Who's going to bet Mitre on the road against Lowe? There's always a premium when you buy the name brand and always a discount when you take the one you've never heard of. When looking for underdogs, get the ones that the average bettor woudn't touch. They wouldn't have built those palaces on the strip if the majority were usually right.

3. Avoiding traps.

Games where the odds seem too big (Ervin Santana +170 in Yankee Stadium) - begging you to take the first place Angels - but check out Santana's home/road splits and also Chien Ming Wang's. The book knows Santana's going to get destroyed by that lineup in the Bronx, and that Wang should sail. The Yanks didn't just win - they won 12-0.

Another trap game we avoided was the Boof Bonser/Mark Buehrle game - Bonser was an underdog - looked like value. BUT: in that homer friendly park, Bonser's biggest weakness (the big fly) would be exacerbated, and Buehrle figured to be tough after the White Sox allowed more than 30 runs the day before in a double-header. Don't mess with Buehrles, Oswalts and Pettittes when the chips are down for their teams. This isn't scientific, but it's a gut feeling I often have and am not easily willing to dismiss.

4. Use volatility to your advantage

Volatility is terrible for a favorite, great for a dog. Jorge De la Rosa (who Jonah bet) is a great example - a guy who pitches great or terrible - a 50/50 proposition with odds. (Of course, he'll never be a favorite on the Royals). This also applies to fantasy - when you're in first place, you want safe players. When you're in fifth, you want guys with upside who are more risky.

5. We had a few (but not too many) drinks.

When you place your bets ask for a few drink tickets. And then, half an hour later, tickets in hand, go to a different clerk and tell him you forgot to get your drink tickets. It was disappointing that the Red Rock only allowed well booze with drink tickets, but you can always go with beer, or in Jonah's case, white wine. Who the hell orders wine at a sports book? (Okay, I admit after three beers, I got a red wine, too).

Posted by Chris Liss at 7/15/2007 12:50:00 AM

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1/9/2011 - 1/15/2011
1/2/2011 - 1/8/2011
12/26/2010 - 1/1/2011
12/19/2010 - 12/25/2010
12/12/2010 - 12/18/2010
12/5/2010 - 12/11/2010
11/28/2010 - 12/4/2010
11/21/2010 - 11/27/2010
11/14/2010 - 11/20/2010
11/7/2010 - 11/13/2010
10/31/2010 - 11/6/2010
10/24/2010 - 10/30/2010
10/17/2010 - 10/23/2010
10/10/2010 - 10/16/2010
10/3/2010 - 10/9/2010
9/26/2010 - 10/2/2010
9/19/2010 - 9/25/2010
9/12/2010 - 9/18/2010
9/5/2010 - 9/11/2010
8/29/2010 - 9/4/2010
8/22/2010 - 8/28/2010
8/15/2010 - 8/21/2010
8/8/2010 - 8/14/2010
8/1/2010 - 8/7/2010
7/25/2010 - 7/31/2010
7/18/2010 - 7/24/2010
7/11/2010 - 7/17/2010
7/4/2010 - 7/10/2010
6/27/2010 - 7/3/2010
6/20/2010 - 6/26/2010
6/13/2010 - 6/19/2010
6/6/2010 - 6/12/2010
5/30/2010 - 6/5/2010
5/23/2010 - 5/29/2010
5/16/2010 - 5/22/2010
5/9/2010 - 5/15/2010
5/2/2010 - 5/8/2010
4/25/2010 - 5/1/2010
4/18/2010 - 4/24/2010
4/11/2010 - 4/17/2010
4/4/2010 - 4/10/2010
3/28/2010 - 4/3/2010
3/21/2010 - 3/27/2010
3/14/2010 - 3/20/2010
3/7/2010 - 3/13/2010
2/28/2010 - 3/6/2010
2/21/2010 - 2/27/2010
2/14/2010 - 2/20/2010
2/7/2010 - 2/13/2010
1/31/2010 - 2/6/2010
1/24/2010 - 1/30/2010
1/17/2010 - 1/23/2010
1/10/2010 - 1/16/2010
1/3/2010 - 1/9/2010
12/27/2009 - 1/2/2010
12/20/2009 - 12/26/2009
12/13/2009 - 12/19/2009
12/6/2009 - 12/12/2009
11/29/2009 - 12/5/2009
11/22/2009 - 11/28/2009
11/15/2009 - 11/21/2009
11/8/2009 - 11/14/2009
11/1/2009 - 11/7/2009
10/25/2009 - 10/31/2009
10/18/2009 - 10/24/2009
10/11/2009 - 10/17/2009
10/4/2009 - 10/10/2009
9/27/2009 - 10/3/2009
9/20/2009 - 9/26/2009
9/13/2009 - 9/19/2009
9/6/2009 - 9/12/2009
8/30/2009 - 9/5/2009
8/23/2009 - 8/29/2009
8/16/2009 - 8/22/2009
8/9/2009 - 8/15/2009
8/2/2009 - 8/8/2009
7/26/2009 - 8/1/2009
7/19/2009 - 7/25/2009
7/12/2009 - 7/18/2009
7/5/2009 - 7/11/2009
6/28/2009 - 7/4/2009
6/21/2009 - 6/27/2009
6/14/2009 - 6/20/2009
6/7/2009 - 6/13/2009
5/31/2009 - 6/6/2009
5/24/2009 - 5/30/2009
5/17/2009 - 5/23/2009
5/10/2009 - 5/16/2009
5/3/2009 - 5/9/2009
4/26/2009 - 5/2/2009
4/19/2009 - 4/25/2009
4/12/2009 - 4/18/2009
4/5/2009 - 4/11/2009
3/29/2009 - 4/4/2009
3/22/2009 - 3/28/2009
3/15/2009 - 3/21/2009
3/8/2009 - 3/14/2009
3/1/2009 - 3/7/2009
2/22/2009 - 2/28/2009
2/15/2009 - 2/21/2009
2/8/2009 - 2/14/2009
2/1/2009 - 2/7/2009
1/25/2009 - 1/31/2009
1/18/2009 - 1/24/2009
1/11/2009 - 1/17/2009
1/4/2009 - 1/10/2009
12/28/2008 - 1/3/2009
12/21/2008 - 12/27/2008
12/14/2008 - 12/20/2008
12/7/2008 - 12/13/2008
11/30/2008 - 12/6/2008
11/23/2008 - 11/29/2008
11/16/2008 - 11/22/2008
11/9/2008 - 11/15/2008
11/2/2008 - 11/8/2008
10/26/2008 - 11/1/2008
10/19/2008 - 10/25/2008
10/12/2008 - 10/18/2008
10/5/2008 - 10/11/2008
9/28/2008 - 10/4/2008
9/21/2008 - 9/27/2008
9/14/2008 - 9/20/2008
9/7/2008 - 9/13/2008
8/31/2008 - 9/6/2008
8/24/2008 - 8/30/2008
8/17/2008 - 8/23/2008
8/10/2008 - 8/16/2008
8/3/2008 - 8/9/2008
7/27/2008 - 8/2/2008
7/20/2008 - 7/26/2008
7/13/2008 - 7/19/2008
7/6/2008 - 7/12/2008
6/29/2008 - 7/5/2008
6/22/2008 - 6/28/2008
6/15/2008 - 6/21/2008
6/8/2008 - 6/14/2008
6/1/2008 - 6/7/2008
5/25/2008 - 5/31/2008
5/18/2008 - 5/24/2008
5/11/2008 - 5/17/2008
5/4/2008 - 5/10/2008
4/27/2008 - 5/3/2008
4/20/2008 - 4/26/2008
4/13/2008 - 4/19/2008
4/6/2008 - 4/12/2008
3/30/2008 - 4/5/2008
3/23/2008 - 3/29/2008
3/16/2008 - 3/22/2008
3/9/2008 - 3/15/2008
3/2/2008 - 3/8/2008
2/24/2008 - 3/1/2008
2/17/2008 - 2/23/2008
2/10/2008 - 2/16/2008
2/3/2008 - 2/9/2008
1/27/2008 - 2/2/2008
1/20/2008 - 1/26/2008
1/13/2008 - 1/19/2008
1/6/2008 - 1/12/2008
12/30/2007 - 1/5/2008
12/23/2007 - 12/29/2007
12/16/2007 - 12/22/2007
12/9/2007 - 12/15/2007
12/2/2007 - 12/8/2007
11/25/2007 - 12/1/2007
11/18/2007 - 11/24/2007
11/11/2007 - 11/17/2007
11/4/2007 - 11/10/2007
10/28/2007 - 11/3/2007
10/21/2007 - 10/27/2007
10/14/2007 - 10/20/2007
10/7/2007 - 10/13/2007
9/30/2007 - 10/6/2007
9/23/2007 - 9/29/2007
9/16/2007 - 9/22/2007
9/9/2007 - 9/15/2007
9/2/2007 - 9/8/2007
8/26/2007 - 9/1/2007
8/19/2007 - 8/25/2007
8/12/2007 - 8/18/2007
8/5/2007 - 8/11/2007
7/29/2007 - 8/4/2007
7/22/2007 - 7/28/2007
7/15/2007 - 7/21/2007
7/8/2007 - 7/14/2007
7/1/2007 - 7/7/2007
6/24/2007 - 6/30/2007
6/17/2007 - 6/23/2007
6/10/2007 - 6/16/2007
6/3/2007 - 6/9/2007
5/27/2007 - 6/2/2007
5/20/2007 - 5/26/2007
5/13/2007 - 5/19/2007
5/6/2007 - 5/12/2007
4/29/2007 - 5/5/2007
4/22/2007 - 4/28/2007
4/15/2007 - 4/21/2007
4/8/2007 - 4/14/2007
4/1/2007 - 4/7/2007
3/25/2007 - 3/31/2007
3/18/2007 - 3/24/2007
3/11/2007 - 3/17/2007
3/4/2007 - 3/10/2007
2/25/2007 - 3/3/2007
2/18/2007 - 2/24/2007
2/11/2007 - 2/17/2007
2/4/2007 - 2/10/2007
1/28/2007 - 2/3/2007
1/21/2007 - 1/27/2007
1/14/2007 - 1/20/2007
1/7/2007 - 1/13/2007
12/31/2006 - 1/6/2007
12/24/2006 - 12/30/2006
12/17/2006 - 12/23/2006
12/10/2006 - 12/16/2006
12/3/2006 - 12/9/2006
11/26/2006 - 12/2/2006
11/19/2006 - 11/25/2006
11/12/2006 - 11/18/2006
11/5/2006 - 11/11/2006
10/29/2006 - 11/4/2006
10/22/2006 - 10/28/2006
10/15/2006 - 10/21/2006
10/8/2006 - 10/14/2006
10/1/2006 - 10/7/2006
9/24/2006 - 9/30/2006
9/17/2006 - 9/23/2006
9/10/2006 - 9/16/2006
9/3/2006 - 9/9/2006
8/27/2006 - 9/2/2006
8/20/2006 - 8/26/2006
8/13/2006 - 8/19/2006
8/6/2006 - 8/12/2006
7/30/2006 - 8/5/2006
7/23/2006 - 7/29/2006
7/16/2006 - 7/22/2006
7/9/2006 - 7/15/2006
7/2/2006 - 7/8/2006
6/25/2006 - 7/1/2006
6/18/2006 - 6/24/2006
6/11/2006 - 6/17/2006
6/4/2006 - 6/10/2006
5/28/2006 - 6/3/2006
5/21/2006 - 5/27/2006
5/14/2006 - 5/20/2006
5/7/2006 - 5/13/2006
4/30/2006 - 5/6/2006
4/23/2006 - 4/29/2006
4/16/2006 - 4/22/2006
4/9/2006 - 4/15/2006
4/2/2006 - 4/8/2006
3/26/2006 - 4/1/2006
3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006