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How much should the preseason affect your draft?
I was running a chat last week, and I got a question about how much I believe the pre-season should affect your fantasy draft strategy. I thought this was an excellent question, so I decided to talk more about it here.

The preseason is a lot like the various summer leagues as well as international play, in that there is no way to directly apply results there to future success in a season. Different players have different things that they want/need to work on in the offseason, and these individual goals play a huge part in the numbers they produce. Some young players are trying to make the team, so they are going 110% at all times to try to produce. On the other hand, many vets just want to use the preseason to get in shape and not get hurt, so they may coast through many games at 70%. Some players are working on a particular move or shot, and may care more about perfecting that move than about their overall output. These factors and many more cloud the offseason results enough that they should not be the main deciding influence on your draft strategy.

On the other hand, there are three main things that I look for as useful information to be gleaned from the preseason.

1) Big injuries. While it is obvious that you want to avoid drafting a player if they suffer a huge injury in the preseason/offseason, it is also important to look for who can take advantage of those injuries. Two years ago, the big injury to Amare Stoudemire led to the explosion of Boris Diaw. Last season the fall of Jason Richardson led to the rise of Monta Ellis. Who will it be this year?

Possible examples this year: Chris Kaman, Tim Thomas, Al Thornton (injured Elton Brand); Smush Parker, Dorrell Wright (injured Dwyane Wade, Jason Williams, out-of-shape Antoine Walker); Adam Morrison, Walter Herrman, Jared Dudley (Sean May); Brendan Haywood, Andray Blatche, Oleksiy Pecherove (Etan Thomas)

2) Young guys ready to make a leap. If you look over the last several years, often the “come from nowhere” free agent pickups really played well in the preseason and/or summer leagues. For young players with talent, there is a point where they get adjusted to the speed of the NBA game and they are able to stop thinking and just play ball. Al Jefferson, Kevin Martin, and David Lee are just a few that I can think of off the top of my head that played well in the offseason then eventually made the leap in the regular season. Warning: not every offseason warrior is a star in the making, as Nicoloz Tskitishvilli was a summer league legend that was never heard from once the games count for real.

Possible examples this year: Dwight Howard, Al Horford, Marco Belinelli, Louis Williams, Martell Webster, Marquis Daniels >

3) Position battles. When multiple players are battling for one position, often the one that plays better in the preseason will be the opening day starter. One of my colleagues has already done a good job laying out most of the position battles , so I won’t belabor those here. I’ll just say to keep an eye on the preseason box scores, especially the minutes played, to start getting an inkling over who might be starting opening night.



Posted by Professor at 10/19/2007 12:02:00 PM
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Decision Time
After an extended lull, during which Kobe re-asserted himself as one of the planet's top ballers at the FIBA Americas tournament, it appears the Lakers and Kobe Bryant have re-commenced hostilities. Last week, Laker owner Dr. Jerry Buss told the L.A. Times that he'd considered trading Bryant but hadn't received a good enough offer. Then, in the last few days, reports that Bryant cleaned out his locker at the Lakers' practice facility hit the wires -- and were denied.

Now, does anyone really think Kobe was simply organizing his sock drawer?

No, I didn't think so.

The guess here is that this gets worse before it gets better. It would be next-to-impossible for the Lakers to get equal value in a Bryant trade. And Kobe has very little leverage -- his only means of forcing a move is to hold out. Every time he skips a practice -- to rest a sore knee -- the rumor mill will start churning out new trade scenarios. That's going to get old -- fast.

Should Kobe's rift with Laker ownership impact your draft strategy? Depends on how you think this will all turn out.

Scenario One: No trade. Kobe plays out the season in Los Angeles -- putting up his usual stellar stats, but missing more games and playing fewer minutes than usual due to a series of minor injuries. He re-opens his "trade me" campaign in the summer, with just one year remaining before the opt-out in his contract.

Scenario Two: Trade. Kobe is re-energized in his new uniform, and scores around 42 revenge points per game -- 65 when he plays the Lakers.

If you don't think he'll be traded, give Kobe a very slight downgrade on your draft board. If you ranked him at number two, slide him down to five or six. On the other hand, if you think a trade -- to Chicago, perhaps? -- is imminent, and you're picking first overall... give Bryant a very long look.

Posted by Charlie Zegers at 10/17/2007 6:58:00 AM
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Change Your League
More so than fantasy baseball or football, league specifics greatly determine draft strategy in fantasy basketball. Particularly, scoring format can affect someone’s value immensely, so “cheat sheets” should never be used blindly. Almost every league is going to utilize points scored, rebounds, assists, steals and blocks, with three pointers made, field goal percentage, free throw percentage and turnovers also commonly used. Personally, I think a weighted scoring system works best, with the big three (points, rebounds and assists) being worth the most; this just seems to be a better reflection of reality.

For the same reason, I’m a proponent of not using the two most “controversial” categories - free throw percentage and turnovers. The ability to shoot free throws is an important skill in the NBA, but Shaquille O’Neal is probably a top-5 player in the history of the game and has a 52.5 percent career mark from the charity stripe. It’s counterintuitive, that one of the very best players in the history of the game frequently needs to be removed late in games, but it’s also fact, and it’s hard to argue with the Big Fella’s resume. Even in his heyday, O’Neal was such a drain in that fantasy category – especially because he shot so many freebies – you were virtually guaranteed a last place finish in FT%, making him someone you’d almost have to pass on.

Additionally, I’m even less fond of using turnovers as a category, as all that ends up doing is punishing the best players in the league – those who have the ball in their hands the most. Listen, assist/turnover ratios matter, and I’d love my point guard to not be unnecessarily careless with the ball, but Steve Nash, the league MVP during the 2004-05 and 2005-06 seasons, finished in the bottom 10 in turnovers per game during both of those campaigns. Last year, Dwayne Wade committed the most TPG in the league, and something tells me that wouldn’t stop him from being the first or second pick if NBA GMs held a draft today. Sure, negative categories exist in fantasy sports – batting average in baseball and INTs in football – but that’s similar to someone who doesn’t have a good field goal (or FT) percentage in basketball. Counting turnovers is akin to making errors a category in fantasy baseball or holding penalties a category in fantasy football – it simply doesn’t make a lot of sense.

In a recent NBA.com, PFC D-League draft, I heard a chorus of “why did you take him?” after making Dwight Howard the 19th overall pick. If selecting a 22-year-old center who got 17.6 ppg, 13.0 rpg, 2.3 apg, 1.0 spg, 2.0 bpg while shooting 62 percent from the floor after the All-Star break last season late in the second round elicits that kind of reaction, then something is clearly wrong with the setup. Now, this specific league doesn’t count turnovers against, so I was more than happy to get Howard there and had to respectfully disagree with their assessment, but he does have an average draft position of 29.42, and considering he “led” the NBA in turnovers last season and shoots free throws poorly, there's a reason for it. Still, I can’t in good conscience take someone like Rashard Lewis (24.4 ADP) ahead of one of the brightest young stars in the game. Fantasy certainly isn’t a perfect reflection of reality – just look at how overvalued stolen bases become in baseball – but the closer we can bridge that gap, the better.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 10/16/2007 9:08:00 PM
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The role of RSD in Fantasy Basketball
My esteemed RotoWire colleague Chris Liss made an interesting point in an earlier blog post that you can win by tanking assists and hording stats like blocks in the draft a fantasy basketball league because it's easier to catch up later in the year in assists.

This point basically hinges on the premise that the less frequent the occurrence of the stat, the harder it is to catch up by acquiring one player. This is demonstrated generally by the concept of Relative Standard Deviation ("RSD"), which is a calculation of the standard deviation as a percentage of the mean. Categories that are more dispersed will have a higher RSD, meaning that the guy ahead of you in the standings will be harder to catch up to by acquiring an average player.

One might come to the initial conclusion that a statistic that occurs with a higher frequency (like points or assists) would be more dispersed -- the more points there are, perhaps, the greater possibility there is to separate from the pack. Counterintuitively, perhaps, last year's RotoWire Staff League demonstrates the opposite (though it would be nice to run the numbers on the entire league). The league average in all of the non-percentage stats, in descending order, were as follows:

  • Points: 12,871

  • Rebounds: 4,744

  • Assists: 2,821

  • Steals: 805

  • 3-pointers: 699

  • Blocks: 545

The RSDs, however, in descending order, were:

  • Blocks: 22.4%

  • 3-pointers: 22.2%

  • Assists: 13.6%

  • Steals: 10.5%

  • Rebounds: 9.7%

  • Points: 7.4%

Interestingly enough, the higher-frequency stats invariably had the lower RSDs -- the RSD list can be obtained by flipping the Averages list, with only assists and steals being juxtaposed. Which is interesting in and of itself, because it basically indicates that even though steals are the (much) less frequent stat, they're still easier to accumulate than assists. This might be explained by one outlier in assists, who, by the end (and for most) of the year, was starting the combination of Manu Ginobili, Ben Gordon, Richard Hamilton, and Cuttino Mobley at guard. Take him out of the equation and the RSD for assists would be 11%, though still more than the RSD for steals.

Obviously, this theory is a bit simplified, and it doesn't take positional scarcity into consideration when valuing stats. But otherwise, all things being equal, it demonstrates that you should load up on blocks and 3-pointers early in the season and then trade to fantasy owners who realize (implicitly or explicitly) that the dispersion in those categories is higher and they are less likely to find guys who can fill that role on the waiver wire. Contrary to Liss's point, though, maybe assists aren't the category to neglect the most. Points and rebounds, and probably steals would seem to fit the bill. I'm just speculating at this point, but the reason that the RSD for assists is higher than rebounds and steals, despite the large relative difference (the average in steals was only 28.5% of the average in assists), is the fact that, as Liss mentioned, assists are more concentrated in one position than are steals, which are found in greater frequency in shooting guards and forwards.

This fact also helps support his point: it's easier to "tank" assists (by not picking up point guards) than to tank steals, since you'd probably have to go out of your way in drafting at all of the positions to pick up guys who don't steal the ball. Likewise, to tank the #1 (blocks) and #2 (3-pointers) positions in the RSD category, you could avoid drafting centers or shooting guards, respectively, high in your draft.

So the next time you're deciding between Marcus Camby and Richard Hamilton... I trust you'll make the right choice.

Posted by Bret Cohen at 10/16/2007 12:31:00 AM

Comments (4)

My Sleeper Rookie
In fantasy we are always looking for that sleeper that pans out to prove to everyone how smart we are. We spend countless hours looking at lists, reading stats, checking depth charts and investigating any other bit of information that will make us that guy. We all want to be the smart guy that drafted Monta Ellis. This year I scoured the rookie class to see if I could find that guy. For me, that guy is Al Horford..

Horford has always been undervalued. He probably was only the third most well-known Florida Gator drafted last season after fellow rookies Joakim Noah and Corey Brewer. and certainly doesn't come with the fanfare of Kevin Durant or Mike Conley. However, just like these rookies, Horford is in a great situation in Atlanta to be a major contributor right off the bat.

First, Horford should be both center and power forward eligible, as he is going to backup both Josh Smith and Zaza Pachulia. This allows greater flexibility for fantasy owners.

Secondly, Horford is already showing his value in the exhibition season. Horford is already getting nearly 30 minutes a game off the bench and is averaging 10.3 points per game and 8.5 rebounds per game on 50% shooting from the floor. Horford does struggle form the foul line but should be able to make it for it with his shot-blocking ability.

Plus, Pachulia led all NBA centers in fouls last season at 3.7 per game, and both he and Smith have of a history of injuries as they each missed 10 games last season. This means extra time for Horford on the court.

I'm not saying Horford is going to be the best fantasy rookie in year one. Kevin Durant should win that award. But in terms of a value selection that has all the potential to pay off big, especially in a keeper league, Horford's not going to let you down.



Posted by Kyle Fisher at 10/15/2007 12:34:00 PM
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Tanking Assists
A former RotoWire columnist, Mark Edelman, wrote about this strategy about five years ago, and I won a couple leagues doing a version of it.

The premise is that assists mostly come from point guards, and that makes them expensive. But if you take all shooting guards (which are usually cheaper), you'll usually get more threes, more points and as good or better percentages. Point guards are typically better at steals, but that's not a hard and fast rule as Larry Hughes (when healthy), Allen Iverson (when he was a SG), and even small forwards like Ron Artest, Caron Butler and Shawn Marion are often among the league leaders in that category.

Ignoring point guards in the early and middle rounds, I was able to get solid big men, small forwards and scoring guards, and then fill in with Rajon Rondo or Jose Calderon types. It also helps to get good passing big men - like Lamar Odom or Andrew Bogut, just to hang around in the assists category and not be so far back that you can't make a pickup or trade and get back into the mix later. It's a lot harder to tank a category like blocks (having bad centers usually costs you in rebounds and points), or FT percentage - once you tank it by drafting Shaq and Ben Wallace, there's no going back. At least with assists, I was able to make some moves and finish in the middle of the pack in that category.

In a competitive league, you're rarely going to be strong everywhere, but by letting go of a category almost completely, you can consolidate your strengths and get the most out of your players' contributions.



Posted by Chris Liss at 10/14/2007 9:19:00 PM

Comments (6)

The Nets
Groovin' out to the new Radiohead CD, In Rainbows. They are selling it themselves at their Web site. You can pay whatever you want. Tried to get one, but the site was jammed up and I couldn't download it. I have since acquired one.

I've been thinking about the Nets lately. Not because Sean Williams was benched Friday night. But a friend of mine asked me who will make the playoffs in the Eastern Conference. I was able to tick off Cleveland, Detroit, Chicago, Boston, Toronto without pause... And then I thought of New Jersey. It was purely an oversight. I like the Nets. And the question about their playoff chances prompted me to look a little closer at the team.

I never thought losing Mikki Moore was that big a deal. The Nets tried to sign him, but the two sides were not of the same mind when it came to Moore's market value. Congratulations to Mikki for getting the Kings to spend $18 million, but he's not the guy I'd be signing to improve my team's rebounding numbers (Sacto was last at 38.9 rpg last season). After Nenad Krstic's knee injury, the Nets played just two bigs (Moore and Jason Collins) consistently in the rotation, and the 7-footer Moore grabbed just 5.1 rebounds per game last season and finished behind Jason Kidd and Vince Carter. He's active and can block shots, but Moore can be pushed around defensively.

If New Jersey wanted to go deeper into the playoffs, they had to have a bigger presence in the front court, particularly at power forward. Not only a defensive presence, but also someone they can count on to score as well -- to balance out an offense that does most of its damage with perimeter players. Once the Jermaine O'Neal-to-Jersey notion became unlikely, the Nets had to go with the best available option on the free agent market, which turned out to be Jamaal Magloire. At this point, he doesn't appear to be the starter at power forward, but he could begin the season playing a lot of minutes at center. Krstic has been scrimmaging all week, but is still a bit tentative. He's hoping he can play in two or three preseason games, but admitted the knee wasn't 100 percent. Don't be surprised to see his minutes limited early on. That would mean more playing time for Magloire. But is he the best fit for the team. Absent a premier low-post scoring threat, Nets coach Lawrence Frank is implementing some motion-offense precepts into a system that will still feature getting the ball in the hands of Carter. That movement-oriented offense means Magloire can't just camp out on the blocks like he's used to doing. Magloire says he's lost 20 pounds and is more agile for the style of NBA game being played today. And he's not going to be asked to score a lot. Not with Carter, Kidd, Krstic and Richard Jefferson the first four options on offense. How he accepts his fate as an in-the-paint defensive beast with limited offensive opportunities while playing a style out of his comfort zone will dictate his playing time.

Did you check out Bostjan Nachbar's 35-point effort in the preseason opener on Friday? Granted, the Nets were resting their top four scorers, but I think Nachbar will have a big enough role this season to have some fantasy value. And there's motivation because it's a contract year for Nachbar, who has been drawing raves from teammates for his play in training camp. He worked out hard over the summer and is reportedly in better shape than ever. He didn't play for Slovenia in EuroBasket 2007, so that he could work on his NBA game and it shows. He's coming off a year when he averaged a career-high 9.2 points on 45.7 percent shooting, including 42.3 percent from 3-point range. A lot of his playing time came while he replaced an injured Richard Jefferson, but with Jefferson healthy this year, Nachbar will still get minutes because Eddie House no longer around. The loss of House means Nachbar becomes the team's best long-distance threat and second-unit scorer. He's pretty athletic and can run the court, if Frank is looking for movement on offense, and can play a couple of positions offensively. Looking further down the road, Nachbar could be a viable replacement to Jefferson at small forward, if the Nets eventually move him for a low-post scoring threat, like Indiana's O'Neal.

The Nets have been playing down Williams' tardiness for Friday's shootaround. Frank quipped, "If you're into excuses, it was a very viable excuse." Williams said he hit some traffic on the way to practice. Who hasn't pulled out the traffic excuse when late for an appointment? "Sean's a good kid," Frank said. "I know because of his past it may (look bad). Sean has been very, very good. Look, he's late. This is what we do. Guys are late and these are the rules of the team. In the NBA, people want to be treated as professionals. Part of being professional is accountability. It's not a big deal. Here's the (punishment) and you move forward." The Nets are hoping that Williams, who blocked 75 shots in 15 games for Boston College last season, can help a club that was 27th in blocked shots, averaging just 3.3 blocks per game. He may not get a ton of playing time, but Williams can have some fantasy value in limited minutes for category-hunters looking to improve in blocks.

Posted by john clemeno at 10/14/2007 11:22:00 AM
Comments (1)

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9/5/2010 - 9/11/2010
8/29/2010 - 9/4/2010
8/22/2010 - 8/28/2010
8/15/2010 - 8/21/2010
8/8/2010 - 8/14/2010
8/1/2010 - 8/7/2010
7/25/2010 - 7/31/2010
7/18/2010 - 7/24/2010
7/11/2010 - 7/17/2010
7/4/2010 - 7/10/2010
6/27/2010 - 7/3/2010
6/20/2010 - 6/26/2010
6/13/2010 - 6/19/2010
6/6/2010 - 6/12/2010
5/30/2010 - 6/5/2010
5/23/2010 - 5/29/2010
5/16/2010 - 5/22/2010
5/9/2010 - 5/15/2010
5/2/2010 - 5/8/2010
4/25/2010 - 5/1/2010
4/18/2010 - 4/24/2010
4/11/2010 - 4/17/2010
4/4/2010 - 4/10/2010
3/28/2010 - 4/3/2010
3/21/2010 - 3/27/2010
3/14/2010 - 3/20/2010
3/7/2010 - 3/13/2010
2/28/2010 - 3/6/2010
2/21/2010 - 2/27/2010
2/14/2010 - 2/20/2010
2/7/2010 - 2/13/2010
1/31/2010 - 2/6/2010
1/24/2010 - 1/30/2010
1/17/2010 - 1/23/2010
1/10/2010 - 1/16/2010
1/3/2010 - 1/9/2010
12/27/2009 - 1/2/2010
12/20/2009 - 12/26/2009
12/13/2009 - 12/19/2009
12/6/2009 - 12/12/2009
11/29/2009 - 12/5/2009
11/22/2009 - 11/28/2009
11/15/2009 - 11/21/2009
11/8/2009 - 11/14/2009
11/1/2009 - 11/7/2009
10/25/2009 - 10/31/2009
10/18/2009 - 10/24/2009
10/11/2009 - 10/17/2009
10/4/2009 - 10/10/2009
9/27/2009 - 10/3/2009
9/20/2009 - 9/26/2009
9/13/2009 - 9/19/2009
9/6/2009 - 9/12/2009
8/30/2009 - 9/5/2009
8/23/2009 - 8/29/2009
8/16/2009 - 8/22/2009
8/9/2009 - 8/15/2009
8/2/2009 - 8/8/2009
7/26/2009 - 8/1/2009
7/19/2009 - 7/25/2009
7/12/2009 - 7/18/2009
7/5/2009 - 7/11/2009
6/28/2009 - 7/4/2009
6/21/2009 - 6/27/2009
6/14/2009 - 6/20/2009
6/7/2009 - 6/13/2009
5/31/2009 - 6/6/2009
5/24/2009 - 5/30/2009
5/17/2009 - 5/23/2009
5/10/2009 - 5/16/2009
5/3/2009 - 5/9/2009
4/26/2009 - 5/2/2009
4/19/2009 - 4/25/2009
4/12/2009 - 4/18/2009
4/5/2009 - 4/11/2009
3/29/2009 - 4/4/2009
3/22/2009 - 3/28/2009
3/15/2009 - 3/21/2009
3/8/2009 - 3/14/2009
3/1/2009 - 3/7/2009
2/22/2009 - 2/28/2009
2/15/2009 - 2/21/2009
2/8/2009 - 2/14/2009
2/1/2009 - 2/7/2009
1/25/2009 - 1/31/2009
1/18/2009 - 1/24/2009
1/11/2009 - 1/17/2009
1/4/2009 - 1/10/2009
12/28/2008 - 1/3/2009
12/21/2008 - 12/27/2008
12/14/2008 - 12/20/2008
12/7/2008 - 12/13/2008
11/30/2008 - 12/6/2008
11/23/2008 - 11/29/2008
11/16/2008 - 11/22/2008
11/9/2008 - 11/15/2008
11/2/2008 - 11/8/2008
10/26/2008 - 11/1/2008
10/19/2008 - 10/25/2008
10/12/2008 - 10/18/2008
10/5/2008 - 10/11/2008
9/28/2008 - 10/4/2008
9/21/2008 - 9/27/2008
9/14/2008 - 9/20/2008
9/7/2008 - 9/13/2008
8/31/2008 - 9/6/2008
8/24/2008 - 8/30/2008
8/17/2008 - 8/23/2008
8/10/2008 - 8/16/2008
8/3/2008 - 8/9/2008
7/27/2008 - 8/2/2008
7/20/2008 - 7/26/2008
7/13/2008 - 7/19/2008
7/6/2008 - 7/12/2008
6/29/2008 - 7/5/2008
6/22/2008 - 6/28/2008
6/15/2008 - 6/21/2008
6/8/2008 - 6/14/2008
6/1/2008 - 6/7/2008
5/25/2008 - 5/31/2008
5/18/2008 - 5/24/2008
5/11/2008 - 5/17/2008
5/4/2008 - 5/10/2008
4/27/2008 - 5/3/2008
4/20/2008 - 4/26/2008
4/13/2008 - 4/19/2008
4/6/2008 - 4/12/2008
3/30/2008 - 4/5/2008
3/23/2008 - 3/29/2008
3/16/2008 - 3/22/2008
3/9/2008 - 3/15/2008
3/2/2008 - 3/8/2008
2/24/2008 - 3/1/2008
2/17/2008 - 2/23/2008
2/10/2008 - 2/16/2008
2/3/2008 - 2/9/2008
1/27/2008 - 2/2/2008
1/20/2008 - 1/26/2008
1/13/2008 - 1/19/2008
1/6/2008 - 1/12/2008
12/30/2007 - 1/5/2008
12/23/2007 - 12/29/2007
12/16/2007 - 12/22/2007
12/9/2007 - 12/15/2007
12/2/2007 - 12/8/2007
11/25/2007 - 12/1/2007
11/18/2007 - 11/24/2007
11/11/2007 - 11/17/2007
11/4/2007 - 11/10/2007
10/28/2007 - 11/3/2007
10/21/2007 - 10/27/2007
10/14/2007 - 10/20/2007
10/7/2007 - 10/13/2007
9/30/2007 - 10/6/2007
9/23/2007 - 9/29/2007
9/16/2007 - 9/22/2007
9/9/2007 - 9/15/2007
9/2/2007 - 9/8/2007
8/26/2007 - 9/1/2007
8/19/2007 - 8/25/2007
8/12/2007 - 8/18/2007
8/5/2007 - 8/11/2007
7/29/2007 - 8/4/2007
7/22/2007 - 7/28/2007
7/15/2007 - 7/21/2007
7/8/2007 - 7/14/2007
7/1/2007 - 7/7/2007
6/24/2007 - 6/30/2007
6/17/2007 - 6/23/2007
6/10/2007 - 6/16/2007
6/3/2007 - 6/9/2007
5/27/2007 - 6/2/2007
5/20/2007 - 5/26/2007
5/13/2007 - 5/19/2007
5/6/2007 - 5/12/2007
4/29/2007 - 5/5/2007
4/22/2007 - 4/28/2007
4/15/2007 - 4/21/2007
4/8/2007 - 4/14/2007
4/1/2007 - 4/7/2007
3/25/2007 - 3/31/2007
3/18/2007 - 3/24/2007
3/11/2007 - 3/17/2007
3/4/2007 - 3/10/2007
2/25/2007 - 3/3/2007
2/18/2007 - 2/24/2007
2/11/2007 - 2/17/2007
2/4/2007 - 2/10/2007
1/28/2007 - 2/3/2007
1/21/2007 - 1/27/2007
1/14/2007 - 1/20/2007
1/7/2007 - 1/13/2007
12/31/2006 - 1/6/2007
12/24/2006 - 12/30/2006
12/17/2006 - 12/23/2006
12/10/2006 - 12/16/2006
12/3/2006 - 12/9/2006
11/26/2006 - 12/2/2006
11/19/2006 - 11/25/2006
11/12/2006 - 11/18/2006
11/5/2006 - 11/11/2006
10/29/2006 - 11/4/2006
10/22/2006 - 10/28/2006
10/15/2006 - 10/21/2006
10/8/2006 - 10/14/2006
10/1/2006 - 10/7/2006
9/24/2006 - 9/30/2006
9/17/2006 - 9/23/2006
9/10/2006 - 9/16/2006
9/3/2006 - 9/9/2006
8/27/2006 - 9/2/2006
8/20/2006 - 8/26/2006
8/13/2006 - 8/19/2006
8/6/2006 - 8/12/2006
7/30/2006 - 8/5/2006
7/23/2006 - 7/29/2006
7/16/2006 - 7/22/2006
7/9/2006 - 7/15/2006
7/2/2006 - 7/8/2006
6/25/2006 - 7/1/2006
6/18/2006 - 6/24/2006
6/11/2006 - 6/17/2006
6/4/2006 - 6/10/2006
5/28/2006 - 6/3/2006
5/21/2006 - 5/27/2006
5/14/2006 - 5/20/2006
5/7/2006 - 5/13/2006
4/30/2006 - 5/6/2006
4/23/2006 - 4/29/2006
4/16/2006 - 4/22/2006
4/9/2006 - 4/15/2006
4/2/2006 - 4/8/2006
3/26/2006 - 4/1/2006
3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006