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Is LeBron James the best player of all time at age 22?
LeBron James is really really good.

You knew that of course. He nearly had a triple double tonight, and twice already this season he's reached 30 points, 13 assists, and 13 rebounds in a game. Now in his fifth season, he’s averaging career highs in rebounds, assists, blocks, and three point percentage.

And he’s just 22.

There are many people out there with short memories who are already anointing King James as “The Greatest Player Ever.” I lived in Chicago during Michael Jordan’s prime and I know who the greatest is. Of course, a generation earlier Philadelphians might have said it about Dr. J. Or a few generations before that it was Wilt and Russell.

For as long as basketball fans exist, this argument will continue. There’s no way to prove that Hakeem Olajuwon was a more dominant big man than George Mikan or that Magic Johnson was better than Oscar Robertson.

LeBron’s age stuck with me. Twenty-two. Is he the greatest NBA player ever at age 22? You might think he is. If you don’t, you might have some idea who would top him. You’d be wrong.

The best player in NBA history at age 22 was…Bob McAdoo.

Yes, this is the same Bob McAdoo that barely missed making the top 50 NBA players list in 1996 and only made the list when the NBA selected ten more players a decade later.

In 1973-1974, in his second year in the league, McAdoo averaged 30.6 ppg, 15.1 rpg, 2.3 apg, 3.3 bpg, and 1.2 spg . He shot 55% from the field and 79% from the line. Comparatively, James, now in year five, is at 29.2 ppg, 7.8 rpg, 8.0 apg, 1.7 bpg, and 1.8 spg, and is shooting 47% from the field and 67% from the line.

I took a look a look at the age 22 year for the all of the top 60 NBA players, and throwing out 18 of them who weren't even in the league at 22 (including Wilt Chamberlain, Larry Bird, Pete Maravich, David Robinson, and Elgin Baylor), I determined these to be the best age 22 seasons:

Bob McAdoo (30.6 ppg, 15.1 rpg, 3.3 bpg, 55% from the field)
Oscar Robertson (30.5 ppg, 10.1 rpg, 9.7 apg)
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (28.8 ppg, 14.5 rpg, 4.1 apg, 52% from the field)
Julius Erving* (31.9 ppg, 12.2 rpg, 4.2 apg, 2.5 spg, 1.8 bpg)
Rick Barry (35.6 ppg, 9.2 rpg, 88% from the line)
Shaquille O’Neal (29.3 ppg, 11.4 apg, 2.4 bpg, 58% from the field)
Magic Johnson (18.6 ppg, 9.6 rpg, 9.5 apg, 2.7 spg, 54% from the field)
Charles Barkley (20.0 ppg, 12.8 rpg, 2.2 spg, 57% from the field)
Kobe Bryant (28.5 ppg, 5.9 rpg, 5.0 apg, 85% from the line)
Hakeem Olajuwon (20.6 ppg, 11.9 apg, 2.7 bpg, 54% from the field)

*Age 22 season was in spent in the ABA

You might also include Bill Russell (19.6 rpg), Wes Unseld (18.2 rpg) or even Dolph Schayes (16.4 rpg) on this list, but none of them were all that great offensively that season, at least compared to what we’re used to now. Michael Jordan probably would’ve made the list but his age 22 season (sandwiched between his brilliant rookie season and his first MVP season) was shortened by injury and was his worst season in a Bulls uniform.

LeBron has his work cut out for him to stay with this group, but if he keeps up his numbers all season, it could be one of the top five seasons all time for someone his age.



Posted by Kenn Ruby at 11/16/2007 9:49:00 PM

Comments (6)

Phil Letterman
Phil Jackson's remark that he calls a game with a lot of penetration a "Brokeback Mountain" game is like the Seinfeld episode in which Jerry's dentist converts to Judaism for the jokes.

"This offends you as a Jewish person?"
"No, it offends me as a comedian."

Phil's joke was mildly humorous in that Michael Scott "that's-what-she-said" kind of way. Was it, as the NBA and the easily offended claim, in poor taste? Yeah, because it was a sex joke, not because it was a gay joke.

Well, good for Phil for not doing the usual song-and-dance groveling and offering up a faux-contrite apology just to appease the victim-class.

Check out his "apology" to cowboys and horses here.

Posted by Jason Thornbury at 11/15/2007 7:25:00 AM

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Too Much Nash
In the NBA Barometer, I wrote about the reasons for fantasy owners to be wary of players on very good teams. A squad like the Spurs, for example, is going to outclass a lot of opponents and generate big leads... and championship contenders are likely to pull their stars in blowouts and save their legs for the long haul.

I'm disappointed to report that Suns coach Mike D'Antoni is apparently not one of my readers.

D'Antoni's Suns absolutely fit the profile of a team that might be inspired to rest key guys with a big lead. They have championship aspirations. They have a number of key players who are older, have extensive injury histories, or both. And yet, in last night's game against an outclassed Knick team that was flying in missing-man formation from the opening tip and then lost Mardy Collins and Renaldo Balkman to in-game injuries, D'Antoni never really emptied the bench.

With six minutes left in the fourth quarter and a 19-point lead, Steve Nash, Amare Stoudemire, Leandro Barbosa, Grant Hill and Boris Diaw were all on the floor. Hill -- he of the long and dramatic injury history -- played 37 minutes. Barbosa -- still recovering from a rib injury -- played 43.

Does D'Antoni have so little faith in his bench that he couldn't trust Marcus Banks or D.J. Strawberry or Alando Tucker with a 19-point lead and six minutes remaining?

I won't suggest that D'Antoni was running up the score... there may be a perfectly logical reason why he chose to let Nash and company log heavy minutes last night. He may have been using the game as a sort of extended training camp -- letting players who have missed time due to injury like Stoudemire, Diaw and Barbosa, build up their wind in game conditions. And as a fantasy owner, I can't say I'm disappointed when guys like Marion -- on my roster in a few leagues -- keep racking up points in garbage time.

But as someone who would really like to see the Suns challenge for a title this season -- as a victory for basketball that's really fun to watch -- I can't help but be concerned. Steve Nash is too valuable a commodity to risk in a blowout.



Posted by Charlie Zegers at 11/14/2007 6:58:00 AM
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Does Marvin Williams Breakout This Year?
In fantasy sports we have accepted that the third year is often the make-or-break year. If a player is not showing signs of being a star by year three, he probably isn't going to be. I know there are exceptions, but in general this is the rule that most of us go by.

Of all of the third year potential breakouts, the most intriguing to me is Marvin Williams. It is safe to stay that both Chris Paul and Deron Williams have broken out and Danny Granger appears well on his way. Williams, if you remember, was the second player chosen in the 2005 NBA draft. He was taken ahead of both Williams and Paul and just behind Andrew Bogut, another player whose career is still in the yet to be determined category. After six games, Williams is averaging 17.5 points, 6.2 rebounds, while shooting almost 56 percent from the floor and 80 percent from the line. All of these are career-highs, a good indicator that a player is improving and therefore on the verge of breakout status. However, in watching Williams and the Hawks closely, this may be closer to the ceiling rather than the floor for Williams.

With the Hawks current roster, Williams will never be the number one scoring option as long as Joe Johnson and Josh Smith are on the team. Williams current scoring average may be closer to its ceiling rather than having the potential to move toward the low 20's, especially since he is shooting such an abnormally high percentage. Coming into this season, Williams was shooting just under 44 percent for his career.

Williams is also on a team that has two great rebounders in Smith and rookie Al Horford. You can't expect Williams' rebounding totals to climb near eight or nine a game with Smith and Horford patrolling the lane. Again, Williams' current average may be closer to its ceiling than to its floor.

Finally, Williams doesn't contribute great numbers in the other categories that can separate good fantasy players from great ones. He doesn't hit many 3-pointers (25 in just over two seasons), and he averages under a block and a steal combined. Williams also doesn't have Steve Nash like assist totals, as he is averaging 2.5 per game this season and just 1.3 per game for his career.

While Williams' numbers are vastly improved, he appears to be at best a four category player (points, rebounds, field goal percentage, free throw percentage) who may wind up being a lot like the Spurs' Tony Parker, a much better real life player than fantasy player. I'm sure the Hawks won't mind!



Posted by Kyle Fisher at 11/12/2007 11:18:00 AM
Comments (2)

The (l)East is the (b)East

The Eastern Conference is back, baby. While planning out my Saturday NBA viewing schedule, I came across several interesting matchups involving various teams in the maligned Eastern Conference. But first I had to navigate my way around a conflicting obligation. My significant other was performing in a theatrical production, making it difficult to watch any NBA action. Patti's cool. She lets me watch way too much hoops with nary a sound of discontent. But I also understand there are times for the NBA and times for couples harmony.

So thank my lucky stars for NBA League Pass and DVR. The former allows me to view the best matchup on any night. The latter allows me to record the best matchup even while attending a theatrical performance featuring my better half. We've all been there, haven't we? Having the problem of trying to avoid hearing sports scores while out and about, preferring to watch the game "live" on tape. I guess in this case, "live" on digital. It's hard to do when you're attending a wedding, because there's always some neanderthal who'll blow the surprise. Someone that sneaks away into the bar to watch the game and blurts out a score on his way back to the table. Heck, I think I've been that neanderthal in the past. I've matured since then. For best results when trying to avoid sports scores, I suggest going to a play. I hate to stereotype, but it's what I do best. There was not one person in the house that appeared to have a rooting interest in the NBA.

Looking at Saturday's schedule, Boston at New Jersey was a no-brainer. The Celtics were entering the game as the league's last undefeated team behind the New Big Three of Kevin Garnett, Paul Pierce and Ray Allen. The Nets have their own Big Three (Jason Kidd, Richard Jefferson, Vince Carter) and along with Toronto and Boston are considered the Big Three in the Atlantic. Jefferson, in particular, has been very good, leading the Nets in scoring in all five games so far. This looked like a game that would be decided by each team's peripheral players. The first of four meetings between the two teams would have a certain amount of meaning, though we should keep in mind it was only Game 5 for Boston and Game 6 for Jersey. It's a long season.

Further down the scoreboard, I wanted to watch the Suns/Magic matchup in Orlando. The Magic were 5-1, looking to become the first team to reach six wins. They were coming off a four-game road winning streak. I don't give a crap that two of those wins came at the expense of disappointments like Minnesota and Washington, winning on the road is a good thing. And coming back to beat Toronto on the second night of a back-to-back set is something to brag about. Orlando had rolled to the top of the Southeast Division largely on its ability to shoot and hit 3-pointers. They were shooting 41 percent from long range and were second in the league behind the Suns in 3-point attempts. This would be a nice test for Orlando, who were blown out by Detroit prior to the four-game stretch.

Those were the two games I decided to record, but it was hard not to include the Toronto/Chicago matchup. The Bulls would be the league's most disappointing team if it were not for the Heat and Wizards. The three teams were a combined 1-14 entering Saturday's action. And now that I think about it, they are part of the reason I'm finding the Eastern Conference fun to follow. Three former playoff teams out/three former lottery teams (Boston, Charlotte, Indiana) in. The Bulls were hoping to use their most complete effort of the season -- a grueling four-point victory over Detroit on Thursday -- as a turning point. Toronto, just like New Jersey, have to keep pace with the Celtics and were playing its fourth game in five nights.

As it turned out, all three games were blowouts. Not much intrigue going on. I was more engrossed in the twists and turns of the play than any of the games.

The Celtics' Big Three outplayed the Nets' Big Three on its way to a 112-101 victory. The game was nip and tuck in the first half with several ties and lead changes, but the Celtics landed the decisive blow in the third quarter, outscoring the Nets 28-14. New Jersey got very cold and fell behind by as much as 23 in the fourth quarter. The Nets could be kicking themselves because they played good defense most of the night and were able to dribble penetrate at will in the first half, but found themselves down by seven at halftime. Boston is going to be tough. At no point in the game were they without at least two of KG, Allen or Pierce on the floor. Who do you double? Who to lay off? This must be Eddie House's wet dream. He has hit for double figures in four straight, while knocking down 10 3-pointers in the last four games. And as the team's backup point guard, he's nearly doubled his career assists-per-game average. Too much has been made of not having a legitimate backup at point guard. All House has to do is bring the ball over half court and get it into the hands of Pierce, Allen of the Ticket. The Nets were rushing House, who needs to realize that he can't do too much with the ball when it's in his hands. Get it to one of the Three or shoot a wide-open 3-pointer. And speaking of players on the periphery. Glen "Big Baby" Davis made his first contribution of the season. He had six points and eight rebounds, including six offensive, while playing significant second-quarter minutes.

The Suns never gave the Magic's 3-point shooters any room in their 106-96 win, that was easier than the 10-point margin indicates. They were content to let Dwight Howard beat them down low -- and did he ever, scoring 33 points on put backs and dunks -- but his poor free-throw shooting returned (7-for-16) as did his penchant for turnovers. And the Suns were just better at what the Magic are trying to be: an uptempo team that uses the 3-pointer as a weapon. The Suns contested shots all night. Rashard Lewis and Hedo Turkoglu -- averaging 40 points between the two of them -- shot a combined 8-for-25 and scored 18 points while getting to the line just twice between them. Side Note: Tiger Woods showed up, so this was Event No. 1 on the Orlando social calendar.

Because the DVR does not allow me to record three games at once (is there an entrepreneur out there?), I couldn't watch the Toronto/Chicago game. And I'm thankful for that. I know the fans at the United Center reprised their "Kobe" chant in the Raptors' 101-71 thumping. The Bulls shot just 33.3 percent and coach Scott Skiles pulled his starting unit early in the third quarter, never to be seen again. Viktor Khryapa may be part of the Russian national team that captured the EuroBasket 2007 title and is headed to Beijing next summer, but when he's getting 21 minutes of playing time in the States, something's gone awry. For Chicago, the timing of a six-game road trip couldn't be better. They head out West beginning Thursday in Phoenix before finishing off against the very same Raptors' team that forced Chicago into team-wide introspection. "We're frustrated, embarrassed. Use whatever word you want. We're at a crossroad where it can't get much worse," Kirk Hinrich told the Chicago Tribune.

The DVR is whirring again on Sunday. And an Eastern Conference team is involved again. The Bobcats host the Rockets tonight. If we noticed anything about Charlotte this week, it's that they can't live without Raymond Felton. The 'cats were blown out in the two games Felton missed because of a knee injury, but he returned Friday and helped lead a spirited comeback victory in Indiana. Later tonight, I'll be watching Cleveland and the surprising 4-1 Clippers. Chris Kaman is the early fave for Comeback Player of the Year.



Posted by johnny at 11/11/2007 7:55:00 PM
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5/3/2009 - 5/9/2009
4/26/2009 - 5/2/2009
4/19/2009 - 4/25/2009
4/12/2009 - 4/18/2009
4/5/2009 - 4/11/2009
3/29/2009 - 4/4/2009
3/22/2009 - 3/28/2009
3/15/2009 - 3/21/2009
3/8/2009 - 3/14/2009
3/1/2009 - 3/7/2009
2/22/2009 - 2/28/2009
2/15/2009 - 2/21/2009
2/8/2009 - 2/14/2009
2/1/2009 - 2/7/2009
1/25/2009 - 1/31/2009
1/18/2009 - 1/24/2009
1/11/2009 - 1/17/2009
1/4/2009 - 1/10/2009
12/28/2008 - 1/3/2009
12/21/2008 - 12/27/2008
12/14/2008 - 12/20/2008
12/7/2008 - 12/13/2008
11/30/2008 - 12/6/2008
11/23/2008 - 11/29/2008
11/16/2008 - 11/22/2008
11/9/2008 - 11/15/2008
11/2/2008 - 11/8/2008
10/26/2008 - 11/1/2008
10/19/2008 - 10/25/2008
10/12/2008 - 10/18/2008
10/5/2008 - 10/11/2008
9/28/2008 - 10/4/2008
9/21/2008 - 9/27/2008
9/14/2008 - 9/20/2008
9/7/2008 - 9/13/2008
8/31/2008 - 9/6/2008
8/24/2008 - 8/30/2008
8/17/2008 - 8/23/2008
8/10/2008 - 8/16/2008
8/3/2008 - 8/9/2008
7/27/2008 - 8/2/2008
7/20/2008 - 7/26/2008
7/13/2008 - 7/19/2008
7/6/2008 - 7/12/2008
6/29/2008 - 7/5/2008
6/22/2008 - 6/28/2008
6/15/2008 - 6/21/2008
6/8/2008 - 6/14/2008
6/1/2008 - 6/7/2008
5/25/2008 - 5/31/2008
5/18/2008 - 5/24/2008
5/11/2008 - 5/17/2008
5/4/2008 - 5/10/2008
4/27/2008 - 5/3/2008
4/20/2008 - 4/26/2008
4/13/2008 - 4/19/2008
4/6/2008 - 4/12/2008
3/30/2008 - 4/5/2008
3/23/2008 - 3/29/2008
3/16/2008 - 3/22/2008
3/9/2008 - 3/15/2008
3/2/2008 - 3/8/2008
2/24/2008 - 3/1/2008
2/17/2008 - 2/23/2008
2/10/2008 - 2/16/2008
2/3/2008 - 2/9/2008
1/27/2008 - 2/2/2008
1/20/2008 - 1/26/2008
1/13/2008 - 1/19/2008
1/6/2008 - 1/12/2008
12/30/2007 - 1/5/2008
12/23/2007 - 12/29/2007
12/16/2007 - 12/22/2007
12/9/2007 - 12/15/2007
12/2/2007 - 12/8/2007
11/25/2007 - 12/1/2007
11/18/2007 - 11/24/2007
11/11/2007 - 11/17/2007
11/4/2007 - 11/10/2007
10/28/2007 - 11/3/2007
10/21/2007 - 10/27/2007
10/14/2007 - 10/20/2007
10/7/2007 - 10/13/2007
9/30/2007 - 10/6/2007
9/23/2007 - 9/29/2007
9/16/2007 - 9/22/2007
9/9/2007 - 9/15/2007
9/2/2007 - 9/8/2007
8/26/2007 - 9/1/2007
8/19/2007 - 8/25/2007
8/12/2007 - 8/18/2007
8/5/2007 - 8/11/2007
7/29/2007 - 8/4/2007
7/22/2007 - 7/28/2007
7/15/2007 - 7/21/2007
7/8/2007 - 7/14/2007
7/1/2007 - 7/7/2007
6/24/2007 - 6/30/2007
6/17/2007 - 6/23/2007
6/10/2007 - 6/16/2007
6/3/2007 - 6/9/2007
5/27/2007 - 6/2/2007
5/20/2007 - 5/26/2007
5/13/2007 - 5/19/2007
5/6/2007 - 5/12/2007
4/29/2007 - 5/5/2007
4/22/2007 - 4/28/2007
4/15/2007 - 4/21/2007
4/8/2007 - 4/14/2007
4/1/2007 - 4/7/2007
3/25/2007 - 3/31/2007
3/18/2007 - 3/24/2007
3/11/2007 - 3/17/2007
3/4/2007 - 3/10/2007
2/25/2007 - 3/3/2007
2/18/2007 - 2/24/2007
2/11/2007 - 2/17/2007
2/4/2007 - 2/10/2007
1/28/2007 - 2/3/2007
1/21/2007 - 1/27/2007
1/14/2007 - 1/20/2007
1/7/2007 - 1/13/2007
12/31/2006 - 1/6/2007
12/24/2006 - 12/30/2006
12/17/2006 - 12/23/2006
12/10/2006 - 12/16/2006
12/3/2006 - 12/9/2006
11/26/2006 - 12/2/2006
11/19/2006 - 11/25/2006
11/12/2006 - 11/18/2006
11/5/2006 - 11/11/2006
10/29/2006 - 11/4/2006
10/22/2006 - 10/28/2006
10/15/2006 - 10/21/2006
10/8/2006 - 10/14/2006
10/1/2006 - 10/7/2006
9/24/2006 - 9/30/2006
9/17/2006 - 9/23/2006
9/10/2006 - 9/16/2006
9/3/2006 - 9/9/2006
8/27/2006 - 9/2/2006
8/20/2006 - 8/26/2006
8/13/2006 - 8/19/2006
8/6/2006 - 8/12/2006
7/30/2006 - 8/5/2006
7/23/2006 - 7/29/2006
7/16/2006 - 7/22/2006
7/9/2006 - 7/15/2006
7/2/2006 - 7/8/2006
6/25/2006 - 7/1/2006
6/18/2006 - 6/24/2006
6/11/2006 - 6/17/2006
6/4/2006 - 6/10/2006
5/28/2006 - 6/3/2006
5/21/2006 - 5/27/2006
5/14/2006 - 5/20/2006
5/7/2006 - 5/13/2006
4/30/2006 - 5/6/2006
4/23/2006 - 4/29/2006
4/16/2006 - 4/22/2006
4/9/2006 - 4/15/2006
4/2/2006 - 4/8/2006
3/26/2006 - 4/1/2006
3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006