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Mining for deep sleepers in Minnesota
Last week I talked about learning to love a new team after my favorite player was traded to them. This week I follow up on the other side of the coin, how to keep the love for my old team after losing their franchise player. This was especially difficult for me in this case, as Kevin Garnett was the entire reason that the Timberwolves were my favorites in the first place. I've never been to Minnesota, I have no natural tie to the squad so why should I stay around? Especially through a dreaded "Rebuild".

For one thing, there's loyalty. I've put a significant amount of blood/sweat/tears into the Wolves over the past decade. With wonderful inventions like the NBA League Pass and the internet I've been able to get to know the team like they were my local squad. For another thing, there's the Wolves community. Guys from the Wolves message boards play in my fantasy leagues, and the Wolves followers I've encountered are some of the more knowledgeable and passionate basketball fans around. I don't want to leave that behind.

Finally, and somewhat surprisingly based upon the almost universally bad press that the Timberwolves front office gets…there's hope. Even before Garnett was traded, the Wolves front office was pushing their young players as the Blueprint of the Future. Now, whether you feel that the return package for Garnett was good value or not, it could be argued that only Portland has a decidedly better young core, and with Greg Oden out it's possible that the Wolves eclipse them as well. They sport nine players under the age of 25, four of which were lottery selections, and it is conceivable that all nine could be regulars in the rotation this season.

This is also where the smart rotisserie player starts to get interested in the Wolves. Unlike a contending team like the Celtics, there is no set hierarchy of minutes and production in place. Instead, Minnesota is now a hotbed of activity in which any from a group of 8 or 10 players could potentially break out this season. This team absolutely needs to be on your fantasy radar in the middle to later rounds, and immediately after the draft is over you should put several others on your "watch" list to pick up in case they get hot during the season. Excluding known quantities Ricky Davis and Mark Blount, who are veteran starters whose current roles are undefined in the youth movement, let's take a look at this year's Wolves of interest on my personal draft card.

Al Jefferson: Late 2nd/early 3rd round. The centerpiece of the Celtics deal, Jefferson could officially make the leap to fantasy stardom this year. Jefferson caught fire once he entered the Celts starting line-up last season, and finished the year by averaging 19.8 ppg on 55% FG, 11.5 rpg, 1.7 bpg and 1.1 steals after the All Star Break. If he can approximate those numbers for the season, he'd be worthy of a first round pick. But beware, he's had injury issues in each of his three NBA seasons and with the additional pressure of being The Man he could have trouble again this year.

Randy Foye: 6th round. I sincerely believe that the Foye/Brandon Roy dynamic this year will be like Deron Williams/Chris Paul last season. Foye had very similar per-minute numbers to Roy as a rookie, but Roy was playing 35 minutes per on a rebuilding team while Foye was playing 20 mpg on a team with playoff hopes. This year Foye is on a rebuilding squad and should be the main perimeter option. He already had the physical ability and big-shot mentality, and this summer he showed a dramatically improved 3-point stroke. Look for big things.

Corey Brewer: 11 - 13th round. The Wolves used their lottery pick this year on Brewer and have since traded Trenton Hassell, whose role he should replicate/improve upon. Brewer is a Garbageman in training that should contribute across many categories in the not-too-distant future, if he can earn the PT.

Gerald Green: 11th - 13th round. Green is competing with Davis, Brewer, and Rashad McCants for minutes at the swingmen slots. He averaged 16 points and 1.8 treys per game in 26 starts with the Celtics last season and also won the dunk contest, which combined to make his name large enough to get him roto attention.

Craig Smith: late rounds. The only reason that I list Smith below Brewer and Green is that he is more unknown. The former second round pick was an NBA All Rookie selection last season and flat out dominated in the Vegas Summer League this year. If he gets near starter minutes this season he could easily average well into double-figure scoring with solid rebounds.

Rashad McCants: late rounds/undrafted. My own personal deep sleeper. McCants came out of college as a scorer with a sweet 3-point stroke, but microfracture surgery killed his sophomore campaign last year. The word out of Minnesota is that his knee is dramatically improved this year, and if he gets his shooting stroke back he could very well grab one of those starting swingmen spots.

Ryan Gomes: very late rounds/undrafted. Gomes is a SF/PF tweener, and at times has been fantasy relevant with the Celtics over the past couple years. I don't think he'll beat out Smith at PF or any of the four swingmen for SF minutes, but if Ricky Davis and/or Mark Blount are traded before the season he has some fantasy upside.

Sebastian Telfair: undrafted but watch. Randy Foye is likely to start the season at PG for the Wolves, but he's still learning the position. Telfair is the only true PG on the roster, and he's still young enough that he could "get it" and become the lottery player he was drafted to be after disappointing in Portland and Boston.

Chris Richard: undrafted. Richard may not even make the playing rotation, but watching him in Vegas this summer he clearly has game. He's a great glue big man, willing to bang around, grab boards and play solid defense. He's also got surprisingly long arms and a nice mid-range jumper, and if he does ever earn bigger minutes he could produce in a Udonis Haslem kind of way.



Posted by Professor at 10/5/2007 6:59:00 AM
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Houston, We Have a Problem
Like most dads, I understand that the impending arrival of a new baby can leave the brain... a bit addled. But I don't care if his wife is expecting quintuplets, I can't imagine why Allan Houston would even consider making his NBA comeback with the Knicks.

According to various published reports, including this item in the New York Post, Houston is considering signing with the Knicks -- though the Nets, Cavs and Suns have also been mentioned as possible destinations.

Let's review those options. Jersey has virtually no depth in the back court or scoring on the bench, but offers the chance to play for a perimeter-oriented team led by Jason Kidd, and one that should make the playoffs. The Cavs are another contender for the Eastern Conference title and could really use a reliable shooter. The Suns dumped a bunch of bench players in the offseason, and everyone who goes to Phoenix puts up huge numbers. At any one of those three, Houston could realistically step in right away and become a significant contributor -- and major fantasy sleeper.

A return to Madison Square Garden, on the other hand, makes practically no sense. The Knicks have about 17 guards under contract currently -- Houston would need to compete with Jamal Crawford, Quentin Richardson, Nate Robinson and possibly Renaldo Balkman, Fred Jones and Demetris Nichols for minutes on the wing. And even if he got playing time, he wouldn't get shots -- New York's offense will rely on pounding the ball inside to Zach Randolph and Eddy Curry.

Signing Houston would appear to make little sense for the Knicks, either. New York is already carrying the max number of contracts, which means Houston's arrival might squeeze out a promising youngster like Nichols or the recently-acquired Jared Jordan.

The only logical reason for Houston to even consider signing with the Knicks -- New York is an easy commute from his house in suburban Connecticut.

Unless... What if Isiah Thomas is about to pull the trigger on a many-for-one trade -- for someone like Shawn Marion or Ron Artest. If that were the case -- if their overstuffed roster is about to be depleted with the likes of Richardson, David Lee and others headed West -- Houston would suddenly change from "unnecessary luxury" to "welcome addition."

Fantasy owners would be well-advised to keep a close eye Houston's eventual destination. If he lands with the Nets, Cavs or Suns, he'll merit immediate consideration in most leagues. With the Knicks... wait for the other shoe to drop.



Posted by Charlie Zegers at 10/3/2007 2:34:00 PM
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Undervalued Players: Part Two
Continuing a theme from last week, the following are undervalued players who are typically going too late in fantasy leagues:

Brandon Roy - Roy has a lingering heel injury that needs to be monitored, but he's also one of the major candidates to break out this season. With Zach Randolph jettisoned and Greg Oden lost for the year, Roy is clearly the centerpiece to Portland's franchise and will be the team's No. 1 scoring option this season. At 6-6, 220 lbs, Roy contributes in nearly every category. With no dominant ballhandler on the roster, Roy will essentially provide point guard stats (at least five assists per game) from the shooting guard position; he averaged 18.7 ppg while shooting 48.5 percent from the floor during the second half of last season. He'll also chip in with around 1.5 threes and steals per game, while providing a boost to your free throw percentage as well. If he somehow falls to you in the fourth round of your draft, consider yourself lucky.

Kevin Durant - It's somewhat perplexing Durant couldn't bench press 185 lbs, but all other signs point to the former Texas star being NBA ready. He's a special talent and his game should make an easy transition into the Association, especially considering his competitiveness. At 6-9, 225 lbs, Durant will basically be unguardable from the shooting guard position. He's a fantastic rebounder, can shoot from long range and will immediately help in the steals and blocks categories. Best yet, the Sonics lost both of their leading scorers from last season in Ray Allen and Rashard Lewis, leaving Durant with the rare opportunity of being the focus of a franchise as a rookie. New coach P.J. Carlesimo is installing a system that's nearly identical to the one Durant played in at Texas, further shortening the learning curve. If Carmelo Anthony could average 21.0 ppg as a rookie on a roster littered with a veteran presence, Durant can do better during his rookie campaign.

Corey Maggette - Unlike the young up-and-comers I've been talking about, Maggette is almost a boring option at this point. However, this season could easily prove to be the ninth-year pro's best yet, as the loss of Elton Brand (Achilles') should lead to a huge uptick in Maggette's statistics. He's never really seen eye to eye with coach Mike Dunleavy, but the relationship is getting better, as Dunleavy already named him a starter over the summer. He underwent arthroscopic knee surgery during the offseason, which should alleviate the pain and soreness he had to play through for much of last season. Entering the year 100 percent, Maggette should also be extra motivated with the ability to opt out of his contract and become a free agent at season's end. If he can build off the strong final month of last season, he'd become an elite fantasy player, as Maggette's April numbers looked like this: 22.8 ppg, 7.6 rpg, 4.0 apg, 1.0 spg, 49.6 fg%. Also, Maggette is a huge help in the free throw category, as he not only shoots freebies well but also gets to the charity stripe with great frequency.

Zach Randolph - Randolph doesn't get the steals or blocks you'd like from the power forward position, but he's a double-double just waiting to happen. Finally fully recovered from microfracture surgery, Randolph averaged nearly 24 points with 10 boards per game last year. He's also improved as a passer, getting 3.1 apg over the second half of the season. Now, Randolph finds himself in New York, playing in a much easier conference where he should be able to dominate in the paint. There are some concerns how he will coexist with Eddy Curry (both play below the rim), but Randolph can step out and hit the jumper as well. Also, playing alongside a center with Curry's rebounding (in)ability, expect Randolph to be extremely active on the glass as well. He's going to hurt you in turnovers, but there are few power forwards who shoot free throws at an 80 percent clip like Randolph does. Do not underestimate the move to the Eastern Conference and to a Knicks team lacking a dominant scorer; Randolph could put up a 27 and 12 type year.

Posted by Dalton Del Don at 10/2/2007 9:24:00 PM
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Real Life vs. Fantasy Life
Posted by: Kyle Fisher

In most fantasy sports, a players real life perception is generally close to his fantasy value. However, in fantasy basketball, several top fantasy players are not recognized as top-25 or even top-50 players by the mass media or the casual fan. In this first segment of Real Life vs. Fantasy Life we will examine three players who may not be considered top players by the mass media and the casual fan, but should be considered first rate players by fantasy owners.

Josh Smith

Real Life: Most fans would have trouble recognizing Smith in an airport or a restaurant. He doesn't have any national commercials and doesn't get mass media attention. He didn't play in college, so he is not as recognizable as past college stars who might be struggling in the NBA. Statistically, he is a good scorer, good rebounder and a great shot-blocker but does nothing to catch the casual fans eye. Ask 10 friends to name the top-25 players in the NBA and see how many times Smith's name comes up. With my friends, the answer was zero.

Fantasy Life: Smith is a great player. He is a good scorer who is only going to get better. For a small forward, he is a great rebounder, and may be the best non-center/power forward shot-blocker on the planet. He also provides a plethora of steals. When his shooting catches up to the rest of his game, Smith has the potential to be a top-five fantasy player. Currently, he would be a steal in the mid-second round of 12 team leagues.

Andre Iguodala:

Real Life: For his first 2+ years in the league, Iguodala was the second fiddle in Philadelphia to Allen Iverson. Iguodala was seen as a guy who has had some highlight dunks and who was a good all-around player, but not great at one thing. Again, ask 10 friends to rank the top-25 players in the NBA and see if Iguodala's name comes up. Again with my friends, the answer was zero.

Fantasy Life: Iguodala had a breakout season last year, as his scoring, rebounds, assists and steals all increased. Ask the seasoned fantasy player where Iguodala ranks, and you will get a lot of people putting him in the top-25. With his all-around play, Iguodala is a better fantasy option at his position than much bigger names such as: Vince Carter, Allen Iverson, Carmelo Anthony and Paul Pierce.

Al Jefferson:

Real Life: Jefferson is probably more well known for being part of the deal that brought Kevin Garnett to Boston than anything he has done on the court. Again, Jefferson didn't play in college, so he is not a big name in the minds of the casual fan. He also hasn't played for a winning team, so he hasn't gotten the national exposure that a deep playoff run produces.

Fantasy Life: If you don't know Jefferson's name, you soon will. Jefferson averaged 16 points and 11 rebounds a game last season. In fantasy terms his production was close to that of future Hall-of-Famer Tim Duncan last season. Jefferson will only get better as his game matures. He is only 21 years old and has gotten better every year. Playing with Randy Foye in Minnesota should only enhance his game. Again, his name may not say second round fantasy pick, but his game sure does.

Posted by Kyle Fisher at 10/1/2007 11:26:00 AM
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Overvalued Players
Every year, there is a scramble for the players that managers must have at any cost. A portion of this group, however, is somewhat overrated: the group of guys that were great years ago but still make headlines every so often. Their fame raises their draft stock considerably, but what must be remembered is that there is no category for nicknames like “The Big Diesel” or “Starbury.” There are also managers that look strictly at the rankings and make moves accordingly. Just because a player is ranked highly in the player rankings doesn't mean that is his true value. Here are some examples of these common misconceptions:

Shaquille O'Neal - Most players are considered overvalued toward the end of their careers as the “Man of Steel” is approaching. O'Neal hasn't played a full season in two years. His points, rebounds, and blocks have been decreasing steadily for the past four years. On top of this, he's not getting any younger and becoming stiffer and less agile. He has been a liability as a player in recent years because he can single handedly lose one category for you; free throws. Not only does he shoot a horrible percentage (42% last year) but he shoots so many of them (7.4 attempts) that it is hard to recover. Considering that his game isn't what it used to be and the fact that he is always injured, that sacrifice is hardly worth the benefits. Let some one else take that burden.

Stephon Marbury - Marbury is a guy going into his 14th season, and that much mileage on a point guard is sure to wear him down. Considering his gradual decline, this year may be the year where he is officially classified as a second-tier guard. This past year, he was below his career averages in every category except three-pointers made and attempted, which tells me that he would rather settle for a jump shot than penetrate and take it to the hole. He is still a valuable asset to a team, but not for the price he used to command. Don't be the fan that takes him too early because you have three pairs of his $14.98 shoes.

Ben Wallace - Like others on this list, age is getting the best of Wallace who recently turned 33. His boards and blocks have decreased for five straight years and his free throw percentage is still the worst in NBA history. Like Marbury, he still has considerable fantasy value but Big Ben is now an afterthought behind some younger centers like Al Jefferson, Dwight Howard, and Tyson Chandler.

Ray Allen - Allen is a proud member of the Boston Celtics, though his fantasy owners aren't singing the same tune. Now that he has great talent around him, he can focus exclusively on shooting, which means he will do a little bit less of everything else. Though his three point and free throw percentages will be remarkable, he will contribute little else. Along with this, he's not getting any younger, and like many 3-point shooters, he will be more inconsistent and streaky, meaning his field goal percentage will take a hit. He is still a great option at shooting guard but there are other younger players who should get a look first like Andre Iguodala, Joe Johnson, and Brandon Roy.

Shane Battier - Battier is still young and in the prime of his career. So why is he on this list? The reason is that year after year Battier is ranked, by many different fantasy rankings, as a top 50 player and even climbing up as high as 38. That is way too high for a guy who has career averages of 4.7 rebounds, 1.8 assists, and 10.4 points per game. His numbers were even less than that this past year. The main attribute that managers are attracted to are his threes and his low turnovers which hardly warrants such a high consideration. He is a solid pickup but not until later rounds.

Posted by Kirk Torossian at 10/1/2007 1:15:00 AM
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Position Battles
While the NBA promotes its brand worldwide in training camps across the globe, fantasy players are looking for something completely different from training camp. It's a time when players compete for starting positions and good draft preparation can give a fantasy owner an edge over the competition. The drafts may be a few weeks away, but your work starts now. With that in mind, let's look at the emerging battles entering camp.

Point Guard:

Houston. Because Tracy McGrady initiates much of Houston's offense, the Rockets point guard isn't going to be used as a traditional point guard. He'll bring the ball over half court, pass to McGrady and be asked to knock down the occasional jump shot to create space for McGrady and Yao Ming. Rafer Alston has the edge as the incumbent, but this looks to be a situation tailor-made for Mike James. Steve Francis may get some work there in training camp, but this will be James' job before long.

Atlanta. The Hawks will be improved this season, but not playoff improved. The need for a veteran point guard, like Speedy Claxton, is not vital. I think a healthy Claxton will come out of camp with the job, but Acie Law will take over during the season.

Memphis. Grizzlies coach Marc Iavaroni is modeling his team after his former club, the Suns, and that means a true point guard. One who will give himself up to make teammates better. While we like Damon Stoudamire's ability to shoot the rock, being a selfless leader is not his calling card. Mike Conley will be leading the Grizzlies opening night with Kyle Lowry and Stoudamire getting what's left over.

Portland. Like Houston with McGrady, the Trail Blazers rely heavily on their shooting guard (Brandon Roy) to distribute offense. Jarret Jack did some nice things last season, but it looks like he'll have to fight Steve Blake and Sergio Rodriguez for minutes. There's nothing flashy to Blake's game. His outside shot is getting better and he knows how to find an open man. Rodriguez is more suited to changing the pace coming off the bench and should get more minutes this season, but not the starting job. Neither Jack nor Blake is a game-changer or game-dominator, and there'll be limited value because Roy will dominate the ball.

Cleveland. The Cavs could really use a point guard that can take the pressure of LeBron James while hitting his outside shots consistently. They toyed with Larry Hughes at the point last year, but he may be needed at shooting guard if Sasha Pavlovic follows through on his threat not to report to camp. That would open the door for Daniel Gibson. He's not a true point and will never run a team, but as LeBron's helper, he should be fine.

Shooting Guard:

Utah. The Jazz has an interesting battle going on with any of four guys in the mix for the starting job. Since morphing the best qualities of all four into one good shooting guard is not yet possible, the Jazz will have to choose the one with the least blemishes. A perimeter threat is what Utah requires most from the position, and Gordan Giricek's the most dangerous weapon they have. Giricek has held the job for various stretches the last four seasons, but has also played his way out those chances. Poor defense and shot selection have mostly been the issue. First-round pick Morris Almond won't be given the job, though he does pass the scoring test. Ronnie Brewer could make it an easy decision if he were a better shooter. His athleticism and defense are not in question; his outside shot is. C.J. Miles could be the answer, but his refusal to show up for summer league leaves him in coach Jerry Sloan's doghouse. Miles wants a contract extension, but the Jazz are not in the mood to give him one. In the end, it may not be who starts the game for the Jazz, but who finishes it. More often than not last season, it was Matt Harpring on the floor with Andrei Kirilenko, Carlos Boozer, Mehmet Okur and Deron Williams.

Small Forward:

Portland. Ideally, the Trail Blazers could use someone like they had last season when Ime Udoka defended hard and knocked down threes. The competition is between Martell Webster and Travis Outlaw. Webster has more offensive game, while Outlaw is the better defender. Darius Miles is reportedly healthy and has a new attitude, but he'll have to prove that to coach Nate McMillan. I think this will be Outlaw's job once the season opens. His outside shot needs consistency, but he defends the perimeter, runs the floor and is more versatile than Webster.

Power Forward:

Los Angeles Clippers. The Elton Brand injury leaves a huge hole in the lineup. Entering training camp, any of three guys are in the mix. Tim Thomas, Ruben Patterson and rookie Al Thornton will all get looks during training camp. The Clippers were bottom-half of the league in offense last season, so that dictates Thomas getting the first crack at replacing Brand. But he can't touch Brand on the defensive end. That's where Patterson has the edge. Thornton won't be much of a factor until later in the season. I suspect coach Mike Dunleavy will patch the hole with Thomas and Patterson for now. But stay tuned for changes as the season progresses. (By the way, I love Corey Maggette this year because of Brand's injury).

Center:

Toronto. The Raptors would like Andrea Bargnani to start at center, but I have doubts whether that's the best fit for him on this team. Ideally, someone who could help Chris Bosh with the defensive aspects of playing center would be the best fit. He's not a great rebounder or shot blocker for a 7-footer. This team won the division with Rasho Nesterovic at center and I'm betting he'll be there again this year.

Detroit. Nazr Mohammed is penciled in as the starter, but I expect Antonio McDyess and Rasheed Wallace will see a lot of action there. McDyess is not a full-timer at this stage of his career, so look for Wallace to slide over to center with Jason Maxiell ready for the prime time at power forward.

Washington. The on-going saga of Etan Thomas and Brandan Haywood. Haywood provides the best offense for the position, but with Gilbert Arenas, Caron Butler and Antawn Jamison on board, offense is not what's needed from Washington's center. Neither will "win" this battle and it will be a wasteland for fantasy owners. If I had to choose one, I'd go with Thomas, who hasn't ticked off coach Eddie Jordan.

Seattle. The early off-season talk surrounds Robert Swift, who won the job in camp last year before a knee injury wiped out the season. With so much change in Seattle, I think new coach P.J. Carlesimo would be better served leaving the seasoned Nick Collison at center to start the season. Swift, who's played in 63 games over two seasons, will get his minutes as the primary backup and gradually move into the starting assignment.

Posted by john clemeno at 9/30/2007 7:54:00 PM
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Where to draft Dwyane Wade?
It seems like every year when an NBA superstar enters the season coming off of surgery, his draft stock drops way too low. Last year it was Kobe Bryant. He was coming off of knee surgery and didn’t play the entire pre-season. I saw some mock drafts that had him going as low as late first round and early second round due to “questions” and “concerns” about his knee. Well, Kobe only missed the first two games of the season due to the knee and ended up averaging 31.6 points, 5.7 rebounds and 5.4 assists, numbers worthy of a top 3 pick. This year’s “question mark” is Dwyane Wade. He’s recovering from off-season shoulder and knee surgery and will most likely miss the first two-three weeks of the season. Before he got hurt last year, Wade was a fantasy monster, averaging 28.8 points, 7.8 assists, 4.8 rebounds, 2.1 steals and 1.3 blocks with great percentages (49.5% from the field and 81.8% from the line). Do your research on Wade’s rehabilitation (he is currently expected to be ready to play by mid-November), but don’t pass on him simply because he’s going to miss some games early in the season. Fantasy basketball is a marathon, not a sprint and D-Wade should only be downgraded a couple of slots (currently #7 on my list) because he is coming off of an injury. If he plays 65-70 games this year and just matches his numbers from last year, you will be happy you made the early season sacrifice.

Posted by Eric Johnson at 9/30/2007 5:33:00 AM
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8/19/2012 - 8/25/2012
8/12/2012 - 8/18/2012
8/5/2012 - 8/11/2012
7/29/2012 - 8/4/2012
7/22/2012 - 7/28/2012
7/15/2012 - 7/21/2012
7/8/2012 - 7/14/2012
7/1/2012 - 7/7/2012
6/24/2012 - 6/30/2012
6/17/2012 - 6/23/2012
6/10/2012 - 6/16/2012
6/3/2012 - 6/9/2012
5/27/2012 - 6/2/2012
5/20/2012 - 5/26/2012
5/13/2012 - 5/19/2012
5/6/2012 - 5/12/2012
4/29/2012 - 5/5/2012
4/22/2012 - 4/28/2012
4/15/2012 - 4/21/2012
4/8/2012 - 4/14/2012
4/1/2012 - 4/7/2012
3/25/2012 - 3/31/2012
3/18/2012 - 3/24/2012
3/11/2012 - 3/17/2012
3/4/2012 - 3/10/2012
2/26/2012 - 3/3/2012
2/19/2012 - 2/25/2012
2/12/2012 - 2/18/2012
2/5/2012 - 2/11/2012
1/29/2012 - 2/4/2012
1/22/2012 - 1/28/2012
1/15/2012 - 1/21/2012
1/8/2012 - 1/14/2012
1/1/2012 - 1/7/2012
12/25/2011 - 12/31/2011
12/18/2011 - 12/24/2011
12/11/2011 - 12/17/2011
12/4/2011 - 12/10/2011
11/27/2011 - 12/3/2011
11/20/2011 - 11/26/2011
11/13/2011 - 11/19/2011
11/6/2011 - 11/12/2011
10/30/2011 - 11/5/2011
10/23/2011 - 10/29/2011
10/16/2011 - 10/22/2011
10/9/2011 - 10/15/2011
10/2/2011 - 10/8/2011
9/25/2011 - 10/1/2011
9/18/2011 - 9/24/2011
9/11/2011 - 9/17/2011
9/4/2011 - 9/10/2011
8/28/2011 - 9/3/2011
8/21/2011 - 8/27/2011
8/14/2011 - 8/20/2011
8/7/2011 - 8/13/2011
7/31/2011 - 8/6/2011
7/24/2011 - 7/30/2011
7/17/2011 - 7/23/2011
7/10/2011 - 7/16/2011
7/3/2011 - 7/9/2011
6/26/2011 - 7/2/2011
6/19/2011 - 6/25/2011
6/12/2011 - 6/18/2011
6/5/2011 - 6/11/2011
5/29/2011 - 6/4/2011
5/22/2011 - 5/28/2011
5/15/2011 - 5/21/2011
5/8/2011 - 5/14/2011
5/1/2011 - 5/7/2011
4/24/2011 - 4/30/2011
4/17/2011 - 4/23/2011
4/10/2011 - 4/16/2011
4/3/2011 - 4/9/2011
3/27/2011 - 4/2/2011
3/20/2011 - 3/26/2011
3/13/2011 - 3/19/2011
3/6/2011 - 3/12/2011
2/27/2011 - 3/5/2011
2/20/2011 - 2/26/2011
2/13/2011 - 2/19/2011
2/6/2011 - 2/12/2011
1/30/2011 - 2/5/2011
1/23/2011 - 1/29/2011
1/16/2011 - 1/22/2011
1/9/2011 - 1/15/2011
1/2/2011 - 1/8/2011
12/26/2010 - 1/1/2011
12/19/2010 - 12/25/2010
12/12/2010 - 12/18/2010
12/5/2010 - 12/11/2010
11/28/2010 - 12/4/2010
11/21/2010 - 11/27/2010
11/14/2010 - 11/20/2010
11/7/2010 - 11/13/2010
10/31/2010 - 11/6/2010
10/24/2010 - 10/30/2010
10/17/2010 - 10/23/2010
10/10/2010 - 10/16/2010
10/3/2010 - 10/9/2010
9/26/2010 - 10/2/2010
9/19/2010 - 9/25/2010
9/12/2010 - 9/18/2010
9/5/2010 - 9/11/2010
8/29/2010 - 9/4/2010
8/22/2010 - 8/28/2010
8/15/2010 - 8/21/2010
8/8/2010 - 8/14/2010
8/1/2010 - 8/7/2010
7/25/2010 - 7/31/2010
7/18/2010 - 7/24/2010
7/11/2010 - 7/17/2010
7/4/2010 - 7/10/2010
6/27/2010 - 7/3/2010
6/20/2010 - 6/26/2010
6/13/2010 - 6/19/2010
6/6/2010 - 6/12/2010
5/30/2010 - 6/5/2010
5/23/2010 - 5/29/2010
5/16/2010 - 5/22/2010
5/9/2010 - 5/15/2010
5/2/2010 - 5/8/2010
4/25/2010 - 5/1/2010
4/18/2010 - 4/24/2010
4/11/2010 - 4/17/2010
4/4/2010 - 4/10/2010
3/28/2010 - 4/3/2010
3/21/2010 - 3/27/2010
3/14/2010 - 3/20/2010
3/7/2010 - 3/13/2010
2/28/2010 - 3/6/2010
2/21/2010 - 2/27/2010
2/14/2010 - 2/20/2010
2/7/2010 - 2/13/2010
1/31/2010 - 2/6/2010
1/24/2010 - 1/30/2010
1/17/2010 - 1/23/2010
1/10/2010 - 1/16/2010
1/3/2010 - 1/9/2010
12/27/2009 - 1/2/2010
12/20/2009 - 12/26/2009
12/13/2009 - 12/19/2009
12/6/2009 - 12/12/2009
11/29/2009 - 12/5/2009
11/22/2009 - 11/28/2009
11/15/2009 - 11/21/2009
11/8/2009 - 11/14/2009
11/1/2009 - 11/7/2009
10/25/2009 - 10/31/2009
10/18/2009 - 10/24/2009
10/11/2009 - 10/17/2009
10/4/2009 - 10/10/2009
9/27/2009 - 10/3/2009
9/20/2009 - 9/26/2009
9/13/2009 - 9/19/2009
9/6/2009 - 9/12/2009
8/30/2009 - 9/5/2009
8/23/2009 - 8/29/2009
8/16/2009 - 8/22/2009
8/9/2009 - 8/15/2009
8/2/2009 - 8/8/2009
7/26/2009 - 8/1/2009
7/19/2009 - 7/25/2009
7/12/2009 - 7/18/2009
7/5/2009 - 7/11/2009
6/28/2009 - 7/4/2009
6/21/2009 - 6/27/2009
6/14/2009 - 6/20/2009
6/7/2009 - 6/13/2009
5/31/2009 - 6/6/2009
5/24/2009 - 5/30/2009
5/17/2009 - 5/23/2009
5/10/2009 - 5/16/2009
5/3/2009 - 5/9/2009
4/26/2009 - 5/2/2009
4/19/2009 - 4/25/2009
4/12/2009 - 4/18/2009
4/5/2009 - 4/11/2009
3/29/2009 - 4/4/2009
3/22/2009 - 3/28/2009
3/15/2009 - 3/21/2009
3/8/2009 - 3/14/2009
3/1/2009 - 3/7/2009
2/22/2009 - 2/28/2009
2/15/2009 - 2/21/2009
2/8/2009 - 2/14/2009
2/1/2009 - 2/7/2009
1/25/2009 - 1/31/2009
1/18/2009 - 1/24/2009
1/11/2009 - 1/17/2009
1/4/2009 - 1/10/2009
12/28/2008 - 1/3/2009
12/21/2008 - 12/27/2008
12/14/2008 - 12/20/2008
12/7/2008 - 12/13/2008
11/30/2008 - 12/6/2008
11/23/2008 - 11/29/2008
11/16/2008 - 11/22/2008
11/9/2008 - 11/15/2008
11/2/2008 - 11/8/2008
10/26/2008 - 11/1/2008
10/19/2008 - 10/25/2008
10/12/2008 - 10/18/2008
10/5/2008 - 10/11/2008
9/28/2008 - 10/4/2008
9/21/2008 - 9/27/2008
9/14/2008 - 9/20/2008
9/7/2008 - 9/13/2008
8/31/2008 - 9/6/2008
8/24/2008 - 8/30/2008
8/17/2008 - 8/23/2008
8/10/2008 - 8/16/2008
8/3/2008 - 8/9/2008
7/27/2008 - 8/2/2008
7/20/2008 - 7/26/2008
7/13/2008 - 7/19/2008
7/6/2008 - 7/12/2008
6/29/2008 - 7/5/2008
6/22/2008 - 6/28/2008
6/15/2008 - 6/21/2008
6/8/2008 - 6/14/2008
6/1/2008 - 6/7/2008
5/25/2008 - 5/31/2008
5/18/2008 - 5/24/2008
5/11/2008 - 5/17/2008
5/4/2008 - 5/10/2008
4/27/2008 - 5/3/2008
4/20/2008 - 4/26/2008
4/13/2008 - 4/19/2008
4/6/2008 - 4/12/2008
3/30/2008 - 4/5/2008
3/23/2008 - 3/29/2008
3/16/2008 - 3/22/2008
3/9/2008 - 3/15/2008
3/2/2008 - 3/8/2008
2/24/2008 - 3/1/2008
2/17/2008 - 2/23/2008
2/10/2008 - 2/16/2008
2/3/2008 - 2/9/2008
1/27/2008 - 2/2/2008
1/20/2008 - 1/26/2008
1/13/2008 - 1/19/2008
1/6/2008 - 1/12/2008
12/30/2007 - 1/5/2008
12/23/2007 - 12/29/2007
12/16/2007 - 12/22/2007
12/9/2007 - 12/15/2007
12/2/2007 - 12/8/2007
11/25/2007 - 12/1/2007
11/18/2007 - 11/24/2007
11/11/2007 - 11/17/2007
11/4/2007 - 11/10/2007
10/28/2007 - 11/3/2007
10/21/2007 - 10/27/2007
10/14/2007 - 10/20/2007
10/7/2007 - 10/13/2007
9/30/2007 - 10/6/2007
9/23/2007 - 9/29/2007
9/16/2007 - 9/22/2007
9/9/2007 - 9/15/2007
9/2/2007 - 9/8/2007
8/26/2007 - 9/1/2007
8/19/2007 - 8/25/2007
8/12/2007 - 8/18/2007
8/5/2007 - 8/11/2007
7/29/2007 - 8/4/2007
7/22/2007 - 7/28/2007
7/15/2007 - 7/21/2007
7/8/2007 - 7/14/2007
7/1/2007 - 7/7/2007
6/24/2007 - 6/30/2007
6/17/2007 - 6/23/2007
6/10/2007 - 6/16/2007
6/3/2007 - 6/9/2007
5/27/2007 - 6/2/2007
5/20/2007 - 5/26/2007
5/13/2007 - 5/19/2007
5/6/2007 - 5/12/2007
4/29/2007 - 5/5/2007
4/22/2007 - 4/28/2007
4/15/2007 - 4/21/2007
4/8/2007 - 4/14/2007
4/1/2007 - 4/7/2007
3/25/2007 - 3/31/2007
3/18/2007 - 3/24/2007
3/11/2007 - 3/17/2007
3/4/2007 - 3/10/2007
2/25/2007 - 3/3/2007
2/18/2007 - 2/24/2007
2/11/2007 - 2/17/2007
2/4/2007 - 2/10/2007
1/28/2007 - 2/3/2007
1/21/2007 - 1/27/2007
1/14/2007 - 1/20/2007
1/7/2007 - 1/13/2007
12/31/2006 - 1/6/2007
12/24/2006 - 12/30/2006
12/17/2006 - 12/23/2006
12/10/2006 - 12/16/2006
12/3/2006 - 12/9/2006
11/26/2006 - 12/2/2006
11/19/2006 - 11/25/2006
11/12/2006 - 11/18/2006
11/5/2006 - 11/11/2006
10/29/2006 - 11/4/2006
10/22/2006 - 10/28/2006
10/15/2006 - 10/21/2006
10/8/2006 - 10/14/2006
10/1/2006 - 10/7/2006
9/24/2006 - 9/30/2006
9/17/2006 - 9/23/2006
9/10/2006 - 9/16/2006
9/3/2006 - 9/9/2006
8/27/2006 - 9/2/2006
8/20/2006 - 8/26/2006
8/13/2006 - 8/19/2006
8/6/2006 - 8/12/2006
7/30/2006 - 8/5/2006
7/23/2006 - 7/29/2006
7/16/2006 - 7/22/2006
7/9/2006 - 7/15/2006
7/2/2006 - 7/8/2006
6/25/2006 - 7/1/2006
6/18/2006 - 6/24/2006
6/11/2006 - 6/17/2006
6/4/2006 - 6/10/2006
5/28/2006 - 6/3/2006
5/21/2006 - 5/27/2006
5/14/2006 - 5/20/2006
5/7/2006 - 5/13/2006
4/30/2006 - 5/6/2006
4/23/2006 - 4/29/2006
4/16/2006 - 4/22/2006
4/9/2006 - 4/15/2006
4/2/2006 - 4/8/2006
3/26/2006 - 4/1/2006
3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006