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RotoWire Podcasts
Just an FYI, we're going to have several weekly podcasts that are worth checking out. I put some up on the site today (some of which were older files), but it's going to be a regular thing going forward. We'll be picking the games against the spread, highlighting players to pick up or start, - all the basics.

Feel free to chime in with feedback as well.

Posted by Chris Liss at 8/30/2007 8:18:00 PM

Comments (5)

Some Negative Surprises for 2007
  • The Ravens win eight games and miss the playoffs.

    The defense is still good, but with Adelius Thomas gone, an aging Ray Lewis and Chris McAlister, and an over-the-hill quarterback, Baltimore finishes third in the division behind Pittsburgh and Cincinnati.

  • At least four of the top-10 running backs are major busts

    Our top-10 are LT, Steven Jackson, Frank Gore, Larry Johnson, Joseph Addai, Willie Parker, Rudi Johnson, Laurence Maroney, Shaun Alexander and Maurice Jones-Drew. No one knows which ones will get hurt or find their opportunities limited by their teams (other than LT), but every year, many of the top-10 picks are busts. Last year, Cadillac Williams, LaMont Jordan, Shaun Alexander, Ronnie Brown were all big disappointments, and 2007 isn't likely to be any different.

  • Hines Ward and Donald Driver fall out of next season's top-30 receivers

    Both are getting older, have dealt with various injuries and are being pushed by younger, more explosive options on their own teams.

  • Brandon Jacobs winds up with less than 200 carries and 850 yards.

    At 265-pounds, much of it above his waist, Jacobs' legs will wear down over the course of the season, and he eventually splits carries with Reuben Droughns. In the last eight games, Droughns outrushes Jacobs.

  • Ronnie Brown and Cedric Benson fail to live up to their early-round pedigrees

    Neither back has really seized his opportunities to date, and at this point in their careers, it's likely we would have seen more from them if either were destined for greatness. It wouldn't be a surprise if either or both got hurt - which is sometimes the easiest way out when you're under pressure to produce.

    Posted by Chris Liss at 8/30/2007 8:15:00 PM

  • Comments (12)

    Draft Day Tips
    In any fantasy draft, there are always two keys to success: Preparation and Strategy. In the rapidly expanding information age, even the least prepared of your counterparts is going to have a fairly decent cheat-sheet prepared. Long gone are the days when you might see someone choose an Eric Metcalf in the 1st round or a proverbial Jay Remiersma in the 2nd (some personal favorites from my home league). You know that guy in your league with the unquestionably-questionable judgment that you refer to simply as “The Chmura Factor?” Chances are that even he has learned his lesson and won’t be getting anywhere near Mike Vick this season. But worry not my friends, because while their blunders may not be as glaring, there are still many ways to capitalize on the mistakes of your adversaries. Sun-Tzu wisely heeds us to, “Know Thy Enemy,” which is as true in fantasy football, as in any walk of life. Let me explain…

    One thing that has happened as Fantasy Football becomes more mainstream each year, is that the sources of information have become centralized and fairly uniform. Chances are that your cheat-sheet – no matter how meticulously prepared – isn’t going to be vastly different from that of the annoyingly chatty secretary who thinks she knows football because she won an office pool last year by picking teams based on their uniform color. This is undoubtedly a frustrating prospect for those who pride themselves on being extremely prepared for the draft – which in the past was always the biggest key to victory. Fact is, it’s probably easier than ever to prepare for a draft, because the few credible sites that have risen to the top of this industry (cough: like Rotowire) have gotten the business of prognostication down to a near-science. Luckily, this year, I’m here to help you put Flo and the metaphorical girls in the secretary pool back in their place. Even better news is that instead of working harder, your key to success this year will be to work smarter. That means briefly putting aside the stats and prognosticating, and starting to think about draft day strategy. Here are just some of the strategies I plan to embrace this year in an effort to prepare smarter:

    Tip #1: USE PREDICTABILITY TO YOUR ADVANTAGE: Have you ever had the feeling for the first few rounds of the draft that everyone else is just going around in a circle reading off your own cheat-sheet? Instead of getting frustrated, use that as a key element of preparation. If you know your draft position already, you should be able to give yourself a pretty good idea of who your first 5 round picks are going to be. I like to prepare a separate ordered list of about 5-7 guys who I think will be available for each of my picks for the first 5 or 6 rounds. This way, there should be no surprises(other than the pleasant variety) when you’re building the core of your team. It also allows you to start thinking ahead to the next few(but very crucial) rounds, as things become less predictable and the less prepared owners start slipping up and making mistakes. If you know your enemy, you will know yourself, and your picks will come easily by the time you’re on the clock. I also like this because by picking quickly, one puts all kinds of pressure on the guy choosing behind you, which is both amusing and rewarding.

    TIP#2 MAKE YOUR MONEY IN THE MARGINS: I’ve typically been in the camp that finds Tight Ends, Kickers, & Defenses about as fascinating as preseason football and Paris Hilton’s opinions on anything. Completely unnecessary, and certainly nothing to get yourself worked up over. Traditionally it’s very difficult to say who the top kicker or defense will be, but I’m not sure that’s still the case anymore. If you look at both kickers and defenses this season, there is a pretty clear cut top tier of each, and then a very likely cut-off point where you can predict a drop-off in production. It may not be sexy, but you need to remember that these are parts of your team that are going to be starting every single week. If you can give yourself an obvious advantage every single week in the categories that others tend to overlook, that’s where you’re going to find the best value for your draft dollar.

    TIP#3 START A RUN: This relates hand-in-hand with the previous tip. If you see a pocket of opportunity on your own draft board, one where you have a group of RB’s and WR’s all bunched together, that’s when you have to pounce! Your personal goal should be to try to start a run on Kickers, Defenses, Tight Ends or any combination of the three during your draft. This also works beautifully with QBs. Sometimes timing a round means the difference between starting Marc Bulger and Jake Delhomme. I like to let someone else blow a pick a round or two early on those of those positions, and then send everyone scrambling 15 minutes later by snatching up one of the few remaining elite Kickers or Defenses. Usually it’s tough to predict who will be the top guy at those spots, but you know that if you get one of the top 5, you’re going to be in real good shape. That way, you get the best value at those positions, and that WR(or some close variation of him) will probably still be there when your pick swings back to you.

    TIP#4 DOMINATE THE LATE ROUNDS: Anybody can go to a store, pick up a $7 magazine, and basically nail the first 6 rounds of a draft. Fantasy has become so mainstream, and the internet so integral to preparation, that even the weakest drafters in your league will have a decent enough team through the first 6 rounds. Now I know you fanny-pack wearing tech-experts are saying to yourself, “Hey didn’t Al Gore invent the internet like a decade ago, why is it such a big deal now?” Well, you know how Bobby Bowden just learned about the EBay and your creepy 47 year-old cousin just got his own MySpace page? I think of the lowest tier of owners in my league much the same way. They’re just sort of figuring this stuff out, which means that you need to evolve your own preparation so you can stay two steps ahead of them, and in that elite group of 3 or 4 owners that always seems to finish near the top of your league. For me, the 2nd half of the draft is where you can separate from the pack. Study those #4 RB’s and #5 WR’s like you’re the Indianapolis Colts trying to decide between Peyton Manning and Ryan Leaf. At the end of the season, it might just be the decision between Vernand Morency and Brandon Jackson that makes all the difference.

    TIP#5 READ BETWEEN THE LINES: Shameless plug alert: This is where your Rotowire subscription pays for itself, so be sure to take full advantage of it. Lost in the crack between the clichés and coach-speak littering the dog days of August, therein lie those golden nuggets of information that usually win leagues. You shouldn’t have been surprised by Marques Colston last year, unless you weren’t paying attention at this time last year. Make sure that you pay attention to the analysis, which breaks down what coaches say and tells you what they actually mean. Start getting into the habit of analyzing those sound-bytes, and trying to draw your own conclusions. The ability to separate the clichés from the key info will fill your trophy case come January. You’ll be shocked at how quickly and effectively you’re able to dissect coach-speak, once you get yourself into the habit of doing so.

    Tip #6 GIVE YOUR KICKER AN INTIMIDATING NICKNAME: This may not win you any games, but I can attest to this from personal experience that Rob “The Matador” Gould, was like cinnamon last year, he just made everything better. Even more effective, come up with a derogatory nickname for the kicker of your arch-rival. I cannot begin to tell you the (unfit for print) type of fun we had at the expense of Shayne Graham and a certain Kansas City Sports Producer in my league last season. Kickers make a great target for your mockery, seeing as they’re generally far wimpier and foreign than your average ballplayer. Remember, at the end of the day, fantasy football is just as much about scoring TD’s, as it is about alienating friends and offending co-workers. Or so I’ve been told.

    Posted by Josh White at 8/30/2007 7:52:00 PM

    Comments (0)

    My NFL Guys This Season
    I just finished the last of my five NFL drafts this season and figured I'd share my analysis of trends I've seen as well as the players I had pegged as targets to take.

    A few trends:

    -While last season was the year of the NFL rookie running back (Jones-Drew, Addai, Maroney) this season may be the year of the geezer running back. Consider these backfields where carries are being shared. The guy with the starting job is going lower in drafts than the hot younger player (overall average draft position via MockDraftCentral.com):

    • ATL: Norwood (61.19) vs. Dunn (103.54)
    • MIN: A. Peterson (49.42) vs. C. Taylor (56.83)
    • CAR: D. Williams (59.53) vs. Foster (92.20)

    I'm not saying Dunn, Taylor or Foster have a large upside, but they're going to get significant carries early on and have value. Grabbing one of these as your second or third running back in the seventh round or lower will pay dividends. You'll be the first owner getting trade offers when a team's starting running back inevitably gets hurt.

    -Quarterback and tight end are deep. There are plenty of QB options I like late (I'll break those down below). What's the difference between Chris Cooley and Alge Crumpler? Not a lot in my book, so there's not a huge drop off if you miss out on the top few guys.

    Beyond those general observations, here are the guys I keyed on in my drafts. I wouldn't necessarily call them sleepers, because it all depends on where you get them. I've taken Marshawn Lynch as high as the second round. But I'd hardly call him a sleeper at that spot. Here are just a list of guys I rank a little higher than were they are going in drafts or compared to most expert rankings:

    QB

    • Ben Roethlisberger - Finally healthy. Moving to a passing offense. Should improve in just his fourth year. And he's going 15th overall at QB in most leagues. You can wait forever for a QB and get him as a starter.
    • Matt Leinart - I'm a believer. He was a stud in college. Excelled in his rookie season. Has great receiving corps. He's going to be a star and you can snag him late (going 12th QB in most leagues).
    • J.P Lohsman - Snag him late as a backup. He had 12 TD passes with about a 90 QB rating in the second half last season. And the Bills will be throwing when behind in games a lot.

    RB

    • Marshawn Lynch (BUF) - I'm not afraid to take talented rookie running backs who have a clear hold on the starting job and will get touches.
    • DeAngelo Williams (CAR) - Of the backups going higher than starters, he's the one I like. He's going later in drafts than Adrian Peterson (the MIN version) and has a more brittle starter ahead of him. He was a stud in college and looked strong last season when he got the starting nod. I want to be there when he finally gets the playing time.
    • Brandon Jackson (GB) - Another rookie with a starting job. His concussion and spotty preseason may turn many off. Don't go too crazy, but he'll get carries and that's a rare commodity.
    • Chris Henry (TEN) - He's probably third in the RB situation in Tennessee, but behind two guys (Chris Brown and LenDale White) who can't stay healty. Good late lottery pick.
    • Cecil Sapp (DEN) - Get your ticket into the Mike Shanahan running back lottery. Mike Bell, Mike Anderson, Reuben Droughns all had value as this type of pick. And if it doesn't pan out, it won't cost you much as he's going in the 14th to 16th rounds in most drafts.
    • Garrett Wolfe (CHI) - I think I'm the only one on the Wolfe bandwagon. He's going undrafted in many expert leagues. Bears fans laugh when I bring his name up. Sure he's undersized and will only be used on special teams initially. But let me ask you this, what's the difference between Wolfe and Maurice Jones-Drew at this point last year? I took Jones-Drew late in almost all my drafts and won several leagues as a result. Jones-Drew was in a similar position. He was only a special teamer, an undersized back who didn't get attention for his production in college. And he was behind an unstable backfield. Fred Taylor, Greg Jones and LaBrandon Toefield were all injury risks or unproven. For the Bears, perhaps the backs ahead of him don't have the same injury risk, but Cedric Benson hasn't always been a hit when he's received playing time. If he gets hurt or underperforms, Adrian Peterson isn't really viewed as an every-down back. Wolfe could get a shot. I'm not saying it's going to happen, only that as the last pick in your draft this is the kind of lottery ticket you want.
    • Jesse Chatman (MIA) and Anthony Thomas (BUF) - I'm not believing the coach speak from either team that they'll get carries and maybe even a starting job. But you can get them in the 13th round or later, so why not take a chance one of the coaches is telling the truth.

    WR

    • Braylon Edwards - It's his third year. He was a stud in college. His rookie year would have been great other than a knee injury. He's got an improving situation at quarterback and offensive line. If it's later than the sixth round as a second or third receiver, I'm buying.
    • Devery Henderson - He averaged 13.8 yards per target. He's in a high-scoring offense and should see a raised profile.
    • Santonio Holmes - Pittsburgh is going to pass more. Good breakout candidate after a solid rookie year.
    • Jacoby Jones (HOU) & James Jones (GB ) - Two receivers who have shined this preseason and you can snag with your last few picks.

    Good luck if you've got a draft this week? Hopefully this helps and take some of those flyers in your last few rounds rather than using the impulse to take a top kicker when you can't think of a pick.

    Posted by Peter Schoenke at 8/30/2007 1:51:00 PM

    Comments (0)

    The Schaub
    The Texans have scored 61 points in the last two weeks and Matt Schaub is looking like he'll do more than hand off to Ahman Green and Ron Dayne. Schaub is 24-for-33, hasn't turned the ball over, and is making quick decisions. He isn't throwing deep a lot, but is very accurate in the short game. And he's been using the tight end a lot. Twelve of his 31 attempts this preseason have targeted the position with Owen Daniels having 10 of them. Daniels and Jeb Putzier have eight catches apiece, so the tight end looks like it will be a big part of the passing game. The no-name wideouts are playing better than their resumé's projected, so defenses may have to account for more than just Andre Johnson. You can't make him a No. 1 quarterback yet, but Schaub will be a nice surprise for some fantasy teams.

    Posted by john clemeno at 8/28/2007 9:42:00 PM
    Comments (5)

    Vikings ... 3-13 ?
    While many analysts think the Vikings had a strong 2007 draft, the overall offseason still leaves too many holes to overcome a losing record. And if the Vikings take a hit in key spots on defense, it's not hard to see them finishing as poorly as 3-13.

    While I love the pick of Adrian Peterson with the seventh overall pick, it doesn't address any of Minnesota's major needs. The Vikings had two main problems in the 2006 season: turning the ball over on offense and an inability to rush the passer on defense.

    The Vikings were 20th in the league with 25 total turnovers, including six returned for touchdowns. Turnovers could be an issue again with the Vikings entering 2007 with a first-year starter at quarterback in Tarvaris Jackson, who threw four interceptions against two touchdowns in two starts last season. That problem may be compounded by a receiving corps that had a combined total of just 191 career receptions before the signing of Robert Ferguson. While Ferguson raises that total, he's hardly an impact player. The Vikings will have a strong running game, but defenses will force them to throw the ball and the results may not be any better than last season.

    Despite ranking eighth in yards allowed, the Vikings were dead last in the NFL in passing yards allowed per game. Their run defense at 61.6 yards per game nearly broke records. Some of that was due to a strong defensive line anchored by Kevin Williams and Pat Williams. But some was also due to a lack of pass rush. The Vikings ranked 26th in the NFL with 30 sacks.

    Despite these two major problems, the Vikings didn't make a major move to address either in the draft or in free agency. Instead the Vikings' brain trust of head coach Brad Childress, President Rob Brzezinski and new GM Rick Speilman seem to want to prove that they could outsmart the competition by turning their pet projects (Jackson chief among them) into stars rather than having an overall game plan. The Vikings have a defense strong enough to be competitive in a weak division with even a passable offense. The better route to go would have been to bring in a few veterans to stabilize the problem areas.

    And the Vikings had the money to go that route, as the Vikings were $20.076 million under the salary cap (3rd higest in the league) earlier this summer, according to ESPN. Maybe this was a bad year of free agency, but they could have acquired players in trades to shore up problem areas. (How about a few low-level draft picks for Randy Moss and Trent Green?)

    And taking Peterson with the seventh pick didn't help the team's overall problems because running back was the team's one area of depth (Mewelde Moore could get significant carries on many teams). And there was no effort to trade that surplus for help elsewhere after the pick or ahead of it knowing they may have taken him.

    The coaching staff doesn't give much confidence as head coach Brad Childress lived up to his critics and was too conservative on offense and didn't make good adjustments in the second half when the offense floundered. I think it was a bad omen that Childress had listed as his No. 1 priority for the season to limit turnovers on offense and failed miserably. That was the exact same No. 1 priority Mike Tice preached when he took over as head coach in 2001, and he also missed that objective by a wide margin.

    As a long time Vikings fan, I have less optimism about this season than I can remember since perhaps the first year of Denny Green's tenure (which turned out well) or the year after the fiasco that was Les Steckel. There seems to be no game plan, a head coach who seems too arrogant to succeed and a roster that has serious questions that were not adequately addressed. In the Mike Tice era at least there were Moss and Culpepper and maybe the defense would get lucky.

    Last year's defense was dominant against the run and survived against the pass. An injury to either Kevin Williams or Pat Williams (both players are large men with a history of knee problems), would hurt the pass rush and take the defense from a top-10 unit to mediocrity. That may be enough for a disaster of a season given that the offense could be the worst unit in the league.

    While that's the worst-case scenario, it's one that I think is far more likely than contending for the playoffs.

    Posted by Peter Schoenke at 8/27/2007 11:36:00 PM
    Comments (4)

    Notes from the Professor
    Pittsburgh native John Clayton spoke at a fantasy football convention on Sunday; here are some of his thoughts. Randy Moss – Moss takes 15 yards to get up to 4.4 speed, making it easier to defend against him. He'll score 10 touchdowns but won’t have a Minnesota-like season. Kellen Winslow – he’s 70 percent of what he was and he may have an unknown discipline problem because he didn’t play till the second quarter on Saturday. Clinton Portis – he’s an old 25. Clayton doesn’t understand why Chad Johnson doesn’t take care of his body better -- always throwing up on the sidelines. Either LT/Steven Jackson could surpass 2500 combined yards and shatter records, LT will score more touchdowns. Larry Fitzgerald has seen Anquan Boldin’s approach to fitness, ethic & attitude and stepped up his own workouts. Clayton sees big things for Frank Gore and all of the NFC West runners (Gore, Jackson, Shaun Alexander & Edgerrin James) saying that all of those teams have bad rush defenses. He also likes receivers Roy Williams, who he looks for him to continue raising his game, Lee Evans and Bernard Berrian. He expects Tampa Bay, Arizona and Miami to post better records because of their schedules and thinks that Cleveland, Buffalo and Detroit have the worst defenses in the league. He also said that LaMont Jordan looks like Art Shell conditioning-wise and is “a scary, scary back” -- not in a good way. Finally, he sees the Atlanta rushing offense falling off from the top of the league to somewhere in the 20s without Michael Vick keeping defenses honest – with Warrick Dunn being done.

    Posted by Topper at 8/27/2007 7:55:00 PM
    Comments (0)

    Surprises That Could Happen in 2007
  • The Chargers go 16-0.

    The team was 14-2 last year, and now they have Shawne Merriman for 16 games, an upgraded WR core with Vincent Jackson (hardly used early on last year) and Craig Davis, a quarterback with another year of experience and a healthier defense.

    Of course, they'd have to win at New England in Week 2 and home against Indy in Week 9.

  • Daunte Culpepper is a top-10 fantasy QB, and the Raiders make the playoffs

    If Culpepper's completely healthy, the team suddenly has an experienced quarterback who has played at a consistently high level in the past. Culpepper's only 30, and before his knee injury, threw 64 TD against just 22 picks from '03-'04. Moreover, the Raiders defense is a nasty, blitzing bunch under defensive coordinator Rob Ryan, son of Buddy Ryan and former assistant to Bill Belichick. If the offense can stay on the field longer, that defense will be even tougher to deal with this season.

  • Matt Schaub is a top-10 fantasy QB

    The Texans defense doesn't project to be very good, so Schaub will presumably be playing from behind often. Ahman Green will get receiving yards out of the backfield, and Owen Daniels is a decent pass-catching TE. Andre Johnson could be an elite No. 1 wideout with better QB play, and Kevin Walter and Jacoby Jones could each get 500-600 yards.

  • Kellen Winslow surpasses Antonio Gates as the league's top pass-catching tight end

    The combination of size, speed, playmaking ability, confidence and young quarterbacks who need a security blanket could put Winslow over the top now that he's another year removed from his knee surgeries.

  • The Giants defense leads the NFL in sacks and is a top-3 fantasy defense

    With Michael Strahan on his way back, Osi Umenyiora healthy, Justin Tuck healthy and having a great camp and Mathias Kiwanuka on the field at outside linebacker, the Giants have a lot of pass rushers to go along with run-stopping Antonio Pierce, Fred Robbins and Kawika Mitchell.

  • The Steelers are a finesse team; Roethlisberger is a top-5 fantasy QB

    With fast Willie Parker, speedy Santonio Holmes, a more wide open offense under Bruce Arians and a declining defense, the Steelers are more likely to be in shootouts than defensive struggles. One of the Cin-Pitt games goes over 70.

  • The Vikings are the NFC version of the Jaguars (with David Garrard)

    Chester Taylor and Adrian Peterson, a good offensive line, good run defense, no passing game to speak of, the Vikings ugly up games and keep it close against good and bad teams alike. Taylor gets 800 yards rushing, Peterson gets 1200, Tarvaris Jackson gets 450.

  • J.T. O'Sullivan is a top-10 QB: Jon Kitna gets hurt or benched early on, and Mike Martz gets the former NFL Europe MVP to become a poor man's Kurt Warner this year.

  • Eric Johnson is a top-five fantasy tight end

    With Devery Henderson nursing a hamstring strain, Robert Meachem not panning out and Terrence Copper having a minor role, Johnson steps up as the team's consistent No. 2 target behind Marques Colston.

  • Vince Young is a consensus top-3 overall pick for 2008

    No one disputes that Young could get 700-800 yards rushing and 6-8 TDs on the ground, but no one seems to think he could throw for 3400 yards and 21 TDs. But in his second year with Norm Chow and more experience under his belt, there's no reason why those pedestrian passing numbers couldn't be reachable if Young shows improvement as a passer. If that happens, his numbers would be off the charts.

  • Calvin Johnson scores 15 touchdowns

    He's Terrell Owens with more speed and height, Randy Moss with more muscle and weight. He's on a team with a terrible defense, and he's got an offensive coordinator who will throw downfield all the time.

  • Tom Brady throws for 35 touchdowns

    He's averaged 26 TDs per year over the last four, and that was with below average receivers - and we don't just mean last year. David Givens and Deion Branch were nothing special, either, and Brady still put up two 28-TD season with them. The Pats like to throw in the red-zone, and that tendency might even be more pronounced with Corey Dillon gone and Randy Moss and Donte' Stallworth on the team.

    Posted by Chris Liss at 8/27/2007 6:34:00 PM

  • Comments (10)

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    6/10/2012 - 6/16/2012
    6/3/2012 - 6/9/2012
    5/27/2012 - 6/2/2012
    5/20/2012 - 5/26/2012
    5/13/2012 - 5/19/2012
    5/6/2012 - 5/12/2012
    4/29/2012 - 5/5/2012
    4/22/2012 - 4/28/2012
    4/15/2012 - 4/21/2012
    4/8/2012 - 4/14/2012
    4/1/2012 - 4/7/2012
    3/25/2012 - 3/31/2012
    3/18/2012 - 3/24/2012
    3/11/2012 - 3/17/2012
    3/4/2012 - 3/10/2012
    2/26/2012 - 3/3/2012
    2/19/2012 - 2/25/2012
    2/12/2012 - 2/18/2012
    2/5/2012 - 2/11/2012
    1/29/2012 - 2/4/2012
    1/22/2012 - 1/28/2012
    1/15/2012 - 1/21/2012
    1/8/2012 - 1/14/2012
    1/1/2012 - 1/7/2012
    12/25/2011 - 12/31/2011
    12/18/2011 - 12/24/2011
    12/11/2011 - 12/17/2011
    12/4/2011 - 12/10/2011
    11/27/2011 - 12/3/2011
    11/20/2011 - 11/26/2011
    11/13/2011 - 11/19/2011
    11/6/2011 - 11/12/2011
    10/30/2011 - 11/5/2011
    10/23/2011 - 10/29/2011
    10/16/2011 - 10/22/2011
    10/9/2011 - 10/15/2011
    10/2/2011 - 10/8/2011
    9/25/2011 - 10/1/2011
    9/18/2011 - 9/24/2011
    9/11/2011 - 9/17/2011
    9/4/2011 - 9/10/2011
    8/28/2011 - 9/3/2011
    8/21/2011 - 8/27/2011
    8/14/2011 - 8/20/2011
    8/7/2011 - 8/13/2011
    7/31/2011 - 8/6/2011
    7/24/2011 - 7/30/2011
    7/17/2011 - 7/23/2011
    7/10/2011 - 7/16/2011
    7/3/2011 - 7/9/2011
    6/26/2011 - 7/2/2011
    6/19/2011 - 6/25/2011
    6/12/2011 - 6/18/2011
    6/5/2011 - 6/11/2011
    5/29/2011 - 6/4/2011
    5/22/2011 - 5/28/2011
    5/15/2011 - 5/21/2011
    5/8/2011 - 5/14/2011
    5/1/2011 - 5/7/2011
    4/24/2011 - 4/30/2011
    4/17/2011 - 4/23/2011
    4/10/2011 - 4/16/2011
    4/3/2011 - 4/9/2011
    3/27/2011 - 4/2/2011
    3/20/2011 - 3/26/2011
    3/13/2011 - 3/19/2011
    3/6/2011 - 3/12/2011
    2/27/2011 - 3/5/2011
    2/20/2011 - 2/26/2011
    2/13/2011 - 2/19/2011
    2/6/2011 - 2/12/2011
    1/30/2011 - 2/5/2011
    1/23/2011 - 1/29/2011
    1/16/2011 - 1/22/2011
    1/9/2011 - 1/15/2011
    1/2/2011 - 1/8/2011
    12/26/2010 - 1/1/2011
    12/19/2010 - 12/25/2010
    12/12/2010 - 12/18/2010
    12/5/2010 - 12/11/2010
    11/28/2010 - 12/4/2010
    11/21/2010 - 11/27/2010
    11/14/2010 - 11/20/2010
    11/7/2010 - 11/13/2010
    10/31/2010 - 11/6/2010
    10/24/2010 - 10/30/2010
    10/17/2010 - 10/23/2010
    10/10/2010 - 10/16/2010
    10/3/2010 - 10/9/2010
    9/26/2010 - 10/2/2010
    9/19/2010 - 9/25/2010
    9/12/2010 - 9/18/2010
    9/5/2010 - 9/11/2010
    8/29/2010 - 9/4/2010
    8/22/2010 - 8/28/2010
    8/15/2010 - 8/21/2010
    8/8/2010 - 8/14/2010
    8/1/2010 - 8/7/2010
    7/25/2010 - 7/31/2010
    7/18/2010 - 7/24/2010
    7/11/2010 - 7/17/2010
    7/4/2010 - 7/10/2010
    6/27/2010 - 7/3/2010
    6/20/2010 - 6/26/2010
    6/13/2010 - 6/19/2010
    6/6/2010 - 6/12/2010
    5/30/2010 - 6/5/2010
    5/23/2010 - 5/29/2010
    5/16/2010 - 5/22/2010
    5/9/2010 - 5/15/2010
    5/2/2010 - 5/8/2010
    4/25/2010 - 5/1/2010
    4/18/2010 - 4/24/2010
    4/11/2010 - 4/17/2010
    4/4/2010 - 4/10/2010
    3/28/2010 - 4/3/2010
    3/21/2010 - 3/27/2010
    3/14/2010 - 3/20/2010
    3/7/2010 - 3/13/2010
    2/28/2010 - 3/6/2010
    2/21/2010 - 2/27/2010
    2/14/2010 - 2/20/2010
    2/7/2010 - 2/13/2010
    1/31/2010 - 2/6/2010
    1/24/2010 - 1/30/2010
    1/17/2010 - 1/23/2010
    1/10/2010 - 1/16/2010
    1/3/2010 - 1/9/2010
    12/27/2009 - 1/2/2010
    12/20/2009 - 12/26/2009
    12/13/2009 - 12/19/2009
    12/6/2009 - 12/12/2009
    11/29/2009 - 12/5/2009
    11/22/2009 - 11/28/2009
    11/15/2009 - 11/21/2009
    11/8/2009 - 11/14/2009
    11/1/2009 - 11/7/2009
    10/25/2009 - 10/31/2009
    10/18/2009 - 10/24/2009
    10/11/2009 - 10/17/2009
    10/4/2009 - 10/10/2009
    9/27/2009 - 10/3/2009
    9/20/2009 - 9/26/2009
    9/13/2009 - 9/19/2009
    9/6/2009 - 9/12/2009
    8/30/2009 - 9/5/2009
    8/23/2009 - 8/29/2009
    8/16/2009 - 8/22/2009
    8/9/2009 - 8/15/2009
    8/2/2009 - 8/8/2009
    7/26/2009 - 8/1/2009
    7/19/2009 - 7/25/2009
    7/12/2009 - 7/18/2009
    7/5/2009 - 7/11/2009
    6/28/2009 - 7/4/2009
    6/21/2009 - 6/27/2009
    6/14/2009 - 6/20/2009
    6/7/2009 - 6/13/2009
    5/31/2009 - 6/6/2009
    5/24/2009 - 5/30/2009
    5/17/2009 - 5/23/2009
    5/10/2009 - 5/16/2009
    5/3/2009 - 5/9/2009
    4/26/2009 - 5/2/2009
    4/19/2009 - 4/25/2009
    4/12/2009 - 4/18/2009
    4/5/2009 - 4/11/2009
    3/29/2009 - 4/4/2009
    3/22/2009 - 3/28/2009
    3/15/2009 - 3/21/2009
    3/8/2009 - 3/14/2009
    3/1/2009 - 3/7/2009
    2/22/2009 - 2/28/2009
    2/15/2009 - 2/21/2009
    2/8/2009 - 2/14/2009
    2/1/2009 - 2/7/2009
    1/25/2009 - 1/31/2009
    1/18/2009 - 1/24/2009
    1/11/2009 - 1/17/2009
    1/4/2009 - 1/10/2009
    12/28/2008 - 1/3/2009
    12/21/2008 - 12/27/2008
    12/14/2008 - 12/20/2008
    12/7/2008 - 12/13/2008
    11/30/2008 - 12/6/2008
    11/23/2008 - 11/29/2008
    11/16/2008 - 11/22/2008
    11/9/2008 - 11/15/2008
    11/2/2008 - 11/8/2008
    10/26/2008 - 11/1/2008
    10/19/2008 - 10/25/2008
    10/12/2008 - 10/18/2008
    10/5/2008 - 10/11/2008
    9/28/2008 - 10/4/2008
    9/21/2008 - 9/27/2008
    9/14/2008 - 9/20/2008
    9/7/2008 - 9/13/2008
    8/31/2008 - 9/6/2008
    8/24/2008 - 8/30/2008
    8/17/2008 - 8/23/2008
    8/10/2008 - 8/16/2008
    8/3/2008 - 8/9/2008
    7/27/2008 - 8/2/2008
    7/20/2008 - 7/26/2008
    7/13/2008 - 7/19/2008
    7/6/2008 - 7/12/2008
    6/29/2008 - 7/5/2008
    6/22/2008 - 6/28/2008
    6/15/2008 - 6/21/2008
    6/8/2008 - 6/14/2008
    6/1/2008 - 6/7/2008
    5/25/2008 - 5/31/2008
    5/18/2008 - 5/24/2008
    5/11/2008 - 5/17/2008
    5/4/2008 - 5/10/2008
    4/27/2008 - 5/3/2008
    4/20/2008 - 4/26/2008
    4/13/2008 - 4/19/2008
    4/6/2008 - 4/12/2008
    3/30/2008 - 4/5/2008
    3/23/2008 - 3/29/2008
    3/16/2008 - 3/22/2008
    3/9/2008 - 3/15/2008
    3/2/2008 - 3/8/2008
    2/24/2008 - 3/1/2008
    2/17/2008 - 2/23/2008
    2/10/2008 - 2/16/2008
    2/3/2008 - 2/9/2008
    1/27/2008 - 2/2/2008
    1/20/2008 - 1/26/2008
    1/13/2008 - 1/19/2008
    1/6/2008 - 1/12/2008
    12/30/2007 - 1/5/2008
    12/23/2007 - 12/29/2007
    12/16/2007 - 12/22/2007
    12/9/2007 - 12/15/2007
    12/2/2007 - 12/8/2007
    11/25/2007 - 12/1/2007
    11/18/2007 - 11/24/2007
    11/11/2007 - 11/17/2007
    11/4/2007 - 11/10/2007
    10/28/2007 - 11/3/2007
    10/21/2007 - 10/27/2007
    10/14/2007 - 10/20/2007
    10/7/2007 - 10/13/2007
    9/30/2007 - 10/6/2007
    9/23/2007 - 9/29/2007
    9/16/2007 - 9/22/2007
    9/9/2007 - 9/15/2007
    9/2/2007 - 9/8/2007
    8/26/2007 - 9/1/2007
    8/19/2007 - 8/25/2007
    8/12/2007 - 8/18/2007
    8/5/2007 - 8/11/2007
    7/29/2007 - 8/4/2007
    7/22/2007 - 7/28/2007
    7/15/2007 - 7/21/2007
    7/8/2007 - 7/14/2007
    7/1/2007 - 7/7/2007
    6/24/2007 - 6/30/2007
    6/17/2007 - 6/23/2007
    6/10/2007 - 6/16/2007
    6/3/2007 - 6/9/2007
    5/27/2007 - 6/2/2007
    5/20/2007 - 5/26/2007
    5/13/2007 - 5/19/2007
    5/6/2007 - 5/12/2007
    4/29/2007 - 5/5/2007
    4/22/2007 - 4/28/2007
    4/15/2007 - 4/21/2007
    4/8/2007 - 4/14/2007
    4/1/2007 - 4/7/2007
    3/25/2007 - 3/31/2007
    3/18/2007 - 3/24/2007
    3/11/2007 - 3/17/2007
    3/4/2007 - 3/10/2007
    2/25/2007 - 3/3/2007
    2/18/2007 - 2/24/2007
    2/11/2007 - 2/17/2007
    2/4/2007 - 2/10/2007
    1/28/2007 - 2/3/2007
    1/21/2007 - 1/27/2007
    1/14/2007 - 1/20/2007
    1/7/2007 - 1/13/2007
    12/31/2006 - 1/6/2007
    12/24/2006 - 12/30/2006
    12/17/2006 - 12/23/2006
    12/10/2006 - 12/16/2006
    12/3/2006 - 12/9/2006
    11/26/2006 - 12/2/2006
    11/19/2006 - 11/25/2006
    11/12/2006 - 11/18/2006
    11/5/2006 - 11/11/2006
    10/29/2006 - 11/4/2006
    10/22/2006 - 10/28/2006
    10/15/2006 - 10/21/2006
    10/8/2006 - 10/14/2006
    10/1/2006 - 10/7/2006
    9/24/2006 - 9/30/2006
    9/17/2006 - 9/23/2006
    9/10/2006 - 9/16/2006
    9/3/2006 - 9/9/2006
    8/27/2006 - 9/2/2006
    8/20/2006 - 8/26/2006
    8/13/2006 - 8/19/2006
    8/6/2006 - 8/12/2006
    7/30/2006 - 8/5/2006
    7/23/2006 - 7/29/2006
    7/16/2006 - 7/22/2006
    7/9/2006 - 7/15/2006
    7/2/2006 - 7/8/2006
    6/25/2006 - 7/1/2006
    6/18/2006 - 6/24/2006
    6/11/2006 - 6/17/2006
    6/4/2006 - 6/10/2006
    5/28/2006 - 6/3/2006
    5/21/2006 - 5/27/2006
    5/14/2006 - 5/20/2006
    5/7/2006 - 5/13/2006
    4/30/2006 - 5/6/2006
    4/23/2006 - 4/29/2006
    4/16/2006 - 4/22/2006
    4/9/2006 - 4/15/2006
    4/2/2006 - 4/8/2006
    3/26/2006 - 4/1/2006
    3/19/2006 - 3/25/2006
    3/12/2006 - 3/18/2006
    3/5/2006 - 3/11/2006
    2/26/2006 - 3/4/2006
    2/19/2006 - 2/25/2006
    2/12/2006 - 2/18/2006
    2/5/2006 - 2/11/2006
    1/29/2006 - 2/4/2006
    1/22/2006 - 1/28/2006
    1/15/2006 - 1/21/2006
    1/8/2006 - 1/14/2006
    1/1/2006 - 1/7/2006