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Golf Draft Kit: 2014-15 Rankings & Profiles

Greg Vara

Vara is the lead golf writer at RotoWire. He was named the 2013 FSWA Golf Writer of the Year. In addition to producing the weekly preview and the bulk of the draft kit content, Vara participates in Yahoo!'s "Experts Picks" where he routinely dominates. He also picks college football games against the spread in his "College Capper" article.

Here are our 2014-15 fantasy golf rankings. Golfers are listed by 2014-15 projected earnings. This list includes:

Top 125 on PGA Tour Money List (M = made money list only)
Top 125 on FedEx Cup Points List (P = made points list only)
PGA Tour Card Winners from Web.com Tour (W)
Notable Exempt Players not in Top 125, i.e. Tiger Woods (N)
Rookies (R)
International Players (I)


RANKGOLFER 2014-15
PROJECTED EARNINGS
2014-15 SEASON OUTLOOK
1 Rory McIlroy $8,000,000What a year for McIlroy. After years of peaks and valleys, McIlroy put it all together during the second-half of the 2014 season and he's now unquestionably the top-player in the world. The problem here, as is usually the case for anyone ranked number-one on the money list, is that his price is just too much to tackle in the salary cap league. In any other format he's the top-pick, no questions asked. He's the only player that you can pencil at least one major in for the 2015 season.
2 Rickie Fowler $6,000,000Fowler finally lived-up to his potential in 2014 -- kind of. No, he wasn't able to rack up multiple wins or break through for his first major win, but he was able to compete during the majors. In fact, his results at the 2014 majors were unmatched as he finished in the top-5 at all four majors. Would a more seasoned-played have found a win among those four top-5s? Possibly, but the important thing is he was a factor against the best fields in the world. Fowler's ceiling is among the best in golf and if he can find just one more win in 2015, his earnings number could be through the roof. He's likely a first-round pick in draft leagues as well.
3 Jordan Spieth $6,000,000What sophomore jinx? Spieth had no problems backing-up his outstanding rookie season last year, but he did slow towards the end of his second season. With that said, he was still one of the top players during the 2014 season and the future looks even brighter for Spieth this year. Spieth has the talent to top the money list this season, but he'll have to maintain a high-level of play throughout the season in 2015, something he was unable to do last year. With another year of experience under his belt, Spieth should reach career highs in earnings and wins in 2015. He's a solid salary cap option this year and should go in the first round in draft leagues.
4 Billy Horschel $5,500,000What a finish to the 2014 season for Horschel. Like Henrik Stenson the year prior, Horschel rode a hot-streak all the way to the finish and a $10 million bonus. The good news for salary cap players is that the $10 million bonus does not count towards his official money for the season, so his number is actually reasonable. Yes, it's on the high-side for a player of Horschel's caliber, but if he builds off his playoff win, he could improve upon that number in 2015. As such, he's not a bad salary cap pick for 2015, but there's certainly some risk involved. In draft leagues he should go early in the second-round.
5 Matt Kuchar $5,500,000Good old steady Matt Kuchar. He's one of the most reliable players on the PGA Tour, but for those that had Kuchar on their team last year, he was a bit of a disappointment. It's hard to label anyone who made nearly $5 million in earnings a disappointment, but Kuchar is a former money-list and Fed Ex Cup champion, so the bar is set pretty high. There's no reason to think he'll regress in 2015 and we know his ceiling is much higher than $5 million, so he's a viable option in salary cap leagues this year. He's also a first-rounder in draft leagues.
6 Adam Scott $5,500,000Is Scott destined to be that guy who's always projected to be one of the best two or three players in the world every year, but never quite able to get there? He's had his moments over the years, like 2013 when he captured his first major, but he was unable to build upon that win last season. The talent is there, the mental game appears to be there, yet there's just something missing. He's always a factor, just hanging around the lead, but too often in 2014 he failed to find that extra gear. It would be unwise to doubt Scott however, so he appears to be a solid salary cap pick this year. As for draft leagues, he's a first-rounder, even if he doesn't live all the way up to his potential.
7 Bubba Watson $5,250,000Watson started the 2014 season on fire and during his hot-streak, he managed to grab his second major title -- another green jacket. After his win at the Masters, it appeared that Watson was ready to take off and take his spot among the best players in the world. While he's undoubtedly one of the top-20 players in the world, he's yet to stake claim to top-10 status because he's still very inconsistent. The talent is there, but drive is still a question. As such, he's not a good salary cap option, but should go in the top-10 in draft leagues, but probably not second overall like his spot on the 2014 money list.
8 Sergio Garcia $5,250,000Garcia accomplished a lot in just 16 starts on the PGA Tour last season. Is he back to his old form though? Tough to tell, in some ways, he might be a better player now than he ever was and that's due in large part to his mental state. Garcia has never been a mental giant on the course, but he seemed to get over a hurdle last year and he just might finally get his first major soon. His price is still a bit too high to justify a salary cap pick however. In draft leagues he's probably a second-rounder, due mainly to his lack of events each year.
9 Jim Furyk $5,000,000It's amazing that a player can make nearly six million dollars in a season without the benefit of a win somewhere along the line. Furyk's winless drought continues to grow and it's to the point where now anytime he's in the lead come Sunday, it will be brought up. Will he ever win again on the PGA Tour? Chances are he'll stumble into one before too long, but for a guy who's struggling on Sunday, this is a pretty high price to pay. He's not worth the nearly $6 million you'd have to spend on him in a salary league, but he is still a first-round pick in draft leagues.
10 Jimmy Walker $5,000,000A tale of two seasons for Walker in 2014. Walker dominated the early part of the season, but didn't get a lot accomplished during the heart of the PGA Tour season. Walker doesn't appear to be a fluke, but he's also not a top-5 player in the world, which is what he appeared to be early last season. As such, his price is too high in salary cap leagues. As for draft leagues, he could be a first-rounder, but probably should go early in the second round.
11 Justin Rose $5,000,000Justin Rose and Adam Scott are essentially the same player. Both have all the talent in the world, both have one major to their credit, yet neither can seem to get over that final hurdle and make their way into the elite class. Rose has shown flashes over the years, but for some reason he's failed to reach the mountain top. As always though, he's a threat to get their, so his ceiling remains as high as just about anyone on the PGA Tour. With that said, he's a decent salary cap pick and could go as early as the first round in draft leagues.
12 Jason Day $5,000,0002014 was both a successful and disappointing year for Jason Day. His numbers were solid, he played well when healthy, but he left so much on the table. To his credit, what was left on the table wasn't entirely his fault. If not for a couple nagging injuries, Day would have surely found his way into the top-10 on the money list and perhaps stolen a major as well. The question now becomes, is Day the type of guy who'll battle injuries his entire career, or was this just one bad year? The ceiling is so high with Day that he's worth the risk in salary cap leagues and he could reasonably go in the first round in draft leagues as well.
13 Chris Kirk $4,250,000Without a doubt, the surprise of the 2014 season. Kirk found himself in rarified air entering the 2014 Fed Ex Cup Playoffs and he didn't crumble under the pressure, he actually held his own against the best players in the world. The question of course is, can he keep it going in 2015? Yes and no. Yes, he'll continue to play well next season, but no, he won't be able to keep up the pace he set in 2014. Kirk is not a good option in salary cap leagues, but it's the draft leagues where he's really hard to peg. He's not a first-rounder, but he should find his way into the second round. The brave will take him early, everyone else will wait until the end of the second round.
14 Webb Simpson $4,250,000Is there a better player on the PGA Tour that goes more unnoticed than Simpson? Year-in and year-out, the guy just produces, but without the benefit of a high-profile win, it's hard to pick him out of a crowd. It wasn't always this way, after all, he did win the U.S. Open a few years back and for a time, he was the center of attention, but since that win he's slipped into the background again, quietly gobbling-up fat paychecks. You can't go wrong with Simpson, he's extremely reliable and he's got a pretty-high upside as well. He's a solid salary cap selection and should go somewhere in round two of your draft.
15 Martin Kaymer $4,000,000Kaymer's first four months last season were a lot like his previous few years -- nothing special. What followed however was something special indeed. Kaymer won the PLAYERS Championship in early May, but he wasn't done. A month later he destroyed the field at the U.S. Open and claimed his second major. He didn't accomplish much outside those two events, but heck, winning the PLAYERS and the U.S. Open is an entire career for some players. The problem of course is that Kaymer cashed two humongous checks and he's unlikely to duplicate that effort this year. As such, he doesn't have much upside in a salary cap league. In draft leagues he should go somewhere in the second round.
16 Harris English $4,000,000English is certainly on the way up in his career, the question is, how high can he go? He started fast on the PGA Tour three years ago when he topped the $1 million mark in his first season. He followed that up with a very nice sophomore campaign where he earned over $2 million. He couldn't quite crack the $3 million mark in his third season, but he came close. We know he's good, but can he keep up this trend? Maybe the better question is, is there any reason he'll regress this year? The answer is no. As such, he's a high-risk/high-reward salary cap option this year. In drafts he could go as early as the 2nd round.
17 Zach Johnson $3,750,000Johnson came into the 2014 portion of the season as hot as anyone out there, but after a few good results, he simply faded away. Most of Johnson's earnings came prior to February, which is a little concerning, but considering his long track record on the PGA Tour, it's not a question of if he'll bounce-back, but when. Heck, even if he fails to produce during the meat of the regular season in 2015, you can at least expect some good production in the fall season as well as the early part of the 2015 season. His 2014 number is low enough to justify a salary cap selection and he should go somewhere in rounds two or three in draft leagues.
18 Hunter Mahan $3,500,000Not a great season for Hunter Mahan, but it could have been a lot worse if not for a win during the Fed Ex Playoffs. Prior to that win Mahan was staring at a sub-$2 million season, which for a golfer of his caliber would have been a failed season. He did get that final win however, so the season wasn't a total loss. Mahan has the talent to be a top-10 guy, but he seems to disappear for long stretches. As such, he's an option in salary cap leagues, but by no means a "must-have". He should go in the third round in draft leagues.
19 Phil Mickelson $3,500,000Not a good year for Mickelson in 2014. After an impressive run at a couple majors in 2013, it appeared as though Mickelson would make some hay during the majors in 2014, but that wasn't the case. He struggled outside the majors as well, all of which led to a very poor year, at least by Phil's standards. The good news of course is that his price is so low entering this season that he's almost a "must-have" in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he'll probably go higher than he should because of his name, but he shouldn't be taken higher than early in round two.
20 Patrick Reed $3,250,000One of the best five players in the world, Reed struggled mightily after his early-season win at the WGC Cadillac Championship and his now infamous boast about being a top-5 player in the world. At the time, he looked the part having won twice in the span of a few months, but to reveal his thoughts at the time was a mistake. Eventually people will forget about his claims and perhaps Reed can just get back to playing golf. The question though is, after his free fall in the second-half of the season, who is Patrick Reed? There seem to be too many questions to justify a selection at his 2014 price. In draft leagues he should go in the third round.
21 Ryan Moore $3,250,000If Moore were to retire tomorrow, we'd all look back and say he had a good career, the only problem with that is, he was supposed to have a great career. We see that greatness in him from time to time, but Moore rarely shows the consistency of the top players in the world. With that said, the upside is still there, but the price is too steep this year. Even if he put it all together, he'd probably top-out around $4 million. In draft leagues he could go late in the 2nd round or early in the 3rd.
22 Hideki Matsuyama $3,250,000Matsuyama entered the 2014 season with a lot of expectations, and for the most part, he didn't disappoint. Matsuyama is actually one of only a few players over the past decade that have lived-up to early expectations, which can only mean that great things lie ahead. The only problem with Matsuyama is his high number from last season. He's probably worth the risk in salary cap leagues, but at nearly $3 million he can't be considered a "must-have". In draft leagues he should go late in the 2nd or early in the 3rd round.
23 Keegan Bradley $3,250,000One of the more maddening players on the PGA Tour, Bradley seems to have all the skills to be a top-10 players, but for some reason, he can't seem to put it all together. He has a major title under his belt, so the talent and the mental game is there, but to reach his full potential, he'll need to show more consistency. Luckily, his price is in that range where you can take a chance on him with not much risk involved. In draft leagues he's probably a third-round selection at this point.
24 Russell Henley $3,250,000It hasn't taken Henley long to adjust to life on the PGA Tour. In his rookie season, Henley earned five top-25s, three top-10s, and one win. In his second season, he earned five top-25s, three top-10s and one win. See a pattern here? The difference between his first and second seasons was about $500k. Normally we'd like to see more of a jump between seasons, but considering last year was just his second year on the PGA Tour, it looks pretty impressive. There's no telling where his ceiling is, but it looks pretty high right now. Henley comes as a high price this season, but he is worth a look in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he could go early in the 2nd round.
25 Brendon Todd $3,000,000Todd was fairly consistent the entire season last year, but it was one incredible stretch that set him apart from most of his peers. The stretch began with a win at the Byron Nelson Classic and ended two months later with a T4 at the Greenbrier Classic. In all, five top-10s in six events, three of which were top-5s. Todd looks like he has the good to build on this momentum, but he's just too pricey to take in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go somewhere in the 3rd round.
26 Kevin Na $3,000,000Na bounced-back from an injury-riddled 2013 season in a big way in 2014. After earning just over $100k in 2013, Na set a career-high in earnings in 2014 when he surpassed the $3 million mark for the first time in his career. Na is no stranger to making money on the PGA Tour, he consistently topped the $2 million mark prior to 2013, but no one expected a year like he had in 2014. As is the case with guys having career years though, they don't often make for good salary cap options the following year and Na is no exception. In drafts he should go somewhere in the 3rd round.
27 Bill Haas $3,000,000Bill Haas is better than he showed last year -- or is he? He's hard to peg. Normally consistent, rarely great, but sometimes outstanding. Haas appears to have as much talent as some of the guys who finished in the top-10 on the money list this year, but for some reason, he can't seem to put it all together. The upside with Haas appears to be tremendous, but the question is, will he ever tap into it? At this price, it's tough to justify a selection in salary cap leagues, he just hasn't shown enough over the past couple seasons. In draft leagues he should go early in the 3rd round.
28 Gary Woodland $3,000,000Woodland has gone through a lot since joining the PGA Tour. He started his career well with plenty of success, only to lose his game while dealing with injuries. He's been healthy now for a good stretch and when he's healthy, he's pretty darn good. He's like a slightly less-talented version of Jason Day. The problem when looking at the 2015 season is his fairly large number from 2014. As such, he's worth a look in salary cap leagues, but he might be a tad too spendy. In draft leagues he could go as early as the 3rd round.
29 Henrik Stenson $3,000,000Stenson shocked the golfing world by capturing the Fed Ex Cup two years back, but in doing so, he set the bar way too high. Stenson is a quality player, but he's not a top-5 guy, which is where he ended the 2013 season. With that said, he's probably better than he showed last year, which makes him an interesting salary cap selection this year. He's probably worth a look in salary cap leagues and should go near rounds four or five in draft leagues.
30 Brandt Snedeker $3,000,000Snedeker is obviously better than what he showed last year and it seems like only a matter of time before he returns to the player he was a couple years ago. $1.6 million in earnings for Snedeker is considered a poor year and as such, he's a "must-have" player entering the 2014 season. Like most guys that are considered "must-have's", his price is low enough that there's virtually no risk. That's the easy part, the hard part is figuring out where he should go in a draft league. He could go as high as the 2nd round, but to be safe, he should probably go in the 3rd round this season.
31 Tiger Woods - N $3,000,000Not much needs to be said here. The odds that Woods will one day reclaim his throne as the best golfer on the planet are shrinking by the year, but he's by no means past the days when he can dominate from time to time. He's only a year removed from a five win season. It goes without saying that he's a "must-have" in salary cap leagues this season. As for drafts, if he's healthy entering the season, he's a first-round pick.
32 Marc Leishman $2,750,000With six top-10s on his resume in 2014, Leishman was able to post a career-high in earnings last season. He's no stranger to top-10s however as he's earned at least two every season since joining the PGA Tour in 2009. Leishman set the bar pretty-high last year though and asking him to show a significant increase this season may be asking a bit too much. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year, but he's a solid 3rd-4th round pick in draft leagues.
33 Matt Every $2,750,000Every is firmly entrenched as one of the better players on the PGA Tour and he seems to be getting better each year. He's finished in the top-70 on the Fed Ex list in each of the past three seasons, but 2014 was his best to date. It's difficult to see where his ceiling is though, it's possible that his ceiling is right around where he finished last year, which makes it tough to take him in a salary cap league this year. In draft leagues he should go somewhere in the 4th round.
34 Charl Schwartzel $2,750,000Schwartzel has done well for himself over the past few seasons, but he hasn't exactly taken off since his Masters win in 2011 like many thought he would. One problem is the limited European-style schedule that he plays every year. He's played more over the past two seasons, but he still comes in at under 20 events each year. With that said, he's a bit of a risk in salary cap leagues, but he's certainly worth some attention. The upside is certainly there and his price is reasonable as well. In draft leagues he should go around the 4th round.
35 Jason Dufner $2,750,000Well so much for backing-up that major championship in 2013. Okay, so he had an excuse for part of the year, actually, we don’t know how long he was dealing with his ailment, so it might actually explain away the entire year. Dufner's misfortune is a break for those in salary cap leagues though as he's now priced at a bargain level entering the 2015 season. Dufner only played in 17 events last year, so if he can get healthy, there's no question he'll play more often and make more money in 2015. As such, he's a "must-have" in salary cap leagues and should go around the 3rd round in draft leagues.
36 Dustin Johnson $2,500,000The curious case of Dustin Johnson was seemingly solved last season, he was apparently under the influence of many things over the past few years, which would explain why he's been unable to ascend to the top-level of the PGA Tour. DJ has all the talent in the world, but he's been unable to find that next gear that would take him to the top of the world. Perhaps the time off will help him put things into perspective and he'll come back stronger than ever. That or he'll turn into a complete head case. With so many questions surrounding him entering this season, there's no way to justify a selection in a salary cap league. As far as draft leagues, well that's a tough one as well because we don't know how much he'll play during the 2014-15 season.
37 Ryan Palmer $2,500,000Ryan Palmer is a very good golfer, but consistency from year to year, let alone week to week has never been his strong point. He's been in this rarified air before, he earned almost the exact same amount in 2010, but followed that season up with three seasons around the $1.5 million mark. He's been at this for a while now and it looks like his ceiling is around the $3 million mark, which makes him a poor choice for salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go in the 3rd or 4th round.
38 John Senden $2,500,000Senden has been all over the map over the past decade, from sub-$1 million to nearly $3 million in earnings like last year. While it's certainly impressive that Senden can up his game from year to year, it's certainly not the track record of a guy you'd want in a salary cap league. Add to that, it looks like his ceiling is right around $3 million and it becomes a no-brainer. In draft leagues he should go late-3rd or early-4th round.
39 Graham DeLaet $2,500,000DeLaet started the 2013-2014 season on fire, but he didn't accomplish much outside that stretch last season. That's not to say they his early-season play was a fluke, but it's a little disheartening that he couldn't build upon what he started early in the season last year. He's probably priced a bit too high for consideration in salary cap leagues this season, especially in those leagues that don't start until 2015. In draft leagues he should go late 3th or early 4th round.
40 Brian Harman $2,500,000Harman had a huge jump up in earnings last year from just under $1 million in 2013, to just over $2.4 million last year. In fact, Harman earned more last year than he did in his first two seasons combined. While it's certainly promising to see him play very well in his third year, it's also hard to imagine that he can pull off a similar trick next season. His ceiling could be higher than $2.4 million, but it's too much of a risk to take him in a salary cap league this season. In draft leagues he should go somewhere around the 4th round.
41 J.B. Holmes $2,500,000Not bad for a guy still recovering from brain surgery. It took a while for Holmes to fully recover, but it appears as though he's finally back to the player he was pre-surgery. There's no reason to think he'll slow down anytime soon, but the question is, can he significantly improve upon his 2014 numbers? Possibly, but possibly does not make for a good salary cap selection. The fact of the matter is, $2.3 million is too much to risk on Holmes this season. In draft leagues, he's a solid 4th round selection.
42 Matt Jones $2,500,000Jones spent most of his first five years on the PGA Tour on the outside looking in. In fact, he ended up within two spots of that magical 125th spot three of those five years, but he seemed to figure it out in 2013 and now he appears to be on the right track. Last season he set a career-high in earnings, but there's still room to grow here. It's always risky taking a guy who's coming off a career-high in earnings, but Jones could be worth the risk this year. In draft leagues he could go as early as the 4th round.
43 Cameron Tringale $2,250,000Tringale is definitely not afraid of burning-out on the PGA Tour. He's one of a select few players that teed it up over 30 times last season, but unlike most of the others who did so, Tringale had plenty of success. In fact, what maybe the most impressive stat of his last year was that he missed only six cuts in 31 starts. On the downside, he had only three top-10s in 31 starts, so that could obviously be better. It's great that he plays so often, but he needs to put some more high-end finishes on his resume before being considered as a good salary cap option. In draft leagues his value is bumped a bit because he plays so often. He should find a spot in the 4th round.
44 Seung-Yul Noh $2,250,000Noh struggled in his second season on the PGA Tour in 2013, but that's often the case for guys that play well during their rookie season. Whatever the issue was during his second season, he seems to have worked it out and appears to be headed back in the right direction. Noh is a solid player and it's possible that he could improve upon his 2014 numbers this season. With that said, the bar was set pretty-high last year, which means it's probably wise to pass on him in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go in the 5th round.
45 Kevin Streelman $2,250,000If not for one insanely hot stretch of golf in late-June, Streelman might have been struggling to save his card for the 2015 season. This insanely-hot stretch of golf wasn't over the course of weeks or even days, rather over a matter of hours. Streelman parlayed a blistering Sunday back-nine at the Travelers Championship into a victory and a check that would make up more than half of his earnings for the entire season. Okay, so you can't win an event by playing well over just nine holes, he played well all week, but you get the point. He didn't show much consistency last year and he'll need to do so this year to improve upon his 2014 numbers. He's certainly capable, but probably not worth the risk this season. In draft leagues he should go in the 4th or 5th round.
46 Tim Clark $2,250,000It's been a long road back from injury for Clark, but the problem now is, he's nearly 40 and it's hard to tell how many really good years he has left. Clark set the bar for himself in 2010 when he earned over $3.5 million, but back then he was healthy and youthful, well, relatively youthful. It's not like 40 is old, but you do see most golfers start to show the signs of again around 40. Clark is not going to fall off the map any time soon, but his upside is limited, which makes him a 50/50 proposition at best in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 5th round.
47 George McNeill $2,250,000McNeil recorded career highs in both earnings and top-25s in 2014. The amazing part was that he accomplished all of that in a trimmed-down schedule. His four top-10s also matched a career-high. The only thing he was missing was a win, something which he'll undoubtedly be shooting for this upcoming season. Whether he gets that win or not will determine if his value is greater than his price this season. As such, he's no better than a 50/50 guy in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go in the 5th or 6th round.
48 Jonas Blixt $2,250,000After two outstanding seasons, Blixt came back to earth last season. Blixt's loss is our gain however as his number is set at a point where it's going to be hard to pass up this year. Blixt is really a $2 million guy, but for some reason he couldn't get it together last season. Blixt has too much talent to make less than $2 million, so unless he's trapped in some kind of funk this season, he should have no problem making significantly more than he did last year. He's not quite a "must-have" this year, but he's close. In draft leagues he should go in the top-50.
49 Kevin Stadler $2,000,000Stadler's been on the PGA Tour since 2007, but he's never had a season like he did last year. Not only did he gain his first victory on the PGA Tour, but he also cracked the $2 million mark for the first time. Considering his previous high in earnings was $1.5 million, it's hard to imagine he can significantly improve upon his earnings number of $2.3 million from last year. He's not going to be a good option in salary cap leagues this year, but he should be drafted in the 4th or 5th round.
50 Graeme McDowell $2,000,000It's been a while since McDowell won his only major title at the U.S. Open and it's about time we start to wonder just how good he is. He was a decent player prior to his major title, but by winning that major, his status jumped considerably and to be honest, he's struggled to live up to the new standard. He's a solid player, but expecting another major or even multiple wins during the season may be a bit too much. He's worth a look in salary cap leagues though because his number is reasonable. In drafts he should go near the 5th round.
51 Charles Howell III $2,000,000Amazingly, in 14 years on the PGA Tour, Howell III has never dropped below $1 million in earnings. He's about as reliable as it gets out here, but he rarely goes above and beyond expectations. You can pencil him for earnings between $1.5 million and $3 million right now, but unless he comes in at the high-end of that range, he's not going to warrant a spot on a salary cap team. In draft leagues he should go late-4th or early 5th round.
52 Charley Hoffman $2,000,000Hoffman nearly cracked the $2 million mark last season, but perhaps his most impressive feat was making the cut in 21 of 25 starts. Hoffman has become a very reliable player, but his upside might not be as high as we once thought. Hoffman earned just over $2.5 million in 2010 and at that point it looked like he was on his way up the money list, but that wasn't the case. He regressed for a few years until last season and he maybe on his way back up again, but his peak looks a lot lower than it did just a few years ago. As such, he's a 50/50 prop in a salary cap league at best. In draft leagues he's a 5th-rounder.
53 Freddie Jacobson $2,000,000Jacobson has become a fairly reliable player, but unless he finds a win somewhere in the schedule, he has little chance of significantly improving his earnings number from last season. The way he's played over the past decade or so, he's almost guaranteed to finish within the top-70 on the money list, but he'll need to crack the top-30 to make a selection worth the price. He's only accomplished that once in the past eight years. In draft leagues he's likely a 6th round pick.
54 Chris Stroud $2,000,000It took Stroud some time to find some traction on the PGA Tour, four years to be exact, but since he earned his card in 2011, he hasn't looked back. The past two years have been especially productive as he's cracked the top-50 in the Fed Ex both years. It's certainly possible that Stroud has a big jump this season, but the track record would indicate that only a slight bump is in the works. As such, he's not a great option in salary cap formats. In draft leagues he's a solid 6th-rounder.
55 Geoff Ogilvy $2,000,000One of the nice stories from the 2014 season was the return of Geoff Ogilvy. Ogilvy, a former U.S. Open champion had struggled for years until last season when we finally got another glimpse of what made him so good a decade ago. He's not back to the level he was 10 years ago, but he's making progress. The problem of course is that he's been extremely unreliable for the past five years, so is he worth the nearly $2 million tag this season? It looks like a 50/50 proposition at this point. Those that like to take chances will want in, those that play it safe will let someone else take the risk. The upside may not be what it once was however, which makes his prospects in a salary cap league iffy at best. In draft leagues he should go in the 5th or 6th round.
56 Camilo Villegas $2,000,000Villegas has been all over the map in his nine years on the PGA Tour. He came onto the tour with a lot of hype and early-on, seemed to embrace it. 2008 was the peak of his professional career as he won twice and topped the $4 million mark. He was able to maintain a fairly-high level of success in the years that followed, but the wheels came off in 2012 when he failed to crack $500k in earnings. Another subpar season followed in 2013, but he got back on track in 2014. The question now is -- which way does he go? Villegas is one of the more difficult players to peg this season as his ceiling is much higher than his 2014 number, yet there's no way to tell if he's all the way back. He appears to be a pretty good salary cap option this season and should go in the 7th round in draft leagues.
57 Morgan Hoffmann $2,000,000Timing is everything in this sport and Hoffmann's timing last season was perfect. Hoffmann essentially turned a top-20 at The PLAYERS into a spot at the TOUR Championship. He didn't exactly play well for much of the regular season, but he did just enough to sneak into the top-125 prior to the Fed Ex playoffs. From there he played his best golf of the season and continued to climb the rankings, ultimately ending up in the top-30. Hoffmann appears to be improving from week to week on the PGA Tour and considering his number is just over $1.5 million, he's worth a look in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go near the 6th round.
58 Ben Martin $2,000,000Martin was just 24 when he first earned his PGA Tour card. That first season didn't turn out so well, but he must have learned from that experience, because the following season on the web.com Tour was a smashing success. His second go-round on the PGA Tour went much better as he nearly earned $1.5 million last year. At the age of 27 and with just a few years of high-level experience under his belt, Martin looks to have a bright future. While there's no concrete evidence to suggest a great season is on the horizon, Martin has the look of someone who is about to take-off. As such, he should be given heavy consideration in salary cap leagues. In drafts he could go as high as the 6th round.
59 Luke Donald $2,000,000It's very dangerous to give up on a golfer who was once atop the world rankings, but how long will it take for Donald to show his old form again? It's been a while since he was ranked number one in the world, but visions of that player are hard to ignore when looking at a price tag of under $1.5 million. Will he ever get back to where he was several years ago? Probably not, but it wouldn't take much to outgain his 2014 significantly. He's not a "must-have" in salary cap leagues, but he should be given consideration. In draft leagues he's likely to go higher than he should, but he should go around the 6th round.
60 Carl Pettersson $2,000,000Pettersson's first-half of the season was quite a disappointment, with only one top-10 during the first six months, but he picked it up near the end of the season and he ended up comfortably inside the top-125 once again. Pettersson is getting harder to peg though as he usually has a spurt or two during the season, but how long that spurt is and how much he accomplishes during that time seems to change every year. With that said, the upside is still there and he's worth consideration in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he could go as high at the 6th round.
61 Angel Cabrera $1,750,0002014 was a largely disappointing season for Cabrera until he managed to pull off a victory at the Greenbrier Classic. Cabrera is known for his play at the majors, but last year he flipped the script and played well outside the majors, but not at the majors. Cabrera seems capable of doing one or the other, but not both and as such, his upside is limited. He's too much of a risk in salary cap leagues, even at this price. In draft leagues his value is a bit higher because of his play at the majors. He should go near the 4th round in draft leagues.
62 Brian Stuard $1,750,000Stuard struggled in his first go-round on the PGA Tour in 2010, but he fought his way back and in 2012 he ended up safely inside the top-125. Last year he built upon that success and finished with a career-high in earnings. The biggest difference between last season and the season prior was a runner-up showing at the Mayakoba Classic. Considering that showing was his only top-3 finish on the season, there's certainly room for improvement, but there are plenty of better choices in this range than Stuard in a salary cap format. In draft leagues he should go near the 5th round.
63 Ernie Els $1,750,000Credit to Els, he refuses to go quietly into the night. Though he seems to show signs of aging from time to time, he always manages to show his old form at some point during the season. The problem with that though is his upside is now limited and it's tough to take older players with limited upside in salary cap leagues. He's not the type of player that will fall off the map anytime soon, but he's also not likely to crack the $4 million mark again in his career. As such, he's not worth the price in a salary cap league and he should go in the 6th or 7th round in draft leagues.
64 Chesson Hadley $1,750,000Not a bad start to a PGA Tour career. Just over $1.7 million in earnings, a spot in the top-60 on the money list and a victory at the Puerto Rico Open. That's the good news, the bad news is, he was incredibly erratic last year. That and his win did come against a pretty weak field. With that said, he did finish strong against the best players on the PGA Tour, so there's hope that he can build off his fantastic rookie season. There is the sophomore jinx to consider as well, which isn't exactly a jinx, it's just a bit of reality setting in. Most guys who play well during their rookie season come back to earth, at least a bit during their second season. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this year, but should be given some consideration. In draft leagues he should go in the 6th or 7th round.
65 K.J. Choi $1,750,000Only four seasons ago, Choi earned over $4 million, but he failed to follow that up with much of anything. In fact, in the two years that followed, Choi failed to crack the $1 million mark. Last year he showed signs of improvement, but as is the case with everyone out here, Choi is getting older and at 44, his skills are bound to deteriorate. Yes, he looked better last season, but even if his game is coming back, he can only go so high at this point. He could improve upon his 2014 number, but probably not by much. As such, he's only worth a quick glance in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 7th round.
66 Ian Poulter $1,750,000Though his personality is anything but stable, Ian Poulter's golf game is very reliable -- at least his numbers at the end of the season are very reliable. Not exactly the type of guy you want to grab in a salary cap league, Poulter is a perfect guy for draft leagues as his added value during majors and WGC events makes him a great middle-round selection. The only way he's ever going to significantly improve on his earnings number is with a major victory and while it's possible, it's never probable. As such, he's not worth the risk in salary cap leagues, but his draft stock is higher than his spot on the money list, so look for Poulter to go around round six.
67 Ben Crane $1,750,000In six of the past nine seasons, Crane has ended the season with a couple hundred thousand of the $1.5 million mark. He's been as high as nearly $3 million and as low as just under $300k, but more often than not, he ends up right where he ended last year. Crane has plenty of upside, but we've witnessed him at his best just once in the past nine years. With that said, you could justify a salary cap selection, but it would probably be wise to steer clear of Crane this season. In draft leagues he could find his way into the 6th round.
68 Russell Knox $1,750,000Talk about a huge jump up; Knox who had failed to crack the $600k mark in his first two seasons on the PGA Tour, surpassed all expectations last season by earning just over $1.5 million. Knox is fairly new to the professional golf scene, so there's no telling where his ceiling lies. The problem of course is that he set the bar awfully high last year. Again, with so many unknowns, it's hard to justify paying such a high price for a guy who hasn't exactly been there and done that. In draft leagues he should go near the 7th round.
69 Scott Stallings $1,750,000Stallings is the rare breed on the PGA Tour. He started strong in his rookie season and he really hasn't progressed or regressed since. In fact, his highest finish on the Fed Ex list was 63rd in 2013 and his lowest was 84th in 2014. He's won an event in three of his four seasons on the PGA Tour, which is both good and bad. Good because he knows how to win at this level, bad because it's hard to replicate on a yearly basis. However, if Stallings can simply find a little more consistency within the season, he could bust through the $2 million mark. He's got the skills and he knows how to win, which makes Stallings a guy who should be given serious consideration in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 7th or 8th rounds.
70 Brendan Steele $1,750,000Since joining the PGA Tour in 2011, Steele has had plenty of success. He had a slight hiccup in 2012 when he missed the Fed Ex Cup, but in the two years since he's finished comfortably inside the top-125 each year. Steele actually set the bar pretty-high out of the gate in his rookie season when he nearly topped $2 million in earnings. He's struggled to find that exact form since, but he's remained productive. Steele's ceiling is at minimum around $2 million, so his price heading into this season seems reasonable. He merits a look in salary cap leagues this season. In draft leagues he should go in the 7th or 8th round.
71 Brendon de Jonge $1,750,000de Jonge is not shy about teeing it up on the PGA Tour. Over the past five seasons, de Jonge has started over 150 events. What that means is, he's giving himself every opportunity to succeed. Last year was actually one of his worst overall, which makes him a good option in salary cap leagues this year. de Jonge is no stranger to the $2 million mark either, he's surpassed it twice in the past five years, so it's entirely possible that de Jonge doubles his 2014 number this year. In draft leagues he should go near the 7th or 8th round.
72 Daniel Summerhays $1,700,000Summerhays has steadily climbed the ranks of the PGA Tour since his sophomore season in 2012. While he is showing improvement, it's a slow and steady process for Summerhays. He earned just over $1.1 million in 2012, just under $1.3 million the following season and just over $1.5 million last year. At this rate, he'll end up around $1.7 million this year. Actually, it would be quite strange if he were to move up just another $200k again this season, but you get the point. There doesn't seem to be a huge jump on the horizon and that's exactly what you need when you place someone on a salary cap roster. In draft leagues he'll prove to be a steady source of income and should be taken around the 7th or 8th rounds.
73 Will MacKenzie $1,500,000Mackenzie started the 2013 on fire, but as hot as he was at the beginning of the season, he ended the season even colder. All of which makes it almost impossible to gauge his prospects for this season. Coming into the season he was a tough player to peg because he'd shown some flashes, but he's also shown a tendency to disappear for long stretches. His price is reasonable for the upcoming season, but he's just too unreliable right now. In draft leagues he could go as early as the 6th or as late as the 9th round.
74 Erik Compton $1,500,000It's impossible to talk about Compton without mentioning the fact that he's alive today with the aid of an artificial heart. Prior to last season, Compton was just a good side story, a guy who beat the odds to play professional golf. Now, he's a legit player on the PGA Tour and the talk is, as it should be, about his game. His game, by the way is pretty solid, he posted a career-high in earnings last season as well as a career-high in top-25s and top-10s. Now the bad news, he absolutely destroyed his previous high in earnings last year and to expect him to do it again this year is a bit much. In draft leagues though, he should be taken around the 7th round.
75 Jason Bohn $1,500,000Bohn has spent most of his time on the PGA Tour in the low-$1 million range or sub-$1 million range, but one strange pattern has revealed itself since he joined the PGA Tour in 2004. Every time he finished the season over the $1 million mark, he backed it up with another $1 million season. This is mentioned because he topped the $1 million mark last year, but the year prior he was sub-$1 million. In other words, if the pattern holds, he'll again be above $1 million this season. The issue of course is that he's never reached the $2 million mark, so his upside is limited. In draft leagues he should go around the 7th or 8th round.
76 Justin Hicks $1,500,000A quick look at Hick's resume and you'd think that he's a young player on his way up the ranks of the PGA Tour. There's only one problem, he's not a young man. Even though he's spent just three full seasons on the PGA Tour, Hicks is a seasoned veteran, well a veteran of golf, not necessarily of the PGA Tour. Hicks posted a career-best $1.5 million in earnings last year, which more than doubled his prior best of just over $700k the year prior. Hicks may very well have plenty left in the tank, but he's too much of a risk at this price to take in a salary cap league. In draft leagues he should go somewhere near the 7th round.
77 Scott Brown $1,500,000Brown was unable to secure his PGA Tour card after his rookie season in 2012, but a win at the Puerto Rico Open in 2013 changed his fortunes. Brown didn't exactly build off that win in 2013, he actually played quite poorly for the remainder of the 2013 season, but the time-off prior to the 2014 season did him wonders as he again found his game, this time for the majority of the season. The worrisome stat on Brown is that it took 30 events to earn just under $1.4 million last year. It's great that he plays so much, but his per-tournament earnings number isn't so great. It's probably wise to take a wait and see position on Brown in salary cap formats this season. In draft leagues he looks like a 8th round pick.
78 Ryo Ishikawa $1,500,000Ryo Ishikawa was Hideki Matsuyama before Hideki Matsuyama was Hideki Matsuyama, with one major difference. Matsuyama embraced the pressure and upped his game while Ishikawa crumbled under the spotlight. With that spotlight long forgotten, Ishikawa is finally starting to play some solid golf once again. He's still young enough to be on the upswing in his career, so his ceiling should be much higher than what he showed last year. The problem is, he hasn't shown the consistency yet, so even at this price he's a bit of a risky proposition. In draft leagues he should go in the 7th or 8th round.
79 Shawn Stefani $1,500,000Stefani finished his rookie season just on the outside of top-125, but he didn't let that disappointment carry over into his second full-season on the PGA Tour. Entering the 2014 season, Stefani knew his chances would be limited, after all, he finished outside the top-125 in 2013, so he had to make the most of every start in 2014. His second start on the PGA Tour came in April where he finished with a solo-5th place finish at the Shell Houston Open. It wasn't June however until he solidified his spot inside the top-125 with a runner-up showing at the Quicken National Loans event. In total, it wasn't a great year for Stefani, he's still got a long ways to go, but at least he can play a full schedule this year. In draft leagues Stefani should go around rounds nine or ten.
80 Kevin Chappell $1,500,000Chappell was the definition of a grinder during the 2014 season. 28 starts, 22 cuts made, nine top-25s, but only one top-10. It's kind of amazing that a guy can earn over $1.3 million and finish inside the top-100 on the money list with only one top-10. Chappell's career hasn't looked much like his 2014 season though. In 2013 he had three top-10s and a runner-up finish at the Memorial. Chappell shouldn't have a hard time improving on his 2014 earnings number, but a significant improvement might be asking too much. In draft leagues Chappell should go around the 9th round.
81 Lee Westwood $1,500,000Westwood had a great 2013 season, but much like his entire career in the US, he came up just a bit short. 2014 was a different story as Westwood didn't show the punch that he had in 2013. Does this mean he's on the down-side of his career? Probably not quite yet, but his upside seems to be limited now, so even at this price he's not a "must-have" in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he's probably a 7th-round pick because of his value during the majors.
82 Steve Stricker $1,500,000Stricker's trimmed-down scheduled did wonders for his game in 2013, but that wasn't the case last year. Normally it would be easy to write this off as just one bad season, but Stricker is starting to get up there in age and a bad season can't simply be dismissed anymore. His upside is well above his 2014 number, which makes him an interesting salary cap pick though. If he chooses to play a lighter schedule again though, it might be tough to make much more than he did in 2014. In draft leagues he should go in 8th or 9th round.
83 Billy Hurley III $1,500,000Poor Billy Hurley III, if not for his affiliation with the Naval Academy, he might have pulled out a win last year over the 4th of July weekend. For those that don't recall, Hurley III held the 54-hole lead at the Greenbrier Classic and the attention was probably just too much to handle. Young players generally struggle in that spot, but add the timing of being a former military man on 4th of July weekend and boom, media circus. Hurley went on to card a top-5, his second of the year, but all anyone could talk about was what could have been. Hurley III has a bright future though and he's worth a look in salary cap leagues this year. In drafts he looks to be a 10th round pick.
84 David Hearn $1,500,000Hearn, known as the "other Canadian" for much of the season, was a bit of a disappointment last season. Living in the shadow of fellow Canadian Graham DeLaet, Hearn was carving out a nice little slice of the PGA Tour kitty heading into this season, but for some reason the momentum came to a halt this year. With that said, he's still on the way up and at this price, he's definitely worth a look in salary cap leagues this year.
85 John Huh $1,500,000Huh has regressed each year since his rookie season of 2012, but that regression has him a perfect salary cap candidate this season. Huh nearly cracked the $3 million mark his rookie season, but fell back to just over $1.5 million the following year. The regression last year was a little more alarming as he failed to top $1 million in earnings, but Huh is still young, still figuring this thing out, so he should bounce back at some point. As such, he makes a great salary cap candidate and is almost a "must-have". In draft leagues he should go around the 8th round.
86 Sang-Moon Bae $1,500,000After a solid sophomore season, which followed a strong rookie season, it appeared as though Bae was heading in the right direction. Something went wrong in his third season however as Bae never got on track. The simple fact of the matter is, Bae is better than he showed last year and at this price, he's going to be hard to pass up in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go well ahead of his final position on the 2014 money list.
87 Martin Laird - N $1,500,000Laird's game went off the rails last year and there's really no explaining it, but if his previous four seasons tell us anything, it's that he'll be back. Laird is fully exempt for the upcoming season because of his win at the Valero Texas Open. He did regress the previous season as well, but still managed to earn over $1.7 million. Expect Laird to at least get back to that level this season. As such, he's a "must-have" in salary cap leagues this year.
88 Richard Sterne - W $1,300,000 The European Tour veteran from South Africa has tinkered with the PGA Tour, but now has his card for the first time. With six Euro wins – he walloped runner-up Charl Schwartzel by seven strokes in February 2013 in Johannesburg -- he’s not your ordinary newcomer. But he’s also still recovering from hip surgery. He missed the cut in the Open Championship but finished T35 at the PGA Championship. At 33, he’s got a lot of golf left and, if healthy, should be a lock for the top 125 and perhaps a lot more. A key will be how many starts he gets and, being ninth in the priority rankings, he should do well in that department.
89 Steven Bowditch $1,250,000Thanks to a win at the Valero Texas Open, Bowditch posted a career-high in earnings in 2014. Not only was it a career-high, but it was also the first time he has cracked the $1 million mark. While it's possible that Bowditch could build off his win last year, the odds are he'll come back down to earth this season. As such, he's not a guy you want to pay much attention to in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he'll likely fall well below where he ended up on the money list last season; perhaps somewhere around the 9th or 10th round.
90 Jerry Kelly $1,250,000As recently as three seasons ago, it looked like Kelly was getting ready for the Champions Tour, but that changes last season when he found the fountain of youth and had his best season since 2011. Kelly spread out four top-10s throughout the schedule last year, which is a good sign because his placement on the money list wasn't simply due to one hot streak during the year. With that said, he is 48 years-old and he's not getting any younger. He's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year, but he should be drafted around the 9th or 10th round.
91 Pat Perez $1,250,00013 years on the PGA Tour and one win. Expectations were higher for Perez when he first started on the PGA Tour, and even though he's had plenty of success and made a ton of money, he never quite reached the heights that many thought he would. He peaked about six years ago when he had a stretch of three seasons over $1.5 million in earnings. Since then he's been over and under the $1 million mark, but no closer to $2 million. It appears he's maxed out in the high-$1 million range and as such he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go in the 9th or 10th round.
92 Robert Streb $1,250,000Streb struggled in his rookie season, but he turned it around last year on his way to a top-100 finish on the money list. The main reason for the turn-around was his consistency. In 21 events, Streb missed only four cuts. Once on the weekend, Streb failed to get much done, but he did manage two top-10s and one runner-up finish at the Zurich Classic of New Orleans. Streb could go one of two ways this year, a regression to his rookie season or an improvement on his sophomore campaign. There's no way to tell which way he'll go, so it's probably best to avoid Streb in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues, Streb should go in the 9th or 10th round.
93 William McGirt $1,250,000McGirt has been on the PGA Tour for four years and we still have no idea what kind of player he is. His rookie year was a struggle, his sophomore year was better. His third year he regressed, his fourth year he showed signs of improvement. Does he continue the pattern and regress after having success last season? Even if he doesn't, it's hard to imagine he improves much off of what was a pretty good season in 2014. As such, he's not a good salary cap option this season. In draft leagues he should go around the 10th round.
94 Jason Kokrak $1,250,000Judging by his percentage of cuts made each year, it appears as though Kokrak is improving. After making the cut in under half of his starts as a rookie, he improved that percentage to 60% in his second season and improved again last year to just over 2/3rds of his starts. He's also improved his percentages of top-25s as well. In fact, of the 13 cuts he made last year, 10 of those resulted in top-25s. He's still lacking the high-end finishes that would put him over the top. They may come in due time, but to bank on the high-end finishes this year would not be wise. In draft leagues he should go around the 10th round.
95 Andrew Svoboda $1,250,000It was a long journey for Svoboda to get into the top-125 and you can bet now that he's safely inside, he doesn't want to waste this chance. The question is, can he take advantage? His record is so limited, there's really no way to tell which way Svoboda will go from here. Considering he missed the cut almost as many times as he made the cut last year, it would appear that Svoboda is still a work in progress. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go around the 10th round.
96 Scott Langley $1,250,000Langley did just enough during his rookie season to retain his card for the 2014 season and he did just enough last year to keep his card for the upcoming season. Check that, last season he finished comfortably inside the top-125, but there's still plenty of room for improvement. The question is, will he show that improvement this year? Langley should continue to improve, but a significant improvement is not guaranteed so he's not worth much of a look in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go near the 10th round.
97 Jeff Overton $1,250,000Overton showed a lot of potential when he burst onto the scene a few years ago, he even played well at the Ryder Cup that year, but he's struggled to regain that form since then. He hasn't fallen off the map, but when you crack the $3 million barrier, people start to expect more than simply retaining your card each year and that's about all Overton has accomplished over the past four seasons. The potential is still there, but as we get further away from that magical season, it's starting to look like more the exception than the rule. In draft leagues he should go around the 10th round.
98 Robert Garrigus $1,250,000Garrigus appears to be locked into at least $1 million in earnings every year, but less than $2 million. He did have one year where he blew right past the $2 million mark and ended the season with over $3 million in earnings, but that was just one year -- out of nine that he's spent on the PGA Tour. With that said, he could be considered in salary cap leagues because he's shown the ability to earn over $3 million, but odds are he'll end up where he's been the majority of his career, between $1 and $2 million. In draft leagues he should be taken around the 10th round.
99 Rory Sabbatini $1,250,000Sabbatini is in the rare group that can claim over $4 million in earnings in one season on the PGA Tour, but he hasn't shown that form for quite a while. He's topped the $2 million mark as recently as 2011, but he hasn't sniffed it since. 2011 was also the last time he won on the PGA Tour. Sabatini still has some game left in him, but he really hasn't been much of a factor over the past three years. As such, he's not a great option in salary cap leagues this year. He should be drafted though, albeit in the later rounds.
100 Louis Oosthuizen $1,250,000Oosthuizen's path has been very similar to Graeme McDowell's over the years. Both players were solid, but not great prior to winning their respective majors and both have failed to take their games up a notch since winning those majors. Oosthuizen still has plenty of upside, but he's had plenty of time to show his major winning form and he just can't get it back. He's worth a look in salary cap leagues, but don't feel bad if you can't find room for him. In draft leagues he should go in the 9th or 10th round.
101 Michael Thompson $1,250,000Four years on the PGA Tour for Thompson and four times inside the top-125. His success has varied though from "just good enough" to "pretty darn good". Last year Thompson clocked-in at "just good enough". His rookie season was much the same as he played well enough to secure his card, but did little to garner much attention. The two years in-between however, Thompson made a bit of noise earning $1.4 and $1.7 million respectively. It is because of those two years in the middle that Thompson is an intriguing pick in salary cap leagues this year. The risk is low because of his price, yet the upside appears to be somewhat limited. In draft leagues he should go around the 10th round.
102 Nick Watney $1,250,000The curious case of Nick Watney. Here's a guy with all the talent in the world, yet he can't seem to string any kind of success together. He's had some moments over the past few years, but just when you think he's turned a corner, he falls back to his old ways, well actually it's his new ways because he used to be one heck of a player. In other words, to quote Toby Keith, "he's not as good as he once was, but he's as good once as he ever was." There in lies the problem, he's as good once, once being the key word. Is the upside there? Definitely, but if he can't string anything together, then there really is no upside. He's worth consideration in salary cap leagues because his price is so low and in draft leagues he's probably a 10th-round pick.
103 Paul Casey $1,250,000It's been a crazy few years for Casey. Not long ago he was among the best European players on the planet, but his fall was hard and fast. It looks like he's on his way back though and there's definitely some value here. Casey played just above the minimum number events last year, so the upside is a bit limited, then again, his price tag is pretty low, so the risk is limited as well. He's worth a look in salary cap leagues and should find his way into the first 10 rounds of a draft.
104 Luke Guthrie $1,250,000After a strong rookie season where he earned nearly $1 million, Guthrie appeared to be on his way up the ranks of the PGA Tour. Something happened however during his second season and Guthrie regressed a bit. With that said, he has the look of a guy who's going to get better and at this price, it wouldn't take much to improve significantly on his numbers from last season. As such, Guthrie looks like a very solid pick in salary cap formats this season. In draft leagues he should go higher than his spot on the 2014 money list, somewhere near the 9th round, possibly higher.
105 Roberto Castro - N $1,250,000Castro made a huge jump from his rookie to his sophomore season, but just as big as the jump up was, his fall last year was just as drastic. Still, he's only a year removed from over $2 million in earnings and a pair of runner-up finishes. Many young players struggle the season following a break-through year, but many of those guys end up coming back stronger than ever, which is what Castro will do this year.
106 Scott Piercy - N $1,250,000Piercy had a good thing going from 2009-2013, he was comfortably inside the top-125 each year, with the exception of one and there was no reason to think this run would end -- then came the 2013-14 season. Piercy was finally hit by the injury bug and the entire season was a loss. The good news is, he returned later in the year, so he won't have to deal with the rust factor and his number from last year is ridiculously low. He's definitely a "must-have" in salary cap leagues this season.
107 D.A. Points - N $1,250,000Points struggled his first few years on the PGA Tour, but right around 2009 he figured everything out. From that point through the end of the 2013 season, Points was very productive, never falling below $900k in earnings. Last year however was very strange as Points completely lost it. Luckily he captured a win in 2013 and he's still fully exempt for the upcoming season. At this price, he's definitely a "must-have" in salary cap formats.
108 Justin Thomas - R $1,200,000 Thomas has an opportunity to be an absolute stud on the PGA Tour. A part of an Alabama team that won a National Championship, Thomas won the third Web.com Tour Finals event, the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship, in a playoff for his first win of the year. Coupled with a second, third, fourth, and a fifth, it was an extremely solid year for Thomas, who finished fifth in total season money, will start the 2014-2015 PGA Tour season second on the Reshuffle List, and is in prime position to make a fall charge. Averaging 311.5 yards off the tee and ending the year third in scoring average, fantasy players will want to draft and start this guy early and often: he’s got the making of an absolute young gun.
109 Jonathan Byrd - N $1,100,000Byrd has struggled for the past two seasons, but he's simply too good to fall below the top-125 on a regular basis. He's only two seasons removed from earnings in excess of $1.5 million, and only three seasons removed from what was nearly a $3 million season. Look for Byrd to get back on track at some point this season and easily surpass his numbers from the past two seasons.
110 Brian Gay - N $1,100,000Gay is fully exempt for the 2014-15 season because of his win at the Humana Challenge in 2013. That alone is reason enough to take him at this price. Gay has never been a consistent golfer, but all it takes for this guy to have a great year is one hot streak. As such, Gay is a great salary cap selection this season. He should also find his way into the first 10 rounds of the draft.
111 Carlos Ortiz - R $1,000,000 While there may be more accomplished rookies in terms of their track records before joining the Web.com Tour, there’s no one who had a better year on the Web.com Tour than Ortiz. Ortiz won three times, at the Panama Claro Championship, El Bosque Mexico Championship, and WinCo Foods Portland Open presented by Kraft, earning a Battlefield Promotion that makes him fully exempt on the PGA Tour for next season, allowing him to pick his own schedule. Statistically he finished fifth in the All-Around Ranking and sixth in total driving. He was overtaken in the overall regular season + finals money list by Adam Hadwin, which negated a shot of getting into The Players, but it was still a hugely successful campaign for Ortiz. Look for big things from Ortiz.
112 Adam Hadwin - R $1,000,000 Hadwin has a chance to be an absolute star. He lit it up in the Web.com Tour Finals, going missed cut (MC)-1-T10-T7 over the four events. The win, his second of the year, came at the Chiquita Classic, and aided by his victory earlier in the season Chile Classic and eight other top-10s, Hadwin was able to supplant Ortiz at the Web.com Tour Championship for the leading Web.com Tour Regular Season + Finals Money List earner, which gets him fully exempt, into the 2015 Players, and off of the Reshuffle List. With fellow Canadian and rising PGA Tour star Graham DeLaet as a resource to help ease his entry into the PGA Tour, look for his rookie season to be one that could include a victory, and possibly a fall win at that. With the PGA Tour season starting October 9 at the Frys.com Open, Hadwin could be a player who carries that momentum into an early season run on the biggest stage in golf.
113 Stuart Appleby $1,000,000Appleby has cracked the $1 million mark in four of his past eight seasons and he's done so by earning a runner-up or a win in one spot each year. In other words, at this point in his career, he's good for about one good showing each season. Sometimes that good showing is a top-5, others, it's a top-3. Depending on how well he plays that one week, his earnings will either top $1 million or they won't. Not exactly the type of player you want in a salary cap league, or a draft league for that matter. With that said, he does have some value in a draft league, but probably not until the 9th or 10th round.
114 Martin Flores $1,000,000Flores has been a full-time member on the PGA Tour for four years and the last three he's managed to retain his card, but little more. He's remained right around the $1 million mark, give a take a couple hundred thousand and it doesn't appear that he's about to make a big move either way anytime soon. With that in mind, Flores doesn't hold much value in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he may go undrafted depending on how deep the league is.
115 Bo Van Pelt $1,000,000Van Pelt spent years being the "best player on the PGA Tour without a win", and for a while after he finally won, he was the player that we all thought he could be. The problem is, we haven't seen that guy for a while now and I'm not sure he's ever coming back. That's the thing about waiting for golfers to find their game, they're still again during the process, so even if they do find their game, they might be 10 years older and age is starting to play a factor as well. Van Pelt does not look like a good salary cap option this year. In drafts he should still go in the first 10 rounds though.
116 Kevin Kisner $1,000,000Kisner really struggled in his first two attempts on the PGA Tour, failing to earn even $400k in either attempt. Last year however he figured out enough to earn nearly $1 million. The jump in earnings is nice, but when you factor in his first two years on the PGA Tour, he's failed more than he's succeeded on the PGA Tour. He's young enough that he's likely still on his way up, but it's unlikely that the progression is anything major this year. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this year. In draft leagues he may go undrafted.
117 Aaron Baddeley $1,000,000Baddeley was one of those guys that came onto the PGA Tour with a lot of hype attached and for a while, it looked like he might live up to it, but for whatever the reason, he's failed to play at a consistently high-level for a prolonged period of time. The talent is there, but the consistency hasn't been there for a while. He's not much of a risk at this price, but the upside is limited as well. He should go somewhere around the 10th round in draft leagues.
118 Stewart Cink $1,000,000Stewart Cink has showed us a bit of everything over the past decade, from consistent top-30 guy, to major champion, to out of the top-125, to just back into the top-125. So which player is Cink? He's probably the guy we saw last year. Still good enough to compete once a month, but not the guy who spoiled Tom Watson's final Open Championship run. The upside just isn't there anymore, which makes him a poor salary cap candidate this season. He should be drafted in most leagues though, albeit pretty late.
119 Gonzalo Fdez-Castano $1,000,000Fdez-Castano was one of many Europeans over the years that was suppose to make his mark on the PGA Tour after having success on the European Tour, but as of the end of the 2014 season, it hasn't happened yet. He seems to have the talent to compete on a weekly basis, after all, he's played well during several majors over the past five years, but something is missing. Whether he finds that this year is anyone's guess. The upside is high enough to consider him at this price, but he's by no means a "must-have" in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 9th or 10th round.
120 John Merrick - N $1,000,000Merrick is fully exempt for the upcoming season thanks to his victory at the Northern Trust Open. It's conceivable that Merrick's poor play last season could be blamed on complacency, knowing that his card was secure no matter how he played last year, but even if that's not the case, he should have no problem getting above the number he posted last season. He hasn't been the most consistent player over the years, so he's not a "must-have", but he should get major consideration in salary cap leagues this season.
121 Derek Fathauer - W $1,000,000 Based on winning the four-event Web.com Tour finals, including Tour Championship last week, Fathauer will be second in priority rankings and exempt from the reshuffle. This was by far his best professional season and, at age 28, may be headed for a breakthrough. Last year’s Web.com Tour finals winner, John Peterson, failed miserably, finishing 179th in the FedEx Cup standings, but Fathauer should fare better, and even qualify for the FEC playoffs – he also already qualified for The Players Championship. He was second on the Web.com Tour in putting this past season en route to eight top 10s.
122 Vijay Singh $900,000Vijay Singh isn't the type of player that's going to jump ship to the Champions Tour because it's easier sledding over there, but his eye might start to wander if the going gets really tough on the PGA Tour. With that in mind, his upside is now limited and he doesn't appear to be a good salary cap candidate this year. In draft leagues it's probably wise to just pass as someone is bound to take him too early.
123 Mike Weir $900,000Talk about a long road back. Mike Weir is living proof that a once-solid golfer is never really done. Sure, he's never going to reach the heights that saw him win a green jacket again, but that doesn't mean he can't be competitive on the PGA Tour again. Whether that means he's barely hanging inside the top-125 or challenging for a spot in the TOUR Championship is the question though. It makes more sense that Weir will only slightly improve off of his 2014 season as opposed to a major improvement though. As such, he's not a good salary cap candidate this season. As for drafts, he should go sometime after the 10th round.
124 Brian Davis $900,000Davis has had a productive career on the PGA Tour, filled with good seasons, but he's never had a great season. He posted his best numbers in 2009 when he earned nearly $1.9 million. The following season he didn't earn as much, but posted a career-high with two runner-up finishes. While it seemed Davis had potential to reach another level a while back, those days are likely gone. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap formats this year. In draft he may find a spot on someone's roster, probably in the 10th round or later.
125 Boo Weekley $900,000It doesn't seem that long ago that Weekley was riding his driver down the first fairway during the Ryder Cup, but it was actually quite a while ago. Weekley will always be fondly remembered for that moment and while he had quite the resurgence in his gold game over the past few years, it does appear that the best is behind him. He's worth a quick look in salary cap leagues, but the upside appears to limited at this point. He should go in the later rounds of a draft league though.
126 Bryce Molder $900,000Molder spent the early part of his career just trying to stay healthy and stay on the PGA Tour. Since that rough stretch at the beginning of his career, Molder has figured out how to retain his card each year with little problem, but he's never quite figured out how to take his game to the next level. The past two years have been particularly bothersome as he's failed to crack the $1 million mark in either season. Since he's appeared to level-off, he doesn't make for a good salary cap candidate this season. In draft leagues he may go undrafted.
127 Retief Goosen $900,000Goosen, like his countryman Ernie Els is starting to feel the effects of aging. Like Els, Goosen is hanging in there pretty well, but he just isn't the same player that he was even five years ago. The upside is too limited now to consider Goosen in a salary cap league. As for draft leagues, he's still got the big name, so he'll probably go too early, but if he's around in the 11th round, he's probably worth a look.
128 Andres Romero $900,0002008 was a banner year for Romero. He was a 26 year-old who earned just over $2 million and already had a PGA Tour victory under his belt. The sky was the limit at that point, but Romero has accomplished very little since that magical season. Fast forward six years and it seems as though the potential is gone. He's still young enough to make a run up the ranks of the PGA Tour, but there just haven't been many signs over the past few years that a jump up is eminent. He's worth a look in salary cap leagues, but he may not be worth the risk anymore. In draft leagues he should go near the 10th round.
129 James Hahn $900,000Goal number one for any PGA Tour rookie is to retain his card for the following season, which Hahn did in 2013. However, once you hit goal number one, the next goal would be to improve upon what you did in your rookie season. That is something Hahn was unable to accomplish in his second season on the PGA Tour. That's not to say that he's headed the wrong way, but it would have been nice to see some improvement from year one to year two. With that said, Hahn looks to have some potential, so perhaps last year's set back was merely an adjustment period to life on the PGA Tour. With that in mind, Hahn should get a look in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should find a spot in the later rounds.
130 Derek Ernst - N $900,000Perhaps the urgency was missing last season. Perhaps Ernst lost his focus or maybe he's just not as good as we first thought? Na, this kid tore it up as a rookie in 2013, not only finishing inside the top-100 on the money list, but also picking up his first career win on the PGA Tour. With that win he became exempt for the 2014 and 2015 seasons, so the urgency to play well last year was absent. It sounds silly, but hey, the kid in only 24, who knows how his mind works.
131 Jamie Donaldson – I $850,000 Donaldson is not a household name to American golf fans but has made a name for himself overseas and through his major championship performances. Earning his card through the Non-Member FedEx Cup Points List, Donaldson’s finishes of T8 at the World Golf Championships-HSBC Champions, T2 at the WGC-Cadillac Championship, T14 at The Masters, T38 at The Players, T37 at the WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and T24 at the PGA Championship got him enough points to clinch his card. On the European Tour, Donaldson has three career wins, including this year’s D+D REAL Czech Masters. A member of this year’s European Ryder Cup squad, he’s currently third in the Race to Dubai (their version of the FedEx Cup) standings. 12th in scoring average on that tour this year, Donaldson’s success on golf’s biggest stages this year should lead to major success on the PGA Tour next year as well.
132 Troy Merritt $800,000Merritt's third season on the PGA Tour was his best, but considering he failed to make even $900k, that's not saying much. His rookie season was fairly productive, but his second season was a disaster. Merritt rebounded well in his third season, but if this is as good as it gets, then he's going to spend his career fighting to stay alive. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues, mainly due to his limited upside. In draft leagues he'll likely go undrafted.
133 Justin Leonard $800,000At the age of 42 Leonard is in the twilight of his career on the PGA Tour. Leonard simply can't produce at the level he could 10 years ago, so his upside is extremely limited. He's still one of the bigger names on the PGA Tour because of what he's accomplished in his career, but it's highly unlikely he makes anymore memories while on this tour. He's not a good option in salary cap leagues, but he'll likely be drafted in the later rounds.
134 David Toms $800,000There were a lot of players just inside the top-125 last year that are seemingly hanging on for dear life. Toms is one of those players as his better days are well behind him. Just like the other guys that barely snuck into the top-125 last year, Tom's upside is extremely limited and as such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he may go undrafted depending on how many players get chosen.
135 Hudson Swafford - W $800,000 Swafford’s anticipated rookie PGA Tour season resulted in a return to the Web.com Tour finals to regain his card. While he is out of the hotbed University of Georgia, the 27-year-old made only 11-of-26 cuts, finishing 146th in the standings. His lone top 10 came in January, with four other top 25s. Can he improve? We suppose so, so the top 125 will be a close call.
136 Eric Axley - W $800,000 The veteran left-hander is now 40, and eight years removed from his lone PGA Tour win (the Valero Texas Open). He’s battled injuries and has played only 23 PGA events in the past five years, At 50th in the priority rankings, he won’t play that many this year. However, in his 10 events in 2013-14, he made seven cuts with two top 25s to wind up 184th in the standings. So, if he plays 18-20 times, could he break the top 125? Based on those 10 events, yes.
137 Victor Dubuisson – I $780,000 Dubuisson entered our golf conscience in a stunning way in February with two of the greatest up-and-downs you will ever see, on one of the biggest stages in golf no less, at the World Golf Championships-Accenture Match Play Championship. He eventually lost the extra holes-championship match to Jason Day, but made sure everyone knew that the “Golden Hands” nickname that runs in his family should be passed down to him, too. Overall on his PGA Tour season, Dubuisson had three top-10s and four top-25 finishes in 10 starts, including a T9 at The Open Championship and a T7 at the PGA Championship. A member of the European Ryder Cup squad, if he can acclimate quickly to playing full-time in America, Dubuisson could be in a line for a very nice 2014-2015 season.
138 Jhonattan Vegas $750,000There was a time, not so long ago that Vegas looked like the next big thing. Believe it or not, that was actually the beginning of the 2011 season. Since that short stretch of fantastic play, Vegas has been either average or below average. Last year he was good enough to earn his card for 2015, but he showed no signs of that guy who nearly won back-to-back events in 2011. The upside is still there, but he likely won't tap into it this season. In draft leagues he may go undrafted.
139 Nicholas Thompson – M $750,000Thompson has put in six full years on the PGA Tour and has only two top-3 finishes to show for it. His best season came in 2008 when he earned over $1.8 million, but he hasn't come close to that total since. In fact, he's failed to even break the $1 million mark in any season since 2008. He's obviously not a good salary cap selection this season and he'll likely go undrafted as well.
140 David Lingmerth - W $750,000 Lingmerth’s claim to fame was finishing second to Tiger Woods in the 2013 Players Championship. He kept his card for 2014, and barely missed the playoffs, at 134th in the standings. But he returns via the Web.com Tour finals, with a decent No. 17 spot in the priority rankings. At 5-foot-7, 175 pounds, he’s among the shorter (in distance) drivers on tour, and isn’t a great putter. Not a good combination.
141 Kyle Stanley - N $750,000Stanley is all about peaks and valleys and last year he was stuck in the valley. Much of the prior three seasons were spent at the peaks, but even within those three seasons he was all over the place. Stanley can't be considered a "must-have" because of his lack of consistency over the years, but with that said, his ceiling is much higher than the number he posted last year. The problem for Stanley this year may be finding enough starts.
142 Ken Duke - N $750,000Duke is fully exempt this season thanks to his win at the 2013 Travelers Championship, so he's automatically worth a look in salary cap leagues. Throw in that he's finished above the $1 million mark in four of his past six full seasons and there's even more reason to consider him. He has had a couple clunkers in the past six seasons though, so he's not a "must-have", but again, at least take a look.
143 Lucas Glover - N $750,000Glover is still exempt from his U.S. Open win a few years back and even though it's been a rough go over the past few years, he still has the talent to be a factor on the PGA Tour. As such, he should be given heavy consideration in salary cap leagues this year as his price holds very little risk.
144 Tim Wilkinson $700,000Wilkinson's PGA Tour career got off to a good start in 2008 when he earned over $1 million, but since that year he's struggled to remain healthy and remain on the PGA Tour. After losing his playing privileges in 2010, Wilkinson worked to regain his status for the following three years and after a solid season on the Web.com Tour, he finally found his way back. He did just enough to retain his card last season, but his prospects for the upcoming season don't look great. As such, he should be ignored in salary cap leagues.
145 Michael Putnam $700,000Putnam's first two go-rounds on the PGA Tour resulted in trips back to the minors, but his third try resulted in his first retained PGA Tour card. Unfortunately, it looks like Putnam is destined to struggled to merely retain his card each season. In other words, there is no upside here. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year and he'll likely go undrafted as well.
146 Danny Lee $700,000Lee did enough to retain his card last season, but it would be a stretch to call it a successful campaign. Lee missed the cut more often than he made the cut in 2014 and if not for a runner-up showing at the Puerto Rico Open, he would have finished well outside the top-125. Lee doesn't have much of a track record on the PGA Tour, so he may have some upside, but it hasn't shown yet, so he's not worth a look in salary cap leagues. He'll likely go undrafted as well.
147 Jim Renner – M $700,000Renner's first attempt on the PGA Tour resulted in a trip back to the Web.com Tour, but his second go-round was much more productive as he nearly doubled his earnings from his rookie season. It's encouraging to see Renner improve so much from his rookie season, but the fact remains that he barely kept his card last year and it happened to be his best effort to date. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year and he'll likely go undrafted as well.
148 Ricky Barnes – P $700,000Barnes finished 127th on the money list but was safely inside the top 125 on the points list at 105. He has been at this for quite a while and only once did he have what can be described as a fantastic season. Even in that season he failed to crack the $2 million mark, so one thing is for certain, is ceiling is not very high. At this point, it looks like any year that results in a card for the following season is a success. Not exactly the type of guy you want in a salary cap league or any other for that matter.
149 John Peterson - W $625,000 A star golfer out of LSU, Peterson won the Web.com Tour finals last year to become a touted PGA Tour rookie. And he proceeded to fall flat, making only seven of 25 cuts. But he used another strong Web.com playoffs, with one second-place check, to get back to the Show. At only 25, he may have just needed to take his lumps for a year, so expect a better effort than 179th in the FEC standings. But how much better is the big question. Making the top 125 will be a close call.
150 Zac Blair - R $600,000 What Zac Blair did in the past month is utterly sensational. Graduating from BYU earlier this year with a degree in Recreation Management, Blair qualified for the U.S. Open, tying for 40th. He didn’t play his first Web.com Tour event until July, but made enough money in basically a two month timeframe to qualify for the Web.com Tour Finals (a T2 at the Price Cutter Charity Championship presented by Dr Pepper certainly helped). But then his game hit a cold snap and he missed the cut in the first three Finals events, shooting no rounds in the 60s, before turning it ON at the Web.com Tour Championship, opening with 63-65 and ending up finishing solo second. That all adds up to an eighth place starting spot on the Reshuffle List and a ton of positive vibes heading into the Frys.com Open in two weeks.
151 Zach Sucher - R $600,000 Sucher’s season started slowly but he was still able to clinch his card by virtue of a three week stretch that helped him finish third on the regular season Web.com Tour money list. It started at the Albertsons Boise Open presented by Kraft Nabisco where he tied for fourth, continued seven days later with a victory at the Midwest Classic, and finished it off the following week with a tie for second at the Stonebrae Classic. In total he amassed six top-10s and 11 top-25s in 25 starts. Seventh in the Web.com Tour All-Around Ranking last season, if Sucher can get better consistency (he missed nine cuts), he could be in line for a solid PGA Tour season.
152 Robert Allenby - P $600,000A couple well-placed finishes put Allenby in the top-125 of the Fed Ex list last season even though he ended up well out of the top-125 on the money list. Allenby caught a huge break in that aspect, but it's doubtful that he'll be able to accomplishment, even with the full card for next season. Allenby is well past his prime and there's no signs of a resurgence any time soon. As such he's not worth much of a look in salary cap leagues and he'll likely go undrafted as well.
153 John Rollins - N $600,000Rollins spent eight consecutive seasons above the $1 million mark on the PGA Tour, but something went horribly wrong last year. At this point, there's no information regarding his playing status for the upcoming season, but he should find a way to get into plenty of events in the 2014-15 season.
154 Spencer Levin - N $600,000It's all about starts for Levin this season. If he gets to double-digits, he'll easily top his 2013 number, but if he doesn't, well, it could be another disappointing season. Considering he's not too far removed from a couple $1 million+ seasons, he'll probably secure enough exemptions to at least double his number from last season.
155 Jason Gore - W $600,000 One of the more colorful golfers around, Gore thus received a number of PGA Tour sponsor’s exemptions last year despite not having his card. He even had a top 10, albeit in the opposite-field Puerto Rico Open. So he should get a good number of starts in 2014-15. He’s one of the handful of PGA Tour winners among the 50, taking the long-forgotten 2005 84 Lumber Classic. But that was long ago, and he hasn’t even won on the Web.com Tour in four years. Despite the fact that everyone will be rooting for him, his best days are far behind. He could secure another top 10 or two, but don’t expect much more.
156 Max Homa - W $600,000 Seeking Special Temporary Membership, Homa played eight events last year while not accruing FedEx Cup points. He started off terrifically, finishing T9 as a sponsor exemption in the season-opening Frys, using that top 10 to get into the Shriners, in which he finished 30th. But that was that, and his bid for STM stalled. He turned to the Web.com Tour in May, and finished in the top 25 in regular-season earnings. So he’s a bit hard to predict. But top 125 seems out of range.
157 Padraig Harrington - N $600,000Harrington's game has been in decline for the past few years, but his drop-off last season caught just about everyone off guard. Though his game isn't going to suddenly resemble his major-winning form again, he should be much better this season. As far as his number of starts, he's still a huge name, so he'll find plenty of opportunities throughout the year.
158 Mark Wilson - N $600,000This is where the PGA Tour exemption system gets tricky. Wilson won in 2012, but did not win during the following two seasons, so he's done with his exemptions for winning, correct? Not sure, because he won multiple times in 2011, he gets a year added on to the normal exemption. Long story short, Wilson, while fully-exempt, should have no problem destroying his number from last season.
159 Blake Adams - N $600,000Adams has dealt with a hip injury over the past two seasons, but he called it a season in early March last season, so hopefully he'll be 100% by the time this season starts. He'll have 16 starts to make just under $500k to secure his card for the remainder of the season. Adams was a $1 million guy when he was healthy, so the goal here would be to see at least a 500% increase in earnings this season.
160 Heath Slocum - W $550,000 Slocum nearly missed this whole month-long Web.com Tour odyssey by a whisper back in the Wyndham Championship. He entered the final event before the playoffs and nearly won it, instead falling just shy – and just shy of the top 125. But until then, he was 158th in the standings. So what’s different this year for the 40-year-old four-time champion? Not much.
161 Andrew Putnam - R $500,000 Putnam, the brother of current PGA Tour player Michael Putnam (who finished the 2013-2014 season 93rd in FedEx Cup points), used a victory at the WNB Golf Classic and a second at the season-opening Pacific Rubiales Colombia Championship Presented by Claro to finish the regular season second in money to clinch his PGA Tour card. He concluded the year with three other top-10s and 13 top-25 finishes in 22 starts. Ninth in putting average and ninth in scoring average on the Web.com Tour this past season, having his brother as a resource could help shorten the learning curve and get Putnam contending on the PGA Tour early on in the fall.
162 Bud Cauley - W $500,000 Cauley is a rarity among the top 50: He’s played the last three seasons on the PGA Tour, this past season finishing 143rd in the point standings, and regained his card by winning the Web.com Tour finals opener. But after missing the cut the next week, he underwent surgery to repair the labrum in his left shoulder. So even though he’s among the most-tested of the new grads – 38th in the FEC point standings in 2012 -- he will miss 4-6 months. He starts out fourth in the priority rankings, but it’s hard to miss that much time and succeed.
163 J.J. Henry - W $500,000 Henry has been a Tour regular since 2001, and made the playoffs every year, until finishing 128th this past season. He didn’t exactly shine in the Web.com Tour finals, flubbing three events but using one fifth-place standing to carry him through. So where does that leave the 39-year-old after his worst year on Tour? Probably no better than 128th in the standings.
164 Tyrone Van Aswegen - W $500,000 The 32-year-old South African completed his first year on the PGA Tour in 144th place in the point standings, and regained his card via the Web.com Tour finals. Van Aswegen made 15-of-25 cuts with four top 25s. From 1011-13, he wasn’t exceptional on the Web.com Tour, either. Outside of the top 125 seems likely for him again.
165 Steve Marino - N $500,000Marino is no lock to succeed this season, but he does have nine events to earn just over $414k this year and retain his playing privileges for the remainder of the season. With Marino, it's always going to come down to health and there's just no way to know how he feels until he gets back out there. He's probably worth the risk in salary cap leagues because of his minimal price.
166 Nick Taylor - R $450,000 Of the guys who made it through via the Web.com Tour Finals, Taylor might have the best story of them all. Dewsweeping in one of the first groups out, Taylor shot a 63 on the Dye Valley course at TPC Sawgrass in the final round of the Web.com Tour Championship to clinch his card, capping off a season in which he had no top-5 finishes but three top-30 finishes in the Web.com Tour Finals that gave him enough money to get a PGA Tour card. 11 missed cuts in 24 starts certainly doesn’t have a nice look to it, and a Reshuffle List of 34th will make the road tougher, but that 63 did show that this guy has a lot of moxie.
167 Alex Cejka - W $450,000 Cejka returns to the PGA Tour with his card for the first time since 2012 and, at 44, is the second oldest of the 50 Web.com Tour graduates. Beginning with a priority ranking of 18th among the 50, he should get in excess of 20 starts, but combining his age and the fact he’s not a long hitter, it’s hard to envision him making an impact, or even retaining his card without returning to the Web.com Tour finals.
168 Chad Collins - W $425,000 Collins missed 17-of-28 PGA Tour cuts, with only a January top 10, to finish 159th in the point standings. Now 47th in the priority rankings, he will be hard-pressed to improve on that standing. Collins has made the FedEx Cup playoffs just once, in 2010.
169 Tony Finau - R $400,000 Finau is a former Big Break contestant – he finished second, losing in the championship match on season 12, Big Break: Disney Golf in 2009 – and will try to join Tommy “Two Gloves” Gainey as the only Big Break alumni to win on the PGA Tour. He got to the PGA Tour by virtue of his victory at the Stonebrae Classic, which included middle rounds of 62-63, and four other top-10s. Averaging 310.3 yards off the tee and ranking ninth in the Web.com Tour All-Around Ranking, Finau is someone to watch in the fall because he ended the year on an up note: finishing T19-T46-T6-T14 over the course of the Web.com Tour Finals. If he can acclimate himself quickly to life on the PGA Tour, look for him to contend early.
170 Sean O'Hair - W $400,000 Here’s the biggest enigma in the entire top 50. Or maybe he’s just a former enigma and just not very good anymore. O’Hair, with four PGA Tour wins, lastly in 2011, was 160th in the FEC point standings. And 170th the year before. So what should be different this coming season? Probably nothing.
171 Chez Reavie - N $400,000Reavie has virtually an entire season to earn enough money to match the 125th player on the money last season, but whether he gets there or not really doesn't matter. He's got 24 starts this season and he's certain to provide a ton of value in salary cap leagues.
172 Blayne Barber - R $350,000 Barber is most known for his good sportsmanship after he disqualified himself from the first stage of PGA Tour Qualifying School in 2012 six days after play was completed after he was unsure he broke a rule while in a bunker (http://golfweek.com/news/2012/nov/05/blayne-barber-disqualifies-himself-six-days-after-/). The golfing gods have a way of rewarding people who do the right thing, and less than two years later, Barber is now a PGA Tour rookie. (As that Golfweek Magazine article reminds us, Chesson Hadley, who got through only because Barber DQ’d himself, was the only PGA Tour rookie to win on tour in 2013-2014. He never makes it to the Web.com Tour for 2013 if Barber doesn’t DQ himself.) This year on the Web.com Tour Barber used a win at the South Georgia Classic presented by First State Bank and Trust Company and a T3 at the BMW Charity Pro-Am Presented by SYNNEX Corporation two weeks later to help earn enough money to get his card. He finished the regular season seventh on the money list, and tacked on a T6 finish at the third Finals event to help his Reshuffle List position. With some more good fortune on his side, Barber could have a great chance to erase a lot of demons this season on the PGA Tour
173 Whee Kim - R $350,000 Kim, a 22-year old South Korean who turned pro in 2010, had a spotty Web.com Tour season. He came out of the gate fast with a T8 in his first start of the season in South America, but soon started to play inconsistently, mixing mid-level finishes with missed cuts. His only regular season top-10 came at the Cleveland Open in June, and needed a third place finish at the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship to seal his card. A short hitter who averaged just 288.1 yards off the tee this season and was just 31st in the All-Around Ranking, Kim will need to be accurate off the tee and hit a lot of greens (think Zach Johnson) to succeed on the PGA Tour. He’s got the talent to do it – in 2012 he led for two rounds at the PGA Tour Qualifying School and beat Kevin Na in a playoff at the Shinhan Donghae Open, an event which featured Paul Casey and Charlie Wi coming up just short of the playoff – so fantasy owners will want to keep tabs on him early and often.
174 Mark Hubbard - R $300,000 Nine top-25s in 24 starts helped propel Hubbard to the PGA Tour, with a T2 at the United Leasing Championship Presented by PTI his best performance of the season. Most impressive about Hubbard’s season is probably the fact that he only missed the cut five times, something that if repeated next season on the PGA Tour, will do him a ton of good. Ranking 28th in the All-Around Ranking, his starting spot of 31st on the Reshuffle List will put him in a bit of a hole if he doesn’t play well, but if he can rack up a bunch of mid-pack-at-worst finishes, he could start 2015 in a position of having a lot more starts on the west coast.
175 Daniel Berger - R $300,000 Berger didn’t get in the winner’s circle during the 2014 Web.com Tour season but certainly came close, ending the year with a second and two thirds. The two thirds came in a three-week span, impressive stuff considering a MC was the middle result. Berger’s Web.com Tour Finals was a bit spotty, as he only played three of the four events, going T19-MC-65. As a result, his Reshuffle List position is hurt, as he’ll start the 2014-2015 PGA Tour season mid-pack, in 25th. The eighth longest hitter on tour who ranked 16th in greens in regulation this past season, Berger will need to make the rookie adjustment to the PGA Tour, get enough starts, and play well in those starts to have a successful season. It’s a lot to ask, but is doable if he plays well enough.
176 Sam Saunders - W $300,000 Let’s get this out of the way: He’s Arnold Palmer’s grandson. Saunders registered four top 16s in the Web.com Tour finals, after having a lackluster regular season. The 27-year-old from Clemson played one PGA Tour event last year – yes, it was Bay Hill. But he acquitted himself nicely, finishing T43 (after a final-round 77). It’s a feel-good story that he’s made the Tour but, despite having a good priority ranking at No. 13, he’ll probably be more pauper than the second coming of the King.
177 Colt Knost - W $300,000 Knost played on the PGA Tour in 2009 and 2011-13, highlighted by two third-place showings in 2012. He didn’t have a strong season on the Web.com Tour, but got hot at the right time, with a runner-up, another top 10 and a top 15 in the playoffs. So while he has a No. 6 priority ranking, he played well in a very small sample size to get there. It doesn’t bode well for a strong return to the PGA Tour.
178 Scott Pickney - R $275,000 Pickney peaked at the right time, and thus has a ticket on the PGA Tour. After an erratic opening part of his season, he finished T11 and T5 at the final two regular season events, and then went T25-T4-WD-T14 in the Finals. With the 2014-2015 PGA Tour season starting in just two weeks at the Frys.com Open, that’s the kind of momentum that can propel someone into contention early and often. Another reason to like Pickney: he shot two 65s at the Web.com Tour Championship, when theoretically the pressure should have been at its highest.
179 Tom Gillis - W $250,000 Gillis has had an interesting stretch the past five years, the first four spent on the PGA Tour. He was 43rd in the point standings in 2010, 114th in 2011 and 40th in 2012 before plummeting to 152nd in 2013 to lose his card. But he’s back, but he’s also now 46 years old. But he was fifth in putting average on the Web.com tour, third in birdie average in second putts per round. Is that enough to turn in a good season, even in the top 150? Probably not.
180 Francesco Molinari – I $250,000 Francesco and his brother Edoardo have been mainstays on the golf scene for years now, with Francesco ending the 2013-2014 PGA Tour season with the better results. He finished the season with only two top-10s, a T5 at the Arnold Palmer Invitational Presented by Mastercard and a T6 at The Players Championship. However, of his 12 PGA Tour starts, seven were in the top-25, and over time he accumulated enough points to get his PGA Tour card. The concern with Molinari, however, has nothing to do with his 2014 season. Instead, it’s his lack of knowledge of PGA Tour venues. Because he’s been a non-member since he started qualifying for majors, Molinari’s PGA Tour schedule has consisted solely of the majors, the WGCs, and the events surrounding those such as Doral. However to be successful on the PGA Tour you need to perform well in all parts of the schedule, including at many venues Molinari has never seen before. There’s a reason why many guys win in their second and third year on tour: that process takes time. Expect the same for Molinari.
181 Jim Herman - W $250,000 Herman had some good 2013 PGA Tour numbers – fifth in the total driving and fifth in ball striking – that boded well for some decent play in 2013-14. But he slumped badly in both and, combined with his traditionally poor putting, wound up back in the Web.com Tour finals. He used a pair of fourth-place showing to return to the PGA Tour for a third straight year and fourth in five. He didn’t so much as have a top 25 last season, and finishing inside the 125 seems a stretch at this point.
182 Jon Curran - R $200,000 Curran finished 12th on the regular season money list and enters the 2014-2015 PGA Tour season in 21st (out of 50) position on the Reshuffle List. He earned his PGA Tour card via a win at the Brasil Champions Presented by HSBC and two other top-10 finishes. He struggled for much of the summer, however, and missed the cut in 11 of his last 13 starts. As a result he’s got little momentum heading into the fall, and would appear to be the perfect player to have a tough time making the immediate adjustment from the Web.com Tour to the PGA Tour. There’s no doubt that Curran has a lot of talent, but as someone who finished 116th in the Web.com Tour All-Around Ranking, fantasy players should hold off on drafting or starting him in the fall until they see his play improve.
183 Patrick Cantlay - N $200,000Cantlay has 11 events to earn over $600k on a medical extension this season and although it seems unlikely that he'll get there, he still has 11 starts and he should have no problem at minimum doubling his earnings this season. If by chance he does earn enough to get his card back, then that's just icing on the cake.
184 Byron Smith - R $175,000 Smith found the winner’s circle in late May at the Rex Hospital Open when he shot 63-66 on the weekend to seal his first victory. The very next week was his only other top-10 finish, a T8 at the Cleveland Open. Ranking 128th in total driving with nine missed cuts in 24 starts, Smith will need to improve on his consistency to succeed at the next level. In addition, with MC-T46-withdrawl-MC his line for the Web.com Tour Finals and a 39th starting spot on the Reshuffle List, fantasy owners may want to see improved play from Smith before starting him on their team.
185 Andres Gonzales - W $175,000 He’s proven to be a quality Web.com Tour golfer, with victories in his last two full seasons. That helped get him back to the PGA Tour, which he played full-time in 2011 and 2013, with just one top 10. He’s only 31, a time when some golfers are entering their prime, but Gonzalez is probably not one of them. If he finishes in the top 200, he’ll qualify again for next year’s Web.com Tour finals.
186 Fabian Gomez - W $175,000 Gomez is back after full-time duty in 2011 and 2013, when he notched his best finish, runner-up in the opposite-field Puerto Rico Open. A second-place finish on the Web.com Tour helped him get back, securing a top-25 spot on the regular-season money list. At 48th in the priority rankings, it’s not a good place to be.
187 Jonathan Randolph - R $150,000 Randolph also got close but didn’t quite sniff the winner’s circle in 2014 on the Web.com Tour. He had a second, two thirds, and a fourth en route to over $200,000 in earnings and a 27th place Reshuffle List position to start the 2014-2015 PGA Tour season. 120th in driving accuracy and 139th in greens in regulation last year on the Web.com Tour, however, Randolph will need to improve on his consistency to succeed on the PGA Tour. If that doesn’t happen, it could be a long year and end in a trip right back to the Web.com Tour Finals.
188 Greg Owen - W $150,000 After playing on the PGA Tour for seven of nine years from 2005-2013, the Englishman lost his card. He used a victory on the Web.com Tour – his first on either tour – to return. He’s now 42 and, though he was as high as 88th in the standings as recently as 2012,that seems like wishful thinking in 2014-15.
189 Bill Lunde - W $150,000 Lunde won the 2010 Turning Stone Resort Championship for his lone PGA Tour title, and he cleared $1 million in earnings. Let’s hope he saved, because it’s not happening again. He also had some decent years in 2009, ’11-’12 for a four-year run on Tour. He finished 22nd on the Web.com Tour money list to regain his card and, at 44th in the priority rankings, will have a tough time getting enough starts to make a dent.
190 Cameron Percy - W $125,000 The 40-year-old Aussie returns to the PGA tour after a one-year absence, having Web.com Tour victory and third-place finish facilitate his promotion. In 2013, Percy missed 13-of-21 PGA cuts, with only one top 25. A similar 2014-15 seems in the cards for him.
191 Steve Wheatcroft - W $125,000 Wheatcroft played on the PGA Tour in 2007, ’10 and ’12, with a lone top 10 (third in 2010). He used a victory on the Web.com Tour this past season as a springboard to regaining his card, but it was his lone top 10 all year. So Wheatcroft caught lightning in a bottle for one week, rather than playing good golf for a long stretch. As such, with a less-than-favorable No. 36 priority ranking to start the season, he will not make an impact on the PGA Tour.
192 Alex Prugh - W $125,000 After only four made cuts in 16 PGA Tour starts, resulting in 206th in the point standings, Prugh played his best golf of the season in the Web.com Tour finals to come back for a fourth go-round on the PGA Tour. Being an economics major at the University of Washington, Prugh should know things don’t look much brighter for him monetarily this time.
193 Steve Alker - W $125,000 The 43-year-old New Zealander played full-time on the PGA Tour only once, back in 2003. He had a win and a second on the Web.com Tour to regain playing privileges, and is 20th in the opening priority rankings. This could amount to a final shot in the Big Show for the veteran, as making a name for himself at this stage of his career seems unlikely, to say the least.
194 Ryan Armour - W $100,000 The 38-year-old Ohioan used five top 10s, including a runner-up, to finish in the top 25 on the Web.com Tour regular-season money list, which is a good thing, since he missed the last three cuts of the playoffs. At 40th in the priority ranking, getting 20 PGA Tour starts will be difficult. Armour played two PGA seasons, in 2007-08, with three top 10s. Don’t expect him to play two consecutive seasons this time around.
195 Daniel Chopra - N $100,000Simple case of risk/reward with Chopra this season. He's not likely to get a lot of starts on the PGA Tour, but there's virtually no risk involved. Chopra could easily surpass his 2014 number with one made cut
196 Vaughn Taylor - N $100,000Once upon a time, Taylor was thought to be one of the up and coming players on the PGA Tour. That time was over a decade ago however and his game in no way resembles that player. With that said, he's got a little left in the tank and it wouldn't take much to top his number from 2014. His starts will be limited, but he might need only a couple to provide value in a salary cap league.
197 Kyle Reifers - W $100,000 Reifers won once on the Web.com Tour – in 2006. This season, he parlayed three top 3s to eke inside the top 25 on the money list, and is an unfavorable 38th in the priority rankings. The 30-year old has two prior PGA Tour seasons, in 2007 and 2012, without much fanfare. That will continue in 2014-15.
198 Scott Verplank - N $100,000Verplank will use his top-25 career money list exemption to play this season on the PGA Tour and while he's unlikely to earn a lot of money this season, he should have no problem outgaining his number from last season.
199 Tom Hoge - R $80,000 Hoge used the Web.com Tour Finals to seal his card for the 2014-2015 PGA Tour season after failing to get a top-10 finish on the Web.com Tour until July and having no top-5 finish until his third at the Chiquita Classic, the second Finals event. Overall he went T53-3-T22-T52 over the four Finals events, and will look to take that momentum into the fall. On the flipside, he’s not overly impressive statistically, and the lack of a top-10 for the first half of the Web.com Tour season could spell trouble on the big stage. Fantasy owners need to be patient and see how Hoge plays.
200 Roger Sloan - R $75,000 The good news: Sloan was a champion on the Web.com Tour in 2014, winning the Nova Scotia Open in a playoff. The bad news: it was his only top-10 finish of the season in 23 starts. He did make 14 cuts, yet had only four top-25s, and he’s better than 31st in only two statistical categories. That lack of strong play across a wide swath of the year (he started his season in February) is troublesome. Keep an eye on him because he does have winning talent – he won in a playoff after all – but it could be a very streaky year as he adjusts.
201 Oscar Fraustro - R $75,000 Fraustro is proof that some awful play can be erased with some timely good finishes. He missed 13 of 22 cuts during the Web.com Tour regular season – with a T5 and T9 sprinkled in, and to make matters worse missed the cut in three of the four Web.com Tour Finals events. Yet the one event he did make the cut in was a T4 at the Chiquita Classic, good enough to have a 2014-2015 PGA Tour card. Though he was 10th in total driving on the Web.com Tour this season, his overall inconsistency will scare a lot of fantasy owners away and we recommend the same: stay away until you see Fraustro put together two consistent weeks.
202 Chris DiMarco - N $50,000About a decade ago, DiMarco was one of the best players on the PGA Tour, but a rib injury derailed his production and he's never been the same. That being said, he's certainly better than he showed last season and although he won't find many starts this year, he'll surely get a handful and that should be enough to justify his selection in a salary cap league.
203 Sung Joon Park - R $45,000 Park had a kind of odd year. In 15 events he made 8 cuts, but was either really good – he had a T3 in February and a T5 in June – or really bad, missing six cuts and being disqualified once. But a T14-T11 finish at the last two Web.com Tour Finals events gave him a PGA Tour card, and a chance to make it on the big stage. Not in his favor is a 42nd Reshuffle List position, which means the first reshuffle period is crucial for him to play well, improve his position, and thus have more playing opportunities for the first part of the 2015 portion of the season.
204 Carlos Sainz Jr - R $45,000 The good news for Sainz: he’s got a 2014-2015 PGA Tour card. The bad news: he’s next to last on the Reshuffle List, meaning he has little control over his schedule and is at the mercy of veterans for how many playing opportunities he gets. He’s a talented guy – he tied for second at the Price Cutter Charity Championship presented by Dr Pepper and finished three of the four Web.com Tour Finals events in the top 31 – but is ranked no better than 48th in any major statistical category and has his back up against the wall at the very start of the season. Play well early, however, and that all changes.
205 Benjamin Alvarado - N $30,000Has only four starts on a medical exemption to make over $600k, which he's unlikely to do, but with virtually no risk involved and four guaranteed starts, he's probably worth a look.
206 Bobby Gates - N $25,000Gates has five starts to earn over $700k and retain his card for the upcoming season and while he's unlikely to accomplish that, he certainly can make more than $10k this season. As such, he's worth a look in salary cap leagues this season.



RotoWire golf writers Jeremy Schilling and Len Hochberg contributed to this report.