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Golf Draft Kit: 2013-14 Golfer Profiles

Greg Vara

Greg Vara

Vara is the lead golf writer at RotoWire. He was named the 2013 FSWA Golf Writer of the Year. In addition to producing the weekly preview and the bulk of the draft kit content, Vara participates in Yahoo!'s "Experts Picks" where he routinely dominates. He also picks college football games against the spread in his "College Capper" article.

DECEMBER UPDATE: Revised 2013-14 golfer profiles and projected earnings following the fall season for leagues whose seasons being in January.

Ranking includes golfers who have earned 2013-14 tour cards:

Top 125 on PGA Tour money list
Top 125 on FedEx Cup Points list - P
Top 25 on Web.com money list - W
Top 25 from The Finals - F
Non-members and foreigners - N
Rookies - R

RANKGOLFER2013-14 PROJECTED EARNINGS2013-14 SEASON OUTLOOK
1Tiger Woods$7,000,000By any other measuring stick than the one we have for Tiger, 2013 was a great season. Five wins and over $8 million in earnings and yet there was still something missing -- a major. He'll get that elusive major in 2014, but as for matching the other numbers, that might prove more difficult. He's still the top pick in a draft format, but tough to pull the trigger on him in a salary cap format.
2Adam Scott$6,000,000With the major-monkey off his back, Scott may finally peak in 2014. There's no doubting Scott's talent, but for years it seemed like his mental game wasn't quite there. That doesn't seem to be an issue anymore and the sky is the limit. Scott has the game to reach number one in the world and he's also good enough to win multiple majors in the same season. The only problem concerning Scott is his limited schedule. He only played 16 times last season, so he needs to make the most of each and every event. He's a top-5 pick in draft formats and a decent pick in salary cap formats -- even at the hefty price.
3Brandt Snedeker$5,500,000Snedeker is a tough guy to peg. He'll go on stretches where he looks like the best player on the planet, only to disappear for a long stretch. Last year he had a good excuse to disappear as he was dealing with an injury soon after a hot start. If fully healthy, Snedeker could challenge for the money list title and possibly win a major. The former seems more likely at this point though as Snedeker hasn't been a factor at too many majors early in his career. If healthy the entire season, Snedeker is a top-5 pick in a draft format and even a reasonable pick in a salary cap format.
4Henrik Stenson$5,000,000What to do with Henrik Stenson. He came on like gang-busters last season, but he may have set the bar too high. It's not like he came out of nowhere last year, Stenson had been one of the better players on the planet about 5-7 years ago before his game fell apart, so there is a foundation to build on there, but is he really a top-5 player? For now it's probably best to let someone else take him in the top-5 of a draft and let the chips fall where they may. There are simply too many quality options at the top of the draft to take a chance on Stenson this year. That's also true in salary cap formats where his cap number from last year is just too high.
5Matt Kuchar$5,000,000Kuchar just keep plugging along. He's not the flashiest player on the PGA Tour, but year in and year out, he's always producing. Kuchar's ceiling is only limited by the fact that he's yet to win a major. He's got everything needed to win one, it just hasn't happened yet. Look for Kuchar to be more competitive at the majors in 2014 and for his totals to be near what they were last year. He's a legit number two pick in a draft format, but probably a bit too pricy in a salary cap format.
6Phil Mickelson$4,750,000Mickelson is not slowing down one bit. A lot of guys start to tail-off in their 40s, but Mickelson seems to be getting better. Getting better when it counts the most anyway. Mickelson came oh so close to capturing two majors last year, but had to settle for just one. He seems more focused than ever on the U.S. Open, which can be a good thing, but too much focus on one event can be detrimental, especially if you don't win it. Mickelson will continue to do what he's done over the past decade again this year. He'll win a couple events, compete at one or two majors and earn somewhere around $5 million. Mickelson is a top-5 pick in a draft format, but his upside probably isn't high enough to take him in a salary cap format.
7Zach Johnson$4,500,000Johnson struggled out of the gate in 2013, but he finished with a fury that saw him end up in the top-10 on the money list last year. That furious stretch included seven top-10s in eight events and over 3$ million in earnings. The early-season struggles are a little alarming, but Johnson has been too good for too long to think it's anything more than just one bad stretch in an otherwise solid career. Expect Johnson to start and finish strong in 2014. Johnson should go in the 10-20 range in draft formats, but his number is probably too high to be considered in salary cap formats.
8Jordan Spieth$4,500,000Jordan Spieth took the PGA Tour by storm in 2013 and this might finally be a case of a guy living up to his huge potential. Where many before him have faltered, Spieth took all the hype and made everyone believe in greatness again. Golf is not an easy sport to thrive in when all the attention is focused on you, Tiger Woods is an obvious exception, but for every Tiger, there are 10 guys who couldn't live up to the hype. Spieth is off to a great start, but the challenge now is to keep up the pace and even improve upon it. Spieth looks like that special player that comes along only every so often. With that said, he's a legit top-10 pick in drafts and a decent option in salary cap leagues.
9Jason Day$4,500,000Jason Day needs to win a major and he needs to do it soon. The reason? He's come so close, so many times that if he's not careful, it could easily start becoming a mind game. Day shouldn't have to worry about that however as his game is just too solid not to break through at some point. Majors aside, Day should be winning on the PGA Tour at a higher clip as well. He's the type of guy who should pick up wins in a couple spots each season regardless of how he plays at the majors. He should go in the top-10 in a draft league and he's a pretty good option in salary cap leagues, even at his price of just over $3 million.
10Rory McIlroy$4,500,000McIlroy's struggles were well documented last year, so much so that it's easy to forget that at the end of the 2012 season he was unquestionably the best player in the world. A lot has happened since then, an equipment change most notably and although he never resembled the best player in the world last year and new year can turn everything around. The question is not if he'll improve on his 2013 number, but how much? I think quite a bit and as such, he's the highest "must-have" player on the 2013 money list. In salary cap formats he'll likely be taken in the top-10 and rightfully so.
11Steve Stricker$4,000,000Steve Stricker may have changed the course of the PGA Tour in 2013 by playing an extremely limited schedule, yet succeeding greatly. Skepticism was high entering the 2013 season on whether Stricker could produce on such a limited schedule, but to his credit, nearly every time he teed it up, he played well. The limited schedule will not work for everyone, but for those top-tier players who were considering playing less, this might be the proof that they needed that it can be done. As for Stricker, he'll play a limited schedule again in 2014 and he'll no doubt play well, but his upside will be limited because of it. He's probably not a top-10 pick in draft formats because of the schedule and he's definitely a risky pick in salary cap formats.
12Justin Rose$4,000,000After years of flashing greatness, Rose finally hit pay dirt with his first major victory at last year's U.S. Open. Yes, the U.S. Open that will go down in history as the one Phil Mickelson should have won. None the less, Rose picked up his first major win and like Adam Scott, the sky appears to be the limit. Rose however doesn't have quite the track record of others in his class, but the upside remains. Like many foreign players however, Rose will be limited by his schedule. With that said, he's a top-10 pick in drafts and a 50/50 proposition in salary cap formats.
13Keegan Bradley$4,000,000After an impressive 2012 campaign, Bradley was expected by many to take his game to the next level in 2013. While that didn't happen exactly, he played well enough to give us hope that he's still that guy with all that potential. In that sense, Bradley enters 2014 with a little something to prove. While other players of his caliber, Scott and Rose, were winning majors, Bradley was struggling. Expect Bradley to up his game in 2014 and again become a factor a one or two majors. Bradley should be slotted somewhere around the 10th pick in draft and he provides some value as a salary cap selection as well.
14Hunter Mahan$3,500,000After an up and down start to his career, Mahan has shown the consistency over the past few years that we like to see, but it's the upside that's been missing lately, especially last year. Mahan's 2013 season couldn't be classified as a disappointment, but he didn't crack the $3 million mark and he didn't pick up a win. With that said, if he happens to pick up a win in 2014, you could see a nice bump in his numbers. He's one of the few players in this range with enough upside to be a good salary cap option. In draft leagues he should go in the 10-20 range.
15Dustin Johnson$3,500,000Dustin Johnson is that guy who looks the part, sometimes plays the part, but rarely nails the part. If that doesn't make sense, let's compare him to that number one draft pick in the NBA who goes for 30 and 10 one night then disappears off the stat sheet the next. You never know what you are going to get from DJ and it can be maddening. That's both an insult and a compliment in that we know how good he can be, but we don't get enough of that player throughout the year. One of these years he's going to blow up in a big way, but there's no way to tell if it will be this year. DJ's range in drafts might be wider than anyone on the PGA Tour. He could go in the top-10 or fall into the mid-20s. He's worth a look in salary cap formats as well -- if you think this is the year.
16Webb Simpson$3,500,000Simpson avoided the first-time-major-winner's hangover last year, but he didn't exactly take his game to the next level. Simpson has enough talent to be a top-10 player, but he'll have to step his game up this year. The good news is he's already picked up a win during the 2013-2014 portion of the schedule, so he's off to a good start this year -- if that matters. We've yet to see how the mini-season that concluded in November will affect the 2014 schedule, but whatever the outcome, Simpson will enter 2014 feeling good about his game. Simpson should go in the 10-20 range in draft leagues and he's also worth consideration in salary cap leagues.
17Nick Watney$3,500,000Watney was on his way to a very disappointing 2013 season, but he turned it all around with a solid finish. The end of the season play makes sense, it's the early-season struggles that was bizarre. With that said, it is those early-season struggles that makes Watney a good option in salary cap formats. Those same struggles might allow you to grab him later in the draft than you normally would as well. He should go in the 10-20 range, but don't be surprised if he slips a little further than that.
18Charl Schwartzel$3,500,000Schwartzel entered the 2013 on fire and was able to sustain a pretty solid run into the first few months of the season, but his game fell off soon after and he didn't really get it back until just before the end of the year. With that said, Schwartzel looks like one of the better players on the PGA Tour and he should continue to improve in 2014. He's got a solid world ranking, so he'll get a chance to play against the best this season, it's just a matter of whether he can find his major-winning form again or not. Schwartzel should go in the 15-25 range in drafts and should also be considered in salary cap leagues.
19Luke Donald$3,500,000While other players around his age and talent level are winning majors, Donald seems stuck in neutral. Nearly $2 million in earnings is quite the season for just about anyone, but we've come to expect more from Donald. We've seen his upside, he's blown by the $2 million dollar mark in previous years, but it seems like we haven't seen his best form in quite a while. The good news is, at this price, he's worth the pick in salary cap leagues because there's virtually no risk and a lot of upside. In draft leagues he could be taken as early as the 10-20 range.
20Bill Haas$3,250,000Haas has to be the most under-the-radar player on the PGA Tour. Year after year he's in or near the top-20 on the money list at the end of the season, but outside his run at the Fed Ex Championship a few years back, you don't often hear his name in conversations of the best players on the PGA Tour. That's likely due to his absence on the leader boards at many of the majors and that's something he'll have to change if he's to be considered in the class of players such as Adam Scott and Justin Rose. Haas could go anywhere in the 10-20 range in a draft format, but he should probably be going anywhere from 15-20. Haas is a risky option in salary cap formats as he'll have a hard time significantly improving upon his number from 2013.
21Jason Dufner$3,000,000Dufner's 2013 was headed nowhere, and then… he won a major. Typical Dufner. If you've watched him play, you know, it's impossible to get a read on this guy. He always has the same demeanor, which in golf is probably a good thing. Never to high, never to low, which is how, even when we all discounted him, he won the PGA Championship. As for the future, how in the world can anyone tell? We do know this, he's got a load of talent and doesn't seemed phased by his new status as a major champion, which means he shouldn't suffer the hangover that often comes the year after one's first major. Dufner will go anywhere from 15-25 in draft leagues and he's worth a look in salary cap leagues.
22Jimmy Walker$3,000,000Walker was one of the more consistent players in 2013, but his final number was a little low because he failed to find a victory. That fact however is working in his favor this year as his number is in a relatively reasonable position. Walker should continue to improve in 2014, which makes him a good pick in the 25-35 range. He's also a decent option in salary cap leagues.
23Gary Woodland$3,000,000Woodland struggled with injuries over the past couple seasons, but when fully healthy, he's pretty darn good. It took a while for Woodland to get into the groove last season, but he finally found his old form at the Reno-Tahoe Open and once he got a taste of victory, his game only improved. Woodland has a very high ceiling and should definitely be considered in salary cap formats. In drafts leagues he could go in the 20-30 range.
24Rickie Fowler$3,000,000As far as fantasy golf goes, there aren't many players that are more of a lightning-rod than Rickie Fowler. Fowler has obvious talent, but he's been hyped so much it's hard to figure out if he's just really good or potentially great. He finished outside the top-40 last season, which has to be considered a disappointment, but just how high is his ceiling? Where do we expect him? Whether you think he's a top-10 player or just a top-30 player, he's got good value in salary cap formats because of his number from last year. In draft leagues he'll probably go in the 20-30 range, but don't be surprised if someone takes him in the 10-20 range.
25Ryan Moore$3,000,000Is this the year? It is asked nearly every year of Moore, but with a win already under his belt during the 2013-2014 portion on the season, this might actually be the year. Moore came onto the PGA Tour with a lot of hype and although he's had a solid career, he hasn't lived up to the lofty expectations...yet. He just might do so this year. Moore is a solid salary cap option this season and in draft leagues he should go in the 40-50 range, possibly higher.
26Billy Horschel$2,750,000Horschel was the story of the first-half of the 2013 season. He had shown some flashes the previous year, but nothing like what he showed us in 2013. Horschel went from a guy trying to make the top-125, to a guy gunning for majors and multiple wins. The problem with Horschel and the question you have to ask of any other golfer that improves so significantly over the course of one season is -- can he keep it up? Horschel looks the part and his game doesn't look like it will drop off significantly, but as for an uptick in his numbers? Probably not likely either. Horschel should go in the 15-25 range in drafts and he's not a good option for salary cap leagues.
27Jim Furyk$2,750,000Furyk's failure to close while in the lead is becoming quite the burden and you have to wonder if it's something he can overcome going forward. It seems odd to question whether a guy who's won so often on the PGA Tour can close, but his inability to do so, time and time again over the past couple years is troublesome. There's no reason to expect that his game will fall-off completely, but at this stage, it's hard to see much upside. Furyk is still a reliable player and should go in the 25-35 range, but he's not a good salary cap option.
28Kevin Streelman$2,750,000Streelman finally put it all together in 2013 and now that the pressure is off, great things could be in store. Streelman started his career on a high-note, but his game fell off in the following years. He's seemingly adjusted to life on the PGA Tour now, which means he can focus on continually improving. He's got plenty of game, but he did set the bar pretty high last year. There are a lot of quality options in this range and as such, Streelman should probably go in the 25-30 range in drafts. In salary cap formats, he doesn't look like a good option -- bar too high.
29Graham DeLaet$2,750,000If you checked out late in the season last year, you may be surprised that DeLaet cracked the top-20 on the 2013 money list. That's because DeLaet made most of his money and had the majority of his success during the second-half of the season. That doesn't mean that it was a fluke, but we'd like to see a little more from DeLaet before we slot him in the 10-20 range. As it stands now, he should be going anywhere from 25-35 in draft leagues. His 2013 number isn't so high that you can automatically discount him from salary cap league, but again, there isn't much beyond his 2013 season to go off of.
30Jonas Blixt$2,750,000Blixt showed some flashes in 2013, which led to a win at the Greenbrier Classic, but outside that win, he didn't show the consistency that many expected. Blixt is becoming that guy, who looks really good one week and then disappears for long stretches. Fact of the matter is, he's better than that and the consistency will come with time. Will it come this year? There's a good chance it will, which would make him a good option in salary cap formats.
31D.A. Points$2,500,000Points had a very solid 2013 campaign and while he didn't show the consistency that we'd like to see throughout the year, there were signs that he might just have figured this thing out. He doesn’t have the name recognition of a lot of guys that finished near him on the money list, so he probably won't go in the top-20, but if you are picking around spot number 30, he's worth a look. In salary cap leagues he's not a great option as the bar was set pretty high for him last year.
32Graeme McDowell$2,500,000McDowell was a very popular pick entering the U.S. and British Opens last year, but he fell flat in both. This could be a case of living up to raised expectations or it could be that McDowell is what he is -- a good, but not great player. That's no insult, many golfers on the PGA Tour would love to have his resume, but after failing to build of his U.S. Open win a couple years back, you have to wonder if he'll ever take the next step. McDowell remains a pretty big name and as such he'll likely go as early as 20th and as late as 30th. His price is low enough to consider a pick in a salary cap league, but it's definitely a risk.
33Roberto Castro$2,500,000Castro came out of nowhere in 2013 and for those that didn't pay close attention, he's probably still under the radar entering the 2014 season. This is the case of a guy having a career year out of the blue, so taking him this season is a bit of a risk, but if you can get him later in the draft, he could pay off big time. In salary cap leagues he's probably too much of a risk at this price.
34Scott Piercy$2,500,000Played well early, middle and late in the season. That's not something you see from too many players out here that aren't positioned in the top-20. That's probably a good sign for Piercy going forward. Now he just needs to have a couple more high-end finishes and he can really improve upon his number from last year. Piercy is worth a look in salary cap leagues and should go in the 35-45 range in drafts.
35Chris Stroud$2,500,000Stroud is an interesting case entering the 2014 season. He got off to a slow start in 2013, but hit a hot stretch a few months into the season where he picked up his only four top-10s of the season. He cooled off near the end of the season, but he came back better than ever during the 2013-2014 portion of the season. Stroud picked up two top-3s in four events last fall and that could be a sign of things to come.
36Boo Weekley$2,250,000Don't bury him, he's not dead yet. Though many left him for dead after an awful four-year stretch, Weekley rose from the ashes in 2013 and now looks to return to the place where he was just 5-6 years ago when he was riding his driver like a horse down the first fairway during his Ryder Cup match. It's impossible to root against this guy, he's golf's answer to Big Papi -- the loveable big man who's always got a smile on his face, but don't let that persuade you to take him out of position. He had a nice year, but it's only one out of a handful and he regressed once, he could do it again. With that said, you should probably wait on him until somewhere in the 30s. In salary cap leagues he's probably too much of a risk.
37Sergio Garcia$2,250,000The main question entering every season for Garcia is whether or not he'll ever get that elusive major. He's stated that he doesn't think he will, but perhaps that was just a way to take some of the pressure off. Professional golf is littered with players that won a major after everyone gave up on them and Garcia could easily be one of those players. Regardless of the major situation, Garcia continues to be productive and he should again have another solid season in 2014. His upside is questionable, but at just over $2 million, he should get a look. In draft leagues he could go higher than he should because of name recognition, but he should be going in the 25-35 range.
38Lee Westwood$2,250,000Just as the major questions continue to dog Sergio Garcia, they'll continue to haunt Lee Westwood as unlike Garcia, Westwood actually had a major in his grasp last year only to falter in the final round. It's hard to say if he'll ever get that elusive major, but his production is fairly easy to predict. He'll contend during one or two majors, maybe pick up a win elsewhere and collect a bunch of top-10s -- just like last year. As such, he's a good pick in the 25-30 range, but probably not a good salary cap option.
39Patrick Reed$2,250,000Reed saved his best play for late in the season last year, which can be looked at in one of two ways. Some would question a player who didn't do much outside his win in August, but considering he picked up that win in August and not late in the fall, I think that bolsters the argument for Reed. Reed made 11 of his final 13 cuts and he's still very young at just 23. He might take a few years to fully adjust or he might take this solid season and build on it. Whatever the case, he's got some upside, which makes him an interesting pick in salary cap leagues.
40Bubba Watson$2,250,000Some players handle the major hangover well and some don't. Watson appears to have struggled with his new status as a major winner last year as he failed to crack the $2 million mark. Watson is clearly better than the number he posted last year, but he doesn't seemed to be fully invested in becoming a great player, which has to worry anyone who drafts him. The upside is still there, I'm just not sure we'll see it this year. He's an intriguing pick in salary cap leagues, but I'd advise against it. In draft leagues he'll probably go a bit early because of his name, but he should be in the 30-40 range.
41Matt Jones$2,250,000Jones is one of those guys thought to have a lot of potential, but for the most part, he's failed to live up to it. He played some good golf at the end of last season however and that could be a sign of things to come. Jones has a lot of upside, even at this price, so he's worth a look in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues you could justify a pick in the high-40s, but considering his lack of name recognition, you could probably get him in the late-50s.
42David Lynn$2,250,000Lynn made most of his money at the Wells Fargo Championship where he finished runner-up, but he didn't accomplish much outside that event. Lynn however is currently inside the top-50 in the World Golf Rankings, which will gain him access to the majors and WGC events if he can maintain his position. If he can play well early, he'll have a lot of opportunities to improve on his 2013 number.
43Ryan Palmer$2,250,000Palmer has long been known as a streaky player, but he started to show some consistency in 2013, which could lead to bigger and better things this year. Palmer earned most of his $1.5 million during four events where he finished in the top-10 last year, but he also showed a pretty solid cut percentage, missing only five cuts in 22 events. If he can maintain that consistency and sprinkle in some high-end finishes, he could be in for a solid season. He's worth a look in salary cap leagues and he should go in the 50-60 range in drafts.
44Harris English$2,000,000English took a step up in class last year when he won the St. Jude Classic and topped the $2 million dollar mark, but for fantasy purposes, this could be a case where he set the bar too high. On a positive note, he's already picked up a win in the 2013-2014 portion of the schedule, so perhaps he's ascending to the next level. Whatever the case, he's probably priced a little too high for salary cap consideration. In draft leagues he should probably go in the 25-35 range.
45David Lingmerth$2,000,000Lingmerth started the season well with a runner-up finish early-on and he backed up that play with a solid stretch in the middle of the season. That kind of resume is what you'd like to see out of a guy on his way up. Lingmerth offers some intrigue in salary cap formats, but he might be priced a little too high. In draft leagues he should fall in the 50-60 range.
46Chris Kirk$2,000,000Extremely consistent 2013 season. Made 19 of 23 cuts, including four top-10s and one runner-up finish. Kirk will need to find some higher-end finishes to improve upon his 2013 numbers, but that shouldn't be too difficult. Kirk is a decent option in salary cap formats and should go in the 50-60 in drafts.
47Ian Poulter$2,000,000Poulter is one of the bigger names that you'll find down near number 50 on the money list and although he seems to come up big every now and then, his upside appears to be limited. You can always count on Poulter making a run at a big event, but more times than not he comes up short, which makes him quite the frustrating fantasy player. Look for more of the same this season with a run at a major and maybe a WGC event, but little outside of that.
48Marc Leishman$2,000,000Leishman had a very nice four-week run last season, which started with a top-5 at the Masters and concluded with a T12 at the Byron Nelson Championship. Outside that stretch though, Leishman didn't accomplish much. Leishman seems to have all the tools necessary to take the next step, but obviously more consistency is needed. He's an interesting prospect in salary cap leagues as he's shown some grit during some big events and at this price, he might be worth a shot. In drafts he should go in the 50-60 range.
49Kyle Stanley$2,000,000Stanley started the 2012 season on fire with a runner-up and a win in the first two months of the season, but he struggled for the remainder of the 2012 season. Those struggles carried over to the 2013 season and for a while, it looked like Stanley wouldn't snap out of it in time. He found his game late in the year though and it looks like he's back on track. He may not be the guy that took the PGA Tour by storm in early 2012, but he's certainly not the guy who struggled to make cuts for a 12-month stretch spanning two seasons. Stanley has some upside, which makes him an option in salary cap leagues and he should go in the 50-60 range in drafts.
50Tim Clark$2,000,000Clark is a guy who's always had the talent to be one of the best players on the PGA Tour, but for one reason or another, he's never quite lived up to his billing. Some years it was an inability to close, others it was an injury problem. Clark missed most of the 2011 season due to injury and he played well during his comeback season in 2012, but more was expected of him last year being a full year removed from injury. Perhaps this will be the season where he gets back to his top form. He's already grabbed a runner-up finish during the 2013-2014 portion of the season, so perhaps he'll get back atop the $2 million mark again. Clark is worth a look in salary cap formats and he should go in the 40-50 range in drafts.
51Jason Kokrak$2,000,000Nothing spectacular about Kokrak's 2013 season. His season was highlighted by a top-3 at the AT&T National in June and he earned three additional top-10s, but he also missed the cut in 40% of his 25 starts. The good news is that he's off to a good start in the 2013-2014 portion of the season with two top-25s and one top-10 in three tries. Kokrak needs a little more consistency in 2014, but he's close enough to warrant a look in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 60-70 range.
52Robert Garrigus$2,000,000Garrigus had eight top-25s in 2013, but only two top-10s. Not bad for a player in this range, but considering he's only a year removed from a $3 million season, 2013 was quite the let down. The good news is, he started to play better as the season wore on and he's already earned three top-25s in four events during the 2013-2014 season. He's not quite a must-have in salary cap leagues, but he's close. In draft leagues he should go in the 40-50 range.
53Charles Howell III$1,750,000Charles Howell III is the definition of "he is what he is". Once upon a time Howell III was thought to be one of the up and comers, but he stalled out somewhere along the road to superstardom and he's never quite found his way back. Don't get me wrong, he's had a very respectable career, but at this point his upside seems to be limited. As such, he's not a good salary cap option. In draft leagues he should go in the 40-50 range.
54Brendon de Jonge$1,750,000Unlike a lot of players that finish in the 40-50 range on the money list last year, de Jonge had little problem with consistency in 2013. However, he struggled to find the high-end finishes that make a golfer's season. He'll need to find a couple high-end finishes to top his 2013 number and I'm not sure he'll be able to find them. He's upside isn't high enough to merit a salary cap selection this season and in draft leagues he should go in the 50-60 range.
55Michael Thompson$1,750,000Thompson is a tough guy to figure out. Is he the guy who won the Honda Classic in 2013 and contended at the 2012 U.S. Open, or is he the guy who's done little outside those two events? Many young players show a pattern like this early in their careers and unfortunately, these players either find the consistency or they don't, there's no way to tell at this stage. With that said, without the consistency, Thompson's number is just too high this year.
56Scott Stallings$1,750,000Stallings had a nice 2013 season, but he had trouble finding high-end finishes. He certainly has some upside, but he got off to a poor start in the 2013-2014 portion of the season where he played four events and earned less than $20k. At just over $1.6 million in earnings, his number is probably too high to take him in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 50-60 range.
57Kevin Chappell$1,750,000Chappell started slowly in 2013 missing more cuts than he made through the end of April, but a runner-up finish at the Memorial in June kick-started his season. After that finish, Chappell missed only one cut the rest of the season and he picked up where he left off last season with three made cuts in three starts during the 2013-2014 season. Chappell has the potential to take a step up this year, but he's a little pricey at this spot. In draft leagues he should go in the 50-60 range.
58Charley Hoffman$1,750,000Here's an interesting fact regarding Hoffman, he's never topped $2 million in earnings during one season. That's a little shocking as Hoffman had a stretch a few years back where it seemed like he was a player on the upswing, but his game has fallen off since then and considering his ceiling is under $2 million, there's really no reason to consider him at this number. He's a steady player though, so he has value in draft leagues, somewhere in the 50-60 range.
59John Huh$1,750,000Huh had a pretty decent 2013 season with eight top-25s, but he lacked the high-end finishes. Huh had only two top-10s and only one top-3 finish last year. He's off to a pretty good start in the 2013-2014 portion of the season with four cuts made in four tries, but again, only one top-25. He'll need to improve on the weekend before he starts making the big bucks. As such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues. In draft formats he should go in the 60-70 range.
60Freddie Jacobson$1,750,000A tale of two season for Jacobson in 2013. He started out on fire with a streak of seven consecutive top-25s during a stretch that spanned the months of February, March and April. After that however, he began to miss cuts on a regular basis. Another troubling stat from last year is the number of events he played. He's failed to reach 20 events in the past two years. If that trend doesn't turn around this year, he'll have a tough time topping his numbers from 2013. With that said, he's an intriguing pick in salary cap leagues as he's only two years removed from a year which he earned over $2.4 million. In drafts he should go in the 50-60 range.
61Matt Every$1,750,000Every started the 2013 slowly, missing the cut in six of his first 13 events, but a top-5 at the Crown Plaza Invitational in May kick-started his season. Every closed the season on a high-note grabbing consecutive top-10s at the Wyndham Championship and the Barclays in August. It looks as though he carried some of that momentum over to the abbreviated season also as he scored a top-10 at the McGladrey Classic in November. Every just turned 30 in December, so he should be in or nearing his peak. With that in mind, he's worth a look in salary cap leagues and he should go in the 60-70 range in drafts.
62Luke Guthrie$1,750,000Guthrie started the 2013 season well with a pair of top-10s, but he never found that form again the rest of the year. That is to be expected from a young player though as last year was his first full year on the PGA Tour. Guthrie posted a top-5 during the 2013-2014 portion of the season and he has the potential to be a break-out player in 2014. At this price, he's worth a long hard look as he could be the Billy Horschel of this season.
63Bo Van Pelt$1,750,000There aren't as many must-have's this year as there have been in years past, but Van Pelt certainly qualifies. Van Pelt struggled to pick up a win for a long time on the PGA Tour, but once he did, his game really picked up as a whole. His game fell off the map last year, but considering he topped the $2 million mark the three previous years, he's certainly earned a pass. Van Pelt is only a year removed from a $3 million season, so his price tag for this year seems very reasonable. In draft leagues he should go in the 30-40 range.
64Russell Henley$1,500,000Henley peaked early in the 2013 season with a win at the Sony Open, but he struggled to build on that win the rest of the way. Players who have that type of resume are hard to get behind because you never know if they can find the magic for one week again during the current year. As such, Henley is a no go in salary cap leagues and probably should go in the 50-60 range in drafts.
65John Merrick$1,500,000Merrick picked up a win early in the 2013 season, but failed to capitalize on the momentum after that. Merrick's been at this for a while now and it's good to see a him get a win, but in order to take the next step he'll need to show more consistency. I'm not sure we'll get that this year and if he can't find another win in 2014, it'll be tough to match his 2013 number. Merrick is a no go in salary leagues and should go in the 50-60 range in draft leagues.
66Angel Cabrera$1,500,000One of these years Cabrera is bound to slow down, but who's going to bet against him at this point? Cabrera has made a career out of showing up at the right time, mainly at the Masters, and he'll likely be up to his old tricks again in 2014. The only problem with that is, if he happens to have a poor week at Augusta, his numbers are likely to be shot. With that in mind, he's not a good option for salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 40-50 range, if for no other reason than he'll be valuable during the majors.
67Martin Laird$1,500,000Laird was a one-hot-wonder in 2013, picking up most of his earnings at one event, the Valero Texas Open. That win came as a surprise as he wasn't playing too well coming in and he didn't play very well after that week as well. All of that makes him a risky pick in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 50-60 range.
68Sang-Moon Bae$1,500,000Bae scored a majority of his earnings from one event last season, which is rarely a good thing. Bae won the Bryon Nelson Championship in May, which account for over $1.2 million of his total of $1.7 million in earnings. He's a good player, but more consistency is needed to justify a pick in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 50-60 range.
69Rory Sabbatini$1,500,000Sabbatini isn't the player he used to be and his upside is limited now, but he should near the end of the 2013 season that he still has some game left. Is it enough to justify a pick in a salary cap league -- probably not, but he's got some value in a draft league and should go in the 60-70 range.
70Kevin Stadler$1,500,000Stadler started the 2013 well with a T3 at the AT&T Pebble Beach Pro-Am in February and he closed with another T3 at the Deutsche Bank late in the year, but he didn't get much done in-between. Stadler has some upside, but we've said that for the past few seasons and he's been unable to break out of this range. Expect another finish in his range on the money list in 2014. Stadler is not a good salary cap option, this year and expect him to go in the 70-80 range in drafts.
71Daniel Summerhays$1,500,000Summerhays parlayed a strong July into a trip to the Fed Ex Cup Playoffs where he earned two additional top-25s last year. Summerhays is off to a pretty good start in the 2013-2014 portion of the season with four made-cuts in five tries. He's also earned a top-10 already. Summerhays just might have enough upside to warrant a salary cap selection this season, but it will be somewhat of a gamble. In draft leagues he should go in the 60-70 range.
72Ben Crane$1,500,000Crane earned at least $1.6 million each year from 2009-2012, but last year was a different story. Whatever the reason for his regression last season, he's got some value in salary cap leagues this year. Crane should bounce back to some degree this season, whether it's all the way back to his peak of $2.8 million, or back to his $1.6 million level, he looks like a good option this season. In draft leagues he should go in the 60-70 range.
73Carl Pettersson$1,500,000Pettersson is only one year removed from a season in which he earned over $3.5 million. That fact alone is enough to merit a selection in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 50-60 range, but he could go earlier based on his 2012 numbers.
74Ken Duke$1,250,000Duke not only saved his season, but possibly his career with a win at the Travelers Championship last June. He is getting up there in age though, so an uptick in earnings is unlikely in 2014. Duke has never been the most consistent player and that spells trouble as he gets older. Duke is not a consideration in a salary cap format and should go in the 70-80 range in draft formats.
75Brian Gay$1,250,000Gay's 2013 season was a lot like his career. He's a homerun hitter, but he strikes out a lot. Last year he picked up a win at the Humana Challenge in January, but earned only $400k after that win. Gay will likely end up in a similar spot on the money list again in 2014 and it will likely be due to one big week. The problem is, you never know when that week will come. He's too much of a risk in salary cap formats and in drafts leagues he should go in the 60-70 range.
76Josh Teater$1,250,000On the whole, Teater had a pretty good 2013 season, but most of his earnings came during the first-half of the season. Teater had three top-10s in 2013 and they all came prior to June. After June, Teater only cracked the top-50 once. It's been more of the same during the 2013-2014 portion of the schedule as he's a perfect 4-4 on cuts made, but he's only cracked the top-25 one time. Teater doesn't have much of a problem making cuts, but his play on the weekend needs improvement. As such, he's not a good salary cap option this year and he should go in the 70-80 range in drafts.
77Brian Davis$1,250,000Once upon a time, Brian Davis was the next guy up. The guy who'd yet to win, but it seemed inevitable that he would at some point. Davis had his share of close calls, most notably when he called a penalty on himself during a playoff, but he never did find that elusive win. Davis will turn 40 this year and that's rarely good for guys trying to improve on the previous season. He may yet find a win on the PGA Tour, but a block buster year seems unlikely at this point. Davis is a no-go in salary cap leagues and should go in the 70-80 range in drafts.
78John Rollins$1,250,000Rollins is probably never going to take the next step in his development, but that's okay. He's had a very respectable career and at this point, he is what he is. He's going to grab a handful of top-10s each year, maybe contend a couple times, but his ceiling is maxed-out around this level. If he finds his game early, he could sneak into the top-50, but even that means only a small increase on his 2013 number. In draft leagues Rollins should go in the 70-80 range.
79David Hearn$1,250,000A very nice 2013 season that included seven top-25s, two top-10s and a runner-up finish. Hearn's performance was a nice surprise and not many had him pegged for a solid season. The good news is, he finished the 2013 season with a lot of momentum, the bad news is, he has little track record to fall back on, which makes him a risky proposition in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 60-70 range.
80Stewart Cink$1,250,000"Will Stewart Cink bounce back this year" has been replaced by, "Will Stewart Cink ever bounce back?" As the years go by it seems more and more unlikely that Cink will ever find the form that made him a major champion just a few years ago. The upside is still there and he's not going to plummet down the money list, but I'd have a hard time pulling the trigger on Cink in a salary cap format. In draft leagues he's bound to go before he should, but if he's there in the 70-80 range, he's worth a look.
81Brian Stuard$1,250,000A decent year from Stuard in 2013. He started the season well and ended the season well, but did little in the middle. In all, he earned a total on four top-10s. Here's the kicker with Stuard though, in the 2013-2014 season, he's already earned nearly $750k because of his two top-25s, one of which was a runner-up. The question now is, with his card all but assured for 2015, does he get complacent, or does he thrive because he has more confidence? When those types of questions remain entering a season, it's best to let someone else take the chance on him.
82Richard Lee$1,250,000Lee struggled to find many high-end finishes in 2013, but he did manage to crack the top-15 five times. All those top-15s really add up at the end of the season. Lee showed a nice improvement from year-one to year-two on the PGA Tour and year-three should be his best to date. Lee obviously has upside, but it's hard to tell just how much. For now, he's a decent salary cap pick, with the potential to be a really good pick. In draft formats he should go in the 70-80 range.
83Geoff Ogilvy$1,250,000Much like Stewart Cink, Ogilvy has struggled since winning his major championship. Unlike Cink, Ogilvy is much younger and it seems more likely that Ogilvy will find his prior form again. Ogilvy may never find his major-winning form again, but at this price, he doesn't have to, he just needs to play a little better. Ogilvy isn't a must have, but he should be given consideration as his ceiling is much higher than his 2013 number. In draft leagues he should go in the 70-80 range.
84Morgan Hoffmann$1,250,000Hoffman had a strong rookie season that included seven top-25s and three top-10s. Hoffman struggled early, but finished strong. That's the kind of recipe for future success. Hoffman has some upside, but it's hard to tell just how much. He's worth some consideration in salary cap leagues and he should go in the range of 90-100 in draft leagues.
85Aaron Baddeley$1,250,000Baddeley went through a very rough stretch in 2013 and if you were paying attention during that stretch, it's hard to imagine that he played well enough to finish inside the top-125…but he did. Baddeley is simply too good to have stretches of abysmal play like he did in 2013 and if he can avoid falling into that mode this year, he should be fine. Baddeley provides some value in salary cap leagues and he should go in the 70-80 range in drafts.
86Nicolas Colsaerts$1,250,000Colsaerts entered the 2013 with high expectations, and even though he finished inside the top-125, his season has to be considered a disappointment. Colsaerts has the game to double or even triple his 2013 earnings, but there's the question of acclimation. Is he comfortable playing a full schedule on the PGA Tour? Maybe not, but perhaps he learned something from his struggles last year and he'll make some adjustments in 2014. If that happens he becomes a solid option in salary cap leagues. In drafts he should go in the 70-80 range.
87John Senden$1,250,0002013 was the first time since 2005 that Senden dropped below $1 million in earnings. The question though is, at 42 is this the start of the back-end of his career on the PGA Tour? Considering he's spent the better part of the past five years around $2 million in earnings, he's earned some consideration for the upcoming season. He's not the most exciting player, but he does provide some value in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 70-80 range.
88Peter Hanson$1,250,000As one of the best players on the European Tour over the past five years, Hanson has more upside than most players in this range, but he didn't meet expectations last season. With that said, if he starts well, he should maintain his world ranking, which will gain him access to all the big events this year and create plenty of opportunity to improve upon his 2013 number. In draft leagues, he should go in the 90-100 range.
89Bud Cauley-F$1,250,000Four made cuts to end PGA Tour season weren't enough to spare 32-year-old a trip to The Finals to save card.
90John Peterson-F-R$1,200,000Gets another crack at PGA Tour via the Web.com Tour. Had some success a few years back, but don't expect too much this season.
91Ernie Els$1,000,000Els keeps fighting the good fight, but it's obvious that his skills are declining with age. He'll turn 45 this year and while that's not a death sentence, it certainly makes it more difficult to improve. Els could only muster one top-10 last season and though he might find his old form for small stretches again this year, he's simply not worth the risk in a salary cap league. In draft leagues he'll likely go higher than he should, but he should be in the 80-90 range.
92K.J. Choi$1,000,000Is Choi on the back-end of his career. He's been a trendy sleeper pick the past couple seasons because everyone knows how good this guy can be, but will we see that form again? Last year it seemed like a good bet that Choi would improve upon his previous season and although the bar was set really low, he barely crept above his 2012 number. Choi will turn 44 in May, so it's possible that age has finally caught up with him. In fact, it's probably the main reason behind his declining play. Because of that, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues this year. In draft formats he should go in the 80-90 range.
93Cameron Tringale$1,000,000Tringale had one top-10 all season last year, but it happened to be a solo-third at the Tampa Bay Championship, which netted him nearly $375k. At 26, Tringale still has time to improve, but there haven't been many signs that he's destined for greater things on the PGA Tour. His 3rd-place finish last year was the first top-3 of his career. The upside is there, but he probably won't reach it this season. In draft formats he should go in the 80-90 range.
94Nicholas Thompson$1,000,000Thompson lacked the high-end finishes in 2013, but he played at a decent slip so often that all his top-25s, seven in all, added up to a pretty good year. Grinders are good for the U.S. Open, but you don't necessarily want them on your fantasy team. As such, Thompson is not worth the price in salary cap leagues, but he's got some value in draft formats, probably in the 90-100 range.
95Brian Harman$1,000,000Harman struggled for much of the 2013 season, but a T3 at the Wyndham Championship in August pushed him into the top-100 on the money list. It also gained him entrance into the Fed Ex Cup Playoffs, but once there, he didn't play well. Harman regressed in year-two on the PGA Tour, which is both good and bad. Bad is obviously that he played poorly for long stretches last year, but the good is that we know he can play better, as he proved in 2012. With that in mind, he's not a great salary cap option his year, but he could provide some value in a draft format in the 90-100 range.
96Martin Kaymer$1,000,000Much was expected of Kaymer after capturing his first major at the PGA Championship a few years ago, but if anything, he's regressed over the past couple years. Kaymer certainly has enough talent to obliterate his 2013 number, but until he shows more consistency over the course of an entire PGA Tour season, he's probably not worth the pick. Kaymer does have value in draft formats though. He should go in the 80-90 range.
97Lucas Glover$1,000,000Believe it or not, Glover is a major champion. After the way he's played the past few years, it's hard to believe that this guy was once one of the best bets to ascend to the top of the PGA Tour. Glover's game fell off a couple years ago and although it could return at any given point, the signs are there right now. Glover has a little value in salary cap leagues -- if you think he's going to bounce back, but for the rest of us, there are better places to spend the money. Glover should go in the 90-100 range in drafts.
98Michael Putnam-W $1,000,000Missed cut in two of first three Web.con events in 2013, but finished with 15 consecutive made cuts. Picked up a win at the South Georgia Classic.
99Brendan Steele$900,000Steele picked up a win at the Valero Texas Open in 2011, but the further we get away from that event, the more it seems like an aberration. Steele is going to pick his spots each year, but after a couple years hovering around the $1 million mark, it looks like he might just spent a lot of time here. Steele doesn't have quite enough upside to be taken in a salary cap league. In drafts leagues he should go in the 80-90 range.
100Pat Perez$900,000Look at the money lists of years past and you are almost always going to find Perez in the 75-125 range. He's had a nice career, but his ceiling was seemingly hit years ago. He won't let you down if you grab him late in your draft, but don't expect too much of an upside either. He's not worth the price in a salary cap format.
101Mark Wilson$900,000Wilson is your typical streaky golfer. He's good enough to win on just about any given week, but he rarely finds that form throughout the year. 2013 was a typical season for Wilson as he missed more cuts than he made, but once on the weekend, he played well. His number is a bit too high to invest in this year though because he'll need to find a win somewhere to show a significant increase on his previous year's earnings and you just can't count on that happening.
102William McGirt$900,000After a solid 2012 season which saw McGirt top $1 million in earnings, McGirt regressed in 2013. It's tough to tell if McGirt will rebound in 2014, but considering his ceiling right now is just above the $1 million mark, he's probably not worth the risk in salary cap leagues this year. In draft leagues he should go in the range of 90-100.
103James Hahn$900,000Hahn played very well out of the gate during his rookie season last year, but for some reason, he hit the wall in early March and never recovered. Luckily, Hahn played well enough during the first two months that his card was all but secured for the 2014 season. He'll have to find his form again and fast if he's to keep his card for next year. Hahn should play well enough to keep his playing privileges in 2015, but right now it looks like his upside isn't all that high.
104Martin Flores$900,000Flores joined the PGA Tour in 2012 and had a solid rookie season with over $1 million in earnings. Last year he regressed a bit, but to his credit, he didn't completely implode like some other sophomores. Flores' upside is not known right now as he's only put two years in on the PGA Tour and as such, he's probably not a good salary cap selection. He's got some value in draft leagues though and should go in the 100-110 range.
105Johnson Wagner$900,000Wagner has made a living on the PGA Tour by showing up a couple times each season and giving everything he has. Okay, so we can't judge his effort, but it's strange how a guy can look so good one week and then disappear for months at a time. Wagner has multiple wins on the PGA Tour, so we know he's got the talent, but he'll never get to the next level unless he finds some consistency. There's no reason to think he'll find that consistency this year though and as such, he's not a good option for salary cap leagues. Since he knows how to win, he is worth a look in draft leagues, probably in the 90-100 range.
106Jeff Overton$900,000Overton has plenty of game, we saw that a few years back when he parlayed a solid season into a Ryder Cup spot where he also played well, but his game has gone south since that season. The upside remains, but the question is not when he'll get his game back, but if he'll get his game back. With that said, he's a risky proposition in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 100-110 range.
107Andres Romero$900,000Romero raised the bar a while back when he nearly won the British Open and although he's had a decent run on the PGA Tour, he hasn't quite lived up to expectations. Last year he made most of his money in Reno and Puerto Rice, which is never a good sign. The upside is still there, but Romero remains a risky proposition. In draft leagues he should go in the 100-110 range.
108Padraig Harrington$900,000Harrington started the 2013 in style with a top-10 at the Waste Management Phoenix Open, but it was all down hill after that. Actually, it wasn't all down hill, he did find two more top-10s along the way, but for the most part, his 2013 season was a disappointment. Harrington is certainly capable of much better play than he showed in 2013, but he's no longer the guy who won multiple majors. If you are looking for that guy, you'll be disappointed, but with that said, he still has enough upside to warrant a look for salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 90-100 range, but could go earlier based on his name.
109Camilo Villegas$900,000Villegas has been just about everywhere in his short career. From "the next big thing", to "underperformer", to "grinder", where he is now. A grinder because he's fighting to stay on the PGA Tour and succeeding. At this point, it doesn't look like he'll get to the next level on the PGA Tour, but he's still capable of threatening the $2 million mark -- if everything goes well. Unfortunately, you can't count on that, so he's probably not worth a selection in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 100-110 range.
110D.H. Lee$800,000Lee had a solid rookie campaign in 2013 with four top-25s, three top-10s and one top-3 finish. The troubling aspect of his season though was the way he finished. Lee failed to make the weekend in his final four starts. He also played poorly in his two starts during the 2013-2014 season. There's too much unknown about Lee right now to take him in a salary cap league.
111Ted Potter, Jr.$800,000Potter Jr. has been the typical hit or miss guy for the entirety of his two years on the PGA Tour. In his first season, Potter Jr. made just over 50% of his cuts, but he also won. Last year he made the cut exactly half the time, but failed to win. Instead he earned two well-placed top-10s. Potter Jr. is too inconsistent to risk a salary cap spot on this year. In draft leagues he's worth a look because he's won on the PGA Tour, but very late.
112James Driscoll$800,000Driscoll first joined the PGA Tour in 2005 and although he's done a good job of maintaining his playing privileges over the past nine years, he's never cracked the $1 million mark. In fact, last season he posted the highest earnings number of his career. His ceiling is obviously limited, which makes him a poor choice for salary cap leagues. He might be worth a look in drafts depending on how deep the league is.
113J.J. Henry$800,000Henry posted as many top-25s in the abbreviated 2013-2014 season as he did during the entire 2013 regular season. That would seem to be a good sign, but Henry just doesn't have the upside that he once did. He's certainly capable of getting back above the $1 million mark, but he probably won't reach even $1.5 million. Henry hasn't been able to find the high-end finishes in recent years, which makes it difficult to move up the money list. Henry has some value in draft leagues though because he play often and makes a lot of cuts. Look for Henry in the 100-110 range.
114Jamie Lovemark-W  $800,000Failed to get into winner's circle on Web.com Tour but had fantastic Finals, going T14-T7-T24 over final three events.
115Derek Ernst$750,000Ernst hit pay-dirt in early May last year when he won the Wells Fargo Championship. That's the good news, the bad news is that he earned less than $100k outside that one week. It's certainly promising that Ernst was able to get a victory last season, but it's also troubling that he was unable to get anything done outside that victory. It's not uncommon to struggle after a big win and although Ernst will probably play better this year than he did after his win last year, it's probably not enough to justify a pick in salary cap leagues. In draft leagues he should go in the 80-90 range.
116Jeff Maggert$750,000At the age of 49, Maggert is still hanging in there on the PGA Tour, but he turns 50 in February and although his plan is likely to stay on the PGA Tour as long as possible, missing cuts can get old after a while. It's not that Maggert can't compete anymore, but the draw of the Champions Tour will only get stronger if he stumbles out of the gate this year.
117Scott Brown$750,000Brown picked up a win last year in Puerto Rico, an event that's never been confused with the Masters, but hey, a win's a win. With that said, he didn't get much done outside that win, so his prospects for the 2014 season don't look very good. His win from last season makes it too difficult to take him in a salary cap league.
118Jerry Kelly$750,000Kelly topped the $1 million mark as recently as 2011, but at his age, an improvement is unlikely. Kelly has virtually no upside at this price and as such, you simply can't take him in a salary cap format. He probably doesn't offer much in a draft format either and he'll once again be fighting to stay within the top-125 this season.
119Bryce Molder$750,000Molder earned over $800k in 2013 without a single top-10. Ah to be a professional on the PGA Tour. So how did he manage to earn that much without at least one really solid week? Eight top-25s certainly help. All those top-25s added up to a decent year, but it unless he can find some high-end finishes this year, his luck may run out. Molder's been at this for a while and we now the upside isn't really there anymore so he's not a good salary cap option this year.
120Bob Estes$750,000Estes has been at this for a long time and at the age of 47, he's well past his prime. In fact, his finish inside the top-125 last year was a bit of a surprise. It would be more of a surprise if he managed to do it again this year. With that in mind, he's obviously not a good pick in salary cap leagues. Depending on how deep the league, he might not get drafted either.
121Jason Bohn$750,000Bohn has made over $11 million during his golf career, but he hasn't has a really solid season since 2010. The strange thing about Bohn is, he's already earned $859k during the 2013-2014 season. That could be a sign of things to come, but it's more likely that he's already played his best golf of the season before the 2014 portion starts. With that in mind, it doesn't seem likely that he'll earn enough money this season to justify his selection in a salary cap league. In drafts he should go in the 90-100 range.
122Justin Leonard$750,000We've been wondering if Leonard is ever going to fully get back to where he was for years, but during this time, he's aged. He's nowhere near the Champions Tour, but at 41, he's probably not going to get much better. As such, he doesn't have enough value for a salary cap selections. Because of his name though, he'll probably be drafted too early. He should go in the 100-100 range though.
123Charlie Wi$750,000Wi has spent the better part of the past five seasons above the $1 million mark, but at 42, he may be on the back-end of his career. Wi is better than the number he posted last year, but probably not significantly better, which is what you need, to be considered for a salary cap selection. Wi has some value in draft leagues though and should go in the 100-110 range.
124Chez Reavie-P $750,000Great mid-season stretch where he made most of his Web.com money. Earned a win, a runner-up and a third-place finish.
125Ryo Ishikawa-F$750,000Joined Web.com tour mid-season and made the most of his short time on tour with four top-10s in just 10 starts. Picked up a win in mid-August.
126Ben Martin-W  $750,000Slow start to the Web.com Tour season, but pulled it together mid-way through year and finished with a flurry. Two wins in 2013 on his way to No. 2 on the money list.
127Peter Malnati-W-R$750,000Leading money-winner on Web.com Tour in 2013 with two wins, a runner-up and a third-place finish on his resume. Future looks bright.
128Greg Chalmers$700,000Chalmers has teed it up 338 times in his career on the PGA Tour and yet he has only two top-3 finishes to show for it. He's banked over $8 million in earnings, but he's never quite found that extra gear. It's unlikely that he ever will, on the PGA Tour anyway. He's not worth the price in salary cap leagues and might go undrafted as well.
129Seung-Yul Noh-F   $700,000Talk about covering your bases. Struggled on 2013 PGA Tour, but hopped over to Web.com Tour and regained his status for 2013-14 season.
130Patrick Cantlay-F-R$700,000Familiar name, 133 starts on the PGA Tour and will be back for another go-round in 2013-14. Split time between tours last year, but saved best play for the Web.com tour.
131Justin Hicks$650,000Hicks' first season on the PGA Tour was a disaster as he earned only just over $250k. Two years later he played considerably better, but he still left a lot to be desired. Hicks' upside appears to be limited and as such, he's not a good option in salary cap leagues. Depending on how deep the league, Hicks may go undrafted as well.
132David Toms$650,000It doesn't seem like that long ago that David Toms sank a hole-in-one during the final-round of his PGA Championship victory, but that was actually 12 years ago. That gives you some idea of how far removed we are from his glory days. Toms is still a good player, but his upside is long gone. As such, he's not worth consideration in salary cap leagues. He might still get drafted because of his name, but it's probably wise just to pass on him.
133Brad Fritsch-F   $650,000Missed Top-125 by a few spots, but saved status with runner-up showing at the Web.com Tour Championship.
134Charlie Beljan$600,000It's tough to call a top-100 finish a disappointing year, but when you miss 3/4s of your cuts, how else can you describe it? Beljan's entire season was made when he finished runner-up at the Northern Trust Open in February. It's hard to get behind a guy who was so inconsistent last season and as such, it would be wise to pass on him in all formats until he can show some consistency.
135Steven Bowditch$600,000In his three seasons on the PGA Tour, Bodwitch has earned roughly $1.5 million. 2013 was actually his best year and while he's still young, just 29 years of age, his upside appears to be limited. There are players with more value in this range, so it's best to pass on Bodwitch in salary cap leagues. Depending on the league, he could go undrafted as well.
136Bronson La'Cassie-W-R$600,000Aussie struggled out of the gate in 2013 with five missed cuts in his first six events. Pulled it together at the end of the season with a win at the Cox Classic.
137Daniel Chopra-W$600,000Solid mid-season stretch saw Reavie make nine consecutive cuts. Not very productive on the weekend, however, which is why he's a ways down the money list.
138Brendon Todd-W$550,000Played only eight times on Web.com Tour in 2013, but packed a punch during those events. Seven top-25s in eight starts and a win.
139Mark Anderson-W $550,000Vaulted into top-5 of the Web.com money list with a win and four top-10s. At 25, he'll be one of the younger rookies on the PGA Tour in 2013-14.
140Matt Bettencourt-W$550,000Did next to nothing in 22 PGA events but a T8 at Web.com Championship saved his card.
141Hideki Matsuyama-N$500,000Shocked golf world by winning FedEx Cup playoff event a few years back, but it's been all down hill since. Upside appears limited.
142Erik Compton$500,000Dating back to the Shell Houston Open in March of 2013, Compton has exactly zero top-25s. If Compton had a track record previous to that dry spell, he might be worth a look in salary cap leagues, but he doesn't and as such, he's not worth consideration. He'll likely go undrafted in most leagues as well.
143Scott Langley-P$500,000Made eight of 11 PGA Tour cuts last season with a T13 best finish.
144Ricky Barnes-F$500,000Earned Web.com top-25 status thanks in part to iron-man mentality. Played 23 events in 2013, but only three top-10s and one top-3 finish.
145Stuart Appleby-P$500,000Opened season with T3 at Sony Open and the ... crickets. To his credit, finished season on a relative high note, but five-month mid-season stretch where he just disappeared is troublesome.
146George McNeill-P$500,000Catapulted to the top of the Web.com money list with an early win; consistent play throughout the year kept him near the top. Finished fourth on the final money list.
147Bobby Gates-F $500,000Grabbed the last qualifying spot in The Finals; missed 15 of 20 Web.com cuts.
148Sean O'Hair-F  $500,000Showed flashes of his potential last season, but still trying to put it all together. It will happen, but when?
149Will Claxton-F    $500,000Did little on Web.com Tour last season but saved tour card in The Finals.
150Chesson Hadley-W-R$500,000Three top-3s on Web.com Tour last season but still needed The Finals to secure card.
151Danny Lee-W $500,000Probably didn't want to spend entire season on Web.com tour after playing for years on PGA Tour, but give him credit, he earned his way back onto the big stage.
152Edward Loar-W$500,000Only played majors last year; Best finish T21 at British Open; WD Masters, MC U.S. Open.
153Kevin Tway-W-R$500,000Won first Web.com start of the season in February and missed the cut in 13 of final 20 starts. Complacency setting in at this level? Not a good sign.
154Gonzalo Fern.-Castano-N$450,000Hard to figure out how he cracked top-125 on the FedEx points list. Only two top-25s and no top-10s. Just a bunch of cuts made that added up after a while, evidently.
155Trevor Immelman-F$450,000Missed only two cuts over final eight months. Best finish was T9 at Travelers Championship.
156Troy Matteson-F   $450,00023-year-old Dane may need seasoning on tougher PGA Tour courses, but has an extremely high ceiling. Good sleeper candidate.
157Alex Prugh-W $450,000Missed cut in almost half his 20 Web.com starts and did not win in 2013, so how did he crack the top-25 on the money list? Consistent play on the weekend. Five top-10s, two of which were top-3 finishes add up to a decent number.
158Brice Garnett-W-R$450,000Started 2013 in style with a third-place finish and a runner-up in first couple months of Web.com, but then hit rut with missed seven consecutive cuts. Pulled out of it late in the year and brings some momentum into new season.
159Will Wilcox-W-R $450,000Only four missed cuts in 19 starts and eight top-25s. Finished Web.com season with four top-25s in his final five starts.
160Hudson Swafford-F-R$420,000One of brightest young stars on international golfing stage, proved it by making this year's Presidents Cup team.
161Jim Herman-F   $400,000Fared much better in 2010 when he tore up the Web.com Tour. One of a few graduates who should make the transition to the PGA Tour easily as he played a full season there just a couple years ago.
162Russell Knox-F    $400,000If healthy the 21-year-old can absolutely play, if given enough opportunities should shine this season on PGA Tour.
163Alex Aragon-W $400,000Somewhat erratic play in 2013. Missed eight cuts in 20 Web.com events, carded only two top-10s, but those top-10s were a win and runner-up.
164Andrew Svoboda-W$400,000Interesting season. After a poor start on PGA Tour, jumped to Web.com tour where he won two times in his final four starts, earning spot No. 25 on the money list and a golden ticket back onto the PGA Tour.
165Tim Wilkinson-W $400,000Struggled in his sophomore season, but considering he earned more than $1.6 million the season prior, he's worth a look.
166Wes Roach-W-R$400,000Only one year removed from a $1M-plus and has won twice on the PGA Tour, so has upside.
167Kevin Kisner-W $350,000Fully exempt after finishing first in the Web.com Tour Finals. Made the cut at the Masters and has a good shot at winning an event this season.
168Thorbjorn Olesen-N$300,000One of more frustating players on PGA Tour. Has shown high upside, but not recently; breakout is always around the corner.
169Heath Slocum-F  $300,000Three Top-10s in 12 events last season for the Spaniard; first in putting from 10-15 feet on the PGA Tour.
170Benjamin Alvarado-W-R$300,000A win and a T4 in first three starts of 2013 , but faded after that stretch. Fortunately, it was enough to earn a Web.com top-25 spot at season's end.
171Chad Collins-F$250,000Finishing just outside Top-125 isn't a complete failure, but entered sophomore season with really high expectations. Expect 2012 version to appear at some point this season.
172Jim Renner-W$250,000Hit his stride in mid-summer last year with five Top-30s in seven events, including three Top-15s.
173Kevin Foley-W-R$250,000$30K on PGA Tour, but secured card with T8 at Web.com Championship. Turns 50 in April.
174Miguel Angel Carballo-W$250,000Hit-or-miss player missed the cut seven times in 18 events. Played well when on the weekend as evidence by win in May and runner-up in July.
175Scott Gardiner-F   $200,000Missed 15 of 26 cuts last year but kept card with solid finish at The Finals.
176Darren Clarke-N$200,000No stranger to the PGA Tour, played his way back onto the big stage with steady diet of made cuts, handful of top-10s. Hopefully will have more luck this time around.
177Andrew Loupe-F-R$200,000Longest hitter on Web.com Tour, averaging 317 yards per pop, longer than the longest hitter on the PGA Tour in 2013.
178Billy Hurley III-F   $200,000Missed nine of 15 Web.com cuts but posted seven Top-25s.
179Tyrone Van Aswegen-F-R$200,000Still trying to find his game, but has shown signs of his former self last couple years; still appears well off his Masters-winning form.
180Will MacKenzie-F$200,000Solid finishes at the right times on Web.com Tour; good bunker player.
181Joe Durant-F  $150,000Strong start to the Web.com season that included two top-5s in first four starts, but season headed south thereafter. Missed cut 10 times in his final 16 starts.
182Lee Williams-F  $100,000All over the place in 2013. Missed cut in half his starts but picked up a win early in Web.com season and backed that up with a third-place showing late in the year.
183Troy Merritt-F$100,000Played best golf early in Web.com season, earning five of his six top-10s. Consistent play in 2013, but only one top-3 finish and no wins.