Vince Carter
Vince Carter
43-Year-Old ForwardF
 Free Agent    
Free Agent
2019 Fantasy Outlook
This will be an NBA-record 22nd season for the 42-year-old Carter and his second with the Hawks after re-signing with the team on a one-year deal this offseason. Carter did not play a significant role in Atlanta last season, but he did remain healthy enough to appear in 76 games. He finished with averages of 7.4 points, 2.6 rebounds and 1.1 assists across 17.5 minutes per game. With the Hawks continuing to find and develop young talent and with Carter getting up there in age, chances are the veteran will see a reduced role in 2018-19. This is especially the case with the additions of rookies De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish via this year's draft, who give the Hawks great size and versatility on the wing and in the frontcourt, and the Hawks will certainly want to see as much as they possibly can out of those two. They also received both Allen Crabbe and Evan Turner in trades this offseason. As a result, Carter's minutes likely won't be high enough to warrant fantasy consideration this season. Read Past Outlooks
$Signed a one-year, $2.56 million contract with the Hawks in August of 2019.
College/International Summary

Vince Carter played for three seasons at the University of North Carolina. As a freshman (1995-96), Carter started 19 of 31 games, playing a modest 18 minutes per game. In both his sophomore and junior seasons, Carter's talented Tar Heel squads won ACC Tournament Championships and made it to the NCAA Tournament Final Four. After Carter's sophomore season, he was named to the All-ACC 3rd Team and the All-Region (East) NCAA Tournament Team. Carter continued to improve in his junior season, averaging 15.6 points and 5.1 rebounds per game while shooting 59% from the field. That production led to be named as a Consensus All-American 2nd Team member. After his junior season, Carter declared for the 1998 NBA Draft and was selected by the Golden State Warriors with the fifth overall pick. During his NBA career, Carter continued taking classes at North Carolina. In August 2000, he graduated from UNC with a degree in African-American studies.

Closes out career
FFree Agent
June 25, 2020
Carter announced Thursday in the latest episode of his "Winging It with Vince Carter" podcast that he has retired from the NBA.
ANALYSIS
The oldest player in the league at 43 years old, Carter spent 22 seasons in the NBA and emerged as one of the game's iconic stars right away in 1998-99, when he took home Rookie of the Year honors. The following season, Carter began a streak of eight consecutive All-Star nods and went on to win the Slam Dunk Contest in one of the most memorable performances in the event's history. After a decade of stardom in Toronto and New Jersey, Carter transitioned into more of a supporting role in the back half of his career, doing most of his damage as a three-point specialist while providing a positive veteran presence for the Magic, Suns, Mavericks, Grizzlies, Kings and Hawks. He finishes his career with 1,541 regular-season appearances and averages of 16.7 points, 4.3 rebounds, 3.1 assists, 1.5 three-pointers and 1.0 steals in 30.1 minutes per game.
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Past Season Summaries
2019

Playing in his NBA-record 22nd season, Carter was a regular part of the Hawks' rotation off the bench. He played double-digit minutes in each of his first 23 appearances on the season, averaging 6.0 points and 1.8 rebounds in 16.1 minutes over that span. Carter scored a season-high 17 points on 7-of-11 shooting in a win over the Hornets on Dec. 8. He scored in double-figures in three straight games from Jan. 28 to Feb. 1, including putting up 14 points, six rebounds and two blocks in a win over the 76ers. Carter entered the All-Star break with averages of 5.3 points, 2.2 rebounds and 0.9 assists in 15.3 minutes per game. After the break, Carter saw action in the Hawks' final 11 games prior to the suspension of the 2019-20 NBA season Mar. 11. In that span, he averaged 3.6 points and 1.5 rebounds in 11.6 minutes per game. In a win over the Hornets on Mar. 9, Carter hit a trio of three-pointers to finish with nine points in 15 minutes off the bench. Shortly before the resumption of the season in Orlando, Carter announced his retirement from the NBA.

2018

During the offseason, Carter was awarded both the Backbone Award and the Most Respected Award at the NBA Players Association Players' Voice Awards. A few days later, Carter signed a one-year agreement with the Hawks -- his eighth NBA team over his 21-season career. Despite 2018-19 being Carter's age-42 season, he actually improved his scoring average by two full points over the prior season to 7.4. The increase came due to Carter hitting 1.6 three-pointers per contest, a level he hadn't reached since his time in Dallas. Despite being the oldest player in the NBA, Carter appeared in 76 games and played 18 minutes per game. On Nov. 21, Carter became the 22nd player in league history to reach 25,000 career points. On Dec. 29, Carter scored 21 points, making him the oldest player ever to score 20-plus in a game -- surpassing Kareem Abdul-Jabbar's long-standing record by six days. On Mar. 4, Carter passed Reggie Miller for 20th place on the all-time scoring list. In that same game, a loss to the Heat, he posted 21 points again, setting a new mark for the oldest player to score 20-plus points. On Mar. 31, the UNC product passed Karl Malone for the fifth-most games played in NBA history.

2017

After signing a one-year agreement with Sacramento, Carter appeared in 58 games during his 20th NBA season and averaged 5.4 points, 2.6 rebounds and 1.2 assists. He also posted a four-year high in field-goal percentage with a 40.3 mark. Before the season began, Carter won Most Influential Veteran at the NBPA Players' Voice Awards. He missed seven games in November due to a kidney stone. But on Dec. 27, Carter exploded for 24 points in a home win over the Cavaliers. The game marked the first time in NBA history that a 40-year-old player came off the bench to drop 20-plus points. Carter ultimately recorded eight games with double-digit points, including a 21-point effort Jan. 28 at San Antonio. During a Mar. 19 loss to the Pistons, he moved into 22nd place on the all-time NBA scorer's list, passing Knicks legend Patrick Ewing.

2016

In the final campaign of his three-year contract with the Grizzlies, Carter -- who turned 40 during the season -- played in an impressive 73 games, averaging 8.0 points, 3.1 rebounds and 1.5 threes per game. On Mar. 13, Carter posted a season-high 24 points along with five boards and three steals in a win over the Bucks. He hit six 3-pointers during that game, marking the first time ever that feat had been accomplished by a 40-year-old. In all, the grizzled veteran delivered 20 or more points on four occasions. He showed he could still get things done on the defensive end at times, too, collecting three steals on five separate occasions and posting a season-high four blocks Feb. 6 against the Spurs. On Mar. 29 versus Indiana, Carter surpassed Ray Allen for 22nd on the NBA's all-time career scoring list. And on Apr. 12, the regular-season finale, Carter passed Kobe Bryant for 13th on the regular-season games-played list.

2015

In Carter's 18th NBA campaign and second season with the Grizzlies, he once again supplied a calming veteran presence off the bench. The former superstar averaged 16.8 minutes per game over 60 contests, which wasn't much of a departure from his first season in Memphis. He mostly came off the bench, though he did draw three starts. After a tough season from beyond the arc in the prior campaign, Carter improved his long-range shot, hitting 34.9 percent of his threes. On the whole, Carter averaged 6.6 points, 2.4 boards and 1.0 made threes per contest. On Feb. 26, Carter scored a season-high 19 points over just 19:35 on the court in a win over the Lakers. In an Apr. 9 loss to the Warriors, Carter posted 15 points, seven rebounds and four assists. At the end of the season, Carter won the Twyman-Stokes Teammate of the Year Award, reinforcing his reputation as a valuable mentor and bench presence.

2014

Carter signed a three-year deal with Memphis ahead of the 2014-15 season. The well-seasoned veteran turned 38 in January, but that didn't stop him veteran from appearing in 66 games for the Grizzlies, supplying 5.8 points and 2.0 rebounds mostly off the bench (with one start). No longer the human highlight reel from his Vinsanity days in Toronto and New Jersey, Carter still provided Memphis with veteran outside shooting, which was helpful on a roster filled with defensive specialists. Coming off ankle surgery, Carter rarely played major minutes, averaging a career-low 16.5 per game. However, he still offered his new club an offensive spark on multiple occasions, as he posted double-digit points on 13 occasions. Carter produced a season-high 18 points on Dec. 17 against the Spurs. In doing so, he moved into 25th on the all-time scoring list, passing Robert Parish. Carter appeared in all 11 of the Grizzlies' playoff games, supplying 6.3 points and 4.3 rebounds per contest.

2013

Carter showed that age is just a number in 2013-14, as he appeared in 81 games for the second consecutive campaign despite turning 37 during the season. He came off the bench in all those games, but that didn't stop Carter from contributing offensively. Indeed, Carter provided the Mavericks plenty of value through both accurate long-range shooting (39.4 percent from behind the arc) and veteran leadership. Over the course of 24.4 minutes per game, he averaged 11.9 points, 3.5 rebounds and 1.8 successful 3-pointers. During a Feb. 24 win over the Knicks, Carter hit seven 3-pointers en route to 23 total points. On Mar. 16, he scored 18 to become the the 27th player in NBA history to pass 23,000 career points. On Mar. 23, Carter delivered 12 points along with a season-high 10 rebounds for his only double-double of the season. Four days later, he matched his season high with another 23-point effort, this time against the Clippers. In all, Carter notched 20-plus points seven times during the regular season. Clearly not fatigued by a season's worth of action, Carter went on to average 12.6 points (powered by 2.1 threes per game) and 3.6 boards over seven playoff contests.

2012

During Carter's second season with the Mavericks, his role focused on delivering instant offense off the bench. After missing 21 games the year before, Carter bounced back to hit the 80-game mark (81, to be exact) for the first time since 2008-09, and his stats actually ticked up from the prior campaign despite his minutes dropping somewhat. Though he turned 36 during the season, he lifted his scoring average to 13.4, an improvement of 2.3 points over 2011-12. He also hit 2.0 threes per game -- his highest mark since way back in 2001-02. Carter rounded out his line with 4.1 rebounds per game, a four-year high. His highest-scoring game of the season came Jan. 18 against the Thunder, when Carter dropped 29 points on 10-of-17 shooting, adding two steals and a block for a well-rounded line. In a Feb. 13 win over the Kings, Carter exploded for 26 points, passing the legendary Larry Bird on the NBA's career scoring list. Carter posted an impressive double-double Apr. 12 against Denver, scoring 22 points to go with 12 rebounds and seven assists. The veteran shooting guard finished the season ranked 27th all-time in points. He also moved into 11th all-time in 3-pointers, passing the likes of Kobe Bryant and Tim Hardaway.

2011

In December, at the conclusion of the NBA lockout, the Suns waived Carter. Four days later, he caught on with Dallas on a three-year deal, joining a talented backcourt that included Jason Kidd and Jason Terry. Carter started 40 of 61 games, oscillating between playing a support role with the Mavericks' starters and providing scoring punch off the bench. Although he turned 35 during the season and wasn't the focus of an offense that mostly ran through Dirk Nowitzki and Terry, Carter still provided 10.1 points per game, marking his 17th consecutive season with a double-digit scoring average. He remained a reliable three-point shooter, knocking down 36.1 percent of his shots from downtown. Carter caught fire toward the end of the campaign. On Apr. 16, he posted his only double-double of the year, netting 18 points along with a season-best 12 rebounds against Utah. Two days later, Carter put up a season-high 23 points in a win over Houston. Another two days later, he scored 19 points against Golden State while hitting the 1,500th three of his career.

2010

Carter found himself on the move again in his age-34 season. Just 22 games into his second campaign with the Magic, they sent Carter, a 2011 first-round pick, Marcin Gortat, Mickael Pietrus and cash to the Suns in exchange for Jason Richardson, Hedo Turkoglu and Earl Clark. Carter averaged 15.1 points in those games with Orlando, but he saw a bit less responsibility in Phoenix, seeing his minutes drop by three per game (to 27.2) and averaging 13.5 points following the trade. Still, Vinsanity reached a major career milestone by scoring his 20,000th career point in the course of a Jan. 17 double-double against the Knicks. Carter delivered 29 points and 12 boards in that contest, leading the Suns to victory and becoming the 39th player in history to reach the 20,000 mark. Carter also delivered a pair of 30-point efforts for Phoenix, peaking with a 33-point, six-rebound game Feb. 4 against the Thunder. For the sixth time, he equaled his career high in steals with six on Feb. 25 against his old Raptors squad.

2009

The Nets dealt Carter to the Magic in the offseason, leading him to suit up for his third NBA franchise in 2009-10. In his age-33 campaign, Carter was asked to play a supporting role alongside superstar big man Dwight Howard. He played in 75 games, averaging 16.6 points -- a strong mark for most players and still good for second on the team, but still a career low for the typically high-scoring Carter. He added 3.9 rebounds and 3.1 assists per contest. He still scored 20-plus points on 25 occasions. Carter even posted a classic Vinsanity performance -- one of the best of his career, in fact -- Feb. 8 against New Orleans, making 19-of-27 shots (including 6-of-10 from deep) for 48 points with seven rebounds. He remained an effective long-range weapon, hitting 1.6 threes per game while making them at a 36.7 percent clip. With greater distribution of responsibility and a stronger cast around Carter came greater long-term success, as the Magic ended up making it to the Eastern Conference Finals -- the deepest playoff run of his career. Carter averaged 15.5 points, 4.2 boards and 2.3 dimes through 14 postseason games.

2008

Although the 2008-09 season saw Carter cede the Nets' team lead in scoring for the first time (to up-and-coming young star Devin Harris), his fifth campaign in Jersey saw the veteran average 20-plus points for the 10th consecutive year. Even though he was coming off ankle surgery, Carter played in 80 games for the third time in his career. With 20.8 points, 5.1 rebounds, 4.7 assists and 1.0 steals per game, Carter continued turning in well-rounded stat lines with regularity. He piled up another 13 games of 30-plus points and scored a season-high 41 in a narrow loss Mar. 15 against the Clippers. The veteran narrowly missed a triple-double Jan. 9 against the Bucks, scoring 23 points with a career-high 14 assists and nine rebounds. Less than a month later, against those same Bucks on Feb. 3, he successfully picked up his fifth career triple-double, netting 14 points along with 12 assists and 10 boards. Carter turned in double-digit rebounds on six occasions and double-digit dimes in four contests.

2007

Carter signed a new four-year contract with the Nets ahead of the 2007-08 season and delivered another strong campaign, contributing 21.3 points per game over 76 contests -- his ninth straight season averaging 20-plus. Although that represented a bit of a drop from his peak scoring production, he made up for it by tying his career-high rebounding average from the year before (6.0) and setting a new personal best with 5.1 assists per game. There were still plenty of big moments for Carter. Always an exceptional ball thief, he recorded six steals along with a 21-point, 10-rebound double-double against Golden State on Dec. 22. He also scored 30-plus points on a dozen occasions, most impressively Mar. 19 against Atlanta, when he dropped 39 points along with 10 rebounds, eight assists and a block. All in all, he recorded nine double-doubles -- five with double-digit rebounds and four with double-digit assists. Following the departure of Jason Kidd, who was traded to Dallas around the deadline, Carter received plaudits for his leadership after assuming the role of team captain.

2006

Carter continued his run of good health with the Nets in the 2006-07 season, playing in all 82 games for the second time in his career while delivering another superstar campaign. Turning 30 during the season didn't stop him from posting 25.2 points per game along with a career-high 6.0 rebounds and a career-high-tying 4.8 assists -- good for his eighth straight All-Star selection. Carter returned to his elite 3-point shooting days, too, averaging 1.9 threes per game on 38.5 percent shooting from beyond the arc. He scored a season-high 46 points against New Orleans on Feb. 21, but the best was yet to come. On Apr. 7, Carter exploded for another 46 points along with a career-high 16 rebounds and 10 assists for his third career triple-double. Nine days later, he put up his fourth, adding 12 rebounds and 10 assists to a 29-point effort against the Knicks. He nearly posted another one two days later, falling one assist short in a 24-point, 10-rebound, nine-dime effort against the Bulls. Carter got revenge on his old Raptors organization in the playoffs, defeating them in the first round before the Nets fell to Cleveland in the Eastern Conference Semifinals. Over the course of 12 postseason games, Carter averaged 22.3 points, 6.8 rebounds and 5.3 assists.

2005

Carter's second season in New Jersey was a success on several levels. The oft-injured superstar was able to play in 79 games, his highest total since his sophomore campaign -- marking his third season in a row without a major injury. He responded with a huge campaign, averaging 24.2 points (12th in the NBA), 5.8 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.2 steals en route to his seventh straight All-Star selection. Carter cleared 30 points 16 times and scored 40-plus in five of those games, but his peak was a career-high-tying 51-point outburst against Miami on Dec. 23 -- a game in which he made an incredible 23 free throws on 24 attempts. He also burned the Heat for his second career triple-double, racking up 28 points with 13 rebounds and 10 assists on Feb. 4. Carter teamed with Jason Kidd to lead the Nets to first place in the Atlantic Division and the No. 3 seed in the East. They went on to the second round of the playoffs before falling to the Heat, with Carter averaging 29.6 points per game along with 7.0 rebounds, 5.3 assists and 1.8 steals across 11 postseason contests. That included a 43-point performance in Game 3 of the second round against the Heat, who went on to win the championship despite Carter's impressive efforts.

2004

After a summer of trade rumors swirling around Carter, he took the floor for Toronto to begin the 2004-05 season, but he ultimately played in just 20 games with the Raptors before being dealt to the Nets on Dec. 17. He'd scuffled to 15.9 points per game with his old club while seeing reduced minutes, but the trade infused Carter with new energy. Over 57 contests with New Jersey, Carter averaged 27.5 points, 5.9 rebounds, 4.7 assists and 1.5 steals, rediscovering his superstar form. He scored more than 30 points on 24 separate occasions -- all as a Net -- with a peak output of 45 against the Celtics on Apr. 9. Carter also collected seven double-doubles, clearing 40 points in three of those games (and very nearly a fourth). On the whole, Carter averaged 24.5 points -- good for eighth in the NBA -- with 5.2 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.4 steals per game, and he received his sixth straight All-Star nod in the process. Carter took the Nets to the playoffs, and though they endured a four-game sweep at the hands of the Heat, their new star averaged 26.8 points, 8.5 rebounds and 5.8 assists in the four-game series.

2003

Back to better health after injuries limited him the season before, Carter saw his stats tick back up in 2003-04. He racked up 22.5 points per game over 73 contests and improved as a ball distributor, setting a new career best with 4.8 assists per game while providing his usual complement of rebounds (4.8), steals (1.2) and blocks (0.9). He erased concerns about his health right from the jump, scoring 39 points in the season opener against the Nets. Carter went on to score 30-plus points on 17 occasions, topping out with a 43-point thrashing of the Hawks. Although he shot just 41.7 percent from the field, a career low, Carter made 38.3 percent of his shots from downtown -- a marked improvement over the prior campaign. He turned in four double-doubles of the points-and-rebounds variety and another three of the points-and-assists type, including a 42-point, 12-dime masterpiece against New Orleans on Mar. 21. For the fifth straight season, Carter was named an All-Star, and he finished seventh in the league in scoring average.

2002

The aftermath of offseason knee surgery slowed Carter in the first half of the 2002-03 campaign, as he managed to play in only 10 of the Raptors' first 42 games. However, once he returned in late January, Carter managed to stay on the court for 33 consecutive contests until an ankle injury ended his season in April. He remained a highly productive scorer, if not quite the game-breaker he had been when fully healthy. Carter posted a vintage offensive performance Mar. 8 against Atlanta, exploding for 43 points on 16-of-24 shooting, including 5-of-8 from downtown. All in all, he played in 43 games, averaging 20.6 points along with 4.4 rebounds, 3.3 assists, 1.1 steals and 1.0 blocks. He actually boosted his field-goal percentage to a career-high 46.7 while making a career-high 80.6 percent of his free throws. Named an All-Star once again, Carter graciously gave up his starting spot to Michael Jordan for the latter's final All-Star appearance.

2001

After signing a six-year contract extension with the Raptors, Carter delivered another high-octane season in 2001-02, averaging 24.7 points per game. He added 5.2 rebounds as well as 4.0 assists and 1.6 steals, with the latter categories representing career bests. Though his season was shortened to 60 games by hamstring, calf and knee issues, Carter made his third consecutive All-Star team (though he was unable to play in the game due to injury) and ranked seventh in the NBA in scoring. He was able to post plenty of highlights even in a shortened campaign, going off for 30-plus points 15 times, including four games with 40 or more. While Carter's season high in scoring was 43, achieved twice, his finest all-around effort came in a Dec. 7 win over Denver, when he accompanied 42 points with 15 rebounds, six assists, five steals and two blocks -- good for one of his five double-doubles. In the process, he became the only player in NBA history besides Charles Barkley (who did it in 1988) to record 40 points, 15 boards, five dimes and five steals in a game. Carter underwent knee surgery following the conclusion of the season.

2000

Carter continued improving his already incredible play in his third NBA season, setting a new career high with 27.6 points per game -- good for fifth in the league -- while continuing to contribute steadily in rebounds (5.5 per game), assists (3.9), steals (1.5) and blocks (1.1). He averaged more than 10 made field goals per game (10.2) while making threes at an even better rate (40.8 percent) than in his sophomore year (40.3). He also took a lot more threes, resulting in Carter averaging 2.2 successful shots from downtown per game. The high-flying young star scored 30-plus points on 30 separate occasions, including four games with 40-plus. Carter topped out at 48 points in a Nov. 18 win over Milwaukee, adding 10 rebounds, four assists, three steals and two blocks. He started his second straight All-Star Game after receiving the most fan votes and was named to the All-NBA Second Team. Carter took the Raptors back to the playoffs and posted a number of explosive offensive performances during their 12-game run, including an incredible 50-point effort in Game 3 of the second round against the Sixers. In that game, Carter hit nine 3-pointers, setting an NBA playoff record.

1999

After a big rookie season, Carter's sophomore campaign saw him take his game to a new level and arrive as one of the NBA's biggest stars. His scoring spiked dramatically as he started all 82 games for the Raptors, averaging 25.7 points with 5.8 rebounds, 3.9 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.1 blocks. Carter became more efficient in every shooting category, raising his field-goal percentage to 46.5 while burying 40.3 percent of his threes and 79.1 percent of his free throws. On Jan. 14, Carter cleared the 40-point mark for the first time by making 20 field goals (on 32 shots) for 47 points, five boards, four assists, two steals and two blocks in a win over the Bucks. But on Feb. 27, Carter outdid himself with a 51-point demolition of the Suns, adding nine rebounds and three steals. He recorded his first career triple-double Apr. 10 against Cleveland, piling up 31 points with 11 rebounds and 10 assists, and delivered eight double-doubles besides. Twice named NBA Player of the Week, Carter earned his first All-Star nod and got the start for the East, scoring 12 points with four boards. Already known as the league's most exciting dunker, he put together a legendary Slam Dunk Contest performance, redefining the possible in that competition. Carter finished the season 10th in the MVP voting and was named to the All-NBA Third Team. He also made his NBA playoff debut, averaging 19.3 points, 6.0 rebounds, 6.3 assists, 1.0 steals and 1.3 blocks over three games.

1998

Drafted fifth overall in the 1998 NBA Draft by the Warriors, Carter was then traded to the Raptors for his college teammate Antawn Jamison, who'd gone with the fourth pick. A lockout shortened the 1998-99 NBA season, preventing Carter from making his debut until Feb. 5. But once he did, the rookie impressed immediately, racking up 16 points with two steals and a block in his first game. It only got better from there, as Carter went on to score 20-plus points 23 times in 50 games (49 of which he started). He hit 30 three times, with his offensive peak coming Mar. 25 against Houston, when he scored 32 with six assists, a steal and a block. But Carter's finest all-around game came soon after -- a 31-point, 11-rebound, six-assist effort with two steals and two blocks for good measure. That was one of his six double-doubles. All in all, Carter's first taste of the NBA saw him average 18.3 points, 5.7 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 1.1 steals and 1.5 blocks, all while throwing down a number of electrifying dunks. Unsurprisingly, "Air Canada" was named Rookie of the Year.

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Transaction History
  • June 24, 1998
    Drafted by the Golden State Warriors in the 1st round (5th pick) of the 1998 NBA Draft. Soon there after, traded by the Golden State Warriors with cash to the Toronto Raptors for Antawn Jamison. Shortly thereafter signed a rookie contract with the Raptors.
  • January 15, 1999
    Signed a three-year contract extension with the Raptors.
  • October 15, 2000
    Raptors exercised team option for 2001-02 season.
  • August 15, 2001
    Signed a six-year contract extension with the Raptors.
  • December 17, 2004
    Traded by the Toronto Raptors to the New Jersey Nets for Alonzo Mourning, Aaron Williams, Eric Williams, a 2005 1st round draft pick and a 2006 1st round draft pick.
  • June 25, 2009
    Traded by the New Jersey Nets with Ryan Anderson to the Orlando Magic for Rafer Alston, Tony Battie and Courtney Lee.
  • December 18, 2010
    Traded by the Orlando Magic with Marcin Gortat, Mickaël Piétrus, cash and a 2011 1st round draft pick (Nikola Mirotic was later selected) to the Phoenix Suns for Earl Clark, Jason Richardson and Hedo Türkoglu.
  • December 9, 2011
    Waived by the Phoenix Suns.
  • December 12, 2011
    Signed a three-year agreement with the Dallas Mavericks.
  • July 12, 2014
    Signed a three-year contract with the Memphis Grizzlies
  • July 10, 2017
    Signed a one-year contract with the Sacramento Kings
  • August 24, 2018
    Signed a one-year contract with the Atlanta Hawks.
  • September 20, 2019
    Signed, again, a one-year contract with the Atlanta Hawks.
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Past Fantasy Outlooks
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After three years in Memphis, Carter joined Sacramento for the 2017-18 season, acting as a veteran mentor to a relatively young roster. Carter ended up seeing the floor for just 58 games and considering he was in his 20th season, his playing understandably was limited to just 17.7 minutes. He posted averages of 5.4 points, 2.6 rebounds 1.2 assists and 1.0 three-pointer, while knocking down 34.5 percent of his deep balls. Looking ahead to the upcoming campaign, Carter is set for a similar role after signing with Atlanta as a free agent. He'll act as a veteran leader to an inexperienced team and should add some solid reserve minutes when he's needed. Still, Carter is now 41 years old and his workload will likely only shrink further in order to keep his legs as fresh as possible. Go ahead and avoid Carter for Fantasy purposes once again, as he's not going to see the floor enough to be an asset in any one category.
Carter, at 40-year-old, played a surprising 24.6 minutes per game with the Grizzlies during the 2016-17 campaign – largely as a function of Chandler Parsons, a projected starter, making just 34 appearances due to a meniscus tear. In those minutes, Carter posted 8.0 points, 3.1 rebounds and 1.8. He also shot 39.4 percent from the field and made 1.5 threes per game at a 37.8 percent clip. Carter has opted to join the youthful, rebuilding Kings for next season, who are headed by his former coach, Dave Joerger. Considering Carter’s age, recent production and Sacramento’s wing depth, it seems doubtful he’ll garner a workload conducive to significant Fantasy production during the 2017-18 season. In the current situation, Carter’s value as a mentor to the Kings’ young wing prospects may be more valuable than his actual production on the floor. As a result, he can probably be avoided with relative safety in almost every Fantasy format.
The 38-year-old managed averages of 5.8 points, 2.0 rebounds, 1.2 assists, 0.7 steals, and 0.2 blocks in 17 minutes per game during 66 regular season games in 2014-15. Offseason ankle surgery and a torn tendon in his foot mid-year helped contribute to what was easily the worst season in Carter's career, as he shot 33 percent from the field, 30 percent from beyond the arc, and 79 percent from the free-throw line. His 33 percent field-goal percentage was the worst mark he has had in his 17-year career, and it's the first time Carter failed to sink 40 percent of his shots. He also produced career-lows in minutes, shot attempts, points, rebounds, and assists per game while shooting the worst three-point percentage since his rookie year. With Courtney Lee, Tony Allen, Jeff Green, Matt Barnes, and Jordan Adams in the mix for minutes, the need to play Carter heavy minutes likely won't arise barring a barrage of injuries.
Carter is entering his 17th season. Last season, he averaged 11.9 points, 3.5 rebounds, 2.6 assists, 0.8 steals, and 0.4 blocks in 24 minutes per game through 81 games. He shot 41 percent from the field on 10.0 attempts per game, 39 percent from deep on 4.6 attempts per game, and 82 percent from the charity stripe on 2.4 attempts per game. During seven playoff games, he averaged 12.6 points, 3.6 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 0.4 steals, and 0.3 blocks in 27 minutes per game. He shot 46 percent from the field on 9.7 attempts per game, 48 percent from beyond the arc on 4.4 attempts per game, and 79 percent from the free-throw line on 2.0 attempts per game. Carter, who turns 38 years old in January, isn't an electrifying high-wire act anymore, but he's still an effective and versatile offensive player. With Mike Miller leaving the Grizzlies in free agency, Carter is the most established three-point threat on a team that finished last in three-pointers last season, which means he's likely to play a considerable role in 2014-15. The team has plenty of depth at shooting guard (Courtney Lee, Tony Allen, Jordan Adams), but their small forward situation is questionable at best given that Tayshaun Prince is in decline and Quincy Pondexter, who has yet to hold a sufficient role, is making his return from a stress fracture that forced him to miss most of the 2013-14 season. If Carter earns as much time with the Grizzlies as he did with the Mavs, he'll likely hold solid late-round value in deeper leagues.
After seeing his scoring decline each of the previous four seasons, Carter reversed the trend in 2012-13, mostly on the strength of his best proficiency from three-point range since his heyday with the Raptors. No longer a player that willingly attacks the rim, Carter now makes his living almost entirely from the outside, with nearly half of his shot attempts coming from three-point land last season. Carter's 162 threes (2.0 per game) vaulted his scoring up from 10.1 to 13.4 points per game, while the 36-year-old also chipped in 4.1 rebounds, 2.4 assists and 0.9 steals, all of which were improvements from his averages from his first season in Dallas. As the Mavericks' sixth man, Carter doesn't receive the minutes some of the other top fantasy options at his position receive to rack up gaudy totals in most categories, but his lower turnover rate and solid three-point production helps cover for some of those deficiencies.
Carter is no longer the player he was when he entered the league but his professionalism has earned him the respect of his teammates. He yo-yoed in and out of the starting lineup and finished the year with a career low in scoring, averaging 10.1 points per game. There is a small silver lining in those numbers, however. Carter averaged more points as a sub than a starter, and with OJ Mayo aboard expect VC to join the second unit on a more permanent basis.
Carter’s status with the Suns will remain up in the air until the lockout is lifted. The Suns have the option of picking up Carter’s $18 million salary or cutting him and paying him $4 million to go away. Although he struggled with both the Magic and Suns for most of last season, both Carter and the Suns agreed to postpone the decision until whenever the lockout gets lifted and real free agency begins, giving the team an opportunity to view the value of Carter’s contract within the structure of what will be the new collective bargaining agreement. As such, it’s believed the Suns’ initial plans were to cut Carter and make him an unrestricted free agent. Whether he plays for the Suns or a contending team next season, at 34, Carter’s days as a dominant starting shooting guard are behind him.
As far as draft value goes, Carter's a player who could go either way. Some fantasy owners, still under the impression that Carter is a mortal lock for 20-plus points, six rebounds, and four assists per game, might go after him in the fourth or fifth round. Others, who've essentially written off the man formerly known as Air Canada, might not consider him an option at all. The truth, of course, lies somewhere in between. With steady declines across the board last season, Carter ultimately ended up as something like an eighth-round talent. After averaging only 30.8 minutes per game last season – and with little reason to see either that or his offensive load, in general, expanding – Carter profiles similarly this season. Of note is the guard's increase in free-throw percentage last season, up to 84.0 from his career average of 79.9. If he can keep that gain, it makes him a net plus in that category.
While he isn’t the freakishly athletic and explosive athlete he used to be, Carter still has plenty of game left to go around. Carter deserves credit for playing out last season and maintaining a high level of production while on a losing squad. Motivation should not be an issue for him this season as he chases his first NBA Championship with the Orlando Magic. The Magic won’t skip a beat as Carter will step in to fill the void at small forward previously filled by Hedo Turkoglu, who bolted for the comforts of Toronto. Although Carter won’t feel as pressured to carry the offensive burden with more than capable scorers in Dwight Howard and Rashard Lewis by his side, his usage rate should remain about the same. His scoring average will likely drop, but it will be at least somewhat offset by an increase in shooting efficiency and three-pointers made – a perk of playing alongside a dominant big man like Howard. Carter has missed just 11 games over the past four seasons, so durability is not a major concern.
Carter is coming off of his lowest scoring output (21.3 ppg) since coming to New Jersey, but he still quietly had a very good season with new personal bests in assists (5.1 apg) and rebounds (6.0 rpg) as well as one of his better shooting seasons (45.6% FG, 81.6% FT). He enters 2008-09 in an entirely different situation, though, with running mates Jason Kidd and Richard Jefferson now making their homes on other teams. Carter now finds himself as the centerpiece of a rebuilding team, which means that his scoring is likely to go up at the expense of his assists and field-goal percentage. Carter has been healthy and motivated ever since he joined the Nets, having missed only nine games over his almost four years in Jersey (after missing 23 games per year over his final three in Toronto). This is the first time since he has been there, though, that the Nets don’t look to be playoff contenders, so it bears watching to see if Carter loses interest and starts going through the motions the way he did in Toronto when they fell out of contention.
Last season may have been the best all-around performance of Carter’s storied career. He posted new career highs in rebounds (6.0) and assists (4.8) and new five-year highs in field-goal percentage and threes made. Cynics will call his performance a product of his drive for a new contract, but that would be, well, cynical – his numbers were very much in line with what he’s done since arriving in New Jersey, and probably relate more to Jason Kidd than anything else. With his shiny new contract, and with Kidd and Richard Jefferson still around to run the offense and draw defenses, it seems reasonable to expect another very solid year of “Vinsanity.”
Carter turned in another very strong fantasy performance for the Nets last season, showing that he could coexist statistically with a healthy Richard Jefferson while still posting strong numbers almost across the board. His 24.2 ppg, 5.8 rpg, and 4.3 apg put him among the elite at his position in all three categories. He also made solid defensive contributions (almost two combined steals/blocks per game), knocked down a difference-making 1.6 3-pointers game, and shot a strong 80% from the line (7.6 FTA per game). At 29 years-old Vinsanity should still be in his prime, with his explosive leaping ability and quick first step still intact. Carter has the tools and system in-place to post another strong season this year as long as his old nemeses like injuries or focus (recently publicized divorce, possible upcoming free agency) don’t sneak in to derail him.
After sleepwalking through a couple of injury-filled seasons, Carter used a midseason trade to the Nets as motivation to regain the all-world form that once earned him the “Next Jordan” mantle. In 57 games with the Nets, Carter averaged 27.5 points, 5.9 rebounds, 4.7 assists and 1.5 steals, while shooting 46.2% from the field, 42.5% from downtown (making 1.9 3s/game) and 81.7% from the line on 6.8 attempts per game. These stats would have made him the best all-around shooting guard in fantasy ahead of Kobe Bryant (FG%) and Dwyane Wade (3-pointers), both of whom have a fantasy weakness. Perhaps the most important stat of all for Carter as a member of the Nets: zero games missed due to injury, after missing an average of 23 games/year over the previous three seasons with the Raptors. If healthy and motivated, the 6-6 Carter is still arguably the most athletically gifted player in the NBA. His combination of outside shooting touch, a quick first step and insane jumping ability make him an impossible matchup. Carter could lose some offensive touches this season while playing next to a healthy Richard Jefferson, but he will still undoubtedly be the primary scoring option on a team that will depend on their wings to carry the offense. Plus, playing with arguably the best distributing point guard of this generation in Jason Kidd should help get him plenty of offensive touches in good position to score.
Carter is more injury-prone than most other marquee names in the NBA. Just on that premise alone, fantasy owners should lower Carter a notch or two on their cheat sheets. After apparently pushing for a trade to the Knicks in the offseason, Carter might become disgruntled once the Raptors fail to win games at a pace of his liking. Injuries and trade demands aside, Carter has the potential to be one of fantasy basketball’s best players on any given week. Carter is a gunslinger, in every essence of the word. When healthy, Carter can rival Pierce in terms of stats. But when he’s injured, you might regret spending such a high pick on a player sitting on your bench. Still, Carter should go somewhere between the late second to late third round in most fantasy leagues. If he falls any lower, take the chance on landing a potential stud in fourth or fifth round of your draft and hope he finds a way to stay healthy for most of the year.
Carter suffered through another injury-plagued campaign, playing in only 43 games and posting the worst averages since he was a rookie (20.6 PPG, 4.4 RPG, 3.3 APG). He's now a high risk-high reward fantasy player -- if he's healthy he'll be a steal, but if he's not you'll end up overpaying for what you get. Tread cautiously.
More Fantasy News
Poor scoring efforts of late
FAtlanta Hawks
February 14, 2020
Carter notched three points during Wednesday's 127-105 loss at the Cavaliers.
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Complete effort off bench
FAtlanta Hawks
January 31, 2020
Carter delivered 14 points (4-8 FG, 2-6 3Pt, 4-4 FT), six rebounds, two blocks and one steal in 24 minutes off the bench during Thursday's 127-117 win over the Sixers.
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Claims another NBA milestone
FAtlanta Hawks
January 5, 2020
Carter scored three points (1-7 FG, 1-4 3Pt) to go with three rebounds and one assist in 18 minutes Saturday in the Hawks' 116-111 win over the Pacers.
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Delights MSG crowd with 15 points
FAtlanta Hawks
December 18, 2019
Carter put up 15 points (5-9 FG, 4-7 3Pt, 1-3 FT), two blocks and one assist in 24 minutes off the bench Tuesday in the Hawks' 143-120 loss to the Knicks.
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Scores season-high 17 points
FAtlanta Hawks
December 8, 2019
Carter had 17 points (7-11 FG, 3-6 3PT), two assists, one rebound and one block in 20 minutes off the bench during Sunday's 122-107 win at Charlotte.
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