1.  
RB  LAR
Rush Att
267
Rush Yds
1233
Rush TD
11
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
54
Rec Yds
533
Rec TD
3
Rec Avg
9.9
Along with the rest of the Rams offense, Gurley thrived under new coach Sean McVay in 2017, leading the NFL in scrimmage yards (2,093) and touchdowns (19), scoring five more TDs than second-place Alvin Kamara despite sitting out a meaningless Week 17. In fact, Gurley's name was all over the leaderboards for running backs - first in goal-line carries, second in red-zone touches, fifth in runs of 15 yards or more and fifth in receptions, just to name a few categories. A physical specimen at 6-1, 227, he dominated defenders all over the field, as his sluggish form from the season before was replaced with the speed, explosiveness and elusiveness that were the hallmarks of his college days before he tore his ACL in November 2014. The Rams didn't rest on their laurels in the offseason, either. The team's offense could be even more dangerous after replacing Sammy Watkins with Brandin Cooks, and the Rams improved their depth along the offensive line in the draft. Defenses forced to choose between letting Jared Goff or Gurley beat them are likely to find there are no right answers, and there doesn't seem to be much that can slow Gurley down heading into 2018.
2.  
RB  ARI
Rush Att
255
Rush Yds
1176
Rush TD
9
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
67
Rec Yds
633
Rec TD
2
Rec Avg
9.4
Coming off his breakout 2016, expectations were sky high for Johnson last year, which made it all the more devastating when his campaign lasted all of 11 carries before a dislocated left wrist landed him on injured reserve. Healthy once again, the 26-year-old will be the focal point of the Arizona offense regardless of whether Sam Bradford or Josh Rosen is under center. Johnson's speed and elusiveness are both elite, and he also has the size and explosiveness to blow through arm tackles and gain yards after contact, along with outstanding receiving skills that make him a genuine three-down threat. New coach Steve Wilks is more defensive-minded than Bruce Arians, but with former Chargers boss Mike McCoy coming in as offensive coordinator, the Cardinals should still be in good hands. McCoy maximized the talents of another prolific pass-catching back, Danny Woodhead, during his time in San Diego. While it will be tough to repeat the 20 touchdowns Johnson scored in 2016 - he needed 58 red-zone carries and 14 red-zone targets to get there - another season with more than 2,000 scrimmage yards is possible given his likely workload. The biggest question for Johnson in 2018 will be health-related - not just for him, but for a veteran Cardinals offensive line that lost both its starters on the left side to injury last year and remade its right side in free agency this offseason. Johnson is entering a contract season and skipped mandatory minicamp while angling for an extension, but he ultimately decided to show up for the start of training camp in late July.
3.  
RB  DAL
Rush Att
288
Rush Yds
1322
Rush TD
11
Rush Avg
4.6
Rec
41
Rec Yds
376
Rec TD
1
Rec Avg
9.2
While Elliott's six-game suspension cast a pall over not just his own season but the Cowboys' entire 2017 campaign, he managed to finish in the top 10 for carries, red-zone touches and TDs despite only playing 10 games. He lost a full yard off his rookie-year YPC and only managed seven runs of 15 yards or more, but his workload was unrivaled by anyone besides Le'Veon Bell, with Elliott taking 26.8 touches per game and rushing for 80 or more yards in all but one game. He's one of the few true bellcow backs in the modern NFL, coming off a season in which he was on the field for 85.5 percent of the Cowboys' offensive snaps in the games he played. While not a high-volume pass catcher along the lines of Bell or David Johnson, the third-year back has shown more than enough as a receiver and blocker to continue handling the majority of third downs. He runs with good power and doesn't lack for speed, but his biggest weapons are vision and patience, assets accentuated by the fearsome offensive line in front of him - a line that got reinforced in the draft with second-rounder Connor Williams. Assuming he doesn't run afoul of the commissioner's office again, Elliott heads into 2018 poised to challenge for another rushing title and seemingly a lock for double-digit TDs.
4.  
RB  NYG
Rush Att
269
Rush Yds
1211
Rush TD
8
Rush Avg
4.5
Rec
62
Rec Yds
578
Rec TD
2
Rec Avg
9.3
The second overall pick in the 2018 draft, Barkley follows in the footsteps of Ezekiel Elliott and Leonard Fournette as running backs deemed worthy of top-five selections in recent years. Barkley has the skills to live up to that billing, as his standout career at Penn State was punctuated by frequent highlight-reel performances. Barkley's speed - a 4.4 40 at the combine - and top-shelf elusiveness and agility make it extremely difficult for defenders once he finds open real estate. At 6-0, 233, Barkley is a load to bring down, and his strong lower body allows him to pick up plenty of yards after contact, though he struggled at times running between the tackles. He also worked hard to turn himself into a three-down back who can help as a receiver and a pass protector, something the Giants needed to prioritize given their aging quarterback and shaky offensive line. The team did remake its line in the offseason, signing Nate Solder and Patrick Omameh as free agents and using a second-round pick on guard Will Hernandez, so Barkley should be able to use his moves to avoid hits two yards past the line of scrimmage instead of two yards behind it. Expect him to see a big workload as the new centerpiece of the Giants offense.
5.  
WR  PIT
Rec
100
Rec Yds
1451
Rec TD
8
Rec Avg
14.5
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
After a down year by his standards in 2016, Brown set the NFL ablaze again last year, leading the league in yards by a wide margin, despite missing two and a half games. In a down year for wide receivers, he was an absolute monster, though his timing - his calf injury came during the fantasy playoffs - wasn't ideal. Brown averaged 9.4 YPT, fifth among the league's 27 100-target WR, and 15.2 YPC (7th). He had five games with 150-plus receiving yards, a league-leading 27 catches for 20 or more yards and tied for second with seven catches of 40-plus. At 5-10, 181, and running a poorly timed 4.56 40, Brown resembles an average man more than a freak NFL receiver. But looks can be deceiving. Brown plays more like a 4.4 runner, and his electrifying quickness makes him just about cornerback-proof. Consider what he did to Jalen Ramsey and A.J. Bouye in the AFC divisional playoffs while coming back from the calf injury - seven catches on 11 targets for 132 yards and two TDs. Brown will turn 30 in July, reaching an age where most receivers are on their downsides, but small receivers typically age better than big ones, and given his long track record of good health and no signs whatsoever of decline, this shouldn't be a major concern. That Ben Roethlisberger - who also seemed at the top of his game during the playoff loss to Jacksonville - has committed to 2018 locks Brown in as the No. 1 WR on the board. Second-year man JuJu Smith-Schuster looks like a star in the making, but given the Steelers' narrow tree, his presence might add rather than detract from Brown's value. The one wild card is the departure of offensive coordinator Todd Haley, but given that he's being replaced by former quarterbacks coach Randy Fichtner, a major scheme overhaul is unlikely.
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