Edwin Diaz

Edwin Diaz

30-Year-Old PitcherRP
New York Mets
2024 Fantasy Outlook
Diaz missed all of last season after suffering a complete tear of his right patellar tendon while celebrating during the World Baseball Classic last March. The veteran closer threw several bullpen sessions towards the end of last season, but the Mets didn't rush him back since they weren't in playoff contention. The last we saw Diaz pitch in the majors, he struck out 118 batters over 62 innings for a strikeout rate north of 50%, but achieving those types of numbers again will depend on several factors. The obvious one is health, while the other two are Diaz's velocity and effectiveness of his slider. The slider didn't play well during his "down" season in 2019 and his ratios suffered. However, if the soon-to-be 30-year-old is throwing triple-digit heaters and wiping hitters out with the slider - look out. Monitor Diaz during spring training, but don't wait to long in the draft room to click his name, as he'll be among the top 3 closers off board soon enough. Read Past Outlooks
RANKS
Rest of Season From Preseason
#50
ADP
$Signed a five-year, $102 million contract with the Mets in November of 2022. Contract includes $20 million team option for 2028.
Secures ninth save
PNew York Mets
July 10, 2024
Diaz struck out the only batter he faced Tuesday to record his ninth save of the season in a 7-5 win over the Nationals.
ANALYSIS
The Mets took a 7-2 lead into the ninth inning, but Reed Garrett made a mess of things and forced manager Carlos Mendoza to turn to his closer with two outs and a runner on first base. Diaz actually allowed the inherited runner to score after Jacob Young took second on defensive indifference and then raced around the bases on a wild pitch, but the right-hander fanned CJ Abrams to end the game. Diaz has gone six straight appearances since returning from his suspension without having a run charged to his own ledger, collecting two wins and four saves during that stretch with a 6:1 K:BB.
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Pitching Stats
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2024
2023
2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2024 MLB Game Log
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2023 MLB Game Log
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2022 MLB Game Log
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2021 MLB Game Log
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2020 MLB Game Log
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2019 MLB Game Log
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2018 MLB Game Log
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Pitching Appearances Breakdown
Average Pitch Count
17
Last 10 Games
15
Last 5 Games
14
How many pitches does Edwin Diaz generally throw?
 
1-10
 
11-20
 
21-30
 
31-40
 
41-50
 
51-60
 
61-70
 
71-80
 
81-90
 
91-100
 
101-110
 
111-120
 
121+
 
1-10
 
11-20
 
21-30
 
31-40
 
41-50
 
51-60
 
61-70
 
71-80
 
81-90
 
91-100
 
101-110
 
111-120
 
121+
 
1-10
 
11-20
 
21-30
 
31-40
 
41-50
 
51-60
 
61-70
 
71-80
 
81-90
 
91-100
 
101-110
 
111-120
 
121+
What part of the game does Edwin Diaz generally pitch?
 
 
 
1st
 
 
 
2nd
 
 
 
3rd
 
 
 
4th
 
 
 
5th
 
 
 
6th
 
 
 
7th
 
 
 
8th
 
 
 
9th
 
Extra
 
 
 
1st
 
 
 
2nd
 
 
 
3rd
 
 
 
4th
 
 
 
5th
 
 
 
6th
 
 
 
7th
 
 
 
8th
 
 
 
9th
 
Extra
 
 
 
1st
 
 
 
2nd
 
 
 
3rd
 
 
 
4th
 
 
 
5th
 
 
 
6th
 
 
 
7th
 
 
 
8th
 
 
 
9th
 
Extra
% Games Reaching Innings Threshold
% Games By Number of Innings Pitched
Left/Right Pitching Splits
Since 2022
 
 
-9%
BAA vs LHP
2024
 
 
-52%
BAA vs RHP
2023
No Stats
2022
 
 
-50%
BAA vs LHP
BAA Batters K BB H 2B 3B HR
Since 2022vs Left .170 152 74 14 23 3 0 6
Since 2022vs Right .186 188 80 12 32 2 0 2
2024vs Left .304 53 21 5 14 2 0 3
2024vs Right .146 52 15 3 7 0 0 2
2023vs Left 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2023vs Right 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2022vs Left .101 99 53 9 9 1 0 3
2022vs Right .202 136 65 9 25 2 0 0
More Splits View More Split Stats
Home/Away Pitching Splits
Since 2022
 
 
-49%
ERA at Home
2024
 
 
-33%
ERA at Home
2023
No Stats
2022
 
 
-65%
ERA at Home
ERA WHIP IP W L SV K/9 BB/9 HR/9
Since 2022Home 1.56 0.83 52.0 4 1 22 16.4 2.6 0.5
Since 2022Away 3.03 1.07 35.2 2 1 19 14.9 2.8 1.3
2024Home 3.52 0.85 15.1 2 1 4 14.1 1.8 1.8
2024Away 5.23 1.55 10.1 1 0 5 10.5 4.4 1.7
2023Home 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2023Away 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2022Home 0.74 0.82 36.2 2 0 18 17.4 2.9 0.0
2022Away 2.13 0.87 25.1 1 1 14 16.7 2.1 1.1
More Splits View More Split Stats
Stat Review
How does Edwin Diaz compare to other relievers?
This section compares his stats with all relief pitcher seasons from the previous three seasons (minimum 30 innings)*. The bar represents the player's percentile rank. For example, if the bar is halfway across, then the player falls into the 50th percentile for that stat and it would be considered average.

* Exit Velocity, Barrels/BBE %, Balls Hit 95+ MPH %, and Spin Rate are benchmarked against 2019 data (min 30 IP). See here for more exit velocity/barrels stats plus an explanation of current limitations with that data set.
  • K/BB
    Strikeout to walk ratio.
  • K/9
    Average strikeouts per nine innings.
  • BB/9
    Average walks per nine innings.
  • HR/9
    Average home runs allowed per nine innings.
  • Fastball
    Average fastball velocity.
  • ERA
    Earned run average. The average earned runs allowed per nine innings.
  • WHIP
    Walks plus hits per inning pitched.
  • BABIP
    Batting average on balls in play. Measures how many balls in play against a pitcher go for hits.
  • GB/FB
    Groundball to flyball ratio. The higher the number, the more likely a pitcher is to induce groundballs.
  • Left On Base
    The percentage of base runners that a pitcher strands on base over the course of a season.
  • Exit Velocity
    The speed of the baseball as it comes off the bat, immediately after a batter makes contact.
  • Barrels/BBE
    The percentage of batted ball events resulting in a Barrel. A Barrel is a batted ball with similar exit velocity and launch angle to past ones that led to a minimum .500 batting average and 1.500 slugging percentage.
  • Spin Rate
    Spin Rate is the rate of spin on a baseball after it is released. It is measured in revolutions per minute (rpm).
  • Balls Hit 95+ MPH
    The percentage of batted balls hit that met or exceeded the 95 MPH threshold.
  • Swinging Strike
    The percentage of pitches that result in a swing and a miss.
K/BB
4.50
 
K/9
12.6
 
BB/9
2.8
 
HR/9
1.8
 
Fastball
97.2 mph
 
ERA
4.21
 
WHIP
1.13
 
BABIP
.305
 
GB/FB
1.33
 
Left On Base
68.2%
 
Exit Velocity
81.5 mph
 
Barrels/BBE
5.0%
 
Spin Rate
2321 rpm
 
Balls Hit 95+ MPH
18.3%
 
Swinging Strike
16.7%
 
Advanced Pitching Stats
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Defensive Stats
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Stats Vs Today's Lineup
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Recent RotoWire Articles Featuring Edwin Diaz See More
Mound Musings: Life, the Universe and Everything
Yesterday
Brad Johnson discusses the current state of pitching and notes how infrequently a star like Paul Skenes comes along.
MLB Barometer: Best and Worst of the First Half
9 days ago
Aaron Judge looks just like his record-breaking 2022 self, if not better, making him the best player of the first half.
Mound Musings: The Endgame Odyssey Continues – American League
15 days ago
Brad Johnson discusses AL bullpens in which adjustments may still be made, and in Oakland Mason Miller is performing well, but will he still be in town after the trade deadline?
Week 13 FAAB Results - How the Turn Tables
18 days ago
Ben Rice, Aroldis Chapman and Spencer Turnbull were the leading FAAB targets in Jeff Erickson's leagues this week.
Mound Musings: The Endgame Odyssey Continues – National League
22 days ago
Brad Johnson examines NL Bullpens with possible changes on the horizon, and in the case of the Mets, current closer Edwin Diaz can't seem to protect leads.
Past Fantasy Outlooks
2023
2022
2021
2020
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
Diaz made the best of a contract year, as no relief pitcher in 2022 came close to his 50.2% strikeout rate, 25.2% SwStr%, 17.1 K/9 or 42.6% K-BB%. His 1.31 ERA ranked fourth among qualified relievers, while his 0.90 FIP and 1.11 SIERA were also the best in the league. Diaz's name was scattered across many Statcast leaderboards, as he posted a 99th percentile rating, or better, in multiple pitching metrics. However, he was "merely" league average in HardHit% and BB%. One main reason why Diaz was so good last season can be attributed to a pitch mix change. He threw his fastball far less often - a roughly 20% difference from his most recent seasons - while using his slider as his primary offering (58% pitch usage) for the first time in his career. Diaz allowed just 17 hits - 16 of which were singles - on his slider for a .114 BA on the pitch. Expect the soon-to-be 29-year-old to be among the top two closers drafted in 2023 now that the Mets re-signed him for 5 years at $102 million.
Diaz was the highest-leveraged reliever in baseball as measured by gmLI, which measures a pitcher's average Leverage Index upon entering a game. He rarely gave up hard contact, as his 21.3% hard hit percentage was fifth-best among qualified relievers and in the 99th percentile. This was a vast improvement over his 48.1% hard hit percentage in 2019, which was third-worst. Diaz was 32-for-38 in save chances with a 3.45 ERA (2.84 SIERA) and 1.05 WHIP over 62.2 innings. He averaged a career best 98.8 mph on his fastball, though his slider carried a .119 XBA and .164 XSLG as his put-away pitch. Most importantly, Diaz maintained his ability to miss bats with a 12.8 K/9 and 16.5% SwStr%. The soon-to-be 28-year-old is entering his final year of arbitration before he becomes a free agent in 2023. He's poised to close another season for the Mets and be drafted among the top 10 options for saves.
Diaz's 2019 campaign, which saw his ERA spike from 1.96 to 5.59, served as a valuable reminder that even the best relievers in baseball aren't particularly reliable from season to season. The righty looked like he was in line for another disappointing season at the start of last year, when he allowed runs in two of his first three appearances. He allowed just three total earned runs the rest of the way, however, finishing the year with a stellar 1.75 ERA, a number he backed up with a career-high 45.5 K%. It wasn't all positive for his fantasy profile, however, as his early struggles combined with his poor 2019 season meant he was removed from the closer role for most of the year and wound up finishing with just six saves. While he may not have his manager's full faith heading into 2021, he's clearly closer material most of the time, making him a risky but very high-ceiling option during draft season.
Diaz struck out 39% of the hitters he faced in 2019 and had a 30 K-BB%, both of which are elite rates for any relief pitcher. The problem was what happened with the other 61% of hitters he faced last season. Despite having both velocity and a strikeout rate in the 99th percentile last season, Diaz was in the second percentile of hard-hit rate and the 11th percentile of exit velocity by batters. Those type of outcomes are what drove his .281 BABIP from his record-breaking 2018 season up to .377 this past season. Both his fastball and slider had negative run values for the first time in his career, and that mainly came from his inconsistent command of both pitches. Diaz's struggles were a great reminder of two things: reliever volatility, and the difference between command and control. He threw strikes, but not where they needed to be. Elite seasons are often followed up by steps backward. Jump back in on Diaz.
Diaz ended 2018 as the top closer and looks to be one of the first off the board in 2019 after an offseason trade to the Mets. Here's the thing: amassing another 61 save chances with 57 conversions is a long shot. Last year, Diaz tied for the second-most saves in history. Even with comparable skills, 15-20 fewer is a fair expectation. Speaking of skills, they're elite. His 18.9 SwStr% was bested by only Josh Hader, and just barely at that. His K-BB% was tops in the league. Diaz throws a 98-mph fastball almost two-thirds of the time, complemented by a 90-mph slider. There's really nothing to point to in terms of luck as Diaz's BABIP, HR/FB and LOB% were all within expected ranges. The skills, hence strikeouts and ratios, are real and repeatable and thus worthy of chasing aggressively. Just don't count on another 50-save season.
The road was a bit rocky for Diaz in 2017, with the Mariners temporarily relieving him of closer duties on a couple occasions, but when it was all said and done Diaz tied for fourth in the American League in saves. He converted 21 of 23 save opportunities in the second half and struck out 32 percent of the batters he faced overall using a combination of high-90s fastballs and high-80s sliders. Diaz can be his own worst enemy with the walks, and the uptick in home runs last season is a concern, although he was better in that regard down the stretch (two homers allowed in his final 30.1 innings). His stuff is electric most of the time and there aren't any proven options behind him in the Seattle bullpen, so Diaz should be given every chance to remain in the closer role throughout 2018. However, he's not exactly a "safe" investment given the slip in performance from 2016 and the general year-to-year unpredictability of major-league relievers.
Seattle's save chances were dominated in the first half by Steve Cishek. However, after Cishek landed on the disabled list, Diaz, once a top starting pitching prospect, took the reins and never looked back. He dazzled in the bullpen over the final two-plus months, going 18-for-21 in save chances. Diaz ranked sixth in second-half K/9 (14.3) among arms with 20-plus appearances, behind Ken Giles, Kenley Jansen, Dellin Betances, Craig Kimbrel and Aroldis Chapman. On the season, he finished fourth among relievers with an 18.5 swinging-strike percentage. While his his walk rate was a sparkling 2.6 BB/9, he has bouts of inefficiency and must aim to get ahead in more at-bats. Still, the right-hander, who turns 23 in March, boasts outstanding peripherals (33.6 K-BB%) and electric stuff. Even with some correction perhaps coming, Diaz could deliver numbers befitting a top-five fantasy closer at a discount relative to bigger names.
It is a sad state of affairs when a pitcher who finished the previous season with a 4.57 ERA in 104.1 innings at Double-A has a claim as the best prospect in a farm system, but that is where the Mariners are at. Diaz is not nearly as bad as that ERA suggests — he had a 1.70 ERA in 37 innings at High-A Bakersfield before his promotion and his 3.22 FIP at Double-A Jackson suggests he was pretty unlucky in Southern League play. His 145:46 K:BB in 141.1 innings illustrates his potential to be an average or better bat misser with an average command profile in the big leagues, essentially serving as a true No. 3 starter who should benefit from playing half his games in Safeco Field. Diaz should spend most, if not all of his age-22 season at Triple-A Tacoma, potentially getting some late-season spot starts with the Mariners, but more likely figuring into the rotation plans in 2017.
A third-round pick out of Puerto Rico in the 2012 draft, Diaz held his own at Low-A Clinton last year as a 20-year-old after dominating in rookie ball in 2013. He has a low-to-mid-90s fastball, a good slider, and a developing changeup. His control needs some work, but he has plenty of time to hone those skills. He will also continue to fill out. His 6-foot-2, 178-pound frame is about 20 pounds more than his draft weight, but he's bound to get bigger and stronger still. The organization's co-starting pitcher of the year in 2014 (along with Jordan Pries), Diaz is a ways away, but he has plenty of upside and is worth keeping an eye on.
More Fantasy News
Blows save but notches win
PNew York Mets
July 7, 2024
Diaz (3-1) got the win during Sunday's 3-2 victory over the Pirates but also blew the save. He did not allow a run on one hit, one walk and one strikeout over 1.1 innings.
ANALYSIS
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Notches save in return
PNew York Mets
July 7, 2024
Diaz struck out one in a scoreless ninth inning Saturday to record his eighth save of the season in a 5-2 win over the Pirates.
ANALYSIS
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Returns from suspension
PNew York Mets
July 6, 2024
The Mets activated Diaz from his 10-game suspension Saturday, Tim Healey of Newsday reports.
ANALYSIS
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Will not appeal suspension
PNew York Mets
Suspension
June 25, 2024
Diaz will begin serving his 10-game foreign substance suspension Tuesday after declining to appeal the ruling, Anthony DiComo of MLB.com reports.
ANALYSIS
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Handed 10-game suspension
PNew York Mets
Suspension
June 24, 2024
Major League Baseball suspended Diaz for 10 games Monday for violating prohibitions on foreign substances, Jon Heyman of the New York Post reports.
ANALYSIS
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Latest Fantasy Rumors
Trying to slow things down
PNew York Mets
May 22, 2024
According to Will Sammon of The Athletic, Diaz is still adjusting to the pitch clock and is working to slow the game down.
ANALYSIS
The Mets longtime closer missed all of last season -- the first MLB campaign with a pitch clock -- with a torn patellar tendon, and he's still adjusting to the time limitations. Diaz is still getting plenty of strikeouts with a 13.5 K/9, but he's already served up five homers, which eclipses the full-season totals of his previous three seasons. However, the right-hander isn't giving up consistent hard contact with an average exit velocity of 84.8 mph, and he also has a 2.89 xFIP and 2.85 xERA. It should only be a matter of time before he's back closing for New York.
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