Alcides Escobar

Alcides Escobar

35-Year-Old ShortstopSS
 Free Agent  
2022 Fantasy Outlook
Escobar returned stateside in 2021 after spending the 2020 season with the Tokyo Yakult Swallows. He began the campaign on a minor-league deal with the Royals, but he didn't reach the majors until he became a regular starter at both second base and shortstop until he was traded to the Nationals in early July. Thereafter, he remarkably regularly hit first or second in the order and played at second base and shortstop after the departure of Trea Turner. Despite logging his first major-league at-bats since 2018, Escobar maintained a 16 K% and posted a career-best .116 ISO -- only the second time he's posted an ISO above .100 in his career. With 53 runs scored, three stolen bases and a .288 batting average, Escobar maintained a useful profile across several categories. Looking ahead to 2022, Escobar has already agreed to terms to return to Washington. Manager Dave Martinez said in March that he expects Escobar to play every day. However, he could also have to compete for playing time with the trio of Cesar Hernandez, Carter Kieboom and Luis Garcia. Read Past Outlooks
RANKSFrom Preseason
#586
ADP
$Signed a one-year, $1 million contract with the Nationals in October of 2021. Released by the Nationals in August of 2022.
Partings ways with Washington
SSFree Agent  
August 3, 2022
The Nationals requested release waivers of Escobar on Wednesday, Jesse Dougherty of The Washington Post reports.
ANALYSIS
The 35-year-old has appeared in only seven games with six plate appearances since returning from a hamstring injury in late June, and Washington has opted to move on in order to make room on the roster for Luke Voit. Escobar has a .218/.260/.282 slash line and career-high 24.4 percent strikeout rate in 42 games this year.
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Batting Stats
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2021
2018
2017
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2021 MLB Game Log
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2018 MLB Game Log
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2017 MLB Game Log
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Batting Order Slot Breakdown
vs Right-Handed Pitchers
vs RHP
#1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
#7
#8
#9
1
8
9
vs Left-Handed Pitchers
vs LHP
#1
#2
#3
#4
#5
#6
#7
#8
#9
5
4
9
Left/Right Batting Splits
Since 2020
 
 
+4%
OPS vs RHP
2022
 
 
+13%
OPS vs RHP
2021
Even Split
2020
No Stats
OPS PA R HR RBI SB AVG OBP SLG
Since 2020vs Left .668 149 22 0 7 0 .257 .322 .346
Since 2020vs Right .697 331 43 4 29 4 .274 .316 .381
2022vs Left .500 45 5 0 3 0 .209 .244 .256
2022vs Right .564 86 7 0 5 1 .222 .267 .296
2021vs Left .743 104 17 0 4 0 .280 .356 .387
2021vs Right .745 245 36 4 24 3 .292 .333 .412
2020vs Left 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2020vs Right 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More Splits View More Split Stats
Home/Away Batting Splits
Since 2020
 
 
+15%
OPS on Road
2022
 
 
+96%
OPS on Road
2021
 
 
+4%
OPS at Home
2020
No Stats
OPS PA R HR RBI SB AVG OBP SLG
Since 2020Home .635 205 26 3 17 1 .247 .293 .342
Since 2020Away .728 275 39 1 19 3 .285 .337 .391
2022Home .365 64 4 0 3 0 .161 .188 .177
2022Away .715 67 8 0 5 1 .274 .328 .387
2021Home .762 141 22 3 14 1 .289 .340 .422
2021Away .732 208 31 1 14 2 .288 .340 .393
2020Home 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
2020Away 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0
More Splits View More Split Stats
Stat Review
How does Alcides Escobar compare to other hitters?
This section compares his stats with all batting seasons from the previous three seasons (minimum 400 plate appearances)*. The bar represents the player's percentile rank. For example, if the bar is halfway across, then the player falls into the 50th percentile for that stat and it would be considered average.

* Exit Velocity and Barrels/PA % are benchmarked against 2019 data (min 400 PA) and Hard Hit Rate is benchmarked against last season's data (min 400 PA). See here for more exit velocity/barrels stats plus an explanation of current limitations with that data set.
  • BB/K
    Walk to strikeout ratio
  • BB Rate
    The percentage of plate appearances resulting in a walk.
  • K Rate
    The percentage of plate appearances resulting in a strikeout.
  • BABIP
    Batting average on balls in play. Measures how many of a batter’s balls in play go for hits.
  • ISO
    Isolated Power. Slugging percentage minus batting average. A computation used to measure a batter's raw power.
  • AVG
    Batting average. Hits divided by at bats.
  • OBP
    On Base Percentage. A measure of how often a batters reaches base. Roughly equal to number of times on base divided by plate appearances.
  • SLG
    Slugging Percentage. A measure of the batting productivity of a hitter. It is calculated as total bases divided by at bats.
  • OPS
    On base plus slugging. THe sum of a batter's on-base percentage and slugging percentage.
  • wOBA
    Weighted on-base average. Measures a player's overall offensive contributions per plate appearance. wOBA combines all the different aspects of hitting into one metric, weighting each of them in proportion to their actual run value.
  • Exit Velocity
    The speed of the baseball as it comes off the bat, immediately after a batter makes contact.
  • Hard Hit Rate
    A measure of contact quality from Sports Info Solutions. This stat explains what percentage of batted balls were hit hard vs. medium or soft.
  • Barrels/PA
    The percentage of plate appearances where a batter had a batted ball classified as a Barrel. A Barrel is a batted ball with similar exit velocity and launch angle to past ones that led to a minimum .500 batting average and 1.500 slugging percentage.
  • Expected BA
    Expected Batting Average.
  • Expected SLG
    Expected Slugging Percentage.
  • Sprint Speed
    The speed of a runner from home to first, in feet per second.
  • Ground Ball %
    The percentage of balls put in play that are on the ground.
  • Line Drive %
    The percentage of balls put in play that are line drives.
  • Fly Ball %
    The percentage of balls put in play that are fly balls.
BB/K
0.16
 
BB Rate
3.8%
 
K Rate
24.4%
 
BABIP
.293
 
ISO
.065
 
AVG
.218
 
OBP
.260
 
SLG
.282
 
OPS
.542
 
wOBA
.244
 
Exit Velocity
81.8 mph
 
Hard Hit Rate
10.9%
 
Barrels/PA
0.8%
 
Expected BA
.210
 
Expected SLG
.264
 
Sprint Speed
23.5 ft/sec
 
Ground Ball %
35.2%
 
Line Drive %
29.7%
 
Fly Ball %
35.2%
 
Advanced Batting Stats
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Additional Stats
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Defensive Stats
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Batted Ball Stats
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Stats Vs Upcoming Pitchers
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Recent RotoWire Articles Featuring Alcides Escobar
Collette Calls: No Sport for Old Men?
82 days ago
Jason Collette ponders whether there is an accelerating aging curve in Major League Baseball. Are aging veterans just as volatile as the league's youngest players?
MLB FAAB Factor: Waiver Pickups of the Week
104 days ago
Jason Shebilske breaks down this week's top waiver-wire options, including Blue Jays righty Ross Stripling.
MLB FAAB Factor: Waiver Pickups of the Week
111 days ago
Jason Shebilske analyzes the top waiver-wire options for the week, including Cardinals pitcher Dakota Hudson.
NL FAAB Factor: Waiver Pickups of the Week
115 days ago
A couple middle infielders highlight Dan Marcus's list of NL additions.
MLB FAAB Factor: Waiver Pickups of the Week
118 days ago
Jason Shebilske analyzes the top waiver-wire options for the week, including Milwaukee's Aaron Ashby.
Past Fantasy Outlooks
2019
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
Lefty pitchers can often pitch until their arm falls off. Apparently, solid defensive shortstops can get 500-plus plate appearances until their glove falls off? Escobar has played a ton in recent years for Kansas City as his defense is certainly deserving of the field most games. The problem is his offensive skills have been 50 shades of awful for the past few years, especially the past two now that he rarely steals bases. The dumbfounding part of this story was how frequently manager Ned Yost let Escobar hit high in the lineup. It bodes well for Billy Hamilton as he is now in Kansas City, but no new club is going to give Escobar the playing time he enjoyed in Kansas City. The new club is also going to try to hit him 10th. We're half-serious here. Your best hope is 50 runs and 10 steals in part-time duty.
There was a point earlier in Escobar's career when the potential for 30-plus steals and an above-average batting average made him a desirable middle-infield filler in mixers and a steady shortstop in AL-only formats. At that time, he was an elite defender, whose ability to pile up a high volume of plate appearances enabled him to yield passable counting stats. While his glove is still very good, Escobar's bat has been among the worst of any big-league regular over the past three seasons. He hasn't eclipsed 20 steals in a season since 2014 -- even with the benefit of an aggressive manager -- thanks in large part to three consecutive seasons with a sub-.300 OBP. In a surprising move, the rebuilding Royals brought Escobar back on a one-year, $2.5 million deal. Even more surprising is the fact that general manager Dayton Moore stated that Escobar will be the team's starting shortstop on Opening Day. Look for Raul Mondesi to push him for playing time if Escobar is as bad as he has been the last two seasons.
Despite setting a career high in plate appearances, Escobar tied his career low with 57 runs scored. That'll happen when you carry an on-base percentage of just .292. Even running into a career-high seven homers didn't help the slick-fielding shortstop's tallies. Speaking of running, Escobar registered 17 pilfers for the second straight campaign after swiping at least 22 from 2011 to 2014, averaging 28.5 per year over that span. Escobar's strongest suit is durability, which keeps his counting stats palatable for single-league formats. Escobar usually finds his way onto a mixed-league squad once injuries thin the player pool. But with such a paltry walk rate and paucity of power at a time where there's an influx of power-hitting shortstops, Escobar is reserve-round fodder in mixed-league drafts, especially since he's a candidate to be dropped to the bottom of the lineup, further dampening production.
Oh, what should have been. Escobar has hardware on one hand for winning the World Series and he holds the Gold Glove in his other hand, but his 74 runs scored as the leadoff man for the Royals left a lot to be desired. He scored so few runs because he had a sub .300 on-base percentage for the fourth time in six seasons. Escobar is an impatient high-contact hitter who does not hit the ball that hard or far so he’s on first more often than not. He complicated that issue with just 17 steals last season which was his lowest total as a Royal. Ideally, he would hit down in the lineup, but that will also cut into his plate appearances and thus his opportunity to score runs. At 29, he’s not suddenly going to become a patient hitter and his lack of power means pitchers can challenge him within the strike zone, forcing him to swing. In short, he’s a better real life player than he is a fantasy one.
Escobar is about as close as it gets to a modern day iron man, having played 155 or more contests in each of his four seasons with Kansas City. 2014 was the first time he played all 162 games, however, and Escobar turned that consistency into arguably the best season of his major league career. The defensive wizard was able to make his presence known at the plate as well, posting career-best totals in doubles (34) and runs scored (74). The latter number was partially bolstered by his movement to the leadoff spot in the order, a move made by manager Ned Yost in mid-September that continued on through the Royals' postseason run. Although fantasy owners can't hope for much from a power standpoint, 30 steals is a reasonable expectation as long as he maintains his batting average, as Escobar has eclipsed 31 steals in each year that he's hit .285 or better. If Yost sticks with Escobar atop his lineup in 2015, the 28-year-old shortstop could be poised for yet another highly productive fantasy season.
After Escobar's breakout campaign in 2012 there were two very distinct camps -- those who believed he was taking his game to the next level and those who believed that he overachieved and wouldn’t be able to duplicate those numbers in 2013. The doubters received their validation as Escobar struggled to match his 2012 totals despite playing in three more games. The root of Escobar's decline can be found in two statistical regressions: a drop in his BABIP, which went from .344 to .264, and a spike in fly balls at the expense of his ground ball rate. Lazy fly balls and bad bounces do not couple well with a poor walk rate and the results are found in a plummeting batting average and subpar on-base percentage. He is fully capable of bouncing back though with a bit more patience at the plate and fewer swings outside the zone, two adjustments not outside the realm of possibility. With even just a slight rebound he could pull his rate stats back up and, coupled with his stolen base potential, return to top-10 shortstop status.
Escobar's development as a major league shortstop took a significant step forward last year as his bat seemed to finally catch up to his defensive prowess. While the Royals love him for his fielding, fantasy owners are enjoying the increased offensive totals that he produced in 2012 that saw career-highs in all of the major fantasy categories, save for runs scored in which he fell just one short from his previous high. While Escobar continues to improve at the plate and was better about laying off pitches outside the zone, he appears to have more work to do. Though he hit more line drives, his groundball rate remained the same which means that when his .344 BABIP normalizes, he probably won't see as many balls fall for hits as he did last season. Still, he is fully capable of hitting for a solid .275 average, and if he can continue to grow as a basestealer (35-for-40 last season) Escobar will prove to be a valuable commodity at a very thin position.
It was a bounce back year of sorts for Escobar in 2011 as he hit for a better average (.254) and got back to stealing bases (26), which was long his calling card in the minors. Unfortunately, he still has not improved his plate discipline enough to really unleash his speed as his did in 2009 at Triple-A Nashville, when he stole 42 bases. His glove is what got him to the majors and it's likely to keep him on the field, but that does little for fantasy owners looking for help at the shortstop position. Those in deeper leagues will want to take a chance on him for his speed, but realize that it comes at a price.
Escobar entered 2010 as a possible Rookie of the Year candidate, but failed to live up to expectations. He finished with a line of .235/.288/.326 with four home runs and 10 stolen bases. The 10 steals were the most disturbing for fantasy owners because he stole 42 the previous season in the minors. Escobar is a high contact type of hitter and he was weighed down by a .266 BABIP. There is a chance that will increase since he was almost always above a .333 BABIP during his minor league career. Don't expect much power from him, but a bump in batting average and stolen bases could happen if the Royals give him a better spot in the lineup and let him run - making him a bit of a sleeper in 2011.
Escobar made his major league debut in 2009, taking over at shortstop for J.J. Hardy. He didn't look overmatched, though he still has a lot of work to do offensively. He stole 41 bases at Triple-A Nashville before being called up, but just four at the major league level. Escobar has little - if any - power, so he'll need to rack up quite a few stolen bases to have as much value in the fantasy world as he does in the real world.
Escobar fulfilled his potential in 2008, hitting .328/.363/.434 for Double-A Huntsville while playing Gold Glove caliber defense. He's just 22 years old so there is no rush to get him to the majors in 2009. Despite a lot of rumors that the Brewers are looking to trade J. J. Hardy to open a spot at shortstop for Escobar, it's more likely that he'll start the season at Triple-A Nashville and get some time at that level. The only way that he'll be part of the team on Opening Day is if the Brewers trade Hardy or move him to third or second base, which is unlikely. A more likely scenario is that Escobar spends most of 2009 at Triple-A and the Brewers make a decision on Hardy after next season.
Depending on who you ask, Escobar is either a top prospect or nothing more than a utility infielder. His glove is already major league ready and has been rated as possible Gold Glove-caliber. The problem is that he's just 20 years old and lacks both power and patience at the plate. He was able to hold his own at Double-A Huntsville at that young age, and may start next season with Triple-A Nashville. He could develop gap power as he matures, but the deciding factor on his future may be whether he can learn how to get on base more consistently.
Escobar took a step back in 2006 after shooting his way up the prospect charts in 2005. After missing the start of the season due to a hamstring injury, he hit just .257 with 19 walks in 350 at-bats for High-A Brevard County. He's still only 20 and is the top middle infield prospect for the Brewers, but his star has dimmed just a bit.
Escobar played well for an 18-year-old at low-A West Virginia, hitting .271 with 30 SB. The downside is that he walked only 20 times for a poor .298 OBP. Escobar was the youngest player in the Arizona Fall League and held his own. He'll start next season at high-A and has quite a bit of potential, but remains very raw.
More Fantasy News
Cleared to return from IL
SSWashington Nationals  
June 21, 2022
The Nationals activated Escobar (hamstring) from the 10-day injured list Tuesday.
ANALYSIS
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Rehab assignment begins Wednesday
SSWashington Nationals  
Hamstring
June 15, 2022
Escobar (hamstring) is expected to begin a rehab assignment at Triple-A Rochester on Wednesday, Jesse Dougherty of The Washington Post reports.
ANALYSIS
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Not ready to return
SSWashington Nationals  
Hamstring
June 12, 2022
Escobar (hamstring) has been able to field grounders and swing but is still feeling his injury when he runs, Mark Zuckerman of MASNSports.com reports.
ANALYSIS
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Placed on 10-day IL
SSWashington Nationals  
Hamstring
June 1, 2022
Escobar (hamstring) was placed on the 10-day injured list Wednesday, Dan Kolko of MASN Sports reports.
ANALYSIS
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Managing hamstring cramps
SSWashington Nationals  
Hamstring
May 31, 2022
Escobar checked out fine after leaving Tuesday's game against the Mets with hamstring cramps, Mark Zuckerman of MASNSports.com reports.
ANALYSIS
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