Dwight Howard
Dwight Howard
34-Year-Old CenterC
Los Angeles Lakers
Out
Injury Knee
Est. Return 8/6/2020
2019 Fantasy Outlook
Howard's 16th NBA season is going to be make-or-break, as the former All-Star has a lot to prove this year in terms of both health and production. After staying surprisingly healthy over the course of the three previous seasons, including playing in 81 games in 2017-18 with Charlotte, Howard's 2018-19 campaign was a complete disaster. Multiple lingering injuries caused Howard to appear in just nine games for the Wizards last season, and he failed to average double-digit rebounds (9.2 per game) in those nine appearances for the first time in his entire NBA career. Howard was then traded to Memphis this offseason and ultimately waived so he could sign with the Lakers shortly after DeMarcus Cousins suffered a torn ACL. It's worth noting that Howard is on a non-guaranteed contract, which doesn't make him a lock to make the final roster, especially if he isn't healthy. But assuming the big man is in shape and the team believes he can contribute, Howard should play a decent-sized role in Los Angeles. Given that Anthony Davis prefers to not play the center position, the Lakers will likely have to play a center next to him most of the time, which would result in Dwight Howard and JaVale McGee splitting time at the position. Howard's numbers over the years have come with him playing 30-plus minutes per game, and with the 33-year-old likely in store for closer to 20 minutes per game and playing next to some high-usage players like LeBron James and Davis, his production will likely be limited and sporadic this season. Read Past Outlooks
$Signed a one-year, $2.56 million contract with the Lakers in August of 2019.
Personal Bio

Dwight David Howard II was born in Atlanta on December 8, 1985 to Dwight Sr. and Sheryl Howard. His father is a Georgia State Trooper and athletic director at Southwest Atlanta Christian Academy, a private school with one of the top high-school basketball programs in the country. His mother was a player on the inaugural women's basketball team at Morris Brown College. Howard won the 2004 Naismith Award as the nation's top high school player and was named Georgia Mr. Basketball in 2004. He has been the recipient of the NBA Community Assist award three times (July 2007, Jan. 2009 and Oct. 2010) and served as a spokesperson for the NBA Fit program to raise awareness of physical fitness and nutrition to fight childhood obesity. In 2011, Howard established the D12 Foundation, which is "focused on facilitating positive change in the lives of American youth -- as well as girls in East Africa -- through strategic programmatic and funding partners." Learn more about Howard by following him on Twitter at @DwightHoward and on Instagram at @dwighthoward.

College/International Summary

Howard was part of the 2004 NBA Draft after making the jump directly from high school. He was a standout player for Southwest Atlanta Christian Academy. Over four seasons, he averaged 16.6 points, 13.4 rebounds and 6.3 blocks. Howard's senior season was particularly impressive, as he averaged 25.0 points, 18.0 rebounds, 8.1 blocks and 3.5 assists. He led his team to the Georgia state title and a 31-2 record. He swept the major high school awards, including the Naismith Prep, Gatorade National and Morgan Wooten High School Player of the Year awards. Howard played in the McDonald's All-American Game and garnered co-MVP honors alongside J.R. Smith. Howard chose to forgo college, entered the 2004 NBA Draft, and was selected first overall by the Orlando Magic.

Out with sore knee
CLos Angeles Lakers
Knee
August 5, 2020
Howard (knee) will not play in Wednesday's game against the Thunder, Dave McMenamin of ESPN reports.
ANALYSIS
Howard has been battling the issue since the start of seeding play, but it did not prevent him from playing in any of the Lakers' first three games. However, with the No. 1 seed in the West locked up, the Lakers will hold Howard out -- likely on a precautionary basis. Coach Frank Vogel said he hopes to have Howard back for Thursday's matchup against Houston.
Read More News
Per Game
Total
Per 36
Season Summaries
NBA Per Game Stats
Loading Per Game Stats...
NBA Total Stats
Loading Total Stats...
NBA Per 36 Stats
Loading Per 36 Stats...
Past Season Summaries
2018

The 2018-19 season was an injury-filled campaign for Howard. Playing on his fourth team in as many years, the 15-year veteran appeared in just nine games for the Washington Wizards thanks to a lower back/glute injury that sidelined him for most of the campaign. He played his final contest Nov. 18, tallying seven minutes before injury ended his game and essentially his season. When on the court, Howard averaged 12.8 points per game. He also notched per-game averages of 9.2 rebounds, 0.4 assists and 0.4 blocks. He was extremely efficient from the field, converting 62.3 percent of his field-goal attempts. The 2004 first-overall draft pick also made 60.4 percent of his free-throws, his highest mark since his rookie campaign. Howard registered double-doubles in three of his nine contests and surpassed the 20-point mark twice. He pulled down 16 rebounds and tallied 11 points against Miami on Nov. 10. Six days later, he went off for 25 points and 17 rebounds -- both season highs -- against the Nets.

2017

Howard joined his fifth NBA team in 2017-18, taking over the starting center position with Charlotte. The former first-overall draft pick provided a steady on-court presence for the Hornets, appearing in 81 games and averaging 30.4 minutes per contest. Howard posted his highest per-game scoring mark in four seasons, averaging 16.6 points on 55.5 percent shooting from the field. He also hit 57.4 percent of this free throws, registering his highest mark since the 2010-11 campaign. Howard continued to be a force on the boards, ranking fourth in the league with 12.5 rebounds per game. Overall, Howard racked up 54 double-doubles, fourth-most in the league. In addition, the 14-year veteran played superb defense in the paint. He placed 10th in the Association with 1.6 blocks per game and collected 3.9 defensive win shares, tied for ninth in the league. Howard got stronger as the season wore on; March was arguably his finest month, as he averaged 20.6 points and 12.1 rebounds while shooting 57.3 percent from the field. It also featured Howard's highest single-game scoring output of the season. In that contest, he poured in 33 points, shooting 13-of-20 from the field and 7-of-8 from the line as the Hornets topped the Hawks on Mar. 15.

2016

Dwight Howard joined the Atlanta Hawks for his 13th campaign after signing a three-year contract in the off-season. The 2004 first-overall draft pick continued to put up solid numbers with the Hawks, averaging 13.5 points and 12.7 rebounds in 74 games. Howard's per game rebound mark ranked fifth in the Association. As has been the case throughout his career, the veteran was very efficient from the field, shooting 63.3 percent to rank within the top 10 in the NBA. Defensively, the big center averaged 1.2 blocks and 0.9 steals per contest. Howard posted an impressive 53 double-doubles on the season, sixth-most in the league. Among those was a 24-point, 23-rebound performance in a win against Houston on Feb. 2. With Howard manning the paint, Atlanta finished with a 43-39 record and qualified for the playoffs. Although they were eliminated in the first round by Washington, Howard put up solid numbers in the six-game series. He averaged 8.0 points and 10.7 rebounds per post-season game while shooting 50 percent from the field.

2015

Howard played 71 games in his third campaign with Houston, up from the 47 contests he logged the previous season. He remained a key part of the Rockets' lineup, averaging 32.1 minutes per contest. While Howard's scoring average took a slight dip to 13.7 points per game, he was more accurate from the field, shooting a career-best 62.0 percent. In the third contest of the season, he finished a perfect 10-for-10 from the field on his way to 23 points. The three-time Defensive Player of the Year's defensive numbers were also up as he averaged 1.6 blocks and one steal per contest. Howard was again one of the top rebounders in the league, and his 11.8 boards per game ranked fourth overall. Altogether, Howard notched 38 double-doubles during the campaign, tied for tenth-most in the league. He collected ten straight double-doubles from Dec. 29 to Jan. 18, culminating in a massive 36-point, 26-rebound performance against the Clippers in which he set his career high in boards. Howard played in all five of Houston's postseason contests, averaging 13.2 points, 14.0 rebounds and 1.4 blocks in an opening-round loss to Golden State. In Game 4 of the series, he tallied 19 points and 15 boards while converting 7-of-9 field goal attempts.

2014

Dwight Howard's 2014-15 campaign with the Houston Rockets was marred by injury. The three-time Defensive Player of the Year was limited to a career-low 41 games due to a persistent knee issue. When he did play, Howard was again an impactful player on the court, averaging a double-double for the 11th consecutive season. The big man posted per-game averages of 15.8 points and 10.5 rebounds while converting 59.3 percent of his field-goal attempts. Howard also contributed 1.3 blocks and 0.7 steals per contest. He double-doubled 23 times during the season -- over half of the games in which he appeared. On Nov. 6, he racked up a season-high 32 points and grabbed 16 rebounds in a win over the rival Spurs. Although Howard missed much of the regular season, he was healthy come playoff time and started all 17 of Houston's postseason contests. In the playoffs, he stepped up his scoring average to 16.4 points per game and shot 57.7 percent from the field. He also grabbed 14.4 boards per contest and contributed on the defensive end with per-game averages of 2.3 blocks and 1.4 steals.

2013

Following a season with the Los Angeles Lakers, Howard signed a multi-year contract to join James Harden in Houston for the 2013-14 campaign. The move proved to be fruitful as Howard raised his scoring average to 18.3 points per game and his field-goal accuracy to 59.1 percent. He also pulled down 12.2 rebounds per contest, good for fourth in the league. Howard continued to be a force on the defensive end as well, swatting 1.8 shots per game. Over the course of the season, the 6-foot-11 center racked up 47 double-doubles, tied for fourth in the league. For his efforts, Howard was rewarded with a trip to his eighth All-Star Game. During the contest, he tallied eight points and 11 rebounds in only 13 minutes of action. Howard was also named to the All-NBA Second Team -- the eighth straight season he earned a spot on one of the All-NBA squads. The Rockets qualified for the postseason and engaged in a six-game battle against Portland in the first round of the playoffs. In that series, Howard averaged 26 points, 13.7 rebounds and 2.8 blocks in a losing effort.

2012

After eight seasons in Orlando, Dwight Howard was traded to the Lakers prior to the 2012-13 campaign. In his age-26 season, Howard played in 74 games and averaged 17.1 points per contest. He finished among the league leaders in numerous categories, ranking first in rebounding (12.4 per contest), second in field-goal percentage (57.8 percent) and fifth in blocks (2.4 per game). Howard's play resulted in his seventh straight selection to the NBA All-Star Game. In that contest, he scored nine points and snagged seven rebounds in 14 minutes. Howard was also named to the All-NBA Third Team and finished 14th in Defensive Player of the Year voting. In the playoffs, Howard started all four games in the first round against San Antonio. He averaged 17 points and 10.8 rebounds per game, but the Lakers were eliminated in a sweep.

2011

Dwight Howard played in 54 games during the lockout-shortened 2011-12 campaign, averaging 20.6 points and a league-leading 14.5 rebounds per contest. He also set a career high by averaging 1.5 steals per game and ranked third in the league with 2.1 blocks per contest. On Jan. 12, he broke the NBA record for free-throw attempts in a game when he made 21 of 39 shots from the charity stripe in a victory over Golden State. Twelve days later, in a win over the Pacers, he tallied 14 points and became Orlando's all-time leading scorer. Howard totaled 43 double-doubles over the course of the season to rank second in the league. His feats did not go unnoticed as he was named to his fifth straight All-Star team. Howard also garnered First Team All-NBA accolades for the fifth year in a row and was named to the All-NBA Defensive First Team for the fourth straight season.

2010

Dwight Howard took his game to new heights during the 2010-11 campaign. He averaged a career-high 22.9 points per contest and continued to dominate on the boards by averaging 14.1 rebounds per game, ranking second in the league. Howard also shot 59.3 percent from the field and registered a 61.6 true-shooting percentage. Defensively, he continued to stand head and shoulders above his peers, ranking fourth in the NBA with 2.4 blocks per game while establishing a career-best 1.4 steals per contest. As a result, Howard was again named the Defensive Player of the Year, becoming the first player in history to take home the award in three consecutive seasons. Other accolades included his fifth straight All-Star selection, fourth consecutive berth to the All-NBA First Team, and third straight election to the All-NBA Defensive First Team. Although the Magic were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs, Howard shone as a dominating force. He turned in a 46-point, 19-rebound performance in Game 1 and finished the series with per-game averages of 27 points, 15.5 rebounds and 1.8 blocks.

2009

For the fifth time in his first six NBA seasons, the durable Dwight Howard played in all 82 regular season games during the 2009-10 campaign. He continued to rank as one of the most dominant forces in basketball, averaging 18.3 points per game and converting a career-best 61.2 percent of his field-goal attempts, the top mark in the league. He also led the NBA with 13.2 rebounds per contest and 64 double-doubles, including a 33-point, 17-rebound performance against Detroit on Feb. 17. Howard cemented his reputation as a defensive force as well, leading the league with a per-game average of 2.8 blocks on the way to his second consecutive Defensive Player of the Year award. The 6-foot-11 center also garnered his fourth straight All-Star berth and was named to the All-NBA First Team for the third consecutive season. Anchored by Howard, the Magic made a deep run in the postseason before falling to the Celtics in the Eastern Conference Finals. In 14 playoff games, Howard averaged 18.1 points, 11.1 rebounds and 3.5 blocks per contest.

2008

The 2008-09 campaign was another season of dominance for Howard, who averaged 20.6 points while leading the NBA in both rebounding (13.8 per game) and blocks (2.9 per game). With 1,093 total rebounds, he led the league in that category for the second straight year, setting several records as he went along. Howard became the youngest player in NBA history with 5,000 rebounds, the youngest player in NBA history to lead the league in blocks, and the youngest player in NBA history to win the Defensive Player of the Year award. Howard put together 10 games with 20-plus rebounds and double-doubled a whopping 63 times. He also collected a rare triple-double with 30 points, 19 rebounds and a career-high 10 blocks on Nov. 12 against the Thunder. But Howard's biggest game of the season came Feb. 17, when he piled up 45 points, 19 rebounds and eight blocks against Charlotte. Unsurprisingly, Howard was selected to the All-NBA First Team for the second straight year and earned his first All-Defensive First Team selection. Howard's dominant play guided the Magic to a 59-23 record and a trip to the NBA Finals, where they ultimately fell to the Lakers. Howard finished the postseason with averages of 20.3 points, 15.3 rebounds and 2.6 blocks, leading the NBA in playoff rebounding for the second straight season. His biggest game of the playoffs came in the deciding Game 6 of the Eastern Conference Finals, when Howard scored 40 points with 14 rebounds to propel the Magic to the Finals.

2007

Howard's fourth NBA season was a momentous one. He earned his second straight All-Star selection and his first All-NBA First Team nod. He was also selected to the NBA All-Defensive Second Team for the first time. Howard averaged a career-high 20.7 points per game to go along with 2.1 blocks and a league-leading 14.2 rebounds. The Magic increased their win total by 12 games behind Howard's stellar play, going 52-30. Howard's season highlights included 69 double-doubles (the most in the league), a new single-game high in points (39), and 11 games with at least 20 rebounds. He etched his name into the record books once more, becoming the youngest player to record 4,000 rebounds -- eclipsing a 56-year-old record. He also became the youngest player in NBA history to lead the league in rebounding, beating Wilt Chamberlain's record by more than two years. The Magic lost to the Pistons in the second round of the playoffs, but Howard averaged 18.9 points along with an NBA-leading 15.8 rebounds and 3.4 blocks in postseason play. He scored 20-plus points with 20-plus rebounds three times in Orlando's first-round series against the Raptors.

2006

Howard continued growing his game in his third NBA campaign, lifting his scoring average once again while remaining one of the biggest rebounding and shot-blocking threats in the league. His career-high 17.6 points per game were accompanied by 12.3 rebounds and a career-high 1.9 blocks. Howard's 1,008 total rebounds ranked first in the NBA. He also lifted his field-goal percentage to a healthy 60.3, good for a seven-point improvement over the season before and the second-best mark in the league. Once again, he was a paragon of health, as Howard played all 82 games for the third straight season to open his career. He recorded the first 30-point game of his career Jan. 10 against the Warriors, adding a season-high 25 rebounds in a monster effort. Howard went on to score 30-plus another five times, topping out with a 35-point effort on 14-of-15 shooting with 11 rebounds against the Sixers on Apr. 14. All told, he recorded 60 double-doubles and pulled down at least 20 rebounds four times. Along the way, he set a new NBA record by becoming the youngest player to reach 3,000 rebounds, surpassing Shaquille O'Neal by nearly two years. Howard's strong efforts were enough for him to earn his first All-Star nod, and he made the All-NBA Third Team as well. Howard also led the Magic to the playoffs for the first time in his career. Although they were swept in four games by the Pistons, Howard posted 15.3 points and 14.8 rebounds per game in the series.

2005

Howard followed up his outstanding rookie season with an even better one as a sophomore. After bulking up a little over the offseason, the impressive young center raised his scoring (15.8) and rebounding (12.5) averages while adding 1.4 blocked shots per game. He shot 53.1 percent from the field, a tick better than his rookie year, and he showed his durability by playing all 82 games again. Howard continued to set records when he became the youngest player in NBA history to record a 20-point, 20-rebound performance in a win over the Bobcats on Nov. 15. Still 19 years old at the time, Howard recorded his 1,000th career rebound just two weeks later in a Nov. 29 matchup against the Bulls, becoming the youngest player to reach that mark -- breaking Shaquille O'Neal's record by over a year. Howard set his season high in scoring with 28 points in an Apr. 15 win over the Sixers, adding a new career high with 26 rebounds. He ultimately recorded at least 20 rebounds in a game three times while piling up 60 double-doubles on the season, which tied for second in the NBA. Howard blocked a season-high six shots on Mar. 17, double-doubling with 18 points and 13 boards along the way. He was also selected to play on the Sophomore Team in the Rookie Challenge during the NBA's All-Star festivities.

2004

Howard was selected with the first overall pick in the 2004 NBA Draft by the Orlando Magic out of high school, marking the second-straight season a high school player went first in the draft (LeBron James, 2003). He stuffed the stat sheet in his first professional game, going for 12 points, 10 rebounds, four blocks, three steals and two assists in a win over the Milwaukee Bucks on Nov. 3. Howard finished the season averaging 12.0 points, 10.0 rebounds and 1.7 blocks. For his efforts, Howard earned All-Rookie First Team honors and finished third in Rookie of the Year voting behind Emeka Okafor (Charlotte) and Ben Gordon (Chicago). His strong inaugural campaign included 32 double-doubles, 11 games with at least 15 rebounds and three games with at least 20 rebounds. He also became the youngest player in NBA history to record 20 rebounds in a single game when he did so Dec. 1 against the Raptors at the age of 18 -- just 14 games into his career.

2019
2018
2017
2016
2019 NBA Game Log
Calculate Stats Over Time
Just click on any two dates.
Scoring
NBA
FanDuel
DraftKings
Yahoo
FantasyDraft
Fanball
Dream11
Loading Game Log...
2018 NBA Game Log
Calculate Stats Over Time
Just click on any two dates.
Scoring
NBA
FanDuel
DraftKings
Yahoo
FantasyDraft
Fanball
Dream11
Loading Game Log...
2017 NBA Game Log
Calculate Stats Over Time
Just click on any two dates.
Scoring
NBA
FanDuel
DraftKings
Yahoo
FantasyDraft
Fanball
Dream11
Loading Game Log...
2016 NBA Game Log
Calculate Stats Over Time
Just click on any two dates.
Scoring
NBA
FanDuel
DraftKings
Yahoo
FantasyDraft
Fanball
Dream11
Loading Game Log...
Schedule
By Month
Starting/Off Bench
Days Rest
Vs Opp
2019 NBA Per Game Split Stats
Loading Split Stats...
2019 NBA Per Game Split Stats - By Month
Loading Split Stats...
2019 NBA Per Game Split Stats - Starting/Off Bench
Loading Split Stats...
2019 NBA Per Game Split Stats - Days Rest
Loading Split Stats...
2019 NBA Per Game Split Stats - Vs Opp
Loading Split Stats...
Advanced Stats
Loading Advanced Stats...
Total
Per Game
Per 36
NBA Historical Fantasy Stats
How are these ratings calculated?
Our historical fantasy ratings are standard scores calculated using 8-Category settings with 12 teams and 13 players per team.
Loading Historical Fantasy Stats...
NBA Per Game Historical Fantasy Stats
Loading Per Game Historical Fantasy Stats...
NBA Per 36 Historical Fantasy Stats
Loading Per 36 Historical Fantasy Stats...
Lakers Depth Chart
Our full team depth charts are reserved for RotoWire subscribers.
Subscribe Now
Lakers Rotation: Minutes Breakdown
Loading Lakers Rotation Data...
Average Fantasy Points
Average Fantasy Points are determined when Dwight Howard was active vs. non-active during the season. Click here to view average fantasy points for a different time period.
Minutes
FanDuel
DraftKings
Yahoo
FantasyDraft
Head2Head
Loading Average Minutes...
Loading FanDuel Points...
Loading DraftKings Points...
Loading Yahoo Points...
Loading FantasyDraft Points...
Loading Head2Head Points...
Transaction History
  • June 24, 2004
    Drafted by the Orlando Magic in the 1st round (1st pick) of the 2004 NBA Draft. He later signed a rookie deal.
  • July 12, 2007
    Signed a five-year rookie scale extension with the Orlando Magic.
  • August 10, 2012
    As part of a four-team trade, traded by the Orlando Magic with Earl Clark and Chris Duhon to the Los Angeles Lakers. The Denver Nuggets traded Arron Afflalo, Al Harrington, a 2013 2nd-round draft pick (Romero Osby was later selected) and a 2014 1st-round draft pick (Dario Saric was later selected) to the Orlando Magic; the Los Angeles Lakers traded Christian Eyenga, Josh McRoberts and a 2017 2nd-round draft pick (Wesley Iwundu was later selected) to the Orlando Magic; the Los Angeles Lakers traded Andrew Bynum to the Philadelphia 76ers; the Orlando Magic traded Jason Richardson to the Philadelphia 76ers; the Philadelphia 76ers traded Andre Iguodala to the Denver Nuggets; and the Philadelphia 76ers traded Maurice Harkless, Nikola Vucevic and a 2018 1st-round draft pick (Landry Shamet was later selected) to the Orlando Magic. A 1st-round pick from Philadelphia to Orlando was eventually traded back to Philadelphia. A 1st-round pick from Los Angeles Lakers to Orlando turns into 2017 and 2018 2nd-round picks if the Lakers' 1st-round pick traded to Phoenix/Philadelphia does not convey by 2017.
  • July 13, 2013
    Signed a four-year contract with a player option with the Houston Rockets.
  • July 12, 2016
    Signed a three-year contract with the Atlanta Hawks.
  • June 20, 2017
    Traded by the Atlanta Hawks with a 2017 2nd-round draft pick (Frank Jackson was later selected) to the Charlotte Hornets for Marco Belinelli, Miles Plumlee and a 2017 2nd-round draft pick (Tyler Dorsey was later selected).
  • July 6, 2018
    Traded by the Charlotte Hornets to the Brooklyn Nets for Hamidou Diallo, Timofey Mozgov, cash and a 2021 2nd-round draft pick.
  • July 7, 2018
    Waived by the Brooklyn Nets.
  • July 11, 2018
    Signed a two-year contract with a player option with the Washington Wizards.
  • July 6, 2019
    Traded by the Washington Wizards to the Memphis Grizzlies for C.J. Miles.
  • August 24, 2019
    Waived by the Memphis Grizzlies.
  • August 26, 2019
    Signed a one-year contract with the Los Angeles Lakers.
Recent RotoWire Articles Featuring Dwight Howard
Yahoo DFS Basketball: Saturday Picks
4 days ago
The Clippers are in an enticing matchup against the fast-paced Pelicans.
FanDuel NBA: Thursday Value Plays
7 days ago
The Lakers and short-handed Clippers face off in a highly-anticipated matchup.
FanDuel NBA: First Look at Prices for Re-Opening Night
27 days ago
Paul George seems like a potential bargain at $7,400.
NBA Return: Power Ranking All 22 Teams
30 days ago
The Milwaukee Bucks earn the top spot in Nick Whalen's power rankings heading into the Orlando restart.
NBA Return: 22 Questions for 22 Teams, Part 1
47 days ago
Can Michael Porter Jr. push the Nuggets to the next level in the playoffs?
Past Fantasy Outlooks
2018
2017
2016
2015
2014
2013
2012
2011
2010
2009
2008
2007
2006
2005
2004
2003
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, Howard joined Charlotte in 2017-18 after stints with the Hawks and Rockets. As he's done for his entire 14-year career, Howard averaged a double-double, upping his scoring to 16.6 points per game, while posting 12.5 rebounds, which was on par with his career number of 12.7 boards. The 6-foot-11 big man also started 81 games, proving himself to be reliable health wise with his third straight season playing more than 70 contests. Howard finished seventh in the NBA in blocks with 1.6 per game, but saw his field goal percentage dip somewhat drastically, going from 63.3 percent in 2016-17 to just 55.5 percent last year. However, Charlotte wasn't willing to retain him and Howard is now headed to yet another new organization. After joining Washington this offseason, Howard once again appears primed to start at center, as the Wizards dealt their previous starter, Marcin Gortat, to the Clippers. That makes Ian Mahinmi, who averaged just 14.9 minutes last season, Howard's only real competition for minutes. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising to see Howard eclipse the 30-minute threshold once again, which should give him every opportunity to keep his double-double streak alive. While Howard may not score as much playing alongside offensive threats like John Wall and Bradley Beal, he's still going to rack up boards and blocks for as long as he gets consistent run, so Fantasy owners can still target him with confidence when looking for those categories. Of course, Howard is a career 56.6 percent free-throw shooter and can't knock down a three-pointer, which hurts his value considerably in some formats.
Howard has had trouble finding a home since leaving Orlando six years ago, but his move to the Hornets appears to be one of his best fits yet. This is a Charlotte team who's struggled to find a center in the mold of Howard, who's comfortable on both sides of the floor. While the numbers have been decreasing in recent seasons for Howard, his 13.5 points, 12.7 rebounds and 1.2 blocks per game averages from last season indicate there's still some gas left in the tank. He did that damage in his most efficient season, shooting a career-high 63.3 percent from the field. While his 29.0 minutes per game last season were a career-low, Howard likely won't see a dramatic increase in playing time, considering his spacing limitations and the fact that the Hornets still have Cody Zeller, who started 58 games a season ago. The key for Howard is health, as he's averaging just 64.5 games played across his last six seasons. With Zeller potentially stealing some minutes at center, Howard's not guaranteed to replicate last seasons numbers and he's also a brutal free-throw shooter. Those factors make Howard's Fantasy value tough to predict, though he's still going to be a double-double threat and a better-than-average rim protector who rebounds at one of the best rates in the NBA.
Though it's hard to imagine now, there was a time when Howard seemed track to become one of the greatest centers of all time, but his career has lost some momentum since he forced his way out of Orlando after the 2011-12 season. Back problems and acrimony with teammates led to a disappointing campaign with the Lakers the following season, and Howard largely failed to deliver star-level production during a three-year stay with the Rockets, finishing his final campaign in Houston with averages of 13.7 points -- his worst mark since his rookie year -- 11.8 rebounds and 1.6 blocks per game. Given his poor fit in the Rockets' up-tempo offensive system, it didn't come as much of a surprise when Howard opted out of his contract for 2016-17 and subsequently joined his hometown Hawks on a three-year, $70.5 million contract in July. That significant financial investment should result in Howard assuming greater primacy in the Hawks' offense than he did in Houston, but his age (he'll turn 31 in December) and difficulty staying healthy (he's missed at least 11 games in four of the last five seasons) suggest that a return to his career averages of 17.8 points, 12.7 boards and 2.1 blocks is probably too ambitious. Moreover, Hawks coach Mike Budenholzer's historical preference to space the floor could make Howard only a marginally better offensive fit in Atlanta, and the center's poor free-throw shooting further dings his value in eight- or nine-category leagues. Though he may have a higher Q Score than former Hawks center Al Horford, who departed for the Celtics this offseason on a bigger contract, Howard likely won't be an upgrade at the position, especially while he appears to be in the decline phase of his career.
While Howard missed 41 games last season due to knee, ankle, and shoulder injuries, he still managed to average 15.8 points, 10.5 rebounds, 1.2 assists, 0.7 steals, and 1.3 blocks in 30 minutes per game. He also extended his streak of averaging a double-double to 11 consecutive seasons. Even though his cumulative totals were hurt due to missing so much time, efficiency-wise, his stats were generally on par with the rest of his career. Howard shot 59 percent from the field, a hair above his career average, and converted 53 percent of his free throws, down from 55 percent in 2013-14. The biggest concern heading into the season is Howard's health. A model of durability through his first seven NBA seasons, Howard has dealt with nagging injury after nagging injury since the start of the 2012 season. When healthy, he's still one of the best big men in the game, but he'll need to play more than half of the season to live up to his fantasy potential. Expected at full strength for the start of the year, Howard will serve as Houston's unquestioned starting center, and he'll aim to average north of 30 minutes per game after dipping below that benchmark for the first time in his career last season.
While he averaged the lowest minutes per game (34) since his rookie season, Howard was still able to put up more than respectable numbers and finished last season averaging 18.3 points, 12.2 rebounds, 1.8 assists, 0.8 steals, and 1.8 blocks per game. In his 10 year career, Howard has been able to average a double-double in points and rebounds every single season, so it should be a safe bet he can repeat that this upcoming year. His rebound average of 12.2 per game placed him as the fourth best in the league on the boards last season, only behind the likes of DeAndre Jordan, Andre Drummond, and Kevin Love. He also remained one of the premiere defenders with his 1.8 blocks per game, which was good enough for seventh in the league. With the trade of Omer Asik to the Pelicans, Dwight will probably be even more heavily relied upon, and his minutes will most likely increase. The added minutes and further familiarity of playing with fellow superstar James Harden, should lead to Howard having an outstanding chance to improve his numbers from the 2013-14 season and provide the Rockets with one of the best centers in the league.
In 2012-13, we learned that Superman had more than one form of kryptonite that diminished his superpowers. In Howard's case, his basketball powers were clearly affected by offseason back surgery and Lakers coach Mike D'Antoni's system, as he finished with still stellar but not superhero-level averages of 17.1 points and 12.4 rebounds per game. Despite the drop in his double-double stats, Howard remained a beast on the defensive end of the court, averaging 2.4 blocks and 1.1 steals. Of course, his free-throw shooting remained abysmal, as he hit just 49 percent of his freebies while attempting 9.5 free throws per game – that level of ineptness is a huge sap to Howard's overall value in rotisserie formats. Still, there's plenty to praise with Howard's game. He remains a physical marvel and should look more like his old self now that he's over a year removed from back surgery. And his move from the Lakers to the Rockets should put him back in a role more consistent to the one he played in Orlando – like the Howard-led Magic teams, Houston is loaded with three-point shooters to space the floor for the big man. At 27, Howard still has plenty of good years left in the tank, and while he may never live up to the extremely lofty expectations put on him earlier in his career, it's tough to find many more centers that are more productive in any category, outside of free-throw shooting.
Off the court, Howard had a trying 2011-12 campaign, as he was involved in on-again, off-again trade demands and rumors all season, but on the court he was his usual dominant self. The big (6-10, 240) center continued to carry his mantle as the most dominant pivot in the league, averaging 20.6 points and a league-leading 14.5 rebounds. He was once again stellar on the defensive end of the court, too, blocking 2.1 shots per game while also amassing a career-high 1.5 steals per contest. His shooting percentage was also Grade-A, as Howard finished with a league-leading clip of 57.3 percent from the floor. The only area where he continued to hurt fantasy owners was in free-throw percentage – Howard shot just 49.1 from the charity stripe, which marked a career low. After dealing with his off-the-court drama for the past year, Howard finally found a new home this summer when he was traded to the Lakers. Los Angeles will ask Howard to be the anchor of the team’s defense, so the rebounds, blocks and steals should hold steady, but now that he’s on a team with more offensive options, we could see a slight dip in his scoring production. Even if Howard’s scoring drops off slightly, his dominance in other areas will be enough to keep his fantasy value from dipping.
The self-proclaimed “Superman” took his game to new heights last season, finishing with a career-high 22.9 points per game while still dominating the glass (14.1 rpg) and controlling the paint (2.4 bpg). The jump in scoring can be directly attributed to his offseason work with all-time NBA great Hakeem Olajuwon, who helped Howard develop a face-up jumper and an array of post-up moves. While Howard won’t be mistaken for the Dream anytime soon, his improved offensive repertoire was evident last season. He also showed some improvement on the defensive side of the ball, chipping in 1.4 steals per game, which was easily a new personal best. But free throw shooting (59.6) and turnovers (3.6) are Howard’s kryptonite. Making matters worse, Howard led the league in free-throw attempts with 11.7 trips to the line per game, which makes his awful shooting from the charity stripe all the more damaging for fantasy owners. Despite his obvious flaws from a fantasy perspective, Howard’s improvements in scoring and steals last season finally pushed him to the elite status he’s held in real life for the past handful of years, and as he’s just 25, we probably haven’t seen his ceiling yet.
Howard once again led the NBA in rebounding (13.2 rpg) and shot blocking (2.8 bpg) last season, though with the addition of Vince Carter, his field goal attempts per game dropped to just 10.2 – the lowest since his rookie season. For someone who recorded a remarkable 61.2 FG percent, it wouldn't be a bad idea to get Howard more involved in the offense. Of course, there's also the free throw issue, as Howard has finished below 60.0 percent from the charity stripe in each of the past five seasons. He took a whopping 10.0 foul shots per game last season, so he can single-handedly destroy the category. When you also factor in his high turnover rate (3.3 tpg last year), it's easy to see why his fantasy value is nowhere near his real life value. Howard has missed just three games over his six-year career, so he's as durable as they come. At 6-11, 265, he's one of the most gifted athletes on the planet, but his low-post game remains raw and has plenty of room for improvement (and at age 24, there's still time). All those boards and blocks are enticing, but for someone who hasn't shown the skills to be a truly elite scorer (18.3 ppg last year), the poor free throw shooting and high volume of turnovers make Howard a good, not great fantasy option.
Howard continues to drop jaws with his otherworldly size (6-11, 265) and freakish athleticism. His development has made him into a perennial All-Star and one of the most dominant big men in the Association. While Howard took his star to another level by leading the Magic to the NBA Finals last season, his fantasy game still hasn’t reached its pinnacle. On the defensive end, Howard dominated games with his league-leading 13.8 rpg and 2.9 bpg while chipping in one steal per, too. Howard helps out on the other end of the court with his 20.6 ppg and 57.2-percent shooting from the floor, but it’s his struggles from the charity stripe that hinder his fantasy outlook. Much like Shaquille O’Neal in his prime, Howard can be a dominant fantasy force, but his inefficiencies from the line can single-handedly destroy that category. For the fourth consecutive season, Howard shot under 60-percent from the free-throw line, finishing at just 59.4 percent last year. His struggles from the line are magnified by his league-leading 10.8 free-throw attempts per game. Regardless, at 23, Howard holds one of the highest ceilings of any player in the league and, as the primary low-post option for the Magic, will continue to post All-NBA production.
Howard is the most physically gifted big man in the NBA, combining an overpowering 6-11, 265-pound frame with great quickness and outstanding leaping ability. He showed this by becoming the only center in NBA history to win the slam dunk contest, and the same gifts that allow him to Superman dunk also make him one of the most difficult match-ups in the league. Howard made noticeable improvements in both the offensive (20.7 ppg, 59.9% FG) and defensive (2.1 bpg, .9 spg) categories. Most importantly, he led the league with 14.2 rpg. Howard also continued his iron man streak, having never missed a game in his four-year career. Superman’s Kryptonite continues to be the foul line, where his 59 percent shooting on a whopping 10.9 free-throw attempts per game was enough to lose that category by himself. Nevertheless, Howard is still only 22 years old with plenty of upside, and if he can get his free-throw percentage even back to the 67 percent he shot as a rookie, the sky’s the limit.
Howard is probably the most physically gifted big man in the NBA, combining an overpowering 6-11, 265-pound frame with great quickness and outstanding leaping ability. (Does anyone remember Howard almost touching the top of the backboard in the dunk contest last year?). He did not take quite the quantum leap in production that many expected from him last season, but he still made noticeable improvements in the offensive (career highs 17.6 ppg, 60.3% FG, 1.9 apg) and defensive (career highs 1.9 bpg, .9 spg) categories while making a push for the league lead in rebounding (12.3 rpg). He also continued his “iron man” streak, having never missed a game in his three-year career. Most importantly for fantasy owners, Howard played most of his games at center and thus solidified his eligibility in the harder-to-fill big-man position. His only real weaknesses last season were an alarming decline in free-throw shooting (career-low 58.6%) and career-worst 3.9 turnovers per night. Nevertheless, Howard is still only 21 years old, and with Rashard Lewis around to stretch opposing defenses and open up space, Howard has the potential to end this season as the top fantasy producer among centers in the NBA.
With all due respect to Amare Stoudemire, Howard is the new Man-Child of the NBA. At 6-11 and an incredibly ripped 240 pounds with outstanding quickness and leaping ability, Howard is already a beast in the paint that can simply overpower and jump over his competition. He was second in the NBA in rebounding at 12.5 rpg last season, and scored 15.8 ppg as well without having many discernible post moves. As Howard matures and starts pairing more technique with this ridiculous athleticism those numbers have quite a bit of room to increase. Howard is disruptive on defense as well, averaging 1.4 bpg and .8 spg as a sophomore but his rookie numbers (1.7 bpg, .9 spg) show that he also easily has the potential to be a two-block/one-steal per game guy. With his point guard Jameer Nelson also coming into his own now, as well as the addition of shooter J.J. Redick, the possible return of Grant Hill from injury, and improvements in Darko Milicic’s game, Howard should also have more room to operate this season as well.
Ladies and gentlemen, we bring you the next NBA superstar. Howard's season numbers – 12 points and 10 rebounds per game – look great, but the 19-year-old rookie, who put up a double-double almost every time out, was even better down the stretch. Over the last two months of the year, Howard averaged 15.1 points and 11.1 rebounds, and did it on 55% shooting from the field. Moreover, Howard will give you a steal and almost two blocks per game. Howard could stand to get better from the line, shooting just 67% on the year, and he could also learn how to kick the ball out from the post, as he averaged just one assist per game last season, but those skills could come as he matures. Keeper league owners should remember that if Fran Vazquez comes over next year, Howard would probably move to center. At that spot, he would easily crack the top five behind Shaquille O'Neal, Yao Ming, Ben Wallace, and Zydrunas Illgauskas. This is said assuming that Nowitzki and Duncan do not get center eligibility in your league.
On the plus side, he doesn't have anyone ahead of him to keep him pinned to the bench. On the minus: he's 18. He may grow into a Kevin Garnett-type player, but for this season he's more likely to be a Stromile Swift.
At his size, he can do just a little bit of everything. He dominates in the paint but also has the ability to step out and hit shots on the perimeter. He's quick off the dribble, isn't afraid to hit the glass, and is a great shot blocker. Scouts haven't found many downsides to Howard, except for the occasional lack of effort. He is a consensus top 2 pick along with former UCONN star Emeka Okafor.
More Fantasy News
Deemed questionable for Wednesday
CLos Angeles Lakers
Knee
August 5, 2020
The Lakers list Howard as questionable for Wednesday's game against the Thunder with a sore right knee.
ANALYSIS
Subscribe now to instantly reveal our take on this news.
Not on injury report
CLos Angeles Lakers
July 29, 2020
Howard is not on the injury report ahead of Thursday's game against the Clippers.
ANALYSIS
Subscribe now to instantly reveal our take on this news.
Limited at practice
CLos Angeles Lakers
Knee
July 28, 2020
Howard was limited at practice Tuesday due to a sore knee, Mike Trudell of Lakers.com reports.
ANALYSIS
Subscribe now to instantly reveal our take on this news.
Will play in Orlando
CLos Angeles Lakers
July 6, 2020
Howard announced Monday that he will join the Lakers in Orlando and play for the team when it resumes its season in late July, Shams Charania of The Athletic reports.
ANALYSIS
Subscribe now to instantly reveal our take on this news.
Dealing with personal issue
CLos Angeles Lakers
Personal
June 30, 2020
The Lakers are hopeful that Howard (personal) will be able to join the team in Orlando, Dave McMenamin of ESPN reports.
ANALYSIS
Subscribe now to instantly reveal our take on this news.