1.  
WR  GB
Rec
110
Rec Yds
1322
Rec TD
14
Rec Avg
12.0
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Adams had a fantasy season for the ages last year, especially when you consider he missed 2.5 games. Prorate his numbers over the full 16, and you get 177-136-1,628-21, which would be the greatest WR PPR season of all time, eclipsing Jerry Rice’s 1995. At 6-1, 215, Adams is a stout, physical wideout who runs smooth routes and has great hands. He’s particularly effective in the red zone, where Aaron Rodgers targets him like no one else in the league. Despite the missed games, Adams had 28 red-zone targets (1st), 20 targets inside the 10 (1st) and 11 targets inside the five (1st). It also helped that Adams had one of the league's easiest schedules — only twice all year did he face a top-10 fantasy defense against receivers (Bears, 8th), and in those games combined he managed a modest-for-him 15-12-107-2 line. Adams faced the top-ranked Rams defense in the divisional playoffs and had 66 yards and a TD on 10 targets, too. Although he tied a career high with five catches of 40-plus yards, Adams’ 11.9 YPC was in line with his career averages, while his per-target efficiency went through the roof (9.2 YPT) thanks to a career-high 77.2 percent catch rate. In other words, he wasn’t getting targeted farther downfield — his 8.7-yard average target depth ranked 26th among the league’s 35 100-target wideouts — he just caught everything thrown his way. At 28, Adams is still in his late prime, and if Rodgers is back for another year, no one has a higher floor. But there’s the rub. Rodgers is reportedly unhappy in Green Bay, and there is a chance he suits up elsewhere. Adams is locked in as the team’s top receiver, regardless, but last year’s first-round pick, Jordan Love — or recently signed Blake Bortles — would be a massive downgrade from the league’s reigning MVP, particularly for Adams.
2.  
WR  KC
Rec
94
Rec Yds
1428
Rec TD
11
Rec Avg
15.2
Rush Att
16
Rush Yds
95
Rush TD
2
Rush Avg
5.9
There’s never been any doubt about Hill’s efficiency — he’s eclipsed 9.5 yards per target every year since he broke out in 2017 — but his volume was usually modest, due to injuries and the variety of weapons on the Chiefs. But the two times Hill has cracked 135 targets, first in 2018 (1,630 scrimmage yards, 14 total TDs) and now in 2020 (1,399 scrimmage yards 17 total TDs, despite sitting out Week 17) the results have been massive. At 5-10, 185, Hill is arguably the fastest player in the league — he ran a 4.24 40 at his Pro Day in 2016. But Hill is also as quick as he is fast, and almost impossible to corral in open space. The Chiefs even use him in the running game, and he’s had six rushing TDs in his career, a bonus that’s projectable. And even though Hill is small, the Chiefs use him from in close — 12 targets from inside the 10 (T-5th) and six inside the five (T-12th). He returns in 2021 with Patrick Mahomes as his QB and Andy Reid as his head coach, and at age 27 there’s no reason Hill should slow down. Travis Kelce will absorb a large portion of the team’s targets, but Mahomes finished last season fifth in passing attempts (588) and inside-the-10 attempts (46), despite missing Week 17, so there’s plenty to go around.
3.  
WR  BUF
Rec
113
Rec Yds
1347
Rec TD
9
Rec Avg
11.9
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
We knew Diggs was a good player from his Minnesota days, but it was hard to see him blowing up in the passing-game wasteland that was Buffalo. Not only was it an outdoor, cold-weather venue, but third-year QB Josh Allen was more of an athlete than a polished quarterback, and Diggs had competition for targets from both John Brown and Cole Beasley. Fast forward 16 weeks, and Diggs, buoyed by a pass-heavy offense and MVP-candidate passer, led the NFL with 127 catches (6th all-time) and 1,535 yards while hauling in eight TDs. At 6-0, 191, and with 4.46 speed, Diggs can get down the field, but his elite quickness, tight route running and good hands set him apart. While Diggs couldn’t replicate the absurd 12.0 YPT from his final season in Minnesota, he posted an impressive 9.2 YPT (8th) on a league-leading 166 looks. At 27, Diggs is still in his late prime, and with Allen turning a corner, this is suddenly one of the league’s best setups. The Bills threw 68.8 percent of the time (5th), so there’s plenty to go around, and Diggs is firmly established as Allen’s top target.
4.  
WR  ARI
Rec
111
Rec Yds
1366
Rec TD
9
Rec Avg
12.3
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Changing teams in the midst of a pandemic where offseason activities were severely curtailed didn’t seem to bother Hopkins much. With Kyler Murray under center instead of Deshaun Watson, Hopkins posted his third consecutive 100-catch season, finished second among wideouts in receiving yards and averaged 8.8 YPT, third highest of his career. At 6-1, 212, Hopkins has good size but only average speed. His lack of vertical explosiveness hasn’t mattered much in Houston or Arizona, though, because he catches anything thrown remotely in his vicinity (only one drop in 160 targets), runs precise routes and is one of the greatest in NFL history at getting his feet down in bounds near the sideline. At 29, Hopkins is probably past his peak, but Hall of Fame level receivers usually produce into their 30s, and his setup in Arizona is nearly ideal in a pass-first offense with complementary pieces like Christian Kirk, an aging A.J. Green and 49th overall pick Rondale Moore, but no one to threaten his target-heavy role. It’s hard to find a player with a higher floor than Hopkins.
5.  
WR  ATL
Rec
103
Rec Yds
1446
Rec TD
9
Rec Avg
14.0
Rush Att
0
Rush Yds
0
Rush TD
0
Rush Avg
0.0
Heading into 2020, Ridley had more or less lived up to his first-round pedigree, but last season constituted a full breakout. Despite missing a game, Ridley finished tied for fifth in yards, sixth in YPT (9.6), first in 100-yard games (8) and scored nine times. He also led all receivers in aDOT (14.6) and air yards (2,067), i.e., Ridley’s 143 targets were not of the dink-and-dunk variety. Unsurprisingly, he tied Justin Jefferson for the league lead in 20-yard catches with 23. At 6-1, 190, and with 4.43 speed, Ridley is a good athlete, but no physical freak. He relies on quickness, route running, versatility — lining up in the slot or outside — and his rapport with Matt Ryan. And now, with Julio Jones out of the picture, Ridley is one of the favorites to lead the league in targets. He topped 100 yards in five of the seven games Jones missed last year, averaging a whopping 11.3 targets (Davante Adams led the NFL with 10.6 per game). New HC Arthur Smith hopes to have a balanced offense where that type of target volume is far-fetched, but Smith faces an uphill battle in Year 1 with Mike Davis as his projected lead back, and he also built the offense in which Ryan Tannehill tossed 55 TDs against 12 INTs in 26 starts the last two years. The Ryan-to-Ridley connection should stay hot, at least for one more season. Ridley had minor foot surgery in June but is expected to be ready for training camp.
Want to see our full fantasy football rankings?

We rank hundreds of players, but only paid RotoWire subscribers have access to our full PPR rankings. This is just one of many features you'll unlock to if you decide to subscribe.

Unlock Our Full Rankings Unlock Our Full Rankings