Golf Draft Kit: 2017-18 Rankings & Profiles

Golf Draft Kit: 2017-18 Rankings & Profiles

This article is part of our Golf Draft Kit series.

Below are our 2017-18 fantasy golf rankings. Golfers are listed by 2017-18 projected earnings. This list includes:

Top 125 on FedEx Cup Points List
Notable Exempt Players not in Top 125 (E)
Non-Rookies from Web.com Tour Top-25 Money List (W)
Non-Rookies from Web.com Tour Finals (F)
Rookies from Web.com Tour/Finals (R)
International Newcomers (I)
Conditional Status Players who Finished 126-150 on Points List (C)

1. Jordan Spieth
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$10,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $9,433,033

Spieth picked up his third career major at the Open Championship last summer and at that specific point in time, he was again the best player on the planet. He lost that title before the end of the year by the slimmest of margins as Justin Thomas was just too much. Though he failed to win the FedEx title or complete the career grand slam, it was a fantastic year for Spieth. Not only did he pick up his third major, but he won two other events, which pushed his career total to 11. Spieth is one of a few guys that can be considered for salary cap purposes because he's already posted a season more than $12 million in earnings. That said, $9.4 million is a price to pay for anyone in today's PGA Tour.

2. Dustin Johnson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$9,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $8,732,193

Johnson was the guy that most people pegged as the one that could pull away from the pack because when he's on, he

Below are our 2017-18 fantasy golf rankings. Golfers are listed by 2017-18 projected earnings. This list includes:

Top 125 on FedEx Cup Points List
Notable Exempt Players not in Top 125 (E)
Non-Rookies from Web.com Tour Top-25 Money List (W)
Non-Rookies from Web.com Tour Finals (F)
Rookies from Web.com Tour/Finals (R)
International Newcomers (I)
Conditional Status Players who Finished 126-150 on Points List (C)

1. Jordan Spieth
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$10,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $9,433,033

Spieth picked up his third career major at the Open Championship last summer and at that specific point in time, he was again the best player on the planet. He lost that title before the end of the year by the slimmest of margins as Justin Thomas was just too much. Though he failed to win the FedEx title or complete the career grand slam, it was a fantastic year for Spieth. Not only did he pick up his third major, but he won two other events, which pushed his career total to 11. Spieth is one of a few guys that can be considered for salary cap purposes because he's already posted a season more than $12 million in earnings. That said, $9.4 million is a price to pay for anyone in today's PGA Tour.

2. Dustin Johnson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$9,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $8,732,193

Johnson was the guy that most people pegged as the one that could pull away from the pack because when he's on, he has more tools that anyone on the PGA Tour. Johnson's blistering start to the season only emboldened that notion as it looked like Johnson was becoming the "big one," where prior stood a "big three" or "big four." That was before the Masters and his now infamous slip on the stairs. That slip not only took him out of the Masters, but it squashed all the momentum that he had built and it took months to regain his form. Possibly the biggest question from last season is, what would have happened had Johnson not injured himself prior to the Masters? The answer will never be known, but it's clear that as long as he's healthy, Johnson will again be one of the best players on the PGA Tour again this season.

3. Hideki Matsuyama
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$8,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $8,380,570

Matsuyama ranked 173rd in strokes-gained on the green last season and he made more than $8 million. Let that sink in, he was one of the worst putters on the PGA Tour and he still managed to earn more than all but three golfers last season. It gives you an idea of how well Matsuyama strikes the ball that he can score without the aid of a putter most weeks. Now, here's the tricky part, it would be easy to assume he's going to improve his putting, but curing putting woes is never a given. If he does fix his putting, he has enough firepower to significantly improve on even his enormous number from last season, but if he doesn't fix the putter, he simply can't perform any better than he did last season. As such, it's probably wise to pass on Matsuyama in salary cap leagues this season.

4. Jon Rahm
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$8,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $6,123,248

Rahm came in with very high expectations this season, but somehow, he managed to exceeded them. Rahm came on the scene late during the 2015-16 season and it was clear that he had a lot of talent. The funny thing about talent though is, unless you have the mental fortitude to back it up, it won't get you very far. Rahm still needs to work on a few things, namely his temper in big spots, but there's no reason to doubt him going forward. Even though his number for this season is very high, he's still worth a look in salary cap formats as he has enough game to significantly improve this season.

5. Justin Thomas
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$7,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $9,921,560

There are several words that come to mind when thinking about Thomas' 2016-17 season. Awesome, incredible, impressive and don't forget surprising. Thomas has had the "potential" label for a few years now, but unlike most of his buddies, Thomas had yet to reach his potential. That began to change early in the 2016-17 season as he posted three wins before the month of February. As expected after that third win, the golf world went nuts and Thomas was inserted as the Masters favorite, the FedEx favorite and a lock for the Hall of Fame. A funny thing happened after that third win though, Thomas' game left him for several months. He obviously found his game before the end of the season and that's why it was so impressive. It would have been easy to get complacent after three wins to start the season, but he battled through a slump that saw him miss three consecutive cuts at one point, to end the season on top of the golf world. With all of that said, there is simply too much talent on the PGA Tour for any one golfer to do what Thomas did last season, in two consecutive seasons.

6. Rickie Fowler
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$6,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $6,083,197

If hype were factored into earnings, Fowler would be on the top of the money list, but it's not and as good as Fowler has been during his career, there's still a sense that he hasn't neared his peak yet. Fowler picked up one win, two runner-ups and two third-place showings last season and somehow, it's not good enough. Fowler is at a point in his career where only a major victory will do. He's come close several times, but he always seems to do something to blow it during crunch time. It might be nerves, it might just be coincidence, but until he gets over the major hump, the golf world will expect more. Fowler is certainly good enough to significantly improve upon his number from last season, but it will likely take a major win and those are hard to write into projections.

7. Brooks Koepka
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$6,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $5,612,397

Koepka entered the season as a young golfer with loads of potential, but he exited the season a major champion. There are lots of guys with potential on the PGA Tour, but so many fail to live up to it, and even fewer ever grab a major. Koepka's season would have been a success even without a win at the U.S. Open, but obviously that win put his season into the exceptional category. With the exception of a stretch during the beginning of 2017, Koepka was solid all season. He recorded a pair of runner-ups and seven total top-10s. Though Koepka reached a new level this past season, there is still room for improvement. As such, he should be considered for salary cap leagues.

8. Jason Day
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$6,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,978,181

It's not often that a guy earns just under $3 million and is considered a must-have, but Day is just that. Day struggled for most of the past season because of things off the course, but he found his game late in the season and turned in a pretty good effort on the whole. Pretty good for a PGA Tour golfer, but not for an elite golfer like Day. Prior to last season, Day had posted consecutive seasons of $8 million or more. Let that sink in, $8 million or more, that's something that only a couple guys on the PGA Tour have ever done. With his personal issues likely in the past, Day will be back on form this season and he should at minimum, get above the $5 million mark.

9. Justin Rose
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$5,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,245,308

Rose posted two top-5s prior to the Masters last season, so it wasn't a shock to see him in contention at Augusta. He failed to hold-off Sergio Garcia that week and although he posted a runner-up finish, it seemed to throw him off his game for a spell. Rose found his game late in the season however and the result was yet another impressive season. Rose finished 15th on the money list last season, but on a per start basis, he ranked 7th. Unfortunately, Rose has a schedule that's not likely to change, so he's always going to be between 15 and 20 starts. With that in mind, he'll have a tough time improving significantly on his number from last season, but when you consider that he didn't win last season, it's certainly possible for Rose to get into the $6 million range with a win or two. It's simply a tough call for salary cap purposes.

10. Daniel Berger
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,287,161

Three years into his career on the PGA Tour and it's pretty clear that Berger is the real deal. Berger wasted no time getting accustomed to the PGA Tour three seasons ago as he earned more than $3 million in his rookie season. Many golfers in that position regress after a rookie season like that, but Berger actually improved. He proved that his first two seasons were no fluke last season as he posted his best season to date. Berger picked-up one win and was oh so close to another as he lost in a playoff to Jordan Spieth and his now famous bunker hole-out. Berger appears to be a guy that's going to continue to improve, but the bar is set pretty high this year. That said, I think he makes a slight improvement, but not big enough to warrant a salary cap selection this season.

11. Rory McIlroy
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,430,182

It's not often that a guy makes $2.4 million on the PGA Tour and it's considered a huge disappointment, but that's exactly the case for McIlroy's 2016-17 season. McIlroy was dealing with an injury for much of the season, which could explain his struggles, but it could be something more than that as well. It's yet to be seen if McIlroy is up to the challenge that guys like Spieth and Justin Thomas are providing, but even if he's not going to regain his spot atop the golfing world, he shouldn't have much difficulty topping his numbers from last season. McIlroy is a must have in salary cap formats because there's too much risk in not having him this season.

12. Kevin Kisner
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,766,936

Kisner struggled to find his footing on the PGA Tour during his first two seasons, but he played well enough in his third full season on the PGA Tour to secure his card the following season and from there, everything changed. It's one of the more remarkable progressions on the PGA Tour in the past decade as Kisner went from a guy who never cracked the $1 million mark in his first three full seasons on the PGA Tour, to a guy who has topped $3 million in each of his past three season. This past season was easily his best though as he picked-up a win, two runner-ups and a third-place finish. Though Kisner made a huge leap from season three to season four and he made another nice leap this past season, it's hard to imagine Kisner can take it to yet another level next season. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this season.

13. Marc Leishman
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $5,866,391

Leishman was perhaps the biggest surprise of the 2016-17 season. Leishman picked up his first win of the season at the Arnold Palmer Invitational in March and scooped up a steady diet of top-10s and top-20s throughout the remainder of the regular season. It was during the playoffs though were he really took off, with a solo-3rd at the Dell and a win at the BMW Championship. Since joining the PGA Tour in 2009, Leishman has always been a productive player, but he lacked the consistency needed to take his game to the next level. That may not be a problem anymore, but he simply set the bar way too high to be considered in salary cap leagues this season.

14. Matt Kuchar
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,282,489

Kuchar is simply a model of consistency as he continues to produce at a high level, year in and year out. The one notable occurrence last season was his near-win at the Open Championship. It was certainly a heart breaker for Kuchar as he's rarely come so close in a major, but as long as he keeps playing at or near the level he's been at for the past decade, he'll have another shot. Kuchar's best season came in 2013 when he earned more than $5.6 million, but he might not have that high of an upside anymore. As such, he's not a great salary cap pick and quite honestly, he never has been because he generally produces the same amount each season.

15. Sergio Garcia
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,522,476

Garcia has had more impressive seasons on the PGA Tour, with better stats and more earnings, but considering he finally nabbed a major last season, it has to be considered his best. Garcia has been one of the better players on the PGA Tour since the turn of the century, but the absence of a major was always a thorn in his side. That is no longer an issue as Garcia not only won a major, but he won the Masters and he not only won the Masters, but he did it in classic fashion by coming from behind to top major champion Justin Rose. It was a fairytale season for Garcia and although his production after his win at the Masters dropped off considerably, it's hard to blame him for losing a bit of focus. Garcia will likely come back this season with more focus and he should improve on his overall numbers.

16. Adam Hadwin
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,455,012

Hadwin had a great start to the 2017-2017 season and although he faded during the second half of the season, his play was strong enough early-on to carry him into the top-30 at the end of the season. Hadwin played well during his first two seasons on the PGA Tour, earning his card during each season, but his third season, last season, really came out of nowhere. Hadwin had zero top-3s in his first two seasons on the PGA Tour, but he posted a win and a runner-up last season, which was the main reason for the huge jump in earnings. Hadwin appears to have the skills to maintain or even increase his level of performance, but buying into his salary at this price point is putting a lot of faith in him.

17. Kevin Chappell
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,149,615

Chappell's career arc has been a strange one as he spent his first five seasons on the PGA Tour securing his card with relative ease, but rarely showing any signs of huge potential. That changed during the 2015-16 season when he earned more than $4.5 million. The odd thing about that season – he didn't win. He did finish runner-up four times though. In another strange twist, he finally picked up his first win last season, but his earnings fell way off from the previous season. Chappell is certainly capable of significantly improving upon his number from this past season as he did it, just a season prior, but he's exactly a safe pick at this price.

18. Patrick Reed
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,055,111

2016 was a great year for Reed as he earned more than $5.6 million and gained a plethora of new fans with his play at the Ryder Cup. He had all the momentum in the world entering the season and then…nothing. Well, not nothing, but he was certainly expected to do better than $3 million in earnings and only one top-3 finish. That said, there's a lot of value with Reed this season as he's recently surpassed his number with ease and he clearly has the game to win multiple times this season. He's not a must have, but he's somebody that definitely deserves a lot of consideration this season.

19. Henrik Stenson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,769,771

For Stenson to just miss out on the Tour Championship was a bit miraculous as his season could not have started much worse. From mid-April through the U.S. Open, Stenson missed five of six cuts, which for a player of his caliber is almost unheard of. He managed to find his old form towards the end of the season, but he simply ran out of time to make it into the top-30. The slow start to the season provides us with a lot a value heading into this season as Stenson is almost certain to show a significant increase in earnings this season.

20. Patrick Cantlay
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$4,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,049,632

Cantlay accomplished what few people could last season as he made it to the Tour Championship with only 13 starts under his belt. It's tough to say where Cantlay's ceiling is because he has so few starts on the PGA Tour, but it's clear that it's definitely higher than the number he posted last year. It's tough to call a guy that we know so little about a must have, but considering his number is just $2 million, he really is a must have. Imagine what Cantlay can do with a full schedule next season, or even an abbreviated schedule.

21. Brian Harman
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,396,470

Harman was one of a few guys in the top-30 last season that made a huge jump from the year prior. There were no signs early in the season that this huge jump was imminent as he had just one top-25 during the fall. As soon as 2017 started though, Harman found another gear. Two top-10s in January were followed by another in April, and a win at the Wells Fargo Championship vaulted Harman into uncharted territory. He carded another top-10 in May and a runner-up at the U.S. Open and while he faded down the stretch, he still posted career highs in just about every measurable category. With that in mind, it's going to be tough to exceed or even match the numbers from last season, so he's not a great salary cap option this season.

22. Paul Casey
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,906,974

Casey picked-up his first win on the PGA Tour in 2009 and at the time, many more wins seemed likely, but eight years later, he's yet to find another win. In that time, he's finished runner-up six times, but most of those runner-ups have been a result of Casey going backwards in the final round, instead of him chasing down the leader. It's difficult to improve on a number like Casey posted last season, without the benefit of a win and as of now, it feels like Casey has a mental block, so projecting a win would not be wise. With that in mind, Casey is not a good salary cap option this season.

23. Russell Henley
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,413,876

Henley had a solid season last year, but it's not quite what you'd expect from someone who finished top-20 on the FedEx list. Henley did pick up a victory at the Shell Houston Open, but he posted only two other top-5s during the season. It didn't hurt that one of those top-5s, was a third-place finish at the Tour Championship, but still, his resume from last season doesn't seem to add up to $3.4 million in earnings. Henley was a two-time winner heading into the season, so his numbers from last season are not that surprising, but his earnings from last season were quite the jump from his previous high of $2.5 million. With that in mind, $3.4 million is probably too much to spend on Henley in salary cap leagues this season.

24. Jason Dufner
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,310,341

Dufner might not be the guy who won twice in 2012 while earning nearly $5 million, but he's proven to be a reliable force on the PGA Tour. Dufner followed up his 2012 season with another solid performance in the season that followed, but he started to regress soon after, finally bottoming out in 2015 when he barely cracked the $1 million mark. He made a big jump the following season though and he improved upon that number last season. Dufner is a guy who is probably going to end up in the $3-4 million mark for the next few years, but that's just not good enough to take him in a salary cap league.

25. Webb Simpson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,209,646

Simpson set the bar so high in 2011, when he won twice and earned more than $6 million that anything he's done since seems like a let down. The funny thing is, he's been really productive since 2011, he just hasn't come close to matching that production, but few have. Simpson again had another strong season and at just 32, there's no reason to think a dramatic drop-off is imminent. Now for the bad news, his number of more than $3.2 million is about the best he's done since his 2011 season and there's little chance he'll replicate that effort.

26. Louis Oosthuizen
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,105,422

Oosthuizen failed to capture a win last season, but he did about everything else expected. Oosthuizen finished runner-up at both the Players and the PGA Championship, which is why he nearly made the Tour Championship. Oosthuizen was the first man out for the Tour Championship, but his prospects look pretty good for the upcoming season. Look for Oosthuizen to find a win at some point, and show a slight increase in earnings.

27. Charley Hoffman
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,300,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,161,008

Hoffman has four wins on the PGA Tour, and while he didn't win last season, it was his second best season on the PGA Tour. Hoffman posted two runner-ups and two third-place finishes last season, with a total seven top-10s. Hoffman's best season came in 2015, when he posted a win, two runner-ups and a 3rd-place showing on his way to more than $4 million in earnings. Hoffman's production dropped quite a bit the season following that one, however, and that's always a possibility here. Hoffman turned 40 last season and while his game doesn't appear to be on the slide, age sneaks up on everyone and a regression could be right around the corner. All things considered, Hoffman isn't a great pick in salary cap leagues next season.

28. Xander Schauffele
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,312,674

Schauffele wasn't even on the radar when the 2016-17 season began. He posted a top-5 during the fall portion of the season, but proceeded to miss four of his first five cuts in 2017. Everything started to click at the U.S. Open though as he posted another top-5 at Erin Hills. A few weeks later, he won the Greenbrier Classic and the entire complexion of his season changed. Schauffele scrambled on the back-nine at the BMW just to make the Tour Championship and he parlayed that into another win. In total, it was an amazing rookie season for Schauffele and while he appears to have a lot of talent, he set the bar awfully high last season, which makes him tough to pick in a salary cap format.

29. Gary Woodland
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,980,225

Woodland joined the PGA Tour in 2011 and he's been chasing that season ever since. He came very close last season, but the absence of a win, made it difficult to match his rookie numbers. Though he couldn't top his rookie accomplishments, he had what was probably his second best season on the PGA Tour. Woodland earned two runner-ups last season, which was no surprise as he had six runner-ups entering the season. Woodland has potential for bigger and better things, but he's been locked into a zone right around of just under $3 million for several years now and to expect that he breaks out of it this season, might be a bit too optimistic.

30. Tony Finau
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,838,639

Finau entered the 2015 season with a lot of hype and he didn't disappoint as he topped the $2 million mark in his rookie season. He backed that up with another solid season the year following and he did the same last season, with yet another solid showing. Last year was actually Finau's best and there's a chance that it's part of a progression that will continue this season. That's a big leap of faith however as he posted a high number last season, but he's got the game to get, so he deserves some consideration in salary cap leagues this season.

31. Billy Horschel
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,697,960

When Horschel won the FedExCup playoffs in 2014, it felt like he had been around for quite a while, but it was actually just his fourth full season on the PGA Tour. It was that fact that led to a massive increase in expectations. Horschel played well in the two seasons that followed, but nowhere near as well as we thought he would after such a strong 2014 campaign. That said, Horschel appeared to get back on track last season and his prospects for the future look good. Good enough to improve significantly on his numbers from last season though? Probably not.

32. Wesley Bryan
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,495,751

Bryan used a "battlefield" promotion in 2016 to gain entrance to the PGA Tour and he didn't disappoint in his first full season. Bryan was one of a few golfers that caught the eye of the golfing world late in 2016 and while he wasn't able to keep up with the likes of Jon Rahm, he outpaced Bryson DeChambeau. It's unclear where Bryan's ceiling is at right now, but with a win under his belt already, we have to assume it's pretty high. Bryan makes for an interesting salary cap selection this season because his upside appears to be much higher than his salary from last season, yet he has only one full year under his belt on the PGA Tour.

33. Zach Johnson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,362,968

This upcoming season could tell the tale on Johnson's future as he's underperformed the past two years and he's getting to an age where a decline in skills isn't much of a surprise. Though Johnson earned well more than $2 million last season, it came on the heels of a season where he failed to reach that figure. This from a guy who regularly surpassed the $3-4 million mark for nearly a decade. Johnson has also failed to win during the past two seasons, but his shortcomings could pay off this season if he finds his game. With that in mind, Johnson has plenty of room for growth ... if he can get back to his old form.

34. Bryson DeChambeau
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,817,054

If not for Jon Rahm, DeChambeau may have been the most hyped young player on the PGA Tour this past season. That gives you an idea of how highly those in the golf world think of DeChambeau. Though he started slowly last season, he managed to find his game at the John Deere Classic where he picked up his first career PGA Tour win. Though he failed to record a top-10 the rest of the season, he didn't fall off the map like some guys do after their first big win. With that in mind, DeChambeau holds plenty of value entering this season.

35. Adam Scott
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,695,144

After a season in which Scott earned more than $6 million, a lot was expected of Scott entering last season, but what he delivered was a very uneventful season. There's no reason to hit the panic button just yet though as Scott fell flat after a big season just a few years earlier. It's too early to call it a pattern, but for whatever reason, Scott has faltered after his two most recent big seasons. The good news is, the last time he fell flat, he rebounded with that aforementioned $6 million season. While a season like that is likely out of the question, a strong rebound is not and as such, he's a must have in salary cap formats this season.

36. Brandt Snedeker
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,625,806

Snedeker's 2016-17 season was hampered by injury almost from the get-go and his resulting earnings number makes him a must have in salary cap leagues this season. When healthy, Snedeker is easily a top-20 player on the PGA Tour, but he's had trouble staying healthy over the past five years. That said, he was very cautious last season, and that should pay off during the upcoming season as he should be more durable after all the time off.

37. Bubba Watson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,223,129

Watson's drop off last season, was perhaps the most inexplicable thing that happened all year (outside of the Pampling win of course). Entering last season, six of Watson's previous seven seasons had resulted in earnings of $3 million or more, and two of those years he surpassed $6 million in earnings. Watson was often mentioned among the likes of Rory, DJ, Spieth and such because he had two majors under his belt and a ton of success at many other PGA Tour stops. Something happened last season though, as he never got on track. Whatever the reason, be it mental or an injury we were unaware of, Watson is a must have entering this season as he has too much potential at this price.

38. Jimmy Walker
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$3,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,101,162

Walker essentially played a full season under the weather as it was revealed that he was dealing with Lyme Disease since November of 2016. When put in that context, it's amazing that Walker played well enough to finish inside the top-125. With that in mind, it's probably best to just throw out all of his results from last season. At this price, the former major champion is a must have as his condition is something that he should be able to manage going forward. Even if he continues to struggle with it, he's still capable of playing well from time to time as proven last season.

39. Jhonattan Vegas
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,944,738

Vegas won as a rookie in 2011, but his game left him soon after and by the end of the 2015 season, it felt like his lone victory was a total fluke. Vegas put all of that fluke talk to rest with a win in 2016 and the narrative changed again last season. Though Vegas lost some of his consistency last season, he had more high-end finishes than he ever had before. Vegas appears like a legit player on the PGA Tour, so a regression shouldn't be expected, but neither should an major improvement either. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this season.

40. Brendan Steele
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,907,095

Steele's season started on a high-note when he won the Safeway Open in October 2016, and although he didn't fall apart after that, he didn't light the world on fire either. Steele mustered only three more top-10s after his October win and his FedExCup ranking fell steadily throughout the season. That's certainly not the resume of a guy who is likely to improve on his numbers this season. As such, expect Steele's production to decline a bit this season, which means he won't be a good option in salary cap leagues this season.

41. Bill Haas
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,842,173

Haas is one of the most consistent golfers on the PGA Tour, which is both good and bad. Good for purposes of reliability, but bad for purposes of significant growth. Haas topped out at more than $4 million in earnings in 2011 and he's finished with $2-4 million every year since. He's generally in the 20-40 range in the FedEx points list as well and that's exactly where he'll likely end up against this season.

42. Hudson Swafford
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,246,090

Swafford ended the 2015-16 on a streak of 13 consecutive made cuts, a streak which he extended through the first six events in the 2016-17 season, and then he won. His win at the Career Builder Challenge was the last cut he would make for a month, providing further evidence that sometimes a win can actually deter future success. Whether the win was responsible for his drop in play last season or not, Swafford appears to be on the way up. As such, Swafford is a decent option in salary cap leagues this season.

43. Ryan Moore
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,751,851

Since breaking through with his first win in 2009, Moore has been extremely consistent, with earnings of $2-plus million in six of eight seasons. Moore peaked during the 2015-16 season, when he nearly cracked the $4 million barrier, but he obviously failed to back that up with a similar performance last season. The dramatic drop in earnings last season provides a great opportunity though as Moore is still top-50 in the world rankings, so he should have access to most of the big events and his floor is right around his number from last season. Moore has plenty of upside to crush his number from last season and he's about as reliable as they get, so he's definitely a good salary cap selection this season.

44. Tommy Fleetwood – I
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,094,454

Fleetwood showed last season that he can compete on the biggest stages in the world. He won twice (Abu Dhabi HSBC Championship, Open de France), finished second twice (WGC-Mexico Championship, Shenzhen International) and had five other top-12 finishes, including a T4 at the U.S. Open, which earned him his 2017-18 PGA Tour card after playing last season on Special Temporary Member status. Fleetwood, who ranked first in greens in regulation on the European Tour, enters this season 17th in the OWGR rankings and is the leader in the Race to Dubai.

45. Thomas Pieters – I
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,058,000

Pieters backed up his impressive performance at the 2016 Ryder Cup with a big year last season on both sides of the Atlantic. A T2 at the Genesis Open, fourth-place finishes at the Masters and WGC-Bridgestone Invitational and a T5 at WGC-Mexico Championship earned him a 2017-18 PGA Tour card as he led non-members with 727 FedEx Cup points, the equivalent to 52nd on the points list. Just how much Pieters plays stateside is uncertain, though. He said he is committed to the European Tour in hopes of earning a place on the 2018 European Ryder Cup team.

46. Kyle Stanley
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $3,402,106

To describe Kyle Stanley's performance on the PGA Tour over the past six seasons as a roller coaster, would be an understatement. Six seasons ago, Stanley earned what was a career high at the time of $2.3 million and he also picked up his first win. This season came in the middle of two fairly impressive seasons and it looked like Stanley would be a staple on the PGA Tour for quite a while and then the 2014 season happened. It's hard to say where he went wrong, but Stanley lost his game for three complete seasons and entering last season, he had become an afterthought. Last season was by far Stanley's best on the PGA Tour, but considering his track record, it's hard to buy into him at this price.

47. Francesco Molinari
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,875,850

Molinari took a huge leap forward last season, going from more than $1 million in earnings during the 2015-16 season to just under $3 million in earnings last season. He also jumped from five top-25s to 14 top-25s last season. The addition of a runner-up finish at the PGA Championship did wonders for his overall numbers as well as it nearly vaulted Molinari into the top-30. As for the upcoming season, it's hard to imagine that Molinari has another significant jump in him as his previous jump was so large. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this season.

48. Charles Howell III
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,606,383

Death, taxes and Charles Howell III. Just like clockwork, Howell III made $1-3 million, yet failed to pick up a win last season. It's been the m.o. for Howell III for the past 10 years as his last win on the PGA Tour came in 2007. Howell III is never going to be a good salary cap option because his upside is limited, but in draft leagues, he's a good asset because he plays a lot and he's good for a handful of top-10s every season.

49. Cameron Smith
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,123,216

Smith made the most of his limited status last year as he won the Zurich Classic in April, which secured his card for the upcoming season. The question with Smith, as with all younger golfers who win early is -will he get complacent or will he take his game to the next level. Early after his win, it looked like complacency was setting in, but he finished the season strong, which would indicate that he's ready to hit the ground running this season. The problem is, he set the bar pretty high last season and as such, he's not a great salary cap selection for the upcoming season.

50. Phil Mickelson
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,102,599

Mickelson isn't getting any younger and it appears as though his age is starting to show. He did have his moments during the 2016-17 season, but we'd expect no less from one of the all-time greats. That said, his moments are becoming more rare each season, which makes it nearly impossible to improve on his numbers from year to year. Mickelson could very well win a big event this season, but a dramatic uptick in production overall is still unlikely.

51. Ollie Schniederjans
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,935,669

Schniederjans made quite the splash in his first full year on the PGA Tour, by nearly cracking the $2 million mark. Schniederjans had plenty of success on the European Tour prior to his rookie season on the PGA Tour, but some pretty good players have been in a similar boat and failed to get much done in the states. The future is certainly bright for Schniederjans and even the bar was set pretty high last season, he has the game to improve significantly on his numbers from last season.

52. Rafa Cabrera Bello
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,934,675

Cabrera Bello impressed in his first full season on the PGA Tour with four top-10s and eight top-25s in just 19 starts. More impressive was the placement of those top-10s. Cabrera Bello finished in the top-5 at The Players and the Open Championship. At just 33, there's still time for Cabrera Bello to improve and if he can find another gear at the big events, he can take the next step in his career. His number from last season leaves just enough room for improvement and as such, he's definitely a guy to consider this season.

53. Kevin Na
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,728,351

The 2016-17 season was the first time in eight years that Na failed to make $2 million in earnings for a full season on the PGA Tour. Na played his usual schedule last season, he just wasn't as productive as his top-5, top-10 and top-25 finishes were all lower from the previous season. Na's poor season provides opportunity though as there's no reason to think he's regressing, he just simply couldn't get it going last season. As such, he's a solid salary cap candidate for the upcoming season.

54. Charl Schwartzel
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,156,036

Schwartzel is stuck in the "good, but not great" zone and he'll likely never find a way out. That didn't seem to be the case in 2011, when he bursted onto the scene by capturing the Masters and although he's been a solid golfer for the past six years, he hasn't taken the next step in his career. With that in mind, Schwartzel nearly earned $3 million in 2015-16 , so there is some significant upside there. Now, That said, Schwartzel doesn't play very often so the odds of a significant improvement are slim.

55. Jamie Lovemark
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,886,972

It seems like a decade ago that Lovemark came on the scene as a highly touted rookie, but as often happens with young golfers with expectations heaped upon them, he stumbled out of the gate and failed to recover. Fast forward just three seasons and Lovemark was finally tapping into that potential that we thought we saw all those years ago. That was the 2015-16 season and last year, Lovemark again had a productive season. He seems to be getting the hang of it now and the questions now becomes, how high can he go? The price is relatively high, but Lovemark has enough upside to justify his salary cap selection this season.

56. Russell Knox
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,643,924

Knox cleaned-up during the fall portion of the 2016-17 season, racking up three top-10s and four top-20s in all, but the 2017 portion of the season didn't go quite as smoothly. During that portion of the season, Knox managed only one top-10 and he missed more cuts than he made. It's tough to get a clear reading on Knox because he earned nearly $5 million during the 2015-16 season, which means his performance last fall could merely have been a continuation of his hot play during the previous season. That said, Knox proved his ceiling is really high and spending more than $1.6 million, might not be a bad idea this season.

57. Emiliano Grillo
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,567,015

Grillo was fantastic in his rookie season of 2015-16 , capturing his first win and amassing more than $3 million in earnings. While his performance last season was good, it was nowhere near the standard he set in his rookie season and therefore, it felt like he underachieved. It's always difficult to judge a guy with just two seasons under his belt, and two very different seasons to boot. The good thing here is that Grillo's price for the upcoming season is relatively cheap when you consider he topped the $3 million mark just two years ago and as such, he's a good salary cap option this season.

58. J.B. Holmes
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,353,584

A strange season for Holmes as he made 19 cuts in 23 starts, but failed to get much done on the weekend. Holmes managed only two top-10s last season and nothing inside the top-3. It was, by far, Holmes' worst season since undergoing brain surgery in 2013. With that in mind, there's no reason to think that this is a trend and since his ceiling is around $4 million, he's certainly a guy worth paying for this season.

59. Scott Piercy
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,317,452

Piercy was on fire last fall, posting three top-10s during five starts. Among those three top-10s, were two top-5s and needless to say, it looked like Piercy was in for a banner season. Then he teed it up in Hawaii and his game was nowhere in sight. Piercy teed it up 17 times during the 2017 portion of the calendar and managed only one top-10. HIs play in 2017 was a surprise, not only because of his hot start during the fall prior, but because he was also coming off of consecutive seasons above $2.7 million in earnings. Considering he's played well during the majority of the past three seasons, a bounce back seems likely this season.

60. Pat Perez
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $4,361,400

Perez entered the 2016-17 on a medical extension with a lot of work to do and he left it having played the best golf of his life – by a wide margin. Prior to last season, Perez had never cracked the $2 million barrier and he had never posted more than two top-3s in one season. Last season however, he carded three top-3s, he matched his previous high of six top-10s and he posted a new high of 14 top-25s. There's simply no way to explain how this happened as Perez had been playing at the same level for almost 15 years. With that in mind, a repeat of his performance from last season is highly unlikely. In fact, anything less than a rather large regression would be a surprise.

61. Mackenzie Hughes
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,355,553

Hughes got off to a fast start last season by winning the RSM Classic in November, but the rest of the season was a struggle. Hughes managed only one additional top-10 for the remainder of the season, which could be indicative of his talent or his state of mind. The latter is probably more likely as it's not uncommon for young golfers who win, to let up for a bit. Hughes is a tricky call though because his number is low enough to show great improvement this season, yet high enough that it requires a decent commitment. There is plenty of upside with Hughes, but his 2017 performance wasn't strong enough to justify his selection in a salary cap format.

62. Anirban Lahiri
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,944,289

Lahiri made a huge jump from two seasons ago to last season as his earnings went from $835k to just under $2 million. The question surrounding Lahiri is – is this just the beginning or is this his ceiling? With only a couple years on the PGA Tour under his belt, it's tough to tell if he has more upside than he showed last season or if he's peaked. In cases like these, it's wise to take the safe route and simply wait and see what he does this year. With all of these questions, Lahiri's number is too much of an investment for the upcoming season.

63. Keegan Bradley
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,940,478

Bradley finally put an end to a four-year slide in earnings last season by more than doubling his salary from the previous season. While that's great news for Bradley, he failed to capture a top-three finish for the third consecutive season. He also set the bar pretty high for a guy that hasn't topped $2 million in earnings since 2014. As such, he's not a great option in salary cap leagues this season.

64. James Hahn
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,841,314

It took a couple years for Hahn to find his footing on the PGA Tour, but over the past three seasons, he's locked himself into the $1.8-2.3 million range. Last season was actually his worst among the past three seasons, but it doesn't appear to be a regression as much as just a variation of where he's normally going to be. With that in mind, Hahn provides plenty of value in draft leagues, but he'll rarely be a good salary cap option because his earnings don't fluctuate enough.

65. Robert Streb
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,588,287

Last season was Streb's fifth on the PGA Tour and it's still not clear who he is. Is he the guy who nearly topped $4 million in earnings in 2015, or the guy who has spent three seasons between $1-2 million. Logic would dictate that the 2015 season was an outlier because he hasn't come close to those results before or since. That said, with a proven upside of nearly $4 million and a cap number of more than $1.5 million, Streb might be worth a shot this season.

66. Kevin Tway
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,472,613

Tway's first go-round on the PGA Tour in 2014 was a complete disaster as he only earned about $167k and recorded no top-25s in 23 starts. His next try, last season, was much better, although it didn't appear as though he had improved much early in the season. Luckily for Tway, he got hot at the end of April and earned there consecutive top-5s, which pretty much made his season. He didn't accomplish much the rest of the season, but that just means there's room for improvement. Tway has the look of a guy who took a while to figure things out and is now ready to move forward, rather than a guy who is out of his league and happened to get lucky this past season.

67. Branden Grace
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$2,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,315,054

With just more than $1.3 million in earnings and only two top-10s, it was certainly not a great year for Grace, but there is a lot of opportunity here. Grace earned more than $2.8 million during the 2015-16 season, so the upside is certainly there and his World Golf Ranking is currently 37th, which means he'll have access to the biggest events next season. All of which adds up to a nice salary cap option this season. Grace is not a workhorse on the PGA Tour, but he did up his events played from 18 to 20 last season, so if he's in that neighborhood again this season, he should easily top his number from last season.

68. Tyrrell Hatton – I
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,103,224

Hatton had a great six weeks last season with four consecutive top-10s worldwide, starting with a T3 at the Dubai Desert Classic in February before sandwiching T4s at the Honda Classic and the Arnold Palmer around a T10 at the WGC-Mexico Championship. He tacked another top-20 at the WGC-Match Play (T17) event a week later. But then things turned sour as he missed five of eight cuts on the PGA Tour, including trunk slams at all four majors, and three of five on the European Tour. His only bright spot was a T3 at the season-ending European Masters. That one great run, though, was enough to earn him a 2017-18 tour card as he totaled 448 non-Member FedEx Cup points, the equivalent to 99th on the FedEx Cup points list.

69. Kelly Kraft
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,638,045

Kraft failed to secure his full playing privileges during his rookie season of 2015-16 , but he made sure not to fail again during his second season. Kraft is anything but consistent, but from time to time, he's really good. Kraft proved as much when he finished runner-up at the AT&T Pro-Am in February and proceeded to back that up with top-5s at the Zurich Classic and the Greenbrier Classic. Kraft will need to show some more consistency in order to take his game to the next level, however. Kraft should improve this season, but not enough to justify a salary cap selection this season.

70. Chris Kirk
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,216,047

Kirk won twice and earned nearly $5 million during the 2014 season, which came as a big surprise to most, but a regression the following season didn't shock anyone. The season after that would explain a lot about Kirk and although he played well, it was well beneath the standard he had set the previous two seasons. Entering this past season, there was a clear downward pattern, but a quick start to the season made it appear as though Kirk just might get back to his previous levels ... and then the calendar flipped to 2017. Kirk's ranking is entirely due to his performance last fall, but his play during the spring/summer was a disaster. That said, Kirk ceiling is much higher than his salary number for this season, so he's someone to consider in salary cap leagues.

71. Alex Noren – I
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,205,516

Noren missed only three cuts worldwide last season, but they came at the deep-field Masters, U.S. Open and Scottish Open. On the other hand, he captured the BMW PGA Championship, carded T6s at the Open Championship and the European Masters and a T10 at the Players Championship. Ranked 14th in the world, the Swede is fifth in the Race to Dubai. His 424 non-member FedEx Cup Points equaled Luke Donald, who was 107th on the points list. It seems reasonable for Noren to surpass last season's earnings significantly.

72. David Lingmerth
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,070,754

Lingmerth had a very impressive rookie campaign, where he recorded two runner-up finishes on his way to more than $1.7 million in earnings. He followed that up with a less than stellar sophomore season of only $600k in earnings, but it was his third season which put him on the map. During that season, Lingmerth picked up his first PGA Tour victory on his way to $2.7 million in earnings. He regressed a bit the following season, and the next season, this past one, he regressed even further. Lingmerth could be stuck going the wrong way, but if he finds his game in any form, he's bound to improve upon his numbers from this past season.

73. Si Woo Kim
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,681,177

Kim won THE Players Championship, which pretty much sums up his entire season. For a week in May, Kim was outstanding, but he didn't accomplish much before or after that victory. It's tough to gauge just how good he is or can be, because we haven't seen enough out of him yet. We know that he can play with the best, when he's at his best, but we know nothing about his determination to play well when things aren't going well. With so much uncertainty, it wouldn't be wise to spend this much money on him in salary cap leagues.

74. Ian Poulter
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $2,098,346

Poulter nearly lost his playing privileges midway through last season, but a surprise reprieve made all the difference in the world as Poulter went from outside the top-125 to fighting for a spot in the Tour Championship. He didn't get that spot of course, but he did play himself well within the top-125. By the end of the season, Poulter had posted his best numbers on the PGA Tour since 2010. With that in mind, he's not a good salary cap option this season because he played about as well as possible last season.

75. Lucas Glover
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,955,822

Glover's 2016-17 was fairly unspectacular for a guy who nearly cracked the $2 million barrier. Glover recorded two top-5s, but both came during the 2016 portion of the season, which is rarely a good thing. As for 2017, Glover managed only two top-10s and that doesn't bode well for this prospects this season. Considering Glover more than doubled his 2015-16 earnings last season, he's not a good candidate in salary cap leagues this season.

76. Sung Kang
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,943,309

Kang's entire 2016-17 season was built upon a three-week stretch where he posted a runner-up at the Shell Houston Open, a T11 at the Heritage and a T6 at Valero Texas Open. Outside of that stretch, Kang accomplished very little and that's a little concerning heading into this season. Kang has improved in each of his three seasons on the PGA Tour, but his jump from the previous season to last season, may have been a bit too much. Although he has plenty of upside, the bar was set too high last year, and as such, he's not a great salary cap pick this season.

77. Sean O'Hair
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,873,856

2009 was a banner year for O'Hair as he recorded a win, a runner-up and nine total top-10s on this way to more than $4 million in earnings. We haven't seen that version of O'Hair since however. To his credit, O'Hair has now managed a runner-up showing in each of his past three season and he's easily topped $1 million in each of those years, but it appears as though his upside is in the past. O'Hair also posted his most top-10s (five), since that 2009 season, but he hasn't cracked the $2 million mark in nearly a decade, so there's little reason to think he'll do it this year.

78. Chez Reavie
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,819,207

Reavie has had an interesting career. His first and only PGA Tour win came in 2008 and his best season was in 2011, but he hadn't played all that well since 2011…until last year. Reavie has dealt with plenty of injuries throughout his career, which account for some of his down seasons, but he's also had bad seasons that were simply the result of poor play. The bottom line is, his upside isn't all that high and his consistency is absent as well, so he's a risky pick in just about every format.

79. Luke List
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,813,219

List showed a major improvement from the 2015-16 season to last season, more than doubling his earnings, but most of List's earnings came during the fall portion of the season, which is a little worrisome. List wasn't terribly during the heart of the season last year, but his only top-10 came at the Shell Houston Open. This was the second consecutive season where List failed to get much done after the fall portion of the season, so he'll have to prove he can produce throughout the year before he becomes a good salary cap option.

80. Martin Laird
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,759,706

Laird amassed four top-10s before the end of February last season, but he only managed one top-10 after that. Laird's only top-3 came at the Quicken Loans National in July, yet combined with his four other top-10s, he was able to get within striking distance of the $2 million mark. Laird is only 34, so he has plenty of good years left in him, but it looks like his peak years are in the past. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this season.

81. Scott Brown
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,748,324

Last season was Brown's best season on the PGA Tour and it was his fifth consecutive season more than $1 million in earnings. While the improvement was impressive, he remains stuck in the land between $1-2 million in earnings. Brown's jump in earnings last season was built upon his two runner-up showings, but those were his only top10s last season. Brown certainly has room to improve and we've yet to see his full potential, but whereas he was a solid salary cap pick last year at more than $1 million in earnings, his price for this season is too steep.

82. Danny Lee
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,611,331

Five full seasons on the PGA Tour and it's still hard to tell how good he is. He struggled early in his career, which is not uncommon, but in his third full season the PGA Tour, he exploded for nearly $4 million in earnings. The past two seasons have been okay, but nothing like what he accomplished in that third season. A closer look at his results from last season might hold the key to Lee. Lee's year on the whole wasn't great, but for a stretch from May through July, where he did all of his damage. After that stretch though, he was awful, missing the cut in his final four starts. It seems clear that Lee is just extremely streaky, but it's also clear that his range is $1-2 million and not near $4 million.

83. Patrick Rodgers
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,346,322

One of these years, Rodgers is going to break out. The same thing was likely said prior to last season and the break out obviously did not take place, but at just 25 years of age, Rodger's best golf is still in front of him. Last season was not a great one for Rodgers as a big chunk of his earnings came from one runner-up showing at the John Deere Classic. Outside of that showing, Rodgers didn't accomplish much as he ended the year with only three top-10s. There's not a lot to point to in the numbers that suggest Rodgers is close to a break out season, but he passes the eye test and at his current salary, it doesn't take much to find a place for him on a salary cap roster.

84. Bud Cauley
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,553,685

Entering the 2012 season, the hype surrounding Cauley was much like the hype surrounding Rahm and DeChambeau entering last season. Cauley didn't disappoint either as he posted six top-10s on his way to more than $1.7 million in earnings. What happened after that season though is a mystery. Over the next three seasons, Cauley missed 27 of 57 cuts and the jury was again out on his skills. He put some of those questions to rest last season and he again resembled the guy who played so well in 2012, but his ceiling is still unclear. With that in mind, Cauley carries a little too much risk and not quite enough reward this season.

85. Nick Taylor
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,255,259

Taylor earned his spot inside the top-100 by recording three top-10s in the span of seven events, but he flamed-out at the end of the season, missing the cut in three of his final five events. On the positive side, his four top-10s were a career high as was his 20 cuts made. Taylor appears to be trending upward, but the question is – how fast can he improve. His number from last season is not too much of a burden, so he's certainly a guy that you can take a chance on in salary cap leagues.

86. Grayson Murray
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,468,728

Murray's rookie season was not going very well until he teed it up at the Barbasol Championship in July. Four days later he had a PGA Tour victory in his pocket and everything changed. Well, his play didn't change much as he struggled on the way in, like he did on the way out, but instead of struggling to get inside the top-125 to keep his card, he was comfortably inside the top-100 and had no worries about his card. There was some steam on Murray heading into last season, so the fact that he won isn't much of a surprise, but that win made it difficult to take him in salary cap leagues as now he carries a decent price tag.

87. Harris English
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $864,959

English had a productive rookie season in 2012 and he was very productive in the years that followed, but for some reason, his play regressed last season. It was English's first sub-$1 million season since becoming a full-time member in 2012. English's season started well, with a top-5 at the Shriners, but he was unable to get much done in 2017. English has never been accurate off the tee, but last season was a new low as he ranked 186th on the PGA Tour. He'll need to address that and if he improves just a little, it could result in a big uptick in earnings. As such, he's worth a long look in salary cap leagues this season.

88. Daniel Summerhays – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $826,124

Summerhays' track record of six consecutive years of earnings increases finally ended in 2016-17 as he failed to top $1 million for the first time since his rookie year in 2011. The reason was just one top-10 finish to his name as his Strokes Gained: Putting diminished from top-6 the previous two years to just 62nd in 2016-17. Still, there are plenty of reasons to suggest last season was an aberration, and this year represents strong bounceback potential for the Utah native.

89. Graham DeLaet
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,603,666

DeLaet had a nice run from 2013-14 where he topped $2.5 million in each season, but he followed that up with two sub-$1 million seasons. He bounced back last season with a performance closer resembling his 2013-14 efforts, but he also set the bar pretty high considering he failed to crack the $1 million mark in his previous two seasons. Considering DeLaet has zero top-3s in the past three seasons, it's reasonable to think he's trending the wrong way and as such, he's not a good salary cap option this season.

90. Byeong Hun An
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,236,090

An made a nice jump from more than $900k in his rookie season, to more than $1.2 million last season. An also made the bulk of his money during the 2017 portion of the season, which is always nice. The problem with An is, he hasn't played many events on the PGA Tour. He played just 14 times two seasons ago and only 22 times this past season. An is just 26, so there's plenty of room to improve, but for fantasy purposes, he won't significantly improve until he plays more often. If word comes out that he plans to play more in the states this season, he's in-play as a salary cap candidate, if not, he's not a great option.

91. Ryan Palmer – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $772,560

Palmer experienced an odd 2016-17 season, as he missed four cuts to open the year, notched three top-11s in April, and the hit a wall at the end of the year, missing 4 of 6 cuts. The result was his first season below $1.4 million since 2009. Expect a strong rebound from Palmer this season, but his chances of claiming victory will be low.

92. Kevin Streelman
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,313,327

There was a moment in 2013, where it looked like Streelman might take off and become a major player on the PGA Tour and when he picked up his second PGA Tour win in 2014, he solidified his status as a middle-tier guy on the PGA Tour, but he's regressed in each of his past three seasons. The biggest issue for Streelman in the past three seasons has been his consistency. Streelman has posted a couple top-3s in the past three seasons, but he's only recorded six top 10s, or two per season. Even in 2014, when he last won, he only could manage two top-10s. It's not all gloom and doom for Streelman, he's still earning around $1.5 million per season, but his prospects as a salary cap selection are all but nil until he shows some signs of the guy he was in 2013.

93. Morgan Hoffmann
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,278,568

Hoffmann is developing a reputation as a grinder on the PGA Tour as he plays a lot, but he rarely has the high-end finishes. Last season was Hoffmann's fifth full season on the PGA Tour and every season he's ended up between $700k and $1.6 million. Hoffmann has just one top-3 finish in his career and only nine top-10s. That's an average of just less than 1.5 top-10s per season, which simply isn't good enough when looking for upside. Hoffman is still young and there is time to improve, but until he shows a little more, there's no reason to spend the nearly $1.3 million on him.

94. Ryan Blaum
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $962,768

Blaum showed an impressive amount of consistency during his first full season on the PGA Tour, making the cut in 22 of 29 starts. He wasn't able to get much done on the weekend, posting only two top-10s, but on the whole, it was a successful season. Though Blaum was at his most consistent during the fall portion of the season, he peaked during the summer, which is a good sign. Both of Blaum's top-10s came in July, which is promising for his prospects this season. Blaum's number makes him an interesting prospect for this season and if he can simply play a little better on the weekend, he'll improve significantly on his number this season.

95. Ross Fisher – I
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,300,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,258,083

The 36-year-old Fisher enjoyed a career renaissance last season, rattling off six top-10s, including three in a row, by early July. But then the dark ages returned as he finished no higher than 36th in his last six events, missing the cut at the European Masters and the PGA Championship and dropping 10 spots to 53rd in the world. He'll at least have more opportunities on the PGA Tour this season.

96. William McGirt
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,300,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,225,005

It felt like McGirt had a really good season last year, mostly because he was in the mix early at some big events, but his year on the whole was just kind of blah. McGirt recorded only three top-10s last season and his best finish was a T3 at the RBC Heritage. This after a spectacular season the year prior where he earned more than $3 million and recorded not only a win, but a runner-up showing as well. McGirt has spent seven full seasons on the PGA Tour and the clear outlier is the $3 million season, so it's hard to explain what exactly happened that year. McGirt is a guy with upside, so there's reason to consider him for salary cap leagues, but the odds say he'll end up right about where he left off last season.

97. Jim Herman
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,300,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,205,632

Herman struggled in his first three seasons on the PGA Tour, but he turned it around in 2015 when he finished safely inside the top-125. He backed up that season with an even better performance during the 2015-16 season, when he topped the $2 million barrier for the first time. Last season then was a barometer on which way Herman would go with his career. Take another step up the rankings and Herman would become a recognizable name, a step back and his fate would be unclear. The latter is where Herman is entering this season as it's hard to tell which way he goes from here. He certainly has the upside to post a big enough number to warrant a salary cap selection, but the safe play is to pass.

98. Patton Kizzire
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,300,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,110,395

Kizzire got off to a great start during the fall portion of the season, when he carded a runner-up finish at the Safeway Open, but what followed was a pattern of extreme highs and lows for the remainder of the season. Kizzire managed a total of three top-10s last season, including another top-5 at the Zurich Classic, but he also missed the cut in half of his 28 starts. Kizzire entered this past season off of a solid rookie campaign where he earned more than $1.4 million, but made 20 cuts in 27 starts, which is what really made the difference between his first and second seasons. Kizzire could improve this season, but he's yet to show much of an upside, so a salary cap selection is not in the cards this season.

99. Stewart Cink
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,463,922

Cink surprised nearly everyone with his performance last season. Cink's nearly $1.5 million in earnings was his best number since 2010. Cink got there by recording three top-10s and a bunch of top-25s. He clearly doesn't have the high-end finishes in him like he used to, but he proved last season that he's not ready for pasture yet either. That said, he set the bar awfully high as he doesn't have that many years left of playing at a high level.

100. C.T. Pan
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,267,649

Pan missed more cuts than he made last season and he posted only three top-10s in 29 starts, but luckily for Pan, one of those top-10s was a runner-up showing at the Farmers Insurance Open. With only one PGA Tour season under his belt, there's simply no way to tell which way Pan will go in his second season. The missed cuts are certainly a concern as most guys in this range are at least making 60-70 percent of their cuts. As such, it would be wise to wait on Pan and see how he performs in year two.

101. Jason Kokrak
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,173,708

Kokrak's 2016-17 season was a lot like his previous five seasons on the PGA Tour – solid, but not spectacular. In six seasons on the PGA Tour, Kokrak has earned as much as more than $1.9 million and as little as just under $1 million. Kokrak makes a majority of his cuts and he winds up in the top-25 about a third of the time. The problem is, he rarely has high-end finishes. Kokrak has only three top-3s in his six years on the PGA Tour and there's really no reason to think that he'll suddenly become a guy who contends every week. With that in mind, he's not a good salary cap option this season.

102. J.J. Spaun
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,122,611

While it wasn't an outstanding season, Spaun accomplished everything a rookie needs to on the PGA Tour last season. He had zero top-5s, but he recorded three top-10s, which coupled with a total of 18 paychecks, was enough to get him safely inside the top-125, which is the main goal of every rookie. Spaun will of course want to improve his overall numbers next season and to do so, he should start with some work in the bunker as he ranked 159th in sand saves last season. It's seems like such a small part of the game, but a stroke here and there can mean the difference between a top-15 and a top-10 and those top-10s add up. It's too early to tell which direction Spaun will go from here and without having much of a track record to go on, he's carries too much risk at this price in salary cap leagues.

103. Brandon Hagy
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $861,227

Hagy didn't have a great rookie season, but he accomplished goal number one of retaining his playing privileges for the upcoming season. Nagy only managed one top-10 all season, but on the bright side, he did make the cut in 17 of 26 starts. Nagy is a bomber, he ranked 3rd on the PGA Tour in driving distance, but 180th in driving accuracy. The good news is, it's much easier to add accuracy than add distance. If Nagy can find some accuracy, it will help him hit more greens, which he ranked 125th last season. Nagy has the tools to improve greatly this season, it's just a matter of whether he does it or not.

104. Ben Martin
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $850,319

Unlike most guys that barely made the top-125 last season, Martin earned most of his points and money during the summer of 2017. Martin was in a terrible position entering May, but nine consecutive cuts made, including two top-10s, changed his entire outlook. From there, A top-15 at the Barracuda Championship was all he needed to sneak inside the top-125. Martin is an interesting option for salary cap purposes this season because his number is relatively low and it's his worst output in the past four seasons. His known ceiling is $2.7 million, which he earned in 2015 and he's been above $1.2 million three of the past four seasons. As such, he's worth some consideration in salary cap leagues this season.

105. Jonas Blixt
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,408,288

Blixt hit the ground running as a rookie in 2012, picking up a win on his way to a $2 million season and he backed that up with a similar effort in 2013, but the three years following were not so great. He came back a bit last season, picking up another win at the Zurich Classic, but that was a team event and when put in context of the entire season, it makes sense that he might have needed help that week. Blixt's win at the Zurich was his only top-10 for the entire season and when combined with the previous three seasons, it paints a bleak picture. As such, Blixt is not a good salary cap option this season.

106. Chris Stroud
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,308,445

As is often the case with guys that finish around $1 million in earnings, Stroud's season was made by one event. That event was a win at the Baracuda Championship in August. He did back up that win with a top-10 at the PGA Championship the following week, but there was really nothing to write home about outside those two weeks. Stroud has been a full time member on the PGA Tour for 11 years, but he's cracked the $1 million barrier just four times. His best season was 2014, when he earned more than $1.8 million. With a ceiling that low, there's no way to justify paying $1.3 million for him this season.

107. Whee Kim
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,125,368

Kim has been on the PGA Tour for three seasons and he hasn't shown much upside. Last season was his best to date, but even in a season where he set an earnings high, he really only played well twice. Kim got off to a decent start in the fall, but it was a runner-up at the Fed Ex that made his season. Through three seasons though, Kim has made just one more cut (38) than he's missed (37). It's reasonable to think that Kim will continue to progress this season, but at his current rate, he's not going to improve enough to warrant a salary cap selection.

108. Seung-Yul Noh
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,080,706

Noh had a fairly decent season last year, but it could have been a lot better if he had finished well. Noh had three top-10s on the season, two of which came during the 2017 portion of the season. His best effort was a T5 at the Wells Fargo Championship, which helped him crack the $1 million mark for the third time in his career. The problem when assessing his prospects for this season is, although he's been above the $1 million mark three times, he's also been below $800k three times. Noh appears to have enough potential to significantly improve upon his number from last year, but he's probably not worth the risk.

109. Richy Werenski
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $890,262

Werenski started the 2016-17 well, but a slump from February through June nearly derailed any hopes of retaining his card. A strong finish saved Werenski though and he's good to go for the upcoming season. Werenski's season on the whole was not very impressive, but goal number one for any rookie is to simply retain the playing privileges for the following season, so in that respect, the season was a success. Werenski's number is low enough that he's a decent candidate for salary cap leagues as it won't take much to significantly improve this season.

110. Dominic Bozzelli
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $868,519

Bozzelli played above average in exactly two events last season, but that was just enough to secure his card for the upcoming season. Bozelli found his best form at the Career Builder Challenge with a top-5 and at the Valspar Championship when he posted his best finish of the season, a T3. Other than that, Bozelli didn't accomplish much as he earned only two additional top-25s during the entire season. That said, Bozzelli accomplished goal number one of every rookie and that's to retain his privileges for the following season. Bozzelli didn't show a lot of upside last season, but his number is pretty low for a young guy who is fully exempt.

111. Smylie Kaufman – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,200,000
2016-17 Earnings: $784,758

Still young, the now 25-year-old Kaufman struck success in just his fourth PGA Tour start two years ago, but he has gotten complacent with just three top-10 efforts since. Kaufman has a distance advantage on most of his peers but struggled last season from the fairway, and he has plenty of work to do to consistently compete on the PGA Tour. However, there's ample time for the youngster to develop, and with one full year of secured starts, look for Kaufman to jump over the $1 million mark this season.

112. Michael Kim
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,100,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,018,204

It's amazing how many players in this range, roughly 85th on the FedEx list and lower, played well in the fall, and did very little during the 2017 portion of the season. Kim is no exception as his best finish came in the fall where he posted a T3 at the Safeway Open. It's important to point out that guys who build their resumes during the fall, generally aren't much help for fantasy players that start their season in January. They may end up retaining their card for the next season, but that's of no help when you need guys to earn checks in July. That said, Kim did show improvement from his rookie season, but not nearly enough to warrant a salary cap selection this season.

113. Harold Varner III
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,100,000
2016-17 Earnings: $918,779

Varner III made his money last season by making cuts and grinding out top-25s. Varner III teed it up 31 times and made 19 cuts, along with seven top-25s, but only one top-10. In fact, his T10 at the Wyndham Championship was his best result all season. It wasn't all that dissimilar from his rookie season the year prior, except during his rookie campaign, Varner III earned four top-10s. Through two full seasons on the PGA Tour, Varner III has yet to find a top-3 and without those high-end finishes, it's difficult for anyone to jump up the rankings. Varner III will likely rebound this season to his rookie levels, but that's not enough improvement to warrant a salary cap selection.

114. David Hearn – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,100,000
2016-17 Earnings: $800,710

After six consecutive years of retaining his card, Hearn just slipped outside the top 125 in FedEx Cup points last season and into conditional status. The 38-year-old Canadian has proven himself solid though less-than-flashy, with no career wins and just thrice coming close to a breakthrough. If Hearn can afford himself enough events to prove himself, expect a bounceback and a return to full exemption on the PGA Tour.

115. Aaron Wise – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,100,000
2016-17 Earnings: $209,488

The former NCAA champion from the University of Oregon has already enjoyed several levels of success as a professional, securing both his first Web.com victory and PGA Tour top-10 during his 2016-2017 campaign. He first gained momentum with a T10 finish at the Shriners Hospitals for Children Open back in November, but the highlight of his summer came at the Air Capital Classic in June where he fired back-to-back 62s in his first two rounds and led wire-to-wire. Despite ranking just 72nd in terms of ball striking on the Web.com Tour, Wise could be in line for one of the more successful PGA Tour careers out of this year's class of rookies.

116. Chad Campbell
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,329,941

Chad Campbell is one of a few guys from the Tiger Woods era that is still alive and kicking. Campbell's career appeared on life support as recently as 2014, when he posted his second consecutive sub-$500k season, but he's bounced back with seasons of $1 million or more over the past three seasons. The problem with Campbell though, is that he's maxing out at this level. He hasn't had a top-3 finish since 2012 and he's had no more than three top-10s since 2008. As such, Campbell is not a good salary cap option this season.

117. Cody Gribble
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,305,554

There is generally a Cody Gribble in every rookie class. He's the guy that comes out on fire in the fall, picks up a win and then disappears for the majority of the spring/summer schedule. Gribble recorded a top-10 the week prior to his win during the fall, but he failed to grab another top-10 the rest of the season. For the season, he only recorded four top-25s, and that's including the win and the top-10 in the fall. It's too early to tell if Gribble played above his talent when he won in the fall or if got complacent after winning, but when those are the two options, it doesn't make for a good salary cap situation.

118. Luke Donald
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $958,850

Donald peaked in 2011, when he earned more than $6.5 million and grabbed the world number one ranking. Since then, he hasn't showed that form very often. The further he gets away from 2011, the less he looks like the player that was once ranked as the best in the world. Last season was the first time he had fallen under $1 million in earnings since 2007. There has been hope for a comeback for years now, but it looks like it's time to finally put those hopes to rest. Donald simply doesn't have the upside he once did and as such he's not a good salary cap option.

119. Scott Stallings
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $955,337

Stallings is one of very few exceptions to the rule of guys in this range that made most of their money in the fall portion of last season. Stallings actually missed the cut in every single start last fall. He turned his season around with an 8th-place showing at the Career Builder Challenge in January. From there, he posted two more top-5s, but both came at opposite-field events. Stallings has had a strange career in that he's won three times on the PGA Tour, but he's never managed to top $2 million in earnings. What that means is, he's capable of playing at a high-level, but not for very long. As such, he's not a good salary cap option this season.

120. Brian Gay
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $942,372

Some would say Gay's largest accomplishment last season was helping Ian Poulter find a discrepancy in the points system and retain his playing privileges, but Gay was actually pretty good on the course as well. The reason Gay found the discrepancy, was because he was in the same spot, trying to earn enough points on a medical extension and when he fell just short, he spotted the issue, which saved his and Poulter's card. Gay was only in that position because he had posted consecutive top-10s at the RBC Heritage and Valero Texas Open. Gay posted one more top-10, a T3 at the Barbasol and was able to retain his card for this season. Gay had a lot of upside a handful of years ago, but it no longer exists.

121. Nick Watney
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $824,162

After an injury-shortened 2015-16 season, Watney did just enough last season to retain his card for the upcoming season. Watney was once one of the better players on the PGA Tour, but he had a bizarre drop-off in production in 2014 that looked like it could be a sign of things to come. He quickly put those fears to rest the next season though as he posted one runner-up finish and more than $1.7 million in earnings. Last season wasn't a great one, but was that a reflection of the state of his game or an injury hangover. Watney is one of the more difficult guys to predict this season, but since he hasn't been above $2 million since 2013, his upside appears limited.

122. Cameron Tringale – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $792,814

For a guy who has yet to win on the PGA Tour, Tringale has made plenty of money, with five of his last seven seasons eclipsing the $1 million mark. Last season he slipped just a bit and failed to earn a top-3 finish for the first time since 2012, but he did pick up three top-10s. Though he underwhelmed last season, there's plenty reason to belive Tringale bounces back, even though he had to go to the Web.com Finals, where he finished 18th, to retain his card after finishing 133rd on the points list. He's a solid salary cap sleeper option who may not win, but has the game to post up to four top-10s over a season.

123. Graeme McDowell – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $639,770

Despite a solid putting year where he was fourth in Strokes Gained: Putting, McDowell did not produce a single top-10 for the first time since 2008. The issue was his shoddy iron and wedge game and a dropoff in driving distance to a sub-280 average, which probably didn't make his iron shots any easier. The Northern Ireland native has eclipsed $2 million or fallen below $700,000 in the past four seasons, making it hard to guess which G-Mac we'll see when he returns with conditional PGA Tour status. With three wins in the past seven years, including a major, McDowell is worth a gamble in salary cap leagues, but it could end in disappointment.

124. Beau Hossler – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $77,028

Many remember Hossler as the 17-year-old sensation who finished T29 at the 2012 U.S. Open and went on to become a standout at the University of Texas. He now has the chance to become a staple on the PGA Tour after securing his card thanks to a top-25 finish on the Web.com's regular season money list in 2017. Hossler also made 4 of 8 cuts at the PGA level during his 2017 campaign, ranging from the Farmers Insurance Open to the Travelers Championship. He missed just 3 of 14 cuts on the Web.com Tour this past season, while also posting two runner-up finishes. It wouldn't be a surprise to see Hossler make some noise as a 22-year-old rookie given his natural talent and experience in the spotlight.

125. Sangmoon Bae – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$1,000,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Bae left the Tour after reaching the Tour Championship at the end of the 2014-15 season to fulfill a 21-month military commitment in South Korea. He has done so, and recently returned to golf in Asia. But he has maintained full status on the PGA Tour under the major medical/family crisis exemption, and he is planning to compete during the fall season. He won the season-opening Frys.com tournament, now the Safeway Open, back in 2014-15, but there was no early word whether he'd be in Napa Valley for the 2017-18 lid-lifter. Bae has two PGA Tour wins (also the 2013 Byron Nelson) and ended 2015 ranked No. 115 in the OWGR. He's now close to No. 2,000. But he also finished 2011 at No. 30, and there was a lot of game there. Bae is only 31, a golfer's prime, so he will be an interesting wild card this season, surely to be picked by someone in your league.

126. Chesson Hadley – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$975,000
2016-17 Earnings: $82,208

Hadley, who won the PGA Tour's 2014 Puerto Rico Open, racked up $2.8M in earnings through two seasons before losing his card after a 2015-16 campaign in which he finished 159th in the FedExCup standings. He'll be back to full status during the 2017-18 season, however, as two victories in his last six starts on the Web.com Tour have secured his card once again. Hadley also appeared in eight PGA Tour events throughout the 2016-17 season, notably placing top-30 in back-to-back starts at the John Deere Classic and Barbasol Championship.

127. Derek Fathauer
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$950,000
2016-17 Earnings: $898,491

Last season was the best of Fathauer's four seasons on the PGA Tour, but he hasn't shown much improvement in four years. The major difference between last season and his first three seasons on the PGA Tour was a T3 at the CIMB Classic, which was his first top-3 on the PGA Tour. Fathauer has improved in each of his first four full seasons on the PGA Tour, but the pace is just too slow to justify a salary cap selection this season.

128. Shane Lowry – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$950,000
2016-17 Earnings: $831,411

Lowry's body of work saw no near-wins last season and a rank outside the top 125, a clear disappointment coming off a $1,585,436 season the year prior. Fortunately for him, his 2015 WGC-Bridgestone victory granted him a three-year exemption that will extend his fully exempt PGA Tour status through the 2017-18 season. After nearly winning the U.S. Open in 2016, the burly Irishman has posted just one top-10, so it's clear Lowry comes with some volatility. Further increasing his risk has been a limited schedule of 17 or less PGA Tour events the last three seasons, so be warned that his above average talent comes with downside as well.

129. Sam Ryder – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$950,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

A dominant, eight-stroke victory at the Web.com's Pinnacle Bank Championship in July combined with four additional top-five finishes vaulted Ryder up to No. 2 on the 2017 money list, thus earning a PGA Tour card for the first time in his career. Through 23 events on the Web.com Tour this past season, Ryder made 16 cuts to go along with 10 top-25s, but missed the cut on his biggest stage at the U.S. Open after earning medalist honors with a 62 at his sectional qualifier. The 27-year-old won't have experience on his side, but harnesses enough game to compete at the next level as a rookie, having ranked first in total driving and third in ball striking on the Web.com Tour.

130. Steve Stricker
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,002,036

Considering he only made 13 starts this past season, Stricker actually fared pretty well on a per-start basis. Unfortunately for Stricker, fantasy leagues don't generally calculate on a per-start basis. It was only five years ago that Sticker earned more than $4 million in a single season, but since that season, he's cut back on his schedule dramatically. As such, his upside is very limited and with his skills diminishing, he's not a good salary cap option anymore.

131. Camilo Villegas
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $971,420

Early in his career, it appeared as though Villegas could be a major factor on the PGA Tour for years to come and after a couple very strong seasons in 2008 and 2010, he was on his way, but something changed after that 2010 season and he hasn't been the same golfer since. Villegas has had some decent seasons during that span, but for the most part, he's been underwhelming. His finish inside the top-100 was mostly due to a runner-up showing in the fall as he had only one top-10 during the 2017 portion of the season. Villegas doesn't appear to have that extra gear anymore and as such, he's not a good salary cap selection this season.

132. Robert Garrigus
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $880,905

Entering the month of July, Garrigus has little hope of retaining his card for the upcoming season, but a spectacular run of three top-10s in three weeks, put him right back inside the top-125. The run started at the Barbasol Championship and continued onto the RBC Canadian Open and finally to the Barracuda Championship. It's not exactly the two Opens and the Masters, but there were enough points earned, to get inside the top-125. Garrigus' prospects for this season however do not look great as he's been at or near this level for quite some time now. He'll likely struggle to keep his card again this season and as such, he's not a good salary cap option this season.

133. Martin Flores
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $830,057

Flores was well outside the top-125 when he teed it up at the Barbasol Championship in late July, but a top-20 there, started a streak of four consecutive top-20s, which vaulted him safely inside the top-125. Flores actually played fairly well during the first FedEx playoff event, but he wasn't able to sneak inside the top-100 and move onto the next event. Flores has six full seasons under his belt on the PGA Tour and just about every one of them has been the same, with Flores fighting tooth and nail to hold onto his card. With a limited ceiling, Flores simply isn't a good salary cap option.

134. Zac Blair – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $788,352

After regressing in the two seasons following his promising rookie campaign Blair finds himself at a crossroads for 2017-18 season as the first man outside the top-125 FedEx Cup points bubble. As such, Blair will definitely need to maximize his limited opportunities this upcoming season with conditional status. Blair's game is characterized by strong driving accuracy and a good short game, so look for him to capitalize on courses that place a premium on these aspects, especially when the field strength is diluted. From what he's shown in his early career his upside seems to be capped, but he's good enough to post at least a couple top-10s to slip inside the top 125.

135. Alex Cejka – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $618,171

After nearly a decade of sub-$1 million earnings, Cejka returned to form in his mid-40s to post back-to-back seasons more than $1 million in 2014-15 and 2015-16. Last season, however, saw a sharp decline to just one top 10 – a tie for ninth at The Greenbrier Classic, resulting in a 149th-place finish on the points list. He retained his card, though, by finishing 16th at the Web.com Finals. As Cejka nears age 50, it's hard to picture another season more than $1 million, but the deadly accurate Czech still makes plenty of cuts and has surprised before.

136. Troy Merritt – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$900,000
2016-17 Earnings: $569,682

In the three seasons prior to this year, Merritt had posted a top-3 finish, but this season ended with zero top-3s and just one top-10. As a result, Merritt had to earn his way through the Web.com Tour Finals to retain his card for a fifth straight year. Going forward it's hard to see Merritt breaking $1 million in earnings in 2017-18, but he'll likely top last year's measley total, which was his worst total since the 2011 season. He's not draftable in salary cap leagues and should go beyond the 10th round in drafts.

137. Tyrone Van Aswegen
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$850,000
2016-17 Earnings: $806,410

One top-10 and a bunch of made cuts – that was Van Aswegen's formula for making the top-125 last season. Van Aswegen's lone top-10 came in the fall at the CIMB Classic, which means he didn't accomplish much during the heart of the season. With that in mind, his prospects this season do not look very good. To his credit, Van Aswegen is a work horse, he plays about as much as anyone can on the PGA Tour – he just doesn't get much done during those starts. As such, he's not a good salary cap option this season.

138. J.T. Poston – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$850,000
2016-17 Earnings: $662,565

At an overall level Poston had a decent rookie campaign, as he made 71 percent of his cuts and posted four top-25s, including one top-10. A closer look reveals a streaky nature to Poston's game, as he made 9 of 10 cuts from February through May but then missed four straight cuts mid-summer and ended the season in mediocrity. With conditional PGA Tour status for 2017-18, Poston will need to find another hot streak despite his limited opportunities if he wants to regain fully-exempt status for next year.

139. Brice Garnett – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$850,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Garnett, who finished first on the Web.com's regular season money list during his bounceback 2017 campaign, once again earns a PGA Tour card after appearing in 72 events from 2014-2016. His most recent season was highlighted by a pair of wins at the Web.com's Utah Championship in July and WinCo Foods Portland Open just over a month later. He also posted eight additional top-25s, but occasionnaly struggled with consistency as he missed 10 cuts in 23 events. Garnett has a chance to surpass his career-best finish of 117th in the FedExCup standings throughout the upcoming season, but he'll need to make short-game improvements after ranking 110th in scrambling on the Web.com Tour.

140. Andrew Landry – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$850,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Landry finished fourth on the Web.com's 2017 regular season money list to earn his PGA Tour card for the second time in his career, having orignally lost it after missing 9 of 18 cuts during his 2015-16 campaign. This past season at the Web.com level, Landry claimed his second career victory at the Bahamas Great Abaco Classic in January before adding six more top-five finishes. Additional highlights for Landry include ranking second in putting average and third in birdie average on the Web.com Tour.

141. Austin Cook – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$825,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Cook originally busted onto the professional golf scene in 2015 when he made 6 of 7 cuts on the PGA Tour while notching a pair of top-10s in the process, but was unable to earn full status until finishing 15th in the Web.com's 2017 regular season money list. His most recent campaign was highlighted by a stretch that included results of T7-T2-T7 from the LECOM Health Challenge through the Pinnacle Bank Championship in July. Cook also ranked an impressive eighth in ball striking and 14th in total driving on the Web.com Tour.

142. Geoff Ogilvy
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $867,249

For about a five-year span, starting in 2006, Ogilvy was one of the best golfers on the planet. His game began to slide in 2012, but a solid 2014 season gave the impression that the slide was a thing of the past, but since that 2014 season, his game has only gotten worse. Every season, Ogilvy plays well during a week or two and gets everyone's hopes up that he's finally back to the old Ogilvy, but the inevitable letdown is never far behind. It's clear now that Ogilvy will never recapture his form that saw him atop the golf world for a handful of years. As such, he's not a good salary cap option this season.

143. Blayne Barber
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $823,082

Barber finished runner-up at the RSM Classic last fall and essentially coasted the rest of the season. That runner-up alone wasn't enough to secure his card for this season, but it was the major factor in him earning that card. A top-20 at the Players and a top-15 at the Barracuda Championship gave him just enough points for the upcoming season, but other than retaining his card, the season was nothing to write home about. Barber is no stranger to fighting until the end of the season for his playing privileges as he followed a similar script in 2015-16 when he finished 112th in points, but a year prior he failed to get over the hump. Bottom line is, Barber seems destined to be in this range year after year and as such, he has no value as a salary cap option.

144. John Huh
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $767,575

Huh made all five cuts last fall and that coupled with a single top-10 during the 2017 portion of the season was enough to sneak inside the top-125 last season and retain his playing privileges for this season. Huh picked up a win and a runner-up finish in his rookie season of 2012 and he earned more than $2.6 million that season, but he hasn't come close to that level since. Huh has spent the past four seasons just at, or under $1 million in earnings, and that's likely where he'll end up this season.

145. Aaron Baddeley – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $755,356

Long believed to be a budding star, Baddeley never really bloomed and has mostly underwhelmed after showing early signs of talent. Last season Baddeley, now 36, upped his cut percentage from 39 percent to 55 percent, but it was still below the PGA Tour average and he notched just $755,356 in earnings. The Aussie gets another shot to breach $1 million for the eighth time in his career thanks to his 2016 Barbasol Championship victory that secured his PGA Tour card for this year. Though Baddeley is a bit of a roller coaster, expect a slight improvement from last season. Just don't expect too much.

146. Rory Sabbatini
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $741,617

Entering the Wyndham Championship, the last event of the regular season, Sabbatini had little hope of retaining his card for the upcoming season, but a surprising T4, put him just inside the line. Sabbatini has been on the PGA Tour so long that he probably has a few exemptions saved up, but it's always nice not having to go into that bag until you have to. Though he came through in the clutch last season, he simply does not have much upside left. As such, he's not a great salary cap option this season.

147. Billy Hurley III – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $719,579

The former Naval officer broke through for a win in 2016 at the Quicken Loans National, but unfortunately took a few steps back in finishing 135th in the FedEx Cup this past season. His lone triumph has secured his card for this season, so perhaps he can contend again and prove his win wasn't a fluke. Hurley's driving is short and crooked – not unlike Luke Donald – but he makes up for it with a strong iron game and putter. Though there isn't much to get excited about with Hurley's game, he should be motivated enough to play well with looming uncertainty regarding his PGA Tour status next year.

148. Johnson Wagner – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $685,306

Wagner started with his best foot forward by notching a top-3 at the Safeway Open to begin the 2016-17 season, but extreme inconsistency followed in what turned into his worst season since 2014. Wagner is typically good for one or two top-5 efforts, but cherry-picking those events alongside a slew of missed cuts is a fool's errand. Wagner's inconsistency is a nightmare in salary cap leagues, and in draft leagues it will be worth waiting at least until the 10th round to solicit his services.

149. Seamus Power – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $646,180

Power's rookie season on the PGA Tour started slowly but ended with promise as he notched three of his four top-25s in his final five events. If Power can muster enough starts to build momentum early in the wraparound season, look for him to flirt with $1 million or more in earnings. Of course there's downside for a sophomore slump that tosses him between the PGA and Web.com tours, but you could do much worse than the 30-year-old Irishman.

150. Brian Stuard – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $588,806

Stuard has rode the coattails of his surprise maiden victory at the 2016 Zurich Classic for a year and a half, and he gets one more season of full exemption to make something happen. His win is unfortunately shaping up to be a fluke, as Stuard has failed to record a top-10 since that lone victory and missed the cut his last seven events. There's simply too much risk to trust Stuard in any event other than the Sony Open, so it's best to avoid him at all costs.

151. Peter Uihlein – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$800,000
2016-17 Earnings: $272,529

A solid player on the European Tour since 2013, Uihlein made the most of his opportunity to play in the Web.com Tour Finals by winning the first leg, the Nationwide Children's Hospital Championship. His $180,000 in earnings from the victory sealed his full-time spot on the PGA Tour, where he notched three top-25s in just seven events last season. The promising talent has plenty of length off the tee and a good putter, so there's potential to shine given a full schedule. Uihlein is worth a pick in the 11th or 12th round of draft leagues and perhaps a higher-risk option worth taking in salary cap leagues.

152. Matt Jones – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $510,622

Jones missed just 8 of 20 cuts on the PGA Tour throughout the 2016-17 season, but failed to record a single top-10 and ultimately needed to finish top-25 at the Web.com Tour finals in order to retain his card. Jones' short game has been top-notch, ranking second in SG: Around-the-Green and 25th in sand-save percentage, but he finished the season at just 159th in GIR percentage. Jones experienced his worst campaign since 2012, having earned just $510,622 in 20 starts.

153. Ryan Armour – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $443,006

For a second straight year Armour earned his way to the PGA Tour, but this time around it was his strong work early in the Web.com Tour Finals that netted him full exemption. Armour last season used a second-round 61 at the Wyndham Championship to post his lone top-10, but if can somehow find a way to improve his short game he's got potential to improve on last seasons earnings.

154. Jonathan Byrd – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$750,000
2016-17 Earnings: $328,337

A dominant showing at the season-ending Web.com Tour Championship resulted in a four-stroke victory for Byrd, thus earning the 39-year-old full-time status on the PGA Tour for the first time since the 2014-15 season. In 18 events at the Web.com level throughout 2017, Byrd made 12 of 18 cuts while notching six top-25s and three top-10s. He also appeared in nine events on the PGA Tour, most notably finishing top-five at the John Deere Classic in mid-July. The five-time winner and 2002 Rookie of the Year could be in line for a bounceback campaign after ending the Web.com season with plenty of momentum.

155. Brandon Harkins – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$725,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

The long-hitting 31-year-old proved to also be proficient with the flat stick, ranking 11th in driving distance, 12th in putting average and eighth in birdie average on the Web.com Tour this past season. He made 15 of 24 cuts while posting a pair of top-threes and six top-25, ultimately finishing at 21st on the regular season money list. Harkins had never earned a PGA Tour card until this point, though he did place T59 at the 2016 U.S. Open.

156. D.A. Points
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $893,700

Coming into the 2016-17 season, Points had failed to crack $400k in earnings in any on his previous three seasons. It is for that reason that his win at the Puerto Rico Open was such a shock. Nonetheless, Points picked up his third career win on the PGA Tour and he's now fully exempt for the upcoming season. Points was a relatively successful golfer on the PGA Tour about seven or eight years ago, but even with the win last season, he appears to be past his prime. With that in mind, Points is not a good salary cap option this season.

157. Vaughn Taylor
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $797,385

Taylor somehow managed to sneak into the top-125 without the benefit of a single top-10 last season. He did make the cut in 19 of 25 starts and finished with seven top-25s. It all adds up in the end and in this case, it was just enough to get Taylor into the top-125. Taylor had unexpectedly picked up a win last season and he used that momentum, and status, to post his second best season since 2010 last year. That said, prior to the 2015-16 season, Taylor had posted five consecutive seasons under $600k in earnings and he doesn't carry much upside anymore.

158. Trey Mullinax – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $758,141

The 25-year-old Mullinax enjoyed a top-10 finish at the U.S. Open at Erins Hills, but did little outside of that as he struggled just to make cuts in his rookie season. Among the longest hitters on the PGA Tour with a close to 310-yard average, Mullinax will need to vastly improve his iron and wedge game to have a realistic shot at getting fully exempt on the PGA Tour. While there's still time to develop into a steady PGA Tour commodity, expect a similar outcome as last season for Mullinax. He's not worth the risk in salary cap leagues and will likely go around the 12th round in draft leagues.

159. Greg Owen – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $738,711

In the 2016-17 season, Owen was incredibly close to winning on two ocassions and securing the next two seasons on the PGA Tour. Instead, he settled for a pair of runner-ups at weaker-fielded events that netted him a combined $604,000 – over 80 percent of his season's earnings. As a result he only has conditional PGA Tour status for this season, a familiar situation for the journeyman. The veteran can still drive it long and hit plenty of good irons, but his short game and putting have proven to be perennial shortcomings.

160. J.J. Henry
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $734,874

Uneventful would be a good way to describe Henry's 2016-17 season. Henry posted just two top-10s, with one coming at the opposite-field Puerto Rico Open and the John Deere Classic, which traditionally has one of the weaker fields every season. Henry's best season on the PGA Tour was over a decade ago and although he's won twice in the past six seasons, he hasn't turned either into a monster year. His days of monster potential are long gone and even if he finds a win this season, it will be at an opposite-field event and won't amount to much more than his number from last season.

161. Ricky Barnes – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $697,624

For the first time in his journeyman career Barnes played in over 30 events in the 2016-17 season, but he managed to avoid top-10s like the plague, earning just shy of $700,000 in an inefficient season. Barnes has long been a wild driver of the golf ball and this Achilles heel has forced him to grind out his PGA Tour status each of the last nine seasons. With just two career seasons over the $1 million mark, the upside is strongly capped for Barnes, who will likely be of little use on fantasy squads this season.

162. Sam Saunders – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $678,117

The well-documented grandson of the legendary Arnold Palmer, Saunders earned himself PGA Tour status the last three seasons, gradually improving his earnings efficiency during that time. With another year on Tour just about locked up, he will have the opportunity to take another step forward, but don't expect anything drastic. Saunders is a solid driver of the ball but lacks in his iron game, where he's lost strokes to the field each of the last three seasons. He will need to see that aspect improve if he's going to expect more top-10 finishes.

163. Jim Furyk – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $558,097

The current Ryder Cup captain made 18 starts last season, making the cut in 10 of them with a best of T6 at the RSM Classic. Furyk finished 157th in points. With this being a Ryder Cup year, you have to figure Furyk will play even less, particularly since he is waiting to use his career money exemption. Furyk, who turns 48 in May, is fourth all-time in earnings, behind Tiger Woods, Phil Mickelson and Vijay Singh. Furyk is first on our list because he could connect with a decent payday in two or three tournaments this season, as he did at the RSM. But still, he didn't even clear $600,000 last season.

164. Adam Schenk – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$700,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Through two generally successful seasons on the Web.com Tour, Schenk racked up just over $400K in 48 total events, but ultimately earned his PGA Tour card for the first time thanks to his win at the Lincoln Land Charity Championship in late June. That victory came during one of the best stretches so far throughout his professional career, finishing top-five in four straight events. Schenk's long game appears to be of PGA Tour caliber after ranking top-20 in both total driving and ball striking on the Web.com, while he also finished top-40 in terms of scrambling.

165. Xinjun Zhang – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$675,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Despite missing 10 of 23 cuts and withdrawing during another start, Zhang's pair of runner-up finishes were enough of a boost to place him inside the top-25 of the Web.com's regular season money list. Zhang ranked 33rd in GIR percentage and 51st in birdie average, though he didn't excel in one specific category throughout the season. He also posted an impressive T21 at the WGC-HSBC Champions event in late October, despite carding a final-round 76.

166. Talor Gooch – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$625,000
2016-17 Earnings: $23,213

Gooch appeared to simply be going through the motions throughout a majority of the Web.com season as he placed top-five just once in his first 16 starts, but a runner-up finish at the Price Cutter Charity Championship in August preceded his first career victory at the News Sentinel Open. He earned over $170K during these two weeks alone, boosting him into position to become a rookie on the PGA Tour as he finished sixth on the Web.com's regular season money list. Gooch also made the cut at the 2017 U.S. Open, but a final-round 80 resulted in a second-to-last place finish among those who made the weekend.

167. Conrad Shindler – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$625,000
2016-17 Earnings: $13,797

Shindler won the Rex Hospital in June of his maiden campaign on the Web.com Tour, which ultimately led him to finish inside the top-25 of the regular season money list as he posted three additional top-10 results as well. The 29-year-old's last start on the PGA Tour came in 2016 at the AT&T Byron Nelson where he made the cut, but ultimately fell into a tie for 75th. He ranked 10th in putting average, 40th in scrambling and 65th in GIR percentage this past season on the Web.com Tour, while he remains unlikely to carry much fantasy relevance throughout his upcoming rookie campaign.

168. Chad Collins – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $693,743

Collins notched a runner-up at the Barbasol Championship and a top-5 at the Honda Classic but was a complete disaster the rest of the season, missing 20 of 26 cuts to finish 143rd in the FedEx Cup Point standings. He retained his card, though, with a 22nd-place finish at the Web.com Finals. Collins has never gone north of $1 million in eight seasons on the PGA Tour, so to expect that would be pie in the sky. His limited upside and lack of consistency make him undraftable in most fantasy formats.

169. Ben Crane – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $618,483

Long gone are the good ol' days of Golf Boys videos, and the same sentiment is true of Crane's golf game. Crane notched only one top-10 last year and just two in the last three seasons, signaling an expedited fall for the 41-year old. He finished 147th on the points list and went to the Web.com Finals to earn his 2017-18 card, but a back injury kept him from playing the Finales finale. He'll have conditional status on the PGA Tour this season and hopes to play about 20 events. While there's a glimmer of hope Crane can return to the form he had from 2008-2012, it's not likely.

170. Shawn Stefani – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $404,377

Stefani found himself outside of the top-150 in the FedExCup standings after missing 15 of 26 cuts throughout the 2016-17 season, but a runner-up finish at the Web.com Tour Championship allowed for him to retain his PGA Tour card. Despite ranking 35th in GIR percentage this past season, Stefani fell to 152nd in birdie average and 158th in average proximity to the hole on approach shots from 50-125 yards out. Stefani has also gone without a top-three finish since the 2014-15 season, so his fantasy value projects to remain limited.

171. Tom Hoge – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $373,092

Hoge has now failed to finish top-125 in the FedExCup standings for three consecutive years, but earned his PGA Tour card back for the upcoming 2017-18 season thanks to a top-25 performance in the Web.com Tour Finals. This past season he struggled mightily off the tee, ranking outside of the top-150 in both driving distance and driving accuracy. He'll look to improve upon his 10 made cuts throughout his 2017-18 campaign.

172. John Peterson – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $329,705

The former LSU star played 15 events under a major medical extension last season, finished 174th in the point standings. He still has eight tournaments left to keep his card by earning $375,165 or accruing 273.760 FedEx Cup points. That's certainly doable, but far from certain. Peterson, 28, earned nearly $330,000 in those 15 events, when he made seven cuts, three of which were top-25s. His best was a T12 at Phoenix. Peterson just competed in the Web.com Tour Finals but didn't do well enough to earn his card there.

173. Danny Willett – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $217,975

Willett did not play frequently enough on Tour last year to retain his card, so he will only be eligible for certain tournaments despite winning the Masters in 2016. That is the last tournament the Englishman has won, as he has been beset by back woes and what appears to be a Masters hangover. Willett was 224th in points across 11 events, making the cut only five times with two WDs and zero top-25s. He'll still be in all the majors, the only guy on this list who can say that. But by having fallen from 11th in the OWGR at the beginning of 2017 to outside the top-60 now, he'll have to play his way into WGCs. Keep an eye out. There are still a bunch of European Tour events left this season. One good finish at some fall season event worldwide could vault him into the top-50 OWGR. For instance, last season, Willett had two top-6s in Asia late in 2016 before his game completely fell apart.

174. Stephan Jaeger – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $24,301

After missing four cuts in his first six starts to begin the 2017 Web.com season, Jaeger won two of his next three events before making the cut at the U.S. Open in June. The German would eventually come back to earth, however, finishing top-15 just once throughout his last 11 events while missing four cuts during that span as well. Jaeger's mid-season surge was still impressive enough to land him at fifth on the regular season money list, earning a PGA tour card for the first time in his career.

175. Zecheng Dou – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$600,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

At just 20 years old, Dou becomes the first Chinese player ever to earn a PGA Tour card after finishing 16th on the Web.com's regular season money list. A win at the Digital Ally Open made this all possible, given the fact he missed 10 of 24 cuts and only notched five top-25s throughout his 2017 campaign. It's difficult to predict much success as a rookie for the 20-year-old, although he did rank eighth in birdie average and 23rd in putting average at the Web.com level. Dou also finished T40 at the 2017 WGC-HSBC Champions event.

176. Andrew Yun – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$575,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Yun finished third-or-better in just one of his first 48 career Web.com events, but did so on four separate occassions throughout his 2017 campaign. Racking up $222,856 in earnings was enough to qualify for a PGA Tour card as he positioned himself in 13th on the regular season money list. Yun, a 26-year-old out of Stanford University, has never appeared in a PGA Tour event so expectations should be somewhat limited right away, especially given the fact he ranked 102nd in terms of GIR percentage this past season.

177. Michael Thompson – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$550,000
2016-17 Earnings: $568,991

Thompson has fallen off the map since his defining win at the Honda Classic in 2013, earning just one top-10 finish in each of the last four seasons. Last year he hit a new low by missing the cut in more than half of his 21 starts, but somehow he still led the PGA Tour in Strokes Gained: Putting. While you try to process that, keep Thompson on the backburner, as he will continue to provide declining value for fantasy squads.

178. Steve Wheatcroft – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$550,000
2016-17 Earnings: $309,518

Wheatcroft averaged just $18,207 in earnings per entry throughout his 2016-17 campaign, finishing at 179th in the FedExCup standings. He'll retain his PGA Tour card, however, having placed inside of the top-25 in the Web.com Tour finals. Despite ranking 15th on Tour in driving accuracy, Wheatcroft was just 188th in GIR percentage as his iron play remained well below average.

179. Ted Potter Jr. – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$550,000
2016-17 Earnings: $31,284

The 33-year-old veteran was unable to establish himself during his first three years on the PGA Tour from 2012-2014, missing 38 of 71 cuts during that span. He missed just 6 of 21 cuts on the Web.com Tour in 2017, however, while 12 top-25s and a pair of runner-ups vaulted him to 14th on the regular season money list. Potter also finished T37 at the Greenbrier Classic in July, but shouldn't pose much season-long fantasy relevance at this stage of his career.

180. Matt Atkins – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$550,000
2016-17 Earnings: $8,190

Following a stretch of five missed cuts throughout his first six starts during the 2017 Web.com season, Atkins came out of nowhere to win the El Bosque Mexico Championship and ultimately finish top-25 on the regular season money list at No. 19. That marked his only top-five finish in 24 events, though he was able to add two other top-10s. Atkins ranked just 98th in ball striking and 62nd in birdie average, so his expectations as a rookie should be tempered. He was able to make the cut during his lone start on the PGA Tour, finishing T72 at the Sanderson Farms Championship.

181. Ben Silverman – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$550,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Silverman missed 11 of 16 cuts during a disappointing 2016 Web.com campaign, but finally broke through with a win at the 2017 Price Cutter Charity Championship to earn his PGA Tour card after finishing 10th in the Web.com's regular season money list. He ranked top-25 on the Web.com Tour in birdie average and GIR percentage, despite placing outside of the top-60 in terms of total driving. There could be a learning curve for Silverman out of the gate as a rookie, having appeared in just one PGA Tour event during his career when he missed the cut at the RBC Canadian Open in 2014.

182. Lanto Griffin – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$550,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Griffin's 2017 campaign got off to an extremely sluggish start with seven missed cuts in his first 11 events, but he bounced back tremendously with a win at the Nashville Golf Open in early July to salvage his season and earn a PGA Tour card for the first time in his career. Accuracy woes off the tee marked Griffin's Achilles' heal throughout the year, though he was still able to rank 14th in birdie average thanks to a hot putter. Griffin has appeared in just two PGA events during his career, missing the cut during both starts back in 2011.

183. Denny McCarthy - R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$525,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Earning a PGA Tour card via the Web.com Tour Finals, McCarthy is set to become a rookie at the next level after making 18 of 23 cuts on the Web.com during 2017. He failed to record any top-three finishes through two seasons on the Web.com Tour, however, so McCarthy's upside may remain limited. McCarthy ranked second in putting average and 21st in birdie average this past season, but was just 128th in terms of GIR percentage.

184. Soren Kjeldsen – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $722,913

The 42-year-old Dane drew inside the top-50 in the Official World Golf Rankings in 2016 but has since fallen to 88th, which means he will be eligible for far fewer high-profile events ont he PGA Tour this season. Kjeldsen figures to split his time between the PGA Tour and European Tour, and there's little to like given his limited availability to play stateside.

185. Cameron Percy – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $623,694

A solid iron player by trade, Percy is a veteran journeyman who finished 144th on the points list last season. He went to the Web.com Finals to retain his card for a third consecutive year, but narrowly missed, finishing 29th. He'll, therefore, have conditional status on the tour this season. His lack of results while retaining PGA Tour status heretofore is something to behold with just four career top-10s in six seasons, including just one last year. It's almost sad to note that he experienced the best earnings of his career last year at $623,694, which speaks to his lack of upside. Keep your distance from Percy in drafts.

186. Jonathan Randolph – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $511,032

Randolph managed to earn his PGA Tour card for a second straight year, this time via the Web.com Tour Finals. In 2016-17, Randolph played in 22 events and made 13 cuts, including a lone top-10 finish at the Wells Fargo Championship. Not much is forecasted for Randolph again this year, as there appears to be nothing separating his game from most of those on the Web.com Tour.

187. Rob Oppenheim – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $224,190

Oppenheim has bounced between the PGA and Web.com Tours each of the past three seasons, but 2017-18 will see him with another fully exempt shot with the big boys after a strong showing in the Web.com Tour Finals. In just four PGA Tour events last season, he earned $224,190 almost exclusively from a top-10 at Pebble Beach. During his last fully exempt PGA Tour season in 2015-16, Oppenheim made a very pedestrian $462,427 which included just one top-10 so don't get too excited about his prospects this season. He's better left undrafted.

188. Nate Lashley – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Lashley first appeared on the Web.com Tour way back when in 2006, but at the age of 34 years old, he's finally earned a coveted PGA Tour card after finishing 11th on the Web.com's 2017 regular season money list. This was essentially made possibly by a win at the Corales Puntacana Resort and Club Championship in May, while he also posted top-25s in just over half of his starts throughout the season. He ranked a dismal 107th in total driving and 83rd in ball striking, but made up for it with an impressive short game as he was third in scrambling.

189. Martin Piller – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$500,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Piller must feel like a ping pong ball bouncing back and forth from Web.com Tour to PGA Tour on five occassions in his career, successfully earning his PGA Tour card this year through the Web.com Tour Finals. Last year Piller's full-time gig on the Web.com Tour netted him $144,667, so he'll be delighted to have the chance to multiply that on the big boy Tour this season. Piller's salient attribute is definitely his putting, as he was 10th on the PGA Tour in Strokes Gained: Putting back in his last fully exempt year of 2015-16. Piller's prospects for this season are probably similar to 2015-16 with limited upside given he's 31 and has proven very little. He's undraftable in salary cap leagues and should probably be ignored in draft leagues as well.

190. Joel Dahmen – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$475,000
2016-17 Earnings: $344,824

In his first full season on the PGA Tour, Dahmen earned just $344,824 in 16 events, making seven cuts and posting two top-25s in the process. He'll retain his card thanks to a top-25 result in the Web.com Tour Finals, but figures to remain quiet in terms of relevance in season-long fantasy formats.

191. Abraham Ancer – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$475,000
2016-17 Earnings: $15,820

Ancer's rookie campaign on the PGA Tour during the 2015-16 season didn't go as planned, missing 13 of 19 cuts to ultimately finish 190th in the FedExCup standings and lose his card as a result. A solid bounceback effort on the Web.com Tour this past season included 18 of 23 made cuts and seven top-10s, placing third on the regular season money list and re-earning his PGA Tour card for 2017-18. Another bright spot for Ancer included a made cut during his lone start at the PGA Tour level, posting a T55 at the OHL Classic in November of 2016.

192. Andrew Putnam – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$475,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Putnam earns back his PGA Tour card after originally losing it due to a poor 2015 campaign in which he missed 13 of 23 cuts, falling to 182nd in the FedExCup standings. The 28-year-old's 2017 Web.com campaign included a win at the Panama Claro Championship in February, and he finished the season having missed just three cuts in 20 events. Putnam statistically doesn't stand out among his peers, but was able to finish eighth on the regular season money list thanks to his ranking of 11th in terms of scoring average.

193. Roberto Diaz – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$475,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

At just 5-foot-6, Diaz's lack of power could turn into a problem at the PGA Tour level against much better competition at more difficult venues, so he'll look to finish near the top-35 in terms of both putting average and scrambling as he did on the Web.com Tour in order to have much of a chance at elevating his potential fantasy value. Diaz posted two top-three finishes during his 2017 campaign on the Web.com, finishing in 25th on the regular season money list and earning his PGA Tour card for the first time. The 30-year-old Mexican also finished T67 at the WGC-Mexico Championship, but missed the cut at both the OHL Classic and U.S. Open.

194. Kyle Thompson – W
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$425,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

One of the more decorated veterans on the Web.com Tour, the 38-year-old owns five career victories to go along with 11 runner-ups.Throughout two full seasons at the PGA Tour level Thompson hasn't experienced the same success, however, most recently missing 18 of 22 cuts during his 2012 campaign. He won the Web.com's season-opening Bahamas Great Exuma Classic, but ended up missing 9 of 21 cuts including three of his last four. He'll likely head into the upcoming season without much momentum after playing poorly thoughout September.

195. Rod Pampling
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $1,539,422

Pampling won an event during the fall portion of the 2016-17 season…and that's where the good news ends. Pampling's win at the Shriner's Hospitals for Children Open was probably the most surprising result of the entire season. Previous to last season, Pampling failed to crack $200k in earnings in any of his previous four seasons. Needless to say, Pampling is not an option in salary cap leagues and even though he's fully exempt because of that win, he's not a good option in draft leagues either.

196. Rick Lamb – C
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $524,372

The long-hitting PGA Tour rookie made his hay with a third place finish at the John Deere Classic, accounting for over 60 percent of his annual earnings. When you look closer and realize he missed 11 of 19 cuts, the risk becomes too great to take a chance on the lefty, despite his relative youth. With plenty to work on outside of his strong advantage off the tee, Lamb should not garner much interest in fantasy leagues until he shows improvement.

197. Brett Stegmaier – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $271,031

Stegmaier fell apart in his second full season on the PGA Tour, his best finish a mediocre 21st at the RSM Classic 11 months ago. Now with his third straight season of securing his PGA Tour card, Stegmaier will look to prove his 2015-16 season of over $1 million in earnings wasn't a fluke after his dismal $271,031 last season. He's undraftable in salary cap leagues, his stock in draft leagues falls past the 10th round.

198. Tyler Duncan – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $271,031

Duncan's last three years on the Web.com Tour have finally grew into a PGA Tour card as he posted a strong T5 finish at the Albertson's Boise Open to secure his rookie season on the PGA Tour. The Purdue graduate has recorded two runner-ups and a handful of top-10 in the last three years on the Web.com Tour, but how that translates to the PGA Tour will be a story we'll soon find out. The fact that Duncan has yet to win on any major tour is a bit of a concern, so avoid his capped upside in salary cap leagues and avoid him until after the 12th round in draft leagues.

199. Ethan Tracy – R
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Despite missing an unimpressive 15 of 24 cuts during the 2017 Web.com season, Tracy was still able to earn his first PGA Tour card thanks to a win at the Club Colombia Championship in February. That marked his only top-10 of the season and he added just two other top-25s. He's made just one cut since the beginning of July, so don't expect Tracy to find much success at the next level as he figures to remain silent in terms of fantasy relevance.

200. Keith Mitchell – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

After missing out on the top-25 on the Web.com Tour and automatic PGA Tour exemption by just one slot, Mitchell forged through the Web.com Tour Finals with a strong showing to earn his PGA Tour card for the first time. On the Web.com last year Mitchell posted six top-10s including his best finish, a third at the News Sentinel Open. Mitchell's clear strength is his immense length off the tee that affords him plenty of birdies or better on par-5s, but the rest of his game has room for improvement. Mitchell could surprise at some weaker-fielded events where length is advantageous, but otherwise shouldn't be on your radar this season.

201. Tom Lovelady – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Lovelady made a splash late in the season on the Web.com Tour and relayed that into a top-3 at the first leg of the Web.com Tour Finals to secure his rookie season on the PGA Tour. The talented youngster is long and paced the Web.com Tour in birdie average so there's potential to also make a splash on the PGA Tour this season, though consistency will likely be an issue. He should probably be left alone until we see more from the 24 year old.

202. Bronson Burgoon – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$400,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Burgoon's strong finishes at the last two events of the Web.com Tour Finals clinched him his PGA Tour card for the first time since the 2015-16 season. Burgoon's second full season on the PGA Tour this year will hopefully bring him his first top-10, but beyond that his expectations are likely quite low, and so are ours despite his solid driving and iron play. Avoid Burgoon in salary cap leagues and in draft leagues hold off until after the 10th round.

203. Peter Malnati – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$350,000
2016-17 Earnings: $358,541

Malnati finished 167th in points, but is exempt via his win in the 2015 Sanderson Farms Championship. Malnati did little the rest of 2015-16 or in 2016-17. Last season, he played 29 tournaments and made 17 cuts, one of which was a top-25 – and even that was at the opposite-field Barbasol (T18).

204. Matt Every – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$350,000
2016-17 Earnings: $351,420

Every finished 168th in the points race, but is exempt thanks to his back-to-back wins in the Arnold Palmer Invitational, a tournament that carries a very valuable three-year exemption. But Every, 33, has had two horrid years in a row, although if you want to say he improved from 2015-16, when he was 200th in points, we won't argue. Every played 30 events last season, which certainly has value. It's the part about missing 20 cuts with only two top-25s and zero top-10s that kind of hurts that value. His API exemption runs out after 2017-18.

205. Greg Chalmers – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$350,000
2016-17 Earnings: $344,631

Chalmers was 173rd in points, but he won the 2016 opposite-field Barracuda to keep his card. He had three top-25s last season, making 10 cuts in 28 starts. His best was a T17 at Bay Hill.

206. Fabian Gomez – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$350,000
2016-17 Earnings: $332,352

Gomez finished 171st, but keeps his card thanks to winning the 2016 Sony Open. He also had three other top-10s and cashed more than $2 million in 2015-16. But last season was not so fruitful for Gomez, who made 10 cuts in 21 starts, with three top-25s, the best being T18 at Memphis.

207. Nicholas Lindheim – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$350,000
2016-17 Earnings: $175,107

Outside of a single tournament in 2014, Lindheim got his first taste of the PGA Tour last season, and boy was it rough. Just one top-25 in 21 starts as he missed nine cuts along the way. Lindheim's return to the big boy tour this season via the Web.com Tour Finals will hopefully be more fruitful, but don't expect any sort of large leap for the California native.

208. Corey Conners – F
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$350,000
2016-17 Earnings: $0

Conners dragged his feet to barely come away with his PGA Tour card in the Web.com Tour Finals, but nonetheless will enjoy a full schedule this season. Conners has played in just 10 PGA Tour events in his life and made just one cut, so don't expect much from the 25 year old.

209. Vijay Singh – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $337,305

Singh is a "Life Member," having won at least 20 times and played at least 15 seasons. Well into his Champions Tour career, Singh played 18 PGA Tour events last season. He made only six cuts, but two of them were top-25s, including an impressive T16 at The Players and a T14 at the Canadian Open. Those two finishes carried Singh to 178th in the point standings and earnings of $337,305. Not too shabby for a 54-year-old, but also not too valuable for fantasy purposes.

210. Davis Love III – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$250,000
2016-17 Earnings: $257,720

A year younger than Singh, Love finished close behind at 185th in points. He played 13 events, making seven cuts, with one top-25, which was also a top-10 – T10 at the Wyndham. Love's exemption for winning the 2015 Wyndham expired after last season, but with 21 career wins, he also will play under the Life Member exemption. He made $257,270 last season.

211. Bob Estes – E
2017-18 Projected Earnings:
$100,000
2016-17 Earnings: $76,930

At 51, Estes is Champions Tour material, but he also teed it up 15 times on the regular tour, making thee cuts with a best of T27 at San Antonio. Estes got to play based on a major medical extension, and still has eight starts remaining to earn $479,000 or 300 points.

RotoWire golf writers Len Hochberg, Michael Riek, Bryce Danielson and Pete Gargano contributed to this report.

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ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Greg Vara
Vara is the lead golf writer at RotoWire. He was named the FSWA Golf Writer of the Year in 2005 and 2013. He also picks college football games against the spread in his "College Capper" article.
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