Fantasy Baseball Injury Report: White Sox Outfielders Sidelined

Fantasy Baseball Injury Report: White Sox Outfielders Sidelined

This article is part of our Fantasy Baseball Injury Report series.

Eloy Jimenez and Luis Robert

The White Sox outfield looks drastically different right now after a pair of lower extremity muscle injuries have sidelined Jimenez and Robert.

Jimenez's injury was described as a "significant" hamstring strain that is expected to keep him out between six to eight weeks. He is expected to be further evaluated early in the week.

When a strain occurs to a muscle, it is assigned a grade based on the amount of damage accrued. A Grade 1 or mild strain is the least severe and is marked by microtearing of the tiny fibers that make up muscle tissue. Pain is minimal after the initial injury ,and the athlete may not even display a loss of function. These types of strains often heal in a week to 10 days. A Grade 2 injury is a more moderate strain and is often referred to as a partial tear. In these injuries, actual muscle fibers are torn, resulting in more pain, more severe symptoms, and impaired motion and strength. Because of the extent of the damage, the recovery window is substantially longer and generally measured in weeks, not days. A severe Grade 3 or 4 injury means the tear is complete and often referred to as a rupture. A complete tear results in a total loss of function and often requires a trip to the operating room and lengthy recovery window.

Reading the tea leaves here, it sounds like Jimenez is managing a Grade 2 strain of one of

Eloy Jimenez and Luis Robert

The White Sox outfield looks drastically different right now after a pair of lower extremity muscle injuries have sidelined Jimenez and Robert.

Jimenez's injury was described as a "significant" hamstring strain that is expected to keep him out between six to eight weeks. He is expected to be further evaluated early in the week.

When a strain occurs to a muscle, it is assigned a grade based on the amount of damage accrued. A Grade 1 or mild strain is the least severe and is marked by microtearing of the tiny fibers that make up muscle tissue. Pain is minimal after the initial injury ,and the athlete may not even display a loss of function. These types of strains often heal in a week to 10 days. A Grade 2 injury is a more moderate strain and is often referred to as a partial tear. In these injuries, actual muscle fibers are torn, resulting in more pain, more severe symptoms, and impaired motion and strength. Because of the extent of the damage, the recovery window is substantially longer and generally measured in weeks, not days. A severe Grade 3 or 4 injury means the tear is complete and often referred to as a rupture. A complete tear results in a total loss of function and often requires a trip to the operating room and lengthy recovery window.

Reading the tea leaves here, it sounds like Jimenez is managing a Grade 2 strain of one of the muscles of the hamstring muscle group. Healing for these injuries is a delicate process that can be easily disrupted. A setback often results in a reset of the entire healing progression. As a result, medical staffs often take a conservative approach during the latter stages of rehab, meaning it won't be surprising to see Jimenez's recovery hit closer to the eight-week mark. He is currently on the 10-day injured list.

Robert's injury was much less severe, and while it was described as groin soreness, he is likely managing a low-grade strain. He hasn't appeared in a game since April 21, missing four straight. The team has opted not to use the IL and is optimistic he can return to action Tuesday after a scheduled day off.

Jonathan India and Mike Moustakas

While the South Side of Chicago is dealing with injuries in the outfield, the Reds are dealing with injuries to the infield. 

India suffered a mild hamstring strain but could be back in action as early as Tuesday. He has progressed smoothly and returned to running the bases Friday. While a quick recovery is encouraging, I'll be monitoring his status over the next week to see if he has truly moved past the injury. The Reds may opt to limit his activity on the base path until he puts together a stretch of sustained health.

Moustakas remains without a timetable after suffering a biceps strain. Unfortunately, the precedent set by other hitters with the same injury does not suggest this will be a quick fix. Players like Giancarlo Stanton, Gary Sanchez and Edgar Renteria missed multiple weeks after straining their biceps, with Stanton's injury costing him 78 days.

Part of the reason for the prolonged recovery is due to the fact that the biceps is a two-joint muscle, meaning it is active with both shoulder and elbow motion. The biceps originates on the scapula (the shoulder blade) at two different locations. In addition to helping flex and abduct the shoulder, the biceps helps stabilize the head of the humerus (upper arm bone) while throwing and swinging a bat. The biceps then extends past the elbow, anchoring to one of the bones of the forearm. As a result, the biceps is able to bend or flex the elbow and rotate the forearm in a direction known as supination.

A fully functional biceps is integral in baseball and, if left untreated, can develop into bigger issues along the shoulder and elbow. Look for Cincinnati to provide an update on his status soon, but I would anticipate his injury keeping him out until May at the earliest.

Check Swings

Jon Gray: The early return on Texas' offseason investment in the 30-year-old right-hander has not paid off. He was sent to the IL after his first start with a blister on his middle finger. In his first game following that injury, he sustained a low-grade medial collateral ligament (MCL) in his left knee. The Rangers do not expect him to miss substantial time, but this injury does allow me the opportunity to remind fantasy managers that on May 2 the minimum IL length for pitchers shifts from 10 days to 15 days.

Teoscar Hernandez: The Blue Jays outfielder is swinging a bat again and is slated to take batting practice as he works his way back from an oblique strain. I detailed the injury last week, and it looks like Hernandez is progressing nicely. While the team hasn't given a firm timeline on his expected return to play, he has a realistic chance to return by early to mid-May. 

J.D. Martinez: The Red Sox veteran was back in action Monday. He missed four straight games with soreness in his groin. Like Robert, the injury was likely a mild strain but not significant enough to warrant a trip to the IL. He finished 1-for-4 in the loss to Toronto.

John Means: I suspected last week that Means may have sustained a serious enough UCL sprain that Tommy John would be required. Sadly, those fears were confirmed, as Means is slated to undergo the procedure soon, ending his 2022 season. The recovery is likely to spill over into the early days of the 2023 season as well. 

Taijuan Walker: The Mets expect Walker back for the team's weekend series against the Phillies. Walker left his first start of the season after experiencing discomfort in his shoulder. The injury was later diagnosed as shoulder bursitis. The bursa are fluid-fill sacs located throughout the body that serve as sort of ball-bearings for joints. Bursitis occurs if one of these bursae becomes inflamed following direct contact or repetitive irritation. Once the inflammation calms down, the individual should be able to return to normal. However, the area could once again become irritated should the root of the problem linger. Walker has progressed nicely. but understand he will return with an elevated degree of risk.

Want to Read More?
Subscribe to RotoWire to see the full article.

We reserve some of our best content for our paid subscribers. Plus, if you choose to subscribe you can discuss this article with the author and the rest of the RotoWire community.

Get Instant Access To This Article Get Access To This Article
RotoWire Community
Join Our Subscriber-Only MLB Chat
Chat with our writers and other RotoWire MLB fans for all the pre-game info and in-game banter.
Join The Discussion
ABOUT THE AUTHOR
Jeff Stotts
Jeff Stotts works as a Certified Athletic Trainer (MAT, ATC, PES, CES). He won the 2011 Best Fantasy Football Article in Print from the Fantasy Sports Trade Association.
MLB: Prospect Mailbag 5/26/22
MLB: Prospect Mailbag 5/26/22
Yahoo DFS Baseball: Thursday Picks
Yahoo DFS Baseball: Thursday Picks
DraftKings MLB: Thursday Breakdown
DraftKings MLB: Thursday Breakdown
Mound Musings: The Endgame Odyssey Continues – American League
Mound Musings: The Endgame Odyssey Continues – American League