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League Type
H2H Points
Scoring
MIL (F, SF, PF)
G
74
Min
33.3
FPTS
2,721.0
REB
938.0
AST
443.0
STL
96.0
BLK
115.0
TO
280.0
FGM
776.0
FGA
1,362.0
FTM
551.0
FTA
737.0
Winner of the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Antetokounmpo has firmly established himself among the truly elite talent in the NBA. In Mike Budenholzer's first year as head coach, the Bucks' offense and defense underwent massive transformation, and Antetokounmpo was able to thrive like never before. As one of the most well-rounded players in the league, Antetokounmpo became just the fifth player in the three-point era to average at least 25 points, 10 rebounds and five assists in a single season -- the others being Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, Russell Westbrook (twice) and DeMarcus Cousins. And of those players' seasons, Antetokounmpo had the highest true shooting percentage (64.4%). Plus, he's averaging a combined 3.1 blocks/steals over the past three seasons and has been named to an All-Defensive team twice. While he may never be a great shooter, Antetokounmpo's one-of-a-kind athleticism makes him arguably the league's most dominant inside scorer, with 643 of his 721 made field-goals coming at the rim. Heading into 2019-20, it's hard to imagine The Greek Freak getting much better, but he's just 24 years old. It's without question that he's one of the few players worthy of being selected with the No. 1 overall pick in fantasy drafts.
Winner of the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Antetokounmpo has firmly established himself among the truly elite talent in the NBA. In Mike Budenholzer's first year as head coach, the Bucks' offense and defense underwent massive transformation, and Antetokounmpo was able to thrive like never before. As one of the most well-rounded players in the league, Antetokounmpo became just the fifth player in the three-point era to average at least 25 points, 10 rebounds and five assists in a single season -- the others being Charles Barkley, Larry Bird, Russell Westbrook (twice) and DeMarcus Cousins. And of those players' seasons, Antetokounmpo had the highest true shooting percentage (64.4%). Plus, he's averaging a combined 3.1 blocks/steals over the past three seasons and has been named to an All-Defensive team twice. While he may never be a great shooter, Antetokounmpo's one-of-a-kind athleticism makes him arguably the league's most dominant inside scorer, with 643 of his 721 made field-goals coming at the rim. Heading into 2019-20, it's hard to imagine The Greek Freak getting much better, but he's just 24 years old. It's without question that he's one of the few players worthy of being selected with the No. 1 overall pick in fantasy drafts.
MIN (C, C)
G
81
Min
34.7
FPTS
2,702.0
REB
1,042.0
AST
292.0
STL
74.0
BLK
138.0
TO
227.0
FGM
789.0
FGA
1,499.0
FTM
420.0
FTA
497.0
Set to turn 24 years old in 2019-20, Towns is coming off two straight All-Star appearances. Over the past two seasons, he's averaged 22.8 points, 12.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 blocks. Maybe most impressive is his efficiency, with Towns shooting 53.1 percent from the field, 40.9 percent from deep and 84.6 percent from the free-throw line as an All-Star. While his production hasn't translated into wins for the Timberwolves, he's undoubtedly one of the best big men in the league on the offensive side of the ball, capable of scoring from anywhere on the court. In 2018-19, he registered 20 performances with at least 30 points, not to mention three 40-point efforts. Minnesota didn't add any high-usage players during the offseason, so Towns' role should be secure. Health is also valuable in fantasy, and Towns has been excellent at staying on the court. He didn't miss a game through his first three seasons, and while he played 77 games last year, he only missed time due to a car accident. Despite not being an All-NBA player, there's plenty of justification for Towns to be the first center off the board in fantasy drafts.
Set to turn 24 years old in 2019-20, Towns is coming off two straight All-Star appearances. Over the past two seasons, he's averaged 22.8 points, 12.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.5 blocks. Maybe most impressive is his efficiency, with Towns shooting 53.1 percent from the field, 40.9 percent from deep and 84.6 percent from the free-throw line as an All-Star. While his production hasn't translated into wins for the Timberwolves, he's undoubtedly one of the best big men in the league on the offensive side of the ball, capable of scoring from anywhere on the court. In 2018-19, he registered 20 performances with at least 30 points, not to mention three 40-point efforts. Minnesota didn't add any high-usage players during the offseason, so Towns' role should be secure. Health is also valuable in fantasy, and Towns has been excellent at staying on the court. He didn't miss a game through his first three seasons, and while he played 77 games last year, he only missed time due to a car accident. Despite not being an All-NBA player, there's plenty of justification for Towns to be the first center off the board in fantasy drafts.
LAL (C, C, PF)
G
74
Min
35.8
FPTS
2,631.0
REB
941.0
AST
267.0
STL
110.0
BLK
199.0
TO
160.0
FGM
737.0
FGA
1,393.0
FTM
499.0
FTA
620.0
Davis was limited to 56 games during the 2018-19 campaign, largely due to a mid-season public trade request (that was not granted until the offseason). Once the trade deadline passed and Davis was still a member of the Pelicans, he saw his workload reduced substantially. The Brow never played more than 24 minutes after Feb. 9, and he appeared in just 13 of the final 25 games of the season. But it's most important to look at how he performed before things reached a breaking point. Through his first 41 appearances of the season, Davis averaged 29.3 points, 13.3 rebounds, 4.4 assists and a combined 4.3 blocks/steals. Had he sustained those numbers across the entire year, Davis would have become just the second player in NBA history to average at least 29 points, 13 rebounds, 4 assists and 2 blocks -- the other being Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. With the Lakers trading for Davis in the offseason, he instantly becomes the best teammate LeBron James has ever had, and the combination figures to be one of the deadliest in the NBA. While playing next to LeBron could reduce Davis' usage, there's a possibility that it will free up his game in different ways. Increased attention on LeBron could result in increased efficiency for Davis, and considering LeBron is the best passer Davis has ever played with, the big man could be in line for some easy buckets off pick-and-rolls. Ultimately, Davis should continue producing at an MVP-caliber level.
Davis was limited to 56 games during the 2018-19 campaign, largely due to a mid-season public trade request (that was not granted until the offseason). Once the trade deadline passed and Davis was still a member of the Pelicans, he saw his workload reduced substantially. The Brow never played more than 24 minutes after Feb. 9, and he appeared in just 13 of the final 25 games of the season. But it's most important to look at how he performed before things reached a breaking point. Through his first 41 appearances of the season, Davis averaged 29.3 points, 13.3 rebounds, 4.4 assists and a combined 4.3 blocks/steals. Had he sustained those numbers across the entire year, Davis would have become just the second player in NBA history to average at least 29 points, 13 rebounds, 4 assists and 2 blocks -- the other being Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. With the Lakers trading for Davis in the offseason, he instantly becomes the best teammate LeBron James has ever had, and the combination figures to be one of the deadliest in the NBA. While playing next to LeBron could reduce Davis' usage, there's a possibility that it will free up his game in different ways. Increased attention on LeBron could result in increased efficiency for Davis, and considering LeBron is the best passer Davis has ever played with, the big man could be in line for some easy buckets off pick-and-rolls. Ultimately, Davis should continue producing at an MVP-caliber level.
HOU (G, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
36.3
FPTS
2,383.0
REB
492.0
AST
626.0
STL
147.0
BLK
50.0
TO
376.0
FGM
708.0
FGA
1,602.0
FTM
716.0
FTA
815.0
The runner up for the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Harden put together another dominant offensive campaign. En route to his sixth All-NBA selection, Harden averaged a league-high 36.1 points to go along with 7.5 assists, 6.6 rebounds and 2.0 steals. He also led the NBA in made threes (378) and free-throws (754), becoming the first player in NBA history to rack up at least 300 threes and 700 free-throws. Unsurprisingly, Harden's 40.5% usage rate ranked No. 1 as well, and it ranked second all-time behind only Russell Westbrook's 2016-17 campaign (41.7%). Ironically, those two are now teammates, as the Rockets traded Chris Paul to the Thunder to acquire Westbrook over the summer in what could end up being the highest-usage backcourt of all-time. While the pair figure to see as little time on the court together as realistically possible (considering that was the case with Harden and Paul), there will be some overlap. How much that overlap will impact Harden's stats is tough to gauge, but it seems likely that Westbrook will sacrifice more, as he's the one joining Harden's offense. Fantasy owners have a right to downgrade Harden slightly with Westbrook coming to town, but he's still worthy of being selected No. 1 overall in the vast majority of fantasy formats.
The runner up for the 2018-19 Most Valuable Player award, Harden put together another dominant offensive campaign. En route to his sixth All-NBA selection, Harden averaged a league-high 36.1 points to go along with 7.5 assists, 6.6 rebounds and 2.0 steals. He also led the NBA in made threes (378) and free-throws (754), becoming the first player in NBA history to rack up at least 300 threes and 700 free-throws. Unsurprisingly, Harden's 40.5% usage rate ranked No. 1 as well, and it ranked second all-time behind only Russell Westbrook's 2016-17 campaign (41.7%). Ironically, those two are now teammates, as the Rockets traded Chris Paul to the Thunder to acquire Westbrook over the summer in what could end up being the highest-usage backcourt of all-time. While the pair figure to see as little time on the court together as realistically possible (considering that was the case with Harden and Paul), there will be some overlap. How much that overlap will impact Harden's stats is tough to gauge, but it seems likely that Westbrook will sacrifice more, as he's the one joining Harden's offense. Fantasy owners have a right to downgrade Harden slightly with Westbrook coming to town, but he's still worthy of being selected No. 1 overall in the vast majority of fantasy formats.
DEN (C, C)
G
76
Min
32.2
FPTS
2,317.0
REB
845.0
AST
591.0
STL
98.0
BLK
54.0
TO
242.0
FGM
607.0
FGA
1,203.0
FTM
311.0
FTA
368.0
Jokic's ascent into stardom still feels like it came out of nowhere, and the center finished fourth in MVP voting last season as the Nuggets finished with the best record in the Western Conference. He's already established himself as one of the best passing big men in NBA history, averaging 7.3 dimes per game last season to go along with 20.1 points, 10.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals. Combine that with great shooting percentages for a center (51/31/82), and you have an elite fantasy asset. But at just 24 years old, Jokic has room to grow. And he's one of the few NBA stars not paired up with another star, so his crucial role in the Nuggets' offense is a lock. Jokic doesn't figure to add any groundbreaking skills to his repertoire, but small improvements to each facet of his game will make a big difference. Notably, if he continues working on his strength and conditioning, he could stay out on the court longer and improve as a shot blocker. While taking Jokic with the first pick in a fantasy draft would be considered a reach, he'll likely be long gone by the time pick 10 comes around.
Jokic's ascent into stardom still feels like it came out of nowhere, and the center finished fourth in MVP voting last season as the Nuggets finished with the best record in the Western Conference. He's already established himself as one of the best passing big men in NBA history, averaging 7.3 dimes per game last season to go along with 20.1 points, 10.8 rebounds and 1.4 steals. Combine that with great shooting percentages for a center (51/31/82), and you have an elite fantasy asset. But at just 24 years old, Jokic has room to grow. And he's one of the few NBA stars not paired up with another star, so his crucial role in the Nuggets' offense is a lock. Jokic doesn't figure to add any groundbreaking skills to his repertoire, but small improvements to each facet of his game will make a big difference. Notably, if he continues working on his strength and conditioning, he could stay out on the court longer and improve as a shot blocker. While taking Jokic with the first pick in a fantasy draft would be considered a reach, he'll likely be long gone by the time pick 10 comes around.
DET (C, C)
G
81
Min
34.5
FPTS
2,294.0
REB
1,301.0
AST
132.0
STL
123.0
BLK
146.0
TO
193.0
FGM
592.0
FGA
1,091.0
FTM
265.0
FTA
435.0
A one-time All-NBA selection, Drummond is coming off a quality season, setting career highs in points (17.3) and steals (1.7) while leading the NBA in total rebounds (1,232) for a fourth-straight year. Many of those rebounds are on the offensive glass, which has led to putbacks, fueling a career 54.3 percent mark from the field. In 2018-19, Drummond collected two 30-point games, 18 games with at least 20 rebounds, seven performances with five-plus blocks, and three performances with five-plus steals. He was especially dominant following the All-Star break, racking up 16.8 boards per contest in his final 26 appearances. While Drummond falls below the elite tier of centers due to poor free-throw shooting and a narrow offensive skillset, he's undoubtedly one of the most dominant one-category fantasy players in the league. The Pistons didn't make any major moves this offseason, so Drummond should maintain his role heading into the 2019-20 season.
A one-time All-NBA selection, Drummond is coming off a quality season, setting career highs in points (17.3) and steals (1.7) while leading the NBA in total rebounds (1,232) for a fourth-straight year. Many of those rebounds are on the offensive glass, which has led to putbacks, fueling a career 54.3 percent mark from the field. In 2018-19, Drummond collected two 30-point games, 18 games with at least 20 rebounds, seven performances with five-plus blocks, and three performances with five-plus steals. He was especially dominant following the All-Star break, racking up 16.8 boards per contest in his final 26 appearances. While Drummond falls below the elite tier of centers due to poor free-throw shooting and a narrow offensive skillset, he's undoubtedly one of the most dominant one-category fantasy players in the league. The Pistons didn't make any major moves this offseason, so Drummond should maintain his role heading into the 2019-20 season.
LAL (F, SF, PF, PG)
G
72
Min
36.2
FPTS
2,131.0
REB
576.0
AST
664.0
STL
97.0
BLK
43.0
TO
296.0
FGM
683.0
FGA
1,354.0
FTM
367.0
FTA
536.0
After 15 years of being one of the most consistently durable superstars in NBA history, James finally showed signs of wear in 2018-19. The 34-year-old missed a career-high 27 games -- most of which were due to a groin strain suffered on Christmas Day. While James was able to return before the end of January, it was too late to save the floundering Lakers, who struggled to a 6-12 record in his absence, falling out of playoff contention in the process. Back for Year 17 with renewed focus, and a revamped supporting cast headlined by Anthony Davis, James will seek to prove he's still arguably the best player in the NBA. When James was on the floor last season, his production -- 27.4 points, 8.5 rebounds, 8.3 assists, 1.3 steals, 51% FG -- spoke for itself. But he'll need to stay healthy, and engaged, for the Lakers to reach their ceiling as one of several title contenders out West. The same goes for James' fantasy value, which remains elite but has tailed off slightly in recent years. The four-time MVP should be among the league leaders in counting stats once again this season, but he's taken a noticeable step back on the defensive end, while his free throw shooting reached new depths (66.5% FT) a year ago. Outside shooting is also somewhat of a concern for James, who's proven to be a dependable threat from downtown over the course of his career but hit less than 34 percent of his 5.9 three-point attempts per game last season. The addition of Davis should help breathe new life into James, and reports that he may end up serving as the Lakers' starting point guard will only boost his already-gaudy assists numbers. Overall, assuming he can stay healthy, James is an elite fantasy commodity who warrants first-round consideration in many leagues.
After 15 years of being one of the most consistently durable superstars in NBA history, James finally showed signs of wear in 2018-19. The 34-year-old missed a career-high 27 games -- most of which were due to a groin strain suffered on Christmas Day. While James was able to return before the end of January, it was too late to save the floundering Lakers, who struggled to a 6-12 record in his absence, falling out of playoff contention in the process. Back for Year 17 with renewed focus, and a revamped supporting cast headlined by Anthony Davis, James will seek to prove he's still arguably the best player in the NBA. When James was on the floor last season, his production -- 27.4 points, 8.5 rebounds, 8.3 assists, 1.3 steals, 51% FG -- spoke for itself. But he'll need to stay healthy, and engaged, for the Lakers to reach their ceiling as one of several title contenders out West. The same goes for James' fantasy value, which remains elite but has tailed off slightly in recent years. The four-time MVP should be among the league leaders in counting stats once again this season, but he's taken a noticeable step back on the defensive end, while his free throw shooting reached new depths (66.5% FT) a year ago. Outside shooting is also somewhat of a concern for James, who's proven to be a dependable threat from downtown over the course of his career but hit less than 34 percent of his 5.9 three-point attempts per game last season. The addition of Davis should help breathe new life into James, and reports that he may end up serving as the Lakers' starting point guard will only boost his already-gaudy assists numbers. Overall, assuming he can stay healthy, James is an elite fantasy commodity who warrants first-round consideration in many leagues.
PHI (G, PG, PF)
G
80
Min
34.9
FPTS
2,060.0
REB
701.0
AST
627.0
STL
116.0
BLK
60.0
TO
261.0
FGM
571.0
FGA
1,010.0
FTM
271.0
FTA
445.0
Simmons backed up his 2017-18 Rookie of the Year award by making his first All-Star team in 2018-19. As a 6-foot-10 point guard with no shooting ability outside of the paint, he's one of the more unique players we've seen in recent history, and he's one of only 10 players in the three-point era to average at least 16 points, 8 rebounds, 7 assists and 1 steal. Simmons naturally draws comparisons to Magic Johnson -- a tall, distributing point guard with limited shooting touch. That said, it remains to be seen what type of ceiling that type of player has in the modern NBA, where three-point shooting is emphasized. While Simmons didn't demonstrate much improvement from Year 1 to Year 2, he's already one of the best passers in the NBA and a dynamic finisher around the basket and in transition. That gives him a high floor moving forward, even if the fit between him and Joel Embiid is less than ideal. Heading into 2019-20, fantasy owners should not expect Simmons to develop a passable jumper (he was 2-for-25 from beyond 15 feet last season), but rather view that possibility as a bonus.
Simmons backed up his 2017-18 Rookie of the Year award by making his first All-Star team in 2018-19. As a 6-foot-10 point guard with no shooting ability outside of the paint, he's one of the more unique players we've seen in recent history, and he's one of only 10 players in the three-point era to average at least 16 points, 8 rebounds, 7 assists and 1 steal. Simmons naturally draws comparisons to Magic Johnson -- a tall, distributing point guard with limited shooting touch. That said, it remains to be seen what type of ceiling that type of player has in the modern NBA, where three-point shooting is emphasized. While Simmons didn't demonstrate much improvement from Year 1 to Year 2, he's already one of the best passers in the NBA and a dynamic finisher around the basket and in transition. That gives him a high floor moving forward, even if the fit between him and Joel Embiid is less than ideal. Heading into 2019-20, fantasy owners should not expect Simmons to develop a passable jumper (he was 2-for-25 from beyond 15 feet last season), but rather view that possibility as a bonus.
UTA (C, C)
G
75
Min
33.2
FPTS
2,053.0
REB
981.0
AST
156.0
STL
64.0
BLK
186.0
TO
126.0
FGM
438.0
FGA
676.0
FTM
329.0
FTA
504.0
Gobert is coming off his second straight Defensive Player of the Year award, and he's posted 2.4 blocks per game across the past five seasons. Gobert also led the NBA in field-goal percentage (66.9) last season, with his game being predicated on mostly dunks and easy lay-ins due to his lengthy 7-foot-1 frame. While he's not thought of as a scorer, Gobert averaged a career-high 15.9 points last season and recorded 19 games with at least 20 points. He's a top-tier rebounder as well, averaging 12.3 boards across the past three campaigns, not to mention three performances with at least 20 rebounds in 2018-19. Heading into 2019-20, it's possible Gobert has tapped out his potential. But that should not scare away fantasy owners in the slightest, as the center has proven to be an elite defender and worthy of two All-NBA teams in his six-year career.
Gobert is coming off his second straight Defensive Player of the Year award, and he's posted 2.4 blocks per game across the past five seasons. Gobert also led the NBA in field-goal percentage (66.9) last season, with his game being predicated on mostly dunks and easy lay-ins due to his lengthy 7-foot-1 frame. While he's not thought of as a scorer, Gobert averaged a career-high 15.9 points last season and recorded 19 games with at least 20 points. He's a top-tier rebounder as well, averaging 12.3 boards across the past three campaigns, not to mention three performances with at least 20 rebounds in 2018-19. Heading into 2019-20, it's possible Gobert has tapped out his potential. But that should not scare away fantasy owners in the slightest, as the center has proven to be an elite defender and worthy of two All-NBA teams in his six-year career.
PHO (C, C)
G
78
Min
32.1
FPTS
2,048.0
REB
861.0
AST
173.0
STL
85.0
BLK
114.0
TO
165.0
FGM
631.0
FGA
1,050.0
FTM
189.0
FTA
247.0
The No. 1 overall pick in 2018, Ayton became just the second player in NBA history 20 years old or younger to average at least 16 points and 10 rebounds on 55 percent shooting -- the other being Shaquille O'Neal. Ayton's impressive campaign was overshadowed by a great rookie class, namely Luka Doncic winning Rookie of the Year and Trae Young having a stellar second half of the season. Ayton did have some big games, however, racking up 39 double-doubles, including 21 games with at least 20 points and five performances with at least 15 rebounds. He's a traditional center, working in the pick-and-roll (135 dunks), post (58.1% on hook shots), and mid-range (34.6% on 127 attempts from 16 feet to the three-point line). While his jumpshooting needs to be more efficient, Ayton went a respectable 12-of-35 from three in college and is a good free-throw shooter (74.6 percent at a rookie), so it seems like that should develop over time. Ayton's defense also needs some work. It was a knock on him coming out of Arizona, and he blocked just 67 shots in 71 games last season. It's possible he's never a true impact player on that end of the floor, though he has the physical tools to get there if things click. All things considered, Ayton is one of the more promising young big men in the league, and fantasy owners should expect improvement heading into Year 2.
The No. 1 overall pick in 2018, Ayton became just the second player in NBA history 20 years old or younger to average at least 16 points and 10 rebounds on 55 percent shooting -- the other being Shaquille O'Neal. Ayton's impressive campaign was overshadowed by a great rookie class, namely Luka Doncic winning Rookie of the Year and Trae Young having a stellar second half of the season. Ayton did have some big games, however, racking up 39 double-doubles, including 21 games with at least 20 points and five performances with at least 15 rebounds. He's a traditional center, working in the pick-and-roll (135 dunks), post (58.1% on hook shots), and mid-range (34.6% on 127 attempts from 16 feet to the three-point line). While his jumpshooting needs to be more efficient, Ayton went a respectable 12-of-35 from three in college and is a good free-throw shooter (74.6 percent at a rookie), so it seems like that should develop over time. Ayton's defense also needs some work. It was a knock on him coming out of Arizona, and he blocked just 67 shots in 71 games last season. It's possible he's never a true impact player on that end of the floor, though he has the physical tools to get there if things click. All things considered, Ayton is one of the more promising young big men in the league, and fantasy owners should expect improvement heading into Year 2.
PHI (C, C)
G
66
Min
32.3
FPTS
2,042.0
REB
819.0
AST
210.0
STL
52.0
BLK
138.0
TO
224.0
FGM
578.0
FGA
1,187.0
FTM
527.0
FTA
642.0
Embiid is coming off his second consecutive All-NBA selection, and he made significant strides as a scorer in 2018-19. He upped his field-goal attempts by 2.1 per game while also increasing his free-throw attempts by 2.7 per game. The end result was a scoring average of 27.5, which was good for fourth-highest in the NBA. Embiid also finished second in rebounds per game (13.6) and sixth in blocks per game (1.9). His next step as a player is improving his three-pointer. While Embiid launched 4.1 shots per game from deep in 2018-19, he converted them at a rate of just 30.0 percent. The 76ers have undergone some roster changes over the summer, signing Al Horford and trading Jimmy Butler to the Heat. The addition of another big man to the starting lineup has the potential to affect Embiid's production. Horford's ability as a floor spacer should ensure that he's out of Embiid's way in the post, but it seems possible that Embiid's rebounding could take a dip. Even if that's the case, Embiid still figures to be an All-NBA selection and fringe MVP candidate assuming he stays healthy. The main concern for Embiid's fantasy value has been, and may always be, his health. He was drafted in 2014 but didn't debut until 2016 due to injury, and he's appeared in just 158 of 246 possible games since then. Drafting Embiid in fantasy practically guarantees elite production at center, but he might never play more than 65 games in a season.
Embiid is coming off his second consecutive All-NBA selection, and he made significant strides as a scorer in 2018-19. He upped his field-goal attempts by 2.1 per game while also increasing his free-throw attempts by 2.7 per game. The end result was a scoring average of 27.5, which was good for fourth-highest in the NBA. Embiid also finished second in rebounds per game (13.6) and sixth in blocks per game (1.9). His next step as a player is improving his three-pointer. While Embiid launched 4.1 shots per game from deep in 2018-19, he converted them at a rate of just 30.0 percent. The 76ers have undergone some roster changes over the summer, signing Al Horford and trading Jimmy Butler to the Heat. The addition of another big man to the starting lineup has the potential to affect Embiid's production. Horford's ability as a floor spacer should ensure that he's out of Embiid's way in the post, but it seems possible that Embiid's rebounding could take a dip. Even if that's the case, Embiid still figures to be an All-NBA selection and fringe MVP candidate assuming he stays healthy. The main concern for Embiid's fantasy value has been, and may always be, his health. He was drafted in 2014 but didn't debut until 2016 due to injury, and he's appeared in just 158 of 246 possible games since then. Drafting Embiid in fantasy practically guarantees elite production at center, but he might never play more than 65 games in a season.
GSW (G, SG, PG)
G
70
Min
34.2
FPTS
1,988.0
REB
379.0
AST
438.0
STL
99.0
BLK
16.0
TO
219.0
FGM
674.0
FGA
1,438.0
FTM
364.0
FTA
395.0
Curry is coming off of his sixth All-NBA selection, and he continues to assert himself as one of the best shooters of all time. Averaging 27.3 points in 2018-19, Curry drilled 5.1 threes per game at 43.7 percent, also making 47.2 percent of his field goals overall and converting 91.6 percent of his free throws. The sure-fire Hall-of-Famer also racked up 5.3 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.3 steals per contest. This season is especially interesting, as it's possible Curry will see his usage increase with the departure of Kevin Durant. The year prior to Durant's arrival (2015-16), Curry collected his second straight MVP award by averaging 30.1 points, 6.7 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 2.1 steals. But that's when Curry was 27 years old, and he'll now be 31. While he's had some injury concerns across the past two seasons, appearing in just 120 games, Curry remains among the elite fantasy assets when healthy and is worthy of a top-5 selection in almost all formats.
Curry is coming off of his sixth All-NBA selection, and he continues to assert himself as one of the best shooters of all time. Averaging 27.3 points in 2018-19, Curry drilled 5.1 threes per game at 43.7 percent, also making 47.2 percent of his field goals overall and converting 91.6 percent of his free throws. The sure-fire Hall-of-Famer also racked up 5.3 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.3 steals per contest. This season is especially interesting, as it's possible Curry will see his usage increase with the departure of Kevin Durant. The year prior to Durant's arrival (2015-16), Curry collected his second straight MVP award by averaging 30.1 points, 6.7 assists, 5.4 rebounds and 2.1 steals. But that's when Curry was 27 years old, and he'll now be 31. While he's had some injury concerns across the past two seasons, appearing in just 120 games, Curry remains among the elite fantasy assets when healthy and is worthy of a top-5 selection in almost all formats.
ATL (F, PF, C)
G
73
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,975.0
REB
779.0
AST
166.0
STL
50.0
BLK
75.0
TO
157.0
FGM
628.0
FGA
1,109.0
FTM
287.0
FTA
369.0
A preseason ankle injury delayed Collins' 2018-19 debut until Nov. 17. He went on to play 61 games for the Hawks, of which he started 59. The Wake Forest product has been impressive through his first two years in the league, and he quietly averaged 19.5 points, 9.8 rebounds and 2.0 assists on 56.0 percent shooting last season. The only other player 21 years old or younger to average those numbers since the three-point era is Shaquille O'Neal. At 6-foot-10 and 235 pounds, Collins has been primarily used as a power forward. But he's played 28% of his career minutes at center, and he may continue seeing spot run at the position given his athleticism and still-in-progress three-point range. In 2018-19, he shot 34.8 percent from long range on 2.6 attempts per game. Expanding his shot is one of the main stepping stones for Collins' development, as is his defense. While he averaged 1.6 blocks per 36 minutes as a rookie, that number dipped to 0.8 blocks per 36 minutes as a sophomore. Even if Collins is already at his ceiling, he's showing off the ability to play at an All-Star level, and there's a chance he'll fall in fantasy drafts due to lack of name recognition.
A preseason ankle injury delayed Collins' 2018-19 debut until Nov. 17. He went on to play 61 games for the Hawks, of which he started 59. The Wake Forest product has been impressive through his first two years in the league, and he quietly averaged 19.5 points, 9.8 rebounds and 2.0 assists on 56.0 percent shooting last season. The only other player 21 years old or younger to average those numbers since the three-point era is Shaquille O'Neal. At 6-foot-10 and 235 pounds, Collins has been primarily used as a power forward. But he's played 28% of his career minutes at center, and he may continue seeing spot run at the position given his athleticism and still-in-progress three-point range. In 2018-19, he shot 34.8 percent from long range on 2.6 attempts per game. Expanding his shot is one of the main stepping stones for Collins' development, as is his defense. While he averaged 1.6 blocks per 36 minutes as a rookie, that number dipped to 0.8 blocks per 36 minutes as a sophomore. Even if Collins is already at his ceiling, he's showing off the ability to play at an All-Star level, and there's a chance he'll fall in fantasy drafts due to lack of name recognition.
POR (G, PG)
G
76
Min
36.2
FPTS
1,966.0
REB
360.0
AST
534.0
STL
85.0
BLK
30.0
TO
214.0
FGM
682.0
FGA
1,525.0
FTM
452.0
FTA
500.0
Lillard is coming off his fourth All-NBA selection, and he posted career highs in field-goal percentage (44.4) and assists per game (6.9). Lillard has been a driving force of Portland's offense essentially since his rookie year, but things really took off once LaMarcus Aldridge left the team ahead of the 2015-16 campaign. Since then, Lillard has averaged 26.2 points, 6.5 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.0 steal. Last season, Lillard racked up six games with at least 40 points, including a 50-point outing, plus 13 games with double-digit assists. Heading into 2019-20, there have been some significant roster changes for Portland. Moving on from Moe Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu -- both of whom had been racking up minutes on the wing for four years -- the Blazers appear in line to start Kent Bazemore at small forward, while Anthony Tolliver, Zach Collins and Mario Hezonja will presumably split time at power forward. Hassan Whiteside will also start at center while Jusuf Nurkic recovers from a devastating late-season leg injury. While the moves seem lateral, the shake-up has the potential to alter Lillard's stats, though it's unlikely to be dramatic. All things considered, Lillard seems primed for another great season as one of the NBA's top guards.
Lillard is coming off his fourth All-NBA selection, and he posted career highs in field-goal percentage (44.4) and assists per game (6.9). Lillard has been a driving force of Portland's offense essentially since his rookie year, but things really took off once LaMarcus Aldridge left the team ahead of the 2015-16 campaign. Since then, Lillard has averaged 26.2 points, 6.5 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 1.0 steal. Last season, Lillard racked up six games with at least 40 points, including a 50-point outing, plus 13 games with double-digit assists. Heading into 2019-20, there have been some significant roster changes for Portland. Moving on from Moe Harkless and Al-Farouq Aminu -- both of whom had been racking up minutes on the wing for four years -- the Blazers appear in line to start Kent Bazemore at small forward, while Anthony Tolliver, Zach Collins and Mario Hezonja will presumably split time at power forward. Hassan Whiteside will also start at center while Jusuf Nurkic recovers from a devastating late-season leg injury. While the moves seem lateral, the shake-up has the potential to alter Lillard's stats, though it's unlikely to be dramatic. All things considered, Lillard seems primed for another great season as one of the NBA's top guards.
WAS (G, PG, SG)
G
80
Min
36.1
FPTS
1,928.0
REB
392.0
AST
422.0
STL
107.0
BLK
55.0
TO
214.0
FGM
750.0
FGA
1,598.0
FTM
373.0
FTA
462.0
Beal is coming off his second straight All-Star appearance, and he led the NBA in total minutes (3,028) during the 2018-19 season. While looking at his per-game numbers for the year shows improvement, much of the progress occurred after John Wall was lost for the year due to injury. Wall played his last game on Dec. 26, and Beal took over as the Wizards' primary ballhandler after that point. From Dec. 28 onward, Beal averaged 27.2 points, 6.0 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.8 steals. Had he posted those numbers across the entire campaign, Beal would have been one of only two players to average at least 25 points, 5 rebounds, 5 assists and 1.5 steals last year -- the other being James Harden. With Washington not bringing in any other high-usage players during the offseason and Wall out for all of 2019-20, it seems reasonable to expect Beal to continue working within the expanded role he took on last season. Assuming that's the case, Beal profiles as a late-first or early-second round draft pick in most fantasy formats.
Beal is coming off his second straight All-Star appearance, and he led the NBA in total minutes (3,028) during the 2018-19 season. While looking at his per-game numbers for the year shows improvement, much of the progress occurred after John Wall was lost for the year due to injury. Wall played his last game on Dec. 26, and Beal took over as the Wizards' primary ballhandler after that point. From Dec. 28 onward, Beal averaged 27.2 points, 6.0 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.8 steals. Had he posted those numbers across the entire campaign, Beal would have been one of only two players to average at least 25 points, 5 rebounds, 5 assists and 1.5 steals last year -- the other being James Harden. With Washington not bringing in any other high-usage players during the offseason and Wall out for all of 2019-20, it seems reasonable to expect Beal to continue working within the expanded role he took on last season. Assuming that's the case, Beal profiles as a late-first or early-second round draft pick in most fantasy formats.
ORL (C, C)
G
74
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,920.0
REB
859.0
AST
272.0
STL
77.0
BLK
84.0
TO
144.0
FGM
614.0
FGA
1,271.0
FTM
155.0
FTA
201.0
Vucevic made his first All-Star team last season, earning a four-year, $100 million extension with the Magic in the process. He set career highs nearly across the board and helped lead the Magic to the playoffs for the first time since 2011-12. Vucevic has done a good job adapting to the modern, spaced-out NBA, converting 148 total threes across the past two campaigns after making just 30 combined across the prior six seasons. Considering the Magic have one of the thinnest point guard rotations in the league, much of the offense runs through Vucevic. He was one of only six players qualifying at center last season to have a usage rate of at least 25 percent -- the others being Nikola Jokic, Karl-Anthony Towns, LaMarcus Aldridge, Joel Embiid and Julius Randle. Heading into the 2019-20 campaign, Orlando's roster is essentially the same, so Vucevic's role will be secure. As a result, it's fair for fantasy owners to expect extremely similar production from the 29-year-old.
Vucevic made his first All-Star team last season, earning a four-year, $100 million extension with the Magic in the process. He set career highs nearly across the board and helped lead the Magic to the playoffs for the first time since 2011-12. Vucevic has done a good job adapting to the modern, spaced-out NBA, converting 148 total threes across the past two campaigns after making just 30 combined across the prior six seasons. Considering the Magic have one of the thinnest point guard rotations in the league, much of the offense runs through Vucevic. He was one of only six players qualifying at center last season to have a usage rate of at least 25 percent -- the others being Nikola Jokic, Karl-Anthony Towns, LaMarcus Aldridge, Joel Embiid and Julius Randle. Heading into the 2019-20 campaign, Orlando's roster is essentially the same, so Vucevic's role will be secure. As a result, it's fair for fantasy owners to expect extremely similar production from the 29-year-old.
DAL (G, PG, SG, SF)
G
76
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,910.0
REB
627.0
AST
498.0
STL
96.0
BLK
27.0
TO
276.0
FGM
608.0
FGA
1,352.0
FTM
403.0
FTA
542.0
The 2018-19 Rookie of the Year, Doncic had one of the best opening campaigns in NBA history. He became the first rookie ever to average at least 20 points, 7 rebounds, 6 assists and 1 steal, and he did it as a 19-year-old. Not only did Doncic record an impressive 21.2 points per game, he did it in unique fashion for a young player, with the only other rookie ever to average at least 2 made threes and 4 made free-throws being Allen Iverson. The Mavericks are already comfortable handing Doncic the keys to the offense, and his all-around skillset makes him a valuable fantasy commodity. He ranked 11th in usage rate (30.5%) last season, and Doncic recorded eight games with at least 30 points, 22 games with at least 10 rebounds, 11 performances with 10-plus assists, and nine outings with greater than three steals. It's difficult to over-emphasize how NBA-ready Doncic looked as a teenager. Heading into his second season, fantasy owners will look for the 6-foot-7 playmaker to increase his efficiency, as he shot a less-than-ideal 42.7 percent from the field, 32.7 percent from deep and 71.3 percent from the charity stripe. If Doncic can bump those percentages up while making small statistical strides elsewhere, he has a strong shot at making the All-Star team in 2019-20 and being a top-tier fantasy asset.
The 2018-19 Rookie of the Year, Doncic had one of the best opening campaigns in NBA history. He became the first rookie ever to average at least 20 points, 7 rebounds, 6 assists and 1 steal, and he did it as a 19-year-old. Not only did Doncic record an impressive 21.2 points per game, he did it in unique fashion for a young player, with the only other rookie ever to average at least 2 made threes and 4 made free-throws being Allen Iverson. The Mavericks are already comfortable handing Doncic the keys to the offense, and his all-around skillset makes him a valuable fantasy commodity. He ranked 11th in usage rate (30.5%) last season, and Doncic recorded eight games with at least 30 points, 22 games with at least 10 rebounds, 11 performances with 10-plus assists, and nine outings with greater than three steals. It's difficult to over-emphasize how NBA-ready Doncic looked as a teenager. Heading into his second season, fantasy owners will look for the 6-foot-7 playmaker to increase his efficiency, as he shot a less-than-ideal 42.7 percent from the field, 32.7 percent from deep and 71.3 percent from the charity stripe. If Doncic can bump those percentages up while making small statistical strides elsewhere, he has a strong shot at making the All-Star team in 2019-20 and being a top-tier fantasy asset.
HOU (C, C)
G
73
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,845.0
REB
878.0
AST
95.0
STL
46.0
BLK
122.0
TO
97.0
FGM
499.0
FGA
758.0
FTM
172.0
FTA
282.0
After signing a huge five-year, $90 million extension last offseason, Capela was highly productive in his first season as Houston's starter at center. He lived up to expectations by posting career highs in points (16.6), rebounds (12.7) and assists (1.4), adding 1.5 blocks in 33.6 minutes per game. He was one of the top shooters in the league from the floor, sporting a 64.8 field goal percentage, and Capela has shot at least 64.0 percent from the floor for three straight seasons. He also finished third in the league with 4.4 offensive rebounds per game, and his ability to crash the boards gives him a high fantasy floor. Capela took a lot of flak the last time he was on the floor, averaging 8.8 points and 10.0 rebounds on 53.5 percent shooting from the floor in the Rockets' loss the Warriors in the Western Conference Semifinals. He will look to redeem himself this season as he continues to elevate his play. Russell Westbrook is a skilled rebounder and scorer and may cut into Capela's production in those two categories, but there is virtually no competition for playing time at center, with Isaiah Hartenstein and the aging Tyson Chandler backing him up. Expect big minutes from Capela this season, with a strong likelihood of a double-double average for the third straight season, a high field-goal percentage, and a healthy amount of blocks.
After signing a huge five-year, $90 million extension last offseason, Capela was highly productive in his first season as Houston's starter at center. He lived up to expectations by posting career highs in points (16.6), rebounds (12.7) and assists (1.4), adding 1.5 blocks in 33.6 minutes per game. He was one of the top shooters in the league from the floor, sporting a 64.8 field goal percentage, and Capela has shot at least 64.0 percent from the floor for three straight seasons. He also finished third in the league with 4.4 offensive rebounds per game, and his ability to crash the boards gives him a high fantasy floor. Capela took a lot of flak the last time he was on the floor, averaging 8.8 points and 10.0 rebounds on 53.5 percent shooting from the floor in the Rockets' loss the Warriors in the Western Conference Semifinals. He will look to redeem himself this season as he continues to elevate his play. Russell Westbrook is a skilled rebounder and scorer and may cut into Capela's production in those two categories, but there is virtually no competition for playing time at center, with Isaiah Hartenstein and the aging Tyson Chandler backing him up. Expect big minutes from Capela this season, with a strong likelihood of a double-double average for the third straight season, a high field-goal percentage, and a healthy amount of blocks.
IND (C, PF, C)
G
77
Min
29.2
FPTS
1,844.0
REB
862.0
AST
259.0
STL
59.0
BLK
37.0
TO
196.0
FGM
518.0
FGA
919.0
FTM
265.0
FTA
356.0
Sabonis once again found himself coming off the bench for the Pacers, starting only five of the 74 games that he appeared in. He averaged 25 minutes a game, which was identical to his average from the previous season. However, he was able to increase his scoring average from 11.6 to 14.1 points per game on the strength of his 59 percent shooting from the field. His usage rate also increased from 22.1% to 23.5%. The scoring column wasn't his only area of improvement, either, since he set a new career-high by averaging 9.3 rebounds per contest. The downside is that he doesn't provide many defensive stats or three-pointers, which somewhat limits his upside. His 71.5% shooting from the charity stripe won't kill fantasy teams, but he could stand to improve in that area, as well. But with Thaddeus Young now a member of the Bulls, Sabonis could find himself starting next to Myles Turner. A potential increase in playing time gives Sabonis the ability to approach a double-double on a nightly basis while shooting a great percentage from the field and passing the ball well for a big man (4.2 assists per 36 minutes last season). If Sabonis can crack the 30-minute mark, he'll be one of the more valuable big men in fantasy.
Sabonis once again found himself coming off the bench for the Pacers, starting only five of the 74 games that he appeared in. He averaged 25 minutes a game, which was identical to his average from the previous season. However, he was able to increase his scoring average from 11.6 to 14.1 points per game on the strength of his 59 percent shooting from the field. His usage rate also increased from 22.1% to 23.5%. The scoring column wasn't his only area of improvement, either, since he set a new career-high by averaging 9.3 rebounds per contest. The downside is that he doesn't provide many defensive stats or three-pointers, which somewhat limits his upside. His 71.5% shooting from the charity stripe won't kill fantasy teams, but he could stand to improve in that area, as well. But with Thaddeus Young now a member of the Bulls, Sabonis could find himself starting next to Myles Turner. A potential increase in playing time gives Sabonis the ability to approach a double-double on a nightly basis while shooting a great percentage from the field and passing the ball well for a big man (4.2 assists per 36 minutes last season). If Sabonis can crack the 30-minute mark, he'll be one of the more valuable big men in fantasy.
TOR (F, PF, C)
G
81
Min
34.9
FPTS
1,839.0
REB
607.0
AST
309.0
STL
90.0
BLK
71.0
TO
227.0
FGM
608.0
FGA
1,177.0
FTM
330.0
FTA
420.0
Siakam broke out during his third year in the league, winning the 2018-19 Most Improved Player award. He became a full-time starter and saw his usage rise to 23.1 percent from 14.4 percent the previous season. Across his 80 appearances, he averaged 16.9 points, 6.9 rebounds and 3.1 assists in 31.9 minutes. Siakam was extremely efficient in the process, ranking 16th in the NBA in true shooting percentage (62.8). He put together some big games, dropping at least 30 points on five occasions, plus a 40-point outing, as well as accumulating 18 games with double-digit rebounds and 17 games with more than four assists. With Kawhi Leonard leaving the Raptors over the offseason to play with the Clippers, Siakam may be in line for another leap forward. With Leonard off the court last season, Siakam averaged 20.2 points, 8.3 rebounds, 3.6 assists and a combined 1.9 steals/blocks per 36 minutes. It's possible Siakam's efficiency will suffer on a worse version of Toronto, but he should be one of the main offensive options alongside Kyle Lowry and Marc Gasol.
Siakam broke out during his third year in the league, winning the 2018-19 Most Improved Player award. He became a full-time starter and saw his usage rise to 23.1 percent from 14.4 percent the previous season. Across his 80 appearances, he averaged 16.9 points, 6.9 rebounds and 3.1 assists in 31.9 minutes. Siakam was extremely efficient in the process, ranking 16th in the NBA in true shooting percentage (62.8). He put together some big games, dropping at least 30 points on five occasions, plus a 40-point outing, as well as accumulating 18 games with double-digit rebounds and 17 games with more than four assists. With Kawhi Leonard leaving the Raptors over the offseason to play with the Clippers, Siakam may be in line for another leap forward. With Leonard off the court last season, Siakam averaged 20.2 points, 8.3 rebounds, 3.6 assists and a combined 1.9 steals/blocks per 36 minutes. It's possible Siakam's efficiency will suffer on a worse version of Toronto, but he should be one of the main offensive options alongside Kyle Lowry and Marc Gasol.
OKC (C, C)
G
79
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,807.0
REB
870.0
AST
124.0
STL
117.0
BLK
76.0
TO
135.0
FGM
513.0
FGA
812.0
FTM
174.0
FTA
320.0
Adams improved his play once again in 2018-19, matching a career-high with 13.9 points and setting new career highs with 9.5 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 2.5 combined blocks/steals in 33.4 minutes per night. He produced 29 double-doubles in 80 games and showed that he could be a force on both ends of the court. His defense and rebounding give him a high fantasy floor, and his ability to score when needed (13 games of at least 20 points last season) gives him some upside as well. Adams' role and production have grown each of the last three seasons, and with Russell Westbrook gone, there's a good chance it could grow again in 2019-20 with increased opportunities for points and rebounds. The Thunder added Danilo Gallinari through the Westbrook trade, but as a stretch-four, he's not a threat to take work from Adams. Adams is likely to see heavy minutes in the frontcourt once again, and his risk of missing time is minimal, as he's missed just 25 games over his six-year career. The 26-year-old center still has room for improvement, and another statistical jump wouldn't be surprising. As the Thunder begin to rebuild in the post-Westbrook era, Adams should be a stabilizing force and a valuable fantasy contributor across multiple categories.
Adams improved his play once again in 2018-19, matching a career-high with 13.9 points and setting new career highs with 9.5 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 2.5 combined blocks/steals in 33.4 minutes per night. He produced 29 double-doubles in 80 games and showed that he could be a force on both ends of the court. His defense and rebounding give him a high fantasy floor, and his ability to score when needed (13 games of at least 20 points last season) gives him some upside as well. Adams' role and production have grown each of the last three seasons, and with Russell Westbrook gone, there's a good chance it could grow again in 2019-20 with increased opportunities for points and rebounds. The Thunder added Danilo Gallinari through the Westbrook trade, but as a stretch-four, he's not a threat to take work from Adams. Adams is likely to see heavy minutes in the frontcourt once again, and his risk of missing time is minimal, as he's missed just 25 games over his six-year career. The 26-year-old center still has room for improvement, and another statistical jump wouldn't be surprising. As the Thunder begin to rebuild in the post-Westbrook era, Adams should be a stabilizing force and a valuable fantasy contributor across multiple categories.
LAC (F, SF, PF)
G
69
Min
33.2
FPTS
1,786.0
REB
493.0
AST
205.0
STL
128.0
BLK
38.0
TO
136.0
FGM
612.0
FGA
1,236.0
FTM
404.0
FTA
478.0
After a nine-game 2017-18 campaign that ended with a trade demand out of San Antonio, Leonard had a successful of a 2018-19 season as possible with Toronto. The Raptors won the NBA Finals, and Leonard was given his second Finals MVP trophy before the age of 28, averaging 28.5 points, 9.8 rebounds, 4.2 assists and a combined 3.1 steals/blocks against the Warriors. The three-time All-NBA and five-time All-Defensive selection appeared in only 60 regular-games last season -- many of his missed games being due to rest. All indications are that Leonard will continue to be rested for the remainder of his career as he deals with a quad injury that initially flared up during his final season with the Spurs. That will artificially drive his fantasy stock down compared to his talent level, but there's no reason Leonard should make it to the third round of any draft, as he's arguably the best two-way player in the NBA. It's possible pairing up with Paul George will reduce Leonard's usage, but it probably won't be enough to result in a huge drop-off in production.
After a nine-game 2017-18 campaign that ended with a trade demand out of San Antonio, Leonard had a successful of a 2018-19 season as possible with Toronto. The Raptors won the NBA Finals, and Leonard was given his second Finals MVP trophy before the age of 28, averaging 28.5 points, 9.8 rebounds, 4.2 assists and a combined 3.1 steals/blocks against the Warriors. The three-time All-NBA and five-time All-Defensive selection appeared in only 60 regular-games last season -- many of his missed games being due to rest. All indications are that Leonard will continue to be rested for the remainder of his career as he deals with a quad injury that initially flared up during his final season with the Spurs. That will artificially drive his fantasy stock down compared to his talent level, but there's no reason Leonard should make it to the third round of any draft, as he's arguably the best two-way player in the NBA. It's possible pairing up with Paul George will reduce Leonard's usage, but it probably won't be enough to result in a huge drop-off in production.
HOU (G, PG)
G
78
Min
34.3
FPTS
1,751.0
REB
604.0
AST
624.0
STL
132.0
BLK
34.0
TO
331.0
FGM
619.0
FGA
1,485.0
FTM
310.0
FTA
459.0
The 2016-17 Most Valuable Player and an eight-time All-NBA selection, Westbrook will begin his first season with a new franchise in 2019-20. He had been a member of the Thunder organization since being drafted fourth overall in 2008, but he was traded to the Rockets over the summer in exchange for, mainly, Chris Paul. Westbrook's bloated contract was thought by some to be untradable, but Houston was willing to take the chance to pair him with James Harden, another former MVP. With both players being so ball-dominant -- Harden's 40.5% usage in 2018-19 ranking No. 1 and Westbrook's 30.9% usage ranking No. 10 -- it's right for fantasy owners to wonder how the situation will affect Westbrook's role and statistics. As was the case with Paul, coach Mike D'Antoni will likely stagger Westbrook and Harden as much as possible, so it would be surprising if Westbrook saw a massive drop in numbers. The main concern with Westbrook will continue to be his shooting percentages. Westbrook is one of only two guards in the three-point era to take at least 20 shots per game while shooting worse than 45 percent from the field and 70 percent from the free-throw line in a single season -- the other being Baron Davis in 2003-04. Efficiency aside, Westbrook's raw numbers continue to fuel his fantasy value. He's averaged a triple-double for the past three seasons -- a streak Westbrook will likely try to continue for as long as possible.
The 2016-17 Most Valuable Player and an eight-time All-NBA selection, Westbrook will begin his first season with a new franchise in 2019-20. He had been a member of the Thunder organization since being drafted fourth overall in 2008, but he was traded to the Rockets over the summer in exchange for, mainly, Chris Paul. Westbrook's bloated contract was thought by some to be untradable, but Houston was willing to take the chance to pair him with James Harden, another former MVP. With both players being so ball-dominant -- Harden's 40.5% usage in 2018-19 ranking No. 1 and Westbrook's 30.9% usage ranking No. 10 -- it's right for fantasy owners to wonder how the situation will affect Westbrook's role and statistics. As was the case with Paul, coach Mike D'Antoni will likely stagger Westbrook and Harden as much as possible, so it would be surprising if Westbrook saw a massive drop in numbers. The main concern with Westbrook will continue to be his shooting percentages. Westbrook is one of only two guards in the three-point era to take at least 20 shots per game while shooting worse than 45 percent from the field and 70 percent from the free-throw line in a single season -- the other being Baron Davis in 2003-04. Efficiency aside, Westbrook's raw numbers continue to fuel his fantasy value. He's averaged a triple-double for the past three seasons -- a streak Westbrook will likely try to continue for as long as possible.
MIA (C, PF, C)
G
82
Min
29.9
FPTS
1,747.0
REB
831.0
AST
236.0
STL
91.0
BLK
88.0
TO
155.0
FGM
416.0
FGA
745.0
FTM
216.0
FTA
290.0
Adebayo parlayed his 2017-18 rookie year flashes into a bigger role last season. He came off the bench for 59 of his first 65 appearances in 2018-19, but Adebayo was given a bigger role down the stretch as coach Erik Spoelstra began to trust him over Hassan Whiteside. The result was Adebayo starting 22 of the final 23 games of the season. That's a role he should occupy full-time in 2019-20, as Whiteside was dealt to the Trail Blazers over the summer. In the 13 games Adebayo saw 30-plus minutes last season, he averaged 12.9 points, 10.5 rebounds, 2.6 assists and a combined 2.2 blocks/steals while shooting an impressive 59.8 percent from the field (102 attempts) and 72.6 percent from the charity stripe (62 attempts). While it seems Adebayo might be destined to be a low-usage offensive player, he should provide strong value to fantasy owners as a rebounder, defender and efficient scorer.
Adebayo parlayed his 2017-18 rookie year flashes into a bigger role last season. He came off the bench for 59 of his first 65 appearances in 2018-19, but Adebayo was given a bigger role down the stretch as coach Erik Spoelstra began to trust him over Hassan Whiteside. The result was Adebayo starting 22 of the final 23 games of the season. That's a role he should occupy full-time in 2019-20, as Whiteside was dealt to the Trail Blazers over the summer. In the 13 games Adebayo saw 30-plus minutes last season, he averaged 12.9 points, 10.5 rebounds, 2.6 assists and a combined 2.2 blocks/steals while shooting an impressive 59.8 percent from the field (102 attempts) and 72.6 percent from the charity stripe (62 attempts). While it seems Adebayo might be destined to be a low-usage offensive player, he should provide strong value to fantasy owners as a rebounder, defender and efficient scorer.
SAN (F, SF, SG)
G
80
Min
34.2
FPTS
1,745.0
REB
470.0
AST
434.0
STL
88.0
BLK
28.0
TO
203.0
FGM
648.0
FGA
1,367.0
FTM
416.0
FTA
498.0
DeRozan is coming off his first season with the Spurs, where he failed to make the All-Star team for the first time since 2014-15, though that was largely due to playing in a more loaded Western Conference. While he saw his scoring take a dip to 21.2 points per game, he set career highs in assists (6.2) and rebounds (6.0). He also continued to have big-game upside, dropping at least 30 points 13 times, grabbing double-digit boards on eight occasions, and handing out at least 10 assists in five appearances. Playing for coach Gregg Popovich resulted in DeRozan abandoning his emerging three-point shot, which likely frustrated fantasy owners. In 2017-18, he went 89-for-287 (31.0 percent) from distance, but that dropped to 7-for-45 (15.6 percent) in 2018-19. That will likely continue this season. While DeRozan isn't the most exciting pick, he has All-Star upside, a relatively clean bill of health, and is consistent.
DeRozan is coming off his first season with the Spurs, where he failed to make the All-Star team for the first time since 2014-15, though that was largely due to playing in a more loaded Western Conference. While he saw his scoring take a dip to 21.2 points per game, he set career highs in assists (6.2) and rebounds (6.0). He also continued to have big-game upside, dropping at least 30 points 13 times, grabbing double-digit boards on eight occasions, and handing out at least 10 assists in five appearances. Playing for coach Gregg Popovich resulted in DeRozan abandoning his emerging three-point shot, which likely frustrated fantasy owners. In 2017-18, he went 89-for-287 (31.0 percent) from distance, but that dropped to 7-for-45 (15.6 percent) in 2018-19. That will likely continue this season. While DeRozan isn't the most exciting pick, he has All-Star upside, a relatively clean bill of health, and is consistent.
BRO (G, PG)
G
70
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,733.0
REB
333.0
AST
450.0
STL
110.0
BLK
27.0
TO
184.0
FGM
622.0
FGA
1,302.0
FTM
271.0
FTA
303.0
Irving was selected to his second All-NBA team in 2018-19, which was his second season with the Celtics. The narrative surrounding Irving's campaign often didn't focus on his play, as there were well-documented chemistry issues in Boston's locker room. But Irving performed as well as he ever has on the court, averaging 23.8 points and career highs in assists (6.9) and rebounds (5.0) while tying a career high in steals (1.5). As a free agent over the summer, Irving opted to join forces with Kevin Durant and DeAndre Jordan in Brooklyn, though Durant isn't expected to play until 2020-21 due to a torn Achilles suffered in the 2019 NBA Finals. With the Nets, Irving figures to continue being the main driver of the offense, and he's finished top-10 in usage rate during three of his eight seasons. However, Irving's fantasy stock takes a hit in general due to his problems staying healthy. He's averaging just 63.5 appearances per year, and he's only reached the 70-game mark once across the past four seasons. Still, he's an All-NBA-level talent and is unlikely to be on the board once the third round hits in most fantasy drafts.
Irving was selected to his second All-NBA team in 2018-19, which was his second season with the Celtics. The narrative surrounding Irving's campaign often didn't focus on his play, as there were well-documented chemistry issues in Boston's locker room. But Irving performed as well as he ever has on the court, averaging 23.8 points and career highs in assists (6.9) and rebounds (5.0) while tying a career high in steals (1.5). As a free agent over the summer, Irving opted to join forces with Kevin Durant and DeAndre Jordan in Brooklyn, though Durant isn't expected to play until 2020-21 due to a torn Achilles suffered in the 2019 NBA Finals. With the Nets, Irving figures to continue being the main driver of the offense, and he's finished top-10 in usage rate during three of his eight seasons. However, Irving's fantasy stock takes a hit in general due to his problems staying healthy. He's averaging just 63.5 appearances per year, and he's only reached the 70-game mark once across the past four seasons. Still, he's an All-NBA-level talent and is unlikely to be on the board once the third round hits in most fantasy drafts.
SAC (G, PG)
G
80
Min
32.7
FPTS
1,733.0
REB
339.0
AST
628.0
STL
147.0
BLK
46.0
TO
229.0
FGM
551.0
FGA
1,182.0
FTM
339.0
FTA
455.0
After an underwhelming first season where he failed to make an All-Rookie team, Fox stepped up as a sophomore in 2018-19. He ranked fourth in total assists (590) and sixth in steals (133) while also averaging 17.3 points and 3.8 rebounds per game. The former fifth overall pick improved his efficiency as well, raising his true shooting percentage from 47.7% to 54.4%. Fox's development helped contribute to a 39-win season for Sacramento, and it was the first time the Kings have reached that many victories since 2005-06. He'll look to continue building on his second season, where he managed to accumulate three 30-point games, 17 games with at least 10 assists, and 19 performances with at least three steals. Already a top contributor in the assists and steals categories, Fox's room to grow is in his scoring. Primarily, increasing his free-throw percentage (72.7%) and finding a way to shoot more threes (1.1 makes per game at 37.1%).
After an underwhelming first season where he failed to make an All-Rookie team, Fox stepped up as a sophomore in 2018-19. He ranked fourth in total assists (590) and sixth in steals (133) while also averaging 17.3 points and 3.8 rebounds per game. The former fifth overall pick improved his efficiency as well, raising his true shooting percentage from 47.7% to 54.4%. Fox's development helped contribute to a 39-win season for Sacramento, and it was the first time the Kings have reached that many victories since 2005-06. He'll look to continue building on his second season, where he managed to accumulate three 30-point games, 17 games with at least 10 assists, and 19 performances with at least three steals. Already a top contributor in the assists and steals categories, Fox's room to grow is in his scoring. Primarily, increasing his free-throw percentage (72.7%) and finding a way to shoot more threes (1.1 makes per game at 37.1%).
NOR (G, PG, SG)
G
73
Min
35.4
FPTS
1,719.0
REB
385.0
AST
519.0
STL
118.0
BLK
58.0
TO
208.0
FGM
582.0
FGA
1,218.0
FTM
247.0
FTA
317.0
Holiday is coming off one of the most productive seasons of his career. He set career highs in points (21.2), free-throws made (3.1), threes made (1.8), rebounds (5.0) and steals (1.6) per game. His average of 7.7 assists also ranked fifth in the league. Holiday had several big games as well, racking up 18 double-doubles, five outings with 30-plus points, 15 outings with at least 10 assists, and 18 games with more than two steals. The biggest knock on Holiday continues to be his injury history. Since 2012-13, the guard is averaging only 61.7 appearances per season. This year, with Anthony Davis being dealt to the Lakers, Holiday should have an opportunity to see his usage increase. While the Pelicans added the likes of Lonzo Ball, Brandon Ingram and Zion Williamson -- all capable of taking touches away from Holiday -- the veteran should be the primary ballhandler for a team looking to remain competitive. Heading into his age 29 season, it's unlikely we see a massive leap forward from Holiday, but he'll be in a strong position to remain productive on the new-look Pelicans.
Holiday is coming off one of the most productive seasons of his career. He set career highs in points (21.2), free-throws made (3.1), threes made (1.8), rebounds (5.0) and steals (1.6) per game. His average of 7.7 assists also ranked fifth in the league. Holiday had several big games as well, racking up 18 double-doubles, five outings with 30-plus points, 15 outings with at least 10 assists, and 18 games with more than two steals. The biggest knock on Holiday continues to be his injury history. Since 2012-13, the guard is averaging only 61.7 appearances per season. This year, with Anthony Davis being dealt to the Lakers, Holiday should have an opportunity to see his usage increase. While the Pelicans added the likes of Lonzo Ball, Brandon Ingram and Zion Williamson -- all capable of taking touches away from Holiday -- the veteran should be the primary ballhandler for a team looking to remain competitive. Heading into his age 29 season, it's unlikely we see a massive leap forward from Holiday, but he'll be in a strong position to remain productive on the new-look Pelicans.
NYK (F, C, PF)
G
76
Min
29.9
FPTS
1,717.0
REB
645.0
AST
251.0
STL
53.0
BLK
46.0
TO
219.0
FGM
591.0
FGA
1,122.0
FTM
357.0
FTA
496.0
The former seventh overall pick in 2014 by the Lakers, Randle spent his first season on a new team in 2018-19, playing 73 games (49 starts) with the Pelicans. He had a career year, posting highs in points (21.4), three-pointers (0.9), steals (0.7) and blocks (0.6) per game, as well as free-throw percentage (73.1). His scoring ability and quality rebounding helped him land a contract with the Knicks, and it seems likely he'll start at power forward for New York. Entering his age 25 season as possibly the best player on the roster, Randle could be primed to take another leap forward statistically. When seeing minutes in the 30s last season, he averaged 24.5 points, 9.6 rebounds and 3.5 assists while shooting 52.2 percent from the field. Randle also posted 11 games with at least 30 points, including one 40-point effort, plus 32 games with double-digit rebounds and 15 games with five-plus assists. All things considered, Randle should be on everyone's fantasy radar as a potential All-Star in the Eastern Conference.
The former seventh overall pick in 2014 by the Lakers, Randle spent his first season on a new team in 2018-19, playing 73 games (49 starts) with the Pelicans. He had a career year, posting highs in points (21.4), three-pointers (0.9), steals (0.7) and blocks (0.6) per game, as well as free-throw percentage (73.1). His scoring ability and quality rebounding helped him land a contract with the Knicks, and it seems likely he'll start at power forward for New York. Entering his age 25 season as possibly the best player on the roster, Randle could be primed to take another leap forward statistically. When seeing minutes in the 30s last season, he averaged 24.5 points, 9.6 rebounds and 3.5 assists while shooting 52.2 percent from the field. Randle also posted 11 games with at least 30 points, including one 40-point effort, plus 32 games with double-digit rebounds and 15 games with five-plus assists. All things considered, Randle should be on everyone's fantasy radar as a potential All-Star in the Eastern Conference.
ATL (G, PG)
G
79
Min
32.0
FPTS
1,712.0
REB
304.0
AST
675.0
STL
85.0
BLK
15.0
TO
319.0
FGM
592.0
FGA
1,377.0
FTM
398.0
FTA
469.0
Expectations are growing for Trae Young and the Hawks heading into the 2019-20 season, as the point guard is coming off a stellar second half of his rookie campaign that made for a competitive Rookie of the Year race down the stretch. In 81 appearances and starts last season, Young averaged 19.1 points, 8.1 assists and 3.7 rebounds, but it's his post-All-Star break numbers that really stand out. In his final 23 games of the regular season, Young averaged 24.7 points, 9.2 assists and 4.7 rebounds across 33.1 minutes per game, and his three-point shooting percentage raised from 31.2 percent to 34.8 percent during that stretch. His 30.8 percent usage rate after the All-Star break would rank in the top 10 among all eligible NBA players. Heading into his sophomore season, Young's usage is not expected to dip. The offense operated at its best with Young as the focal point, and he will now be surrounded by even more young talent with the addition of De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish in the first round of the 2019 draft.
Expectations are growing for Trae Young and the Hawks heading into the 2019-20 season, as the point guard is coming off a stellar second half of his rookie campaign that made for a competitive Rookie of the Year race down the stretch. In 81 appearances and starts last season, Young averaged 19.1 points, 8.1 assists and 3.7 rebounds, but it's his post-All-Star break numbers that really stand out. In his final 23 games of the regular season, Young averaged 24.7 points, 9.2 assists and 4.7 rebounds across 33.1 minutes per game, and his three-point shooting percentage raised from 31.2 percent to 34.8 percent during that stretch. His 30.8 percent usage rate after the All-Star break would rank in the top 10 among all eligible NBA players. Heading into his sophomore season, Young's usage is not expected to dip. The offense operated at its best with Young as the focal point, and he will now be surrounded by even more young talent with the addition of De'Andre Hunter and Cam Reddish in the first round of the 2019 draft.
BOS (G, PG)
G
77
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,698.0
REB
331.0
AST
444.0
STL
94.0
BLK
23.0
TO
159.0
FGM
615.0
FGA
1,400.0
FTM
354.0
FTA
413.0
Kemba can finally relax a bit, as he will no longer have to carry his team's scoring load on a nightly basis, as he did with Charlotte. With the Celtics, he's now on a roster with more skill and depth at every position compared to last year's Hornets squad. The resulting statistical outcome could be fewer points, more assists and more efficient shooting percentages for the veteran point guard. This year, Walker has legitimate drive-and-dish options in Jayson Tatum, Gordon Hayward, Jaylen Brown and even Marcus Smart. And while it's fair to criticize Enes Kanter's defense, the 6-foot-11 center can catch most passes and finish with a strong layup. Fantasy owners should have concerns about Walker's minutes, however. In Charlotte, Walker was a lock for 34-plus minutes per contest. That should decline a bit with Boston, as coach Brad Stevens prefers a deeper rotation, resting his vets for the expected playoff run. But this is nitpicking. Walker is a model of consistency, averaging 80.5 games played over his past four seasons.
Kemba can finally relax a bit, as he will no longer have to carry his team's scoring load on a nightly basis, as he did with Charlotte. With the Celtics, he's now on a roster with more skill and depth at every position compared to last year's Hornets squad. The resulting statistical outcome could be fewer points, more assists and more efficient shooting percentages for the veteran point guard. This year, Walker has legitimate drive-and-dish options in Jayson Tatum, Gordon Hayward, Jaylen Brown and even Marcus Smart. And while it's fair to criticize Enes Kanter's defense, the 6-foot-11 center can catch most passes and finish with a strong layup. Fantasy owners should have concerns about Walker's minutes, however. In Charlotte, Walker was a lock for 34-plus minutes per contest. That should decline a bit with Boston, as coach Brad Stevens prefers a deeper rotation, resting his vets for the expected playoff run. But this is nitpicking. Walker is a model of consistency, averaging 80.5 games played over his past four seasons.
SAN (C, C, PF)
G
73
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,678.0
REB
638.0
AST
159.0
STL
38.0
BLK
88.0
TO
128.0
FGM
598.0
FGA
1,171.0
FTM
299.0
FTA
360.0
For a team that usually has a lot of continuity, the Spurs went through a significant roster overhaul last offseason when they traded Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors. They brought in another talented scorer in DeMar DeRozan, but plenty of the scoring burden was still left to be placed on the shoulders of Aldridge. He once again came through with flying colors, averaging 21.3 points per game while shooting 51.9 percent from the field and 84.7 percent from the free-throw line. His usage rate checked in at 26.9 percent, which ranked second on the team only to DeRozan (27.9 percent). Aldridge's usage was down from 29.1 percent the previous season, but that was to be expected since Leonard had missed most of that campaign due to injury. While adding DeRozan was big, the Spurs still had limited depth in their frontcourt, which enabled Aldridge to average 9.2 rebounds per game. That was his highest mark since the 2014-15 season when he was still with the Blazers. The Spurs didn't make any significant changes to their roster during the offseason, so there is no reason to believe that Aldridge can't produce similar numbers in 2019-20.
For a team that usually has a lot of continuity, the Spurs went through a significant roster overhaul last offseason when they traded Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors. They brought in another talented scorer in DeMar DeRozan, but plenty of the scoring burden was still left to be placed on the shoulders of Aldridge. He once again came through with flying colors, averaging 21.3 points per game while shooting 51.9 percent from the field and 84.7 percent from the free-throw line. His usage rate checked in at 26.9 percent, which ranked second on the team only to DeRozan (27.9 percent). Aldridge's usage was down from 29.1 percent the previous season, but that was to be expected since Leonard had missed most of that campaign due to injury. While adding DeRozan was big, the Spurs still had limited depth in their frontcourt, which enabled Aldridge to average 9.2 rebounds per game. That was his highest mark since the 2014-15 season when he was still with the Blazers. The Spurs didn't make any significant changes to their roster during the offseason, so there is no reason to believe that Aldridge can't produce similar numbers in 2019-20.
MEM (C, C)
G
74
Min
25.2
FPTS
1,648.0
REB
716.0
AST
147.0
STL
32.0
BLK
109.0
TO
154.0
FGM
501.0
FGA
920.0
FTM
266.0
FTA
342.0
Valanciunas was traded to the Grizzlies shortly before the trade deadline in the Marc Gasol deal, playing 19 games with Memphis. He started 17 of those and put together strong averages of 20.2 points, 10.9 rebounds and 1.7 blocks per game. It was a career stretch for the Lithuanian big man, who has averaged 12.5 points, 8.9 boards and 1.0 blocks over the last six seasons. He took on a greatly expanded role post-trade, going from just 18.8 minutes per night in Toronto to 27.7 in Memphis. He signed a three-year, $45 million extension to remain with the Grizzlies, and he will start at center opposite Jaren Jackson in what should be a formidable frontcourt. Expect Valanciunas to carry a similar workload as he did in his brief run with Memphis at the end of last season. He'll be a quality source of points, rebounds and blocks, making him likely one of the top-75 players off the board in most fantasy formats this season.
Valanciunas was traded to the Grizzlies shortly before the trade deadline in the Marc Gasol deal, playing 19 games with Memphis. He started 17 of those and put together strong averages of 20.2 points, 10.9 rebounds and 1.7 blocks per game. It was a career stretch for the Lithuanian big man, who has averaged 12.5 points, 8.9 boards and 1.0 blocks over the last six seasons. He took on a greatly expanded role post-trade, going from just 18.8 minutes per night in Toronto to 27.7 in Memphis. He signed a three-year, $45 million extension to remain with the Grizzlies, and he will start at center opposite Jaren Jackson in what should be a formidable frontcourt. Expect Valanciunas to carry a similar workload as he did in his brief run with Memphis at the end of last season. He'll be a quality source of points, rebounds and blocks, making him likely one of the top-75 players off the board in most fantasy formats this season.
LAC (F, SF, PF)
G
64
Min
35.8
FPTS
1,634.0
REB
484.0
AST
274.0
STL
137.0
BLK
27.0
TO
165.0
FGM
532.0
FGA
1,233.0
FTM
342.0
FTA
399.0
George is coming off the best season of his career. He was voted onto his fifth All-NBA team and his fourth All-Defensive team while leading the league in total steals (170). Notably, he established himself as the clear-cut best player on the Thunder over Russell Westbrook. His chapter in Oklahoma City has come to a close, however, as he was traded to the Clippers in the offseason to pair up with Kawhi Leonard. The early favorites to win the title, LA is presumably the best team George has ever played on. He'll still be a defensive force, but it's possible we see George see a slightly decreased role offensively. It may not be necessary for him to take 21.0 shots per game, as he did in 2018-19. Even if that's the case, George is virtually a lock to average 20 points and provide quality rebounding and assist numbers. He's also proven to be an efficient scorer, hitting 43.8 percent of his field goals, drilling 3.8 threes per game at 38.6 percent and converting 83.9 percent of his free throws. We're witnessing George in his prime, and it seems relatively safe to bank on him continuing his All-NBA ways in 2019-20.
George is coming off the best season of his career. He was voted onto his fifth All-NBA team and his fourth All-Defensive team while leading the league in total steals (170). Notably, he established himself as the clear-cut best player on the Thunder over Russell Westbrook. His chapter in Oklahoma City has come to a close, however, as he was traded to the Clippers in the offseason to pair up with Kawhi Leonard. The early favorites to win the title, LA is presumably the best team George has ever played on. He'll still be a defensive force, but it's possible we see George see a slightly decreased role offensively. It may not be necessary for him to take 21.0 shots per game, as he did in 2018-19. Even if that's the case, George is virtually a lock to average 20 points and provide quality rebounding and assist numbers. He's also proven to be an efficient scorer, hitting 43.8 percent of his field goals, drilling 3.8 threes per game at 38.6 percent and converting 83.9 percent of his free throws. We're witnessing George in his prime, and it seems relatively safe to bank on him continuing his All-NBA ways in 2019-20.
MIA (F, SF, SG)
G
69
Min
36.8
FPTS
1,632.0
REB
395.0
AST
336.0
STL
128.0
BLK
30.0
TO
136.0
FGM
511.0
FGA
1,105.0
FTM
409.0
FTA
477.0
Butler will be joining his fourth team in four years. He forced his way out of Minnesota after 10 appearances last season, finishing the year with the 76ers. While he missed out on the All-Star team for the first time since 2013-14, possibly due to his vehement trade demand, Butler played up to his standards during his age 29 season. His scoring dipped once arriving in Philly due to the wealth of talent around him, but he still managed 18.7 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 1.9 steals in 2018-19. Now with the Heat, Butler is the clear-cut best player on the team, and he should control the offense. As a result, it's possible we see his usage rate hit highs we haven't seen since his final year in Chicago (26.5%). That season, he averaged 23.9 points on 16.5 shots, 6.2 rebounds, 5.5 assists and 1.9 steals. He did that in 37.0 minutes per game, however, and it's unlikely he'll see that much run in Miami considering he'll be 30 years old and no longer coached by Tom Thibodeau. Fantasy owners do need to take into consideration Butler's health. Since his age 24 season, Butler is averaging just 68.2 appearances per year. But ultimately, Butler appears to be en route for another All-Star-caliber season.
Butler will be joining his fourth team in four years. He forced his way out of Minnesota after 10 appearances last season, finishing the year with the 76ers. While he missed out on the All-Star team for the first time since 2013-14, possibly due to his vehement trade demand, Butler played up to his standards during his age 29 season. His scoring dipped once arriving in Philly due to the wealth of talent around him, but he still managed 18.7 points, 5.3 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 1.9 steals in 2018-19. Now with the Heat, Butler is the clear-cut best player on the team, and he should control the offense. As a result, it's possible we see his usage rate hit highs we haven't seen since his final year in Chicago (26.5%). That season, he averaged 23.9 points on 16.5 shots, 6.2 rebounds, 5.5 assists and 1.9 steals. He did that in 37.0 minutes per game, however, and it's unlikely he'll see that much run in Miami considering he'll be 30 years old and no longer coached by Tom Thibodeau. Fantasy owners do need to take into consideration Butler's health. Since his age 24 season, Butler is averaging just 68.2 appearances per year. But ultimately, Butler appears to be en route for another All-Star-caliber season.
BOS (C, C)
G
73
Min
28.1
FPTS
1,628.0
REB
824.0
AST
145.0
STL
40.0
BLK
33.0
TO
148.0
FGM
472.0
FGA
854.0
FTM
213.0
FTA
267.0
Which Enes Kanter will show up in Boston? Will the Celtics see the Kanter that OKC deemed unplayable in the playoffs due to his defensive limitations? Or will they enjoy the Kanter that played 29 clutch minutes per game in the playoffs for Portland, averaging 11.4 points, 9.6 boards, 0.7 steals and a mildly serviceable 0.6 block? In good conscience, we are unable to ponder Kanter's time with the dumpster-fire Knicks. All indications point towards the 27-year old veteran behaving more like the Portland Trail Blazer we saw last year. With Al Horford packing his bags for Philadelphia, Kanter now stands as the lone starting center in option in Boston, with the opportunity to continue posting double-doubles to the delight of many bargain-hunting fantasy fans. There are even off-season whispers of Kanter improving his three-point shooting under coach Brad Stevens' tutelage (see Baynes, Aron). Kanter will certainly never remind the Garden faithful of the legendary Bill Russell, but his strong inside scoring moves and greedy rebounding should satisfy many a fantasy owner.
Which Enes Kanter will show up in Boston? Will the Celtics see the Kanter that OKC deemed unplayable in the playoffs due to his defensive limitations? Or will they enjoy the Kanter that played 29 clutch minutes per game in the playoffs for Portland, averaging 11.4 points, 9.6 boards, 0.7 steals and a mildly serviceable 0.6 block? In good conscience, we are unable to ponder Kanter's time with the dumpster-fire Knicks. All indications point towards the 27-year old veteran behaving more like the Portland Trail Blazer we saw last year. With Al Horford packing his bags for Philadelphia, Kanter now stands as the lone starting center in option in Boston, with the opportunity to continue posting double-doubles to the delight of many bargain-hunting fantasy fans. There are even off-season whispers of Kanter improving his three-point shooting under coach Brad Stevens' tutelage (see Baynes, Aron). Kanter will certainly never remind the Garden faithful of the legendary Bill Russell, but his strong inside scoring moves and greedy rebounding should satisfy many a fantasy owner.
MIL (G, SG, SF)
G
80
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,613.0
REB
496.0
AST
356.0
STL
112.0
BLK
8.0
TO
187.0
FGM
553.0
FGA
1,264.0
FTM
268.0
FTA
309.0
Playing under new head coach Mike Budenholzer, Middleton earned his first All-Star appearance of his seven-year career. In 77 games, Middleton averaged 18.3 points, 6.0 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.0 steal. While he was arguably less productive than in 2017-18, coach Budenholzer scaled back Middleton's workload to 31.1 minutes per game from the previous mark of 36.4 minutes per game. But Middleton did manage to secure career highs in assists (4.3), rebounds (6.0) and made threes (2.3). Playing next to Giannis Antetokounmpo, Middleton's ceiling is relatively capped, though it's possible the loss of Malcolm Brogdon will force the ball into Middleton's hands more. Ultimately, we shouldn't expect a big role or skill change from the 28-year-old wing on this established Bucks roster, but he's clearly worth an early-to-mid-round fantasy selection given his All-Star pedigree.
Playing under new head coach Mike Budenholzer, Middleton earned his first All-Star appearance of his seven-year career. In 77 games, Middleton averaged 18.3 points, 6.0 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.0 steal. While he was arguably less productive than in 2017-18, coach Budenholzer scaled back Middleton's workload to 31.1 minutes per game from the previous mark of 36.4 minutes per game. But Middleton did manage to secure career highs in assists (4.3), rebounds (6.0) and made threes (2.3). Playing next to Giannis Antetokounmpo, Middleton's ceiling is relatively capped, though it's possible the loss of Malcolm Brogdon will force the ball into Middleton's hands more. Ultimately, we shouldn't expect a big role or skill change from the 28-year-old wing on this established Bucks roster, but he's clearly worth an early-to-mid-round fantasy selection given his All-Star pedigree.
UTA (G, PG, SG)
G
78
Min
33.7
FPTS
1,605.0
REB
320.0
AST
335.0
STL
107.0
BLK
31.0
TO
221.0
FGM
678.0
FGA
1,495.0
FTM
370.0
FTA
454.0
Mitchell followed up an impressive rookie season with an even better second-year performance, reaching new career highs in points (23.8), assists (4.2) and rebounds (4.1). He drained 2.4 threes per tilt for the second straight season, boosting his three-point percentage to a respectable 36.2. The Louisville product contributed on the defensive side of the ball too, swiping 1.4 steals for the second year in a row. Mitchell had a huge role for the Jazz last season, logging a 30.9 usage rate, good for seventh in the NBA among players with at least 1900 minutes. He's likely to see that hefty usage rate decrease in 2019-20 with the addition of Mike Conley, who is a better all-around scorer and playmaker than former Jazz point guard Ricky Rubio. Conley will handle some of the backcourt load and enable Mitchell to play off-ball more frequently. New forward Bojan Bogdanovic could cut into Mitchell's production as well, given his natural scoring abilities. Even though his role may diminish slightly this season, Mitchell is still one of the best young guards in the league and will provide solid fantasy contributions in most categories, making him a clear early-round selection in all formats.
Mitchell followed up an impressive rookie season with an even better second-year performance, reaching new career highs in points (23.8), assists (4.2) and rebounds (4.1). He drained 2.4 threes per tilt for the second straight season, boosting his three-point percentage to a respectable 36.2. The Louisville product contributed on the defensive side of the ball too, swiping 1.4 steals for the second year in a row. Mitchell had a huge role for the Jazz last season, logging a 30.9 usage rate, good for seventh in the NBA among players with at least 1900 minutes. He's likely to see that hefty usage rate decrease in 2019-20 with the addition of Mike Conley, who is a better all-around scorer and playmaker than former Jazz point guard Ricky Rubio. Conley will handle some of the backcourt load and enable Mitchell to play off-ball more frequently. New forward Bojan Bogdanovic could cut into Mitchell's production as well, given his natural scoring abilities. Even though his role may diminish slightly this season, Mitchell is still one of the best young guards in the league and will provide solid fantasy contributions in most categories, making him a clear early-round selection in all formats.
PHI (F, PF, SF)
G
80
Min
35.2
FPTS
1,598.0
REB
587.0
AST
209.0
STL
50.0
BLK
37.0
TO
149.0
FGM
570.0
FGA
1,223.0
FTM
257.0
FTA
304.0
Harris has played on five teams across his eight-year career, but it appears he's finally found a home. The 76ers traded for Harris at the 2018-19 deadline, and he went on to average 18.2 points on 46.9 percent shooting, 7.9 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.6 threes for Philly. During the offseason, Harris and the 76ers agreed to a four-year, $64 million contract. Though Harris spent 86 percent of his minutes at power forward while with the 76ers last season, it appears a move to small forward is in the cards after the team acquired Al Horford over the summer. It's possible that will result in some growing pains, as Harris last played primarily small forward during the 2014-15 season. Harris might grab slightly fewer rebounds, but fantasy owners shouldn't have too much concern aside from that. All things considered, Harris' role should be similar to last season, and he should continue providing value mainly as an efficient all-around scorer and rebounder.
Harris has played on five teams across his eight-year career, but it appears he's finally found a home. The 76ers traded for Harris at the 2018-19 deadline, and he went on to average 18.2 points on 46.9 percent shooting, 7.9 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.6 threes for Philly. During the offseason, Harris and the 76ers agreed to a four-year, $64 million contract. Though Harris spent 86 percent of his minutes at power forward while with the 76ers last season, it appears a move to small forward is in the cards after the team acquired Al Horford over the summer. It's possible that will result in some growing pains, as Harris last played primarily small forward during the 2014-15 season. Harris might grab slightly fewer rebounds, but fantasy owners shouldn't have too much concern aside from that. All things considered, Harris' role should be similar to last season, and he should continue providing value mainly as an efficient all-around scorer and rebounder.
BOS (F, SF)
G
81
Min
33.0
FPTS
1,597.0
REB
493.0
AST
217.0
STL
90.0
BLK
59.0
TO
133.0
FGM
602.0
FGA
1,312.0
FTM
275.0
FTA
326.0
After a third-place finish for Rookie of the Year, much was expected of Tatum in his sophomore season. But the return of Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward seemed to dampen Tatum's development. In particular, Hayward and Tatum were an awkward fit together during the first half of the season, resulting in many ugly mid-range jumpers for both forwards. Eventually, Hayward was moved to the bench, freeing things up, somewhat, for Tatum. The Duke product ended the year with a slight uptick in points, rebounds and assists over his rookie season, but didn't earn the big leap forward many predicted. That could change in year three, now that the Celtic depth chart has thinned due to the departures of Irving, Al Horford, Marcus Morris, Terry Rozier and Aron Baynes. Despite the addition of Kemba Walker, some in Boston are referring to this season as "Plan J", with more of an emphasis on youngsters Tatum and Jaylen Brown. Early on, it will be interesting to see if Walker or Tatum are the first options on offense. The door is open for the 21-year-old Tatum to be a true leader in Boston, especially if he can resist those ugly mid-range jumpers.
After a third-place finish for Rookie of the Year, much was expected of Tatum in his sophomore season. But the return of Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward seemed to dampen Tatum's development. In particular, Hayward and Tatum were an awkward fit together during the first half of the season, resulting in many ugly mid-range jumpers for both forwards. Eventually, Hayward was moved to the bench, freeing things up, somewhat, for Tatum. The Duke product ended the year with a slight uptick in points, rebounds and assists over his rookie season, but didn't earn the big leap forward many predicted. That could change in year three, now that the Celtic depth chart has thinned due to the departures of Irving, Al Horford, Marcus Morris, Terry Rozier and Aron Baynes. Despite the addition of Kemba Walker, some in Boston are referring to this season as "Plan J", with more of an emphasis on youngsters Tatum and Jaylen Brown. Early on, it will be interesting to see if Walker or Tatum are the first options on offense. The door is open for the 21-year-old Tatum to be a true leader in Boston, especially if he can resist those ugly mid-range jumpers.
PHO (G, PG, SG)
G
71
Min
34.7
FPTS
1,589.0
REB
316.0
AST
363.0
STL
66.0
BLK
14.0
TO
254.0
FGM
640.0
FGA
1,409.0
FTM
448.0
FTA
511.0
Booker burst onto the scene as a sophomore in 2016-17, averaging 22.1 points per game as a 20-year-old, not to mention dropping 70 points on the Celtics. His game has continued to evolve since then, improving his efficiency and becoming a better distributor. Booker reached a career-high 46.7 FG% last season despite a 5.7 percent dip from beyond the arc. He also spent a career-high 15 percent of his minutes at point guard in 2018-19 and averaged a career-high 6.8 assists in the process. However, with the Suns signing Ricky Rubio during the offseason, it's possible Phoenix envisions Booker as more of a pure scorer than a combo guard, so we may see his assists decrease. Booker has had no problem scoring the ball, and he racked up 21 performances with at least 30 points last season, plus two 50-point outings. While Booker's role seems to be in a slight flux, he's unquestionably the No. 1 option on the Suns, and he should continue being one of the most high-usage players in the league.
Booker burst onto the scene as a sophomore in 2016-17, averaging 22.1 points per game as a 20-year-old, not to mention dropping 70 points on the Celtics. His game has continued to evolve since then, improving his efficiency and becoming a better distributor. Booker reached a career-high 46.7 FG% last season despite a 5.7 percent dip from beyond the arc. He also spent a career-high 15 percent of his minutes at point guard in 2018-19 and averaged a career-high 6.8 assists in the process. However, with the Suns signing Ricky Rubio during the offseason, it's possible Phoenix envisions Booker as more of a pure scorer than a combo guard, so we may see his assists decrease. Booker has had no problem scoring the ball, and he racked up 21 performances with at least 30 points last season, plus two 50-point outings. While Booker's role seems to be in a slight flux, he's unquestionably the No. 1 option on the Suns, and he should continue being one of the most high-usage players in the league.
CLE (F, C, PF)
G
66
Min
31.1
FPTS
1,575.0
REB
763.0
AST
165.0
STL
21.0
BLK
17.0
TO
122.0
FGM
411.0
FGA
971.0
FTM
326.0
FTA
371.0
Love appeared in only 22 games last season while attending to toe, back and shoulder injuries. There was little reason to rush him back into action, as the Cavaliers were one of the worst teams in the league during 2018-19, finishing with just 19 wins. Love clearly wasn't comfortable during his limited action, as he shot just 38.5 percent from the field. Still, his per-36-minute averages were on par with what we've come to expect from Love as a member of the Cavaliers (22.5 points, 14.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists). The two-time All-NBA selection will once again head into 2019-20 as the clear-cut best player on the roster, and there will be plenty of opportunities for him to rack up numbers. Fantasy owners' main concern should be Love's health. He's appeared in just 141 games across the past three seasons, and he'll be heading into his age 31 season on a rebuilding squad where youth development will presumably be the priority. Drafting Love has its risks, but a healthy season would mean big payoff for those who take the chance.
Love appeared in only 22 games last season while attending to toe, back and shoulder injuries. There was little reason to rush him back into action, as the Cavaliers were one of the worst teams in the league during 2018-19, finishing with just 19 wins. Love clearly wasn't comfortable during his limited action, as he shot just 38.5 percent from the field. Still, his per-36-minute averages were on par with what we've come to expect from Love as a member of the Cavaliers (22.5 points, 14.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists). The two-time All-NBA selection will once again head into 2019-20 as the clear-cut best player on the roster, and there will be plenty of opportunities for him to rack up numbers. Fantasy owners' main concern should be Love's health. He's appeared in just 141 games across the past three seasons, and he'll be heading into his age 31 season on a rebuilding squad where youth development will presumably be the priority. Drafting Love has its risks, but a healthy season would mean big payoff for those who take the chance.
DET (F, PF, C)
G
66
Min
34.4
FPTS
1,560.0
REB
489.0
AST
384.0
STL
38.0
BLK
23.0
TO
219.0
FGM
522.0
FGA
1,150.0
FTM
367.0
FTA
476.0
Griffin has evolved significantly since he came into the league in 2010, and he reached new heights as he secured his fifth All-NBA selection last season. Once known for his pick-and-rolls, post-ups and posterizations, Griffin is now a primary ballhandler and three-point threat, leading the Pistons in both assists (402) and three-pointers (189) in 2018-19. Playing next to Andre Drummond has reduced Griffin's rebounding opportunities (7.5 RPG), and his stats now resemble more of a small forward than a power forward. Heading into 2019-20, Griffin figures to occupy the same role, as the Pistons didn't make any acquisitions of high-usage players over the offseason. But with Griffin, the issue is never his production -- it's his health. Since 2014-15, Griffin is averaging just 59.2 games per season, and he's only crossed the threshold of 60 games three times over this stretch. As a result, selecting Griffin in a fantasy draft includes some risk, but his talent level is impossible to ignore.
Griffin has evolved significantly since he came into the league in 2010, and he reached new heights as he secured his fifth All-NBA selection last season. Once known for his pick-and-rolls, post-ups and posterizations, Griffin is now a primary ballhandler and three-point threat, leading the Pistons in both assists (402) and three-pointers (189) in 2018-19. Playing next to Andre Drummond has reduced Griffin's rebounding opportunities (7.5 RPG), and his stats now resemble more of a small forward than a power forward. Heading into 2019-20, Griffin figures to occupy the same role, as the Pistons didn't make any acquisitions of high-usage players over the offseason. But with Griffin, the issue is never his production -- it's his health. Since 2014-15, Griffin is averaging just 59.2 games per season, and he's only crossed the threshold of 60 games three times over this stretch. As a result, selecting Griffin in a fantasy draft includes some risk, but his talent level is impossible to ignore.
NYK (C, C)
G
75
Min
27.5
FPTS
1,533.0
REB
641.0
AST
56.0
STL
79.0
BLK
236.0
TO
53.0
FGM
338.0
FGA
489.0
FTM
129.0
FTA
209.0
The 36th overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft, Robinson is coming off an impressive rookie campaign. Despite playing in just 66 games and seeing only 20.6 minutes per contest, Robinson ranked fourth in the league in total blocks (161), blocking 2.4 per game and 4.3 per 36 minutes. He started 19 games, but really showed off his potential during the 10 contests in which he saw at least 30 minutes. In those games, he averaged 12.6 points on 73.1 percent shooting, 13.0 rebounds, 3.4 blocks and 1.4 steals. Heading into 2019-20, Robinson figures to be the Knicks' starting center, though the front office wasted no time finding plenty of reserve options. Foul trouble may keep Robinson from garnering 30 minutes on a consistent basis, but he's already established himself as an elite rim-protector and great rebounder. It remains to be seen how much he can improve his game, but even if he's simply given more run, he should be a lock for a mid-round, if not earlier, selection in most fantasy drafts.
The 36th overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft, Robinson is coming off an impressive rookie campaign. Despite playing in just 66 games and seeing only 20.6 minutes per contest, Robinson ranked fourth in the league in total blocks (161), blocking 2.4 per game and 4.3 per 36 minutes. He started 19 games, but really showed off his potential during the 10 contests in which he saw at least 30 minutes. In those games, he averaged 12.6 points on 73.1 percent shooting, 13.0 rebounds, 3.4 blocks and 1.4 steals. Heading into 2019-20, Robinson figures to be the Knicks' starting center, though the front office wasted no time finding plenty of reserve options. Foul trouble may keep Robinson from garnering 30 minutes on a consistent basis, but he's already established himself as an elite rim-protector and great rebounder. It remains to be seen how much he can improve his game, but even if he's simply given more run, he should be a lock for a mid-round, if not earlier, selection in most fantasy drafts.
SAC (G, SG, SF)
G
81
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,508.0
REB
411.0
AST
218.0
STL
84.0
BLK
28.0
TO
146.0
FGM
609.0
FGA
1,367.0
FTM
188.0
FTA
216.0
Hield has been a model of health through his first three years in the league, only missing two games. Last season was a breakout for the former No. 6 overall pick, as he set career highs in points (20.7), assists (2.5), rebounds (5.0), free-throw percentage (88.6), field-goal percentage (45.8) and made threes (3.4). Hield has emerged into one of the league's elite threats from long range. His 278 total hits from deep ranked fourth in 2018-19, and his career three-point percentage (41.9) is seventh among all active players. Hield has some big games under his belt, too, cracking the 30-point mark in seven games last season. Heading into 2019-20, Hield should maintain the same role with the Kings, so we shouldn't be surprised if he repeats his efforts from last year. While fantasy owners won't get much from Hield in terms of supplementary stats, his elite scoring ability from distance means he's still a great fantasy option.
Hield has been a model of health through his first three years in the league, only missing two games. Last season was a breakout for the former No. 6 overall pick, as he set career highs in points (20.7), assists (2.5), rebounds (5.0), free-throw percentage (88.6), field-goal percentage (45.8) and made threes (3.4). Hield has emerged into one of the league's elite threats from long range. His 278 total hits from deep ranked fourth in 2018-19, and his career three-point percentage (41.9) is seventh among all active players. Hield has some big games under his belt, too, cracking the 30-point mark in seven games last season. Heading into 2019-20, Hield should maintain the same role with the Kings, so we shouldn't be surprised if he repeats his efforts from last year. While fantasy owners won't get much from Hield in terms of supplementary stats, his elite scoring ability from distance means he's still a great fantasy option.
WAS (C, PF, C)
G
75
Min
26.2
FPTS
1,502.0
REB
596.0
AST
121.0
STL
33.0
BLK
88.0
TO
79.0
FGM
444.0
FGA
765.0
FTM
140.0
FTA
184.0
Bryant inked a new three-year, $25 million deal with the Wizards in the offseason to remain with Washington. He was effective during his first season in DC, starting in 53 of 72 appearances and playing 20.8 minutes per contest, averaging 10.5 points, 6.5 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.2 blocks. The Wizards' frontcourt was hectic last season, with the trio of Bryant, Ian Mahinmi and Bobby Portis splitting minutes at center with Dwight Howard out of action. With Howard and Portis off the team this season, Washington has committed to Bryant as the starter at center. It would be reasonable to expect Bryant's production to grow if he secures more minutes and takes on a larger role. He averaged 18.2 points, 10.9 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 2.2 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes last season, giving him big upside for the upcoming season.
Bryant inked a new three-year, $25 million deal with the Wizards in the offseason to remain with Washington. He was effective during his first season in DC, starting in 53 of 72 appearances and playing 20.8 minutes per contest, averaging 10.5 points, 6.5 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.2 blocks. The Wizards' frontcourt was hectic last season, with the trio of Bryant, Ian Mahinmi and Bobby Portis splitting minutes at center with Dwight Howard out of action. With Howard and Portis off the team this season, Washington has committed to Bryant as the starter at center. It would be reasonable to expect Bryant's production to grow if he secures more minutes and takes on a larger role. He averaged 18.2 points, 10.9 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 2.2 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes last season, giving him big upside for the upcoming season.
IND (C, C)
G
77
Min
29.8
FPTS
1,493.0
REB
575.0
AST
125.0
STL
65.0
BLK
220.0
TO
108.0
FGM
422.0
FGA
861.0
FTM
184.0
FTA
241.0
Coming off an underwhelming third season in which his per-game averages took a bit of a dip, Turner totally transformed his body last summer and bounced back in a big way in 2018-19. However, for the first time since 2013-14, the league leader in blocks did not earn All-Defensive honors, which may help fuel his fire even more heading into 2019-20. Along with swatting a career-best 2.7 blocks per game, Turner also chipped in career highs in made threes per game (1.0), three-point shooting percentage (38.8) and assists (1.6). Offensively, Turner remains a work in progress and occasionally shies away from open shots. Nevertheless, with Victor Oladipo (knee) likely to be sidelined until at least December or January, Turner may be called upon to pick up the slack as a scorer to start the campaign. The fact that the Pacers are expected to start another traditional big man (Domantas Sabonis) alongside Turner won't help him improve his mediocre rebounding average (7.2), but the 23-year-old center should continue to increase his three-point attempts. Moreover, the offseason addition of Malcolm Brogdon provides Turner with a talented point guard for pick-and-roll and pick-and-pop situations. Another leap is certainly in the cards, especially if Turner can get back to earning at least 30 minutes per game, which he did as a sophomore in 2016-17. Still, it's possible he's destined to be a low-usage offensive player.
Coming off an underwhelming third season in which his per-game averages took a bit of a dip, Turner totally transformed his body last summer and bounced back in a big way in 2018-19. However, for the first time since 2013-14, the league leader in blocks did not earn All-Defensive honors, which may help fuel his fire even more heading into 2019-20. Along with swatting a career-best 2.7 blocks per game, Turner also chipped in career highs in made threes per game (1.0), three-point shooting percentage (38.8) and assists (1.6). Offensively, Turner remains a work in progress and occasionally shies away from open shots. Nevertheless, with Victor Oladipo (knee) likely to be sidelined until at least December or January, Turner may be called upon to pick up the slack as a scorer to start the campaign. The fact that the Pacers are expected to start another traditional big man (Domantas Sabonis) alongside Turner won't help him improve his mediocre rebounding average (7.2), but the 23-year-old center should continue to increase his three-point attempts. Moreover, the offseason addition of Malcolm Brogdon provides Turner with a talented point guard for pick-and-roll and pick-and-pop situations. Another leap is certainly in the cards, especially if Turner can get back to earning at least 30 minutes per game, which he did as a sophomore in 2016-17. Still, it's possible he's destined to be a low-usage offensive player.
LAC (C, PF, C)
G
80
Min
25.7
FPTS
1,491.0
REB
510.0
AST
128.0
STL
68.0
BLK
117.0
TO
126.0
FGM
500.0
FGA
795.0
FTM
209.0
FTA
335.0
A candidate for Most Improved Player and Sixth Man of the Year, Harrell had a breakout campaign in 2018-19 -- his second year with the Clippers. With DeAndre Jordan moving on to Dallas, there were more minutes available at center for Harrell. In his 26.3 minutes per game, Harrell averaged 16.6 points on 61.5 percent shooting, 6.5 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 1.3 blocks. He racked up three 30-point games, 17 performances with double-digit boards and 14 games with at least three swats. Heading into the 2019-20 season, Harrell's role should be safe, and it appears he'll split time with Ivica Zubac at center. While that limits Harrell's upside, he'll be entering his age 26 season, so improvement is certainly on the table. And if Zubac suffers an injury, Harrell would presumably be in line for 30-plus minutes.
A candidate for Most Improved Player and Sixth Man of the Year, Harrell had a breakout campaign in 2018-19 -- his second year with the Clippers. With DeAndre Jordan moving on to Dallas, there were more minutes available at center for Harrell. In his 26.3 minutes per game, Harrell averaged 16.6 points on 61.5 percent shooting, 6.5 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 1.3 blocks. He racked up three 30-point games, 17 performances with double-digit boards and 14 games with at least three swats. Heading into the 2019-20 season, Harrell's role should be safe, and it appears he'll split time with Ivica Zubac at center. While that limits Harrell's upside, he'll be entering his age 26 season, so improvement is certainly on the table. And if Zubac suffers an injury, Harrell would presumably be in line for 30-plus minutes.
CHI (F, PF)
G
70
Min
33.1
FPTS
1,486.0
REB
647.0
AST
103.0
STL
51.0
BLK
54.0
TO
117.0
FGM
496.0
FGA
1,123.0
FTM
240.0
FTA
278.0
Though Markkanen has struggled to stay healthy in his first two seasons, totaling only 120 games played, his time on the floor has been impressive. The No. 7 overall pick in 2017, Markkanen set career highs nearly across the board during his sophomore campaign. Notably, he became the first player in NBA history to average at least 18 points, 9 rebounds and 2 three-pointers at 21 years old or younger. While the Bulls signed Thaddeus Young to shore up frontcourt depth, Markkanen is still in line to start at power forward and see 30-plus minutes per game. It seems unlikely the 7-footer will ever be a force defensively or as a passer, but his upside as a scoring big with great rebounding ability is undeniable. In Markkanen's 52 appearances last season, he racked up eight 30-point games, 20 contests with at least 10 rebounds and five performances with five made threes. But he's not just a stretch-big. Markkanen has shown aggressiveness, making 3.3 free-throws per game last season. Only three other players 6-foot-10 or taller in 2018-19 converted at least 2 threes and 3 free-throws per game (Kevin Love, Blake Griffin and Danilo Gallinari). All things considered, Markkanen looks to be on track to become one of the NBA's top power forwards sooner than later.
Though Markkanen has struggled to stay healthy in his first two seasons, totaling only 120 games played, his time on the floor has been impressive. The No. 7 overall pick in 2017, Markkanen set career highs nearly across the board during his sophomore campaign. Notably, he became the first player in NBA history to average at least 18 points, 9 rebounds and 2 three-pointers at 21 years old or younger. While the Bulls signed Thaddeus Young to shore up frontcourt depth, Markkanen is still in line to start at power forward and see 30-plus minutes per game. It seems unlikely the 7-footer will ever be a force defensively or as a passer, but his upside as a scoring big with great rebounding ability is undeniable. In Markkanen's 52 appearances last season, he racked up eight 30-point games, 20 contests with at least 10 rebounds and five performances with five made threes. But he's not just a stretch-big. Markkanen has shown aggressiveness, making 3.3 free-throws per game last season. Only three other players 6-foot-10 or taller in 2018-19 converted at least 2 threes and 3 free-throws per game (Kevin Love, Blake Griffin and Danilo Gallinari). All things considered, Markkanen looks to be on track to become one of the NBA's top power forwards sooner than later.
ORL (F, SF, PF)
G
77
Min
32.3
FPTS
1,474.0
REB
567.0
AST
298.0
STL
74.0
BLK
70.0
TO
173.0
FGM
476.0
FGA
1,038.0
FTM
197.0
FTA
279.0
Gordon put together another strong showing in 2018-19, averaging 16.0 points, 7.4 rebounds, 3.7 assists, 1.6 threes and 1.4 combined blocks/steals. Gordon produced similar numbers in 2017-18, except for the assists, which were a career high. Gordon also managed a respectable 44.9 field goal percentage while hitting a career-high 34.9 percent of his threes. He played a career-high 33.8 minutes over 78 games as well, and his playing time has increased in each of his five NBA seasons. Gordon will be only 23 years old when he enters his sixth season, and he should be in for heavy minutes once again. The addition of a solid passing game to his already-steady scoring and rebounding makes Gordon particularly valuable. He's head-and-shoulders above the other power forwards on the roster in his overall game, and Gordon should be offensive option 2A behind Nikola Vucevic, with Evan Fournier acting as option 2B. Gordon is a strong option for his ability to contribute numbers across multiple categories, and he's likely to be a top-75 fantasy selection for 2019-20.
Gordon put together another strong showing in 2018-19, averaging 16.0 points, 7.4 rebounds, 3.7 assists, 1.6 threes and 1.4 combined blocks/steals. Gordon produced similar numbers in 2017-18, except for the assists, which were a career high. Gordon also managed a respectable 44.9 field goal percentage while hitting a career-high 34.9 percent of his threes. He played a career-high 33.8 minutes over 78 games as well, and his playing time has increased in each of his five NBA seasons. Gordon will be only 23 years old when he enters his sixth season, and he should be in for heavy minutes once again. The addition of a solid passing game to his already-steady scoring and rebounding makes Gordon particularly valuable. He's head-and-shoulders above the other power forwards on the roster in his overall game, and Gordon should be offensive option 2A behind Nikola Vucevic, with Evan Fournier acting as option 2B. Gordon is a strong option for his ability to contribute numbers across multiple categories, and he's likely to be a top-75 fantasy selection for 2019-20.
POR (G, PG, SG)
G
80
Min
34.8
FPTS
1,469.0
REB
331.0
AST
268.0
STL
78.0
BLK
33.0
TO
133.0
FGM
664.0
FGA
1,457.0
FTM
190.0
FTA
225.0
McCollum's per-game averages dipped, albeit only slightly, across several categories in 2018-19. In fact, he managed his lowest assists (3.0), steals (0.8) and minutes (33.9) averages since he was a sophomore back in 2014-15 and posted his lowest scoring average (21.0) since his first year as a full-time starter (2015-16). McCollum also failed to appear in at least 80 games for the first time since his sophomore year. With that being said, he stepped up per usual in the playoffs when afforded a heavier dose of playing time, helping lead the Trail Blazers to the Western Conference Finals. Dealing Evan Turner for Kent Bazemore this offseason replaces a ball-dominant point forward with a low-usage and complementary veteran wing who capably spaces the floor from beyond the arc, perhaps opening up more opportunities for McCollum to initiate the offense, and thus increase his production in the points and dimes departments. Even if Portland is able to keep McCollum's minutes in check during the regular season once again, which may not be a given due to the Western Conference's incredible depth of potential playoff contenders, the soon-to-be 28-year-old combo guard is likely entering the prime of his career and remains an excellent option across all fantasy formats.
McCollum's per-game averages dipped, albeit only slightly, across several categories in 2018-19. In fact, he managed his lowest assists (3.0), steals (0.8) and minutes (33.9) averages since he was a sophomore back in 2014-15 and posted his lowest scoring average (21.0) since his first year as a full-time starter (2015-16). McCollum also failed to appear in at least 80 games for the first time since his sophomore year. With that being said, he stepped up per usual in the playoffs when afforded a heavier dose of playing time, helping lead the Trail Blazers to the Western Conference Finals. Dealing Evan Turner for Kent Bazemore this offseason replaces a ball-dominant point forward with a low-usage and complementary veteran wing who capably spaces the floor from beyond the arc, perhaps opening up more opportunities for McCollum to initiate the offense, and thus increase his production in the points and dimes departments. Even if Portland is able to keep McCollum's minutes in check during the regular season once again, which may not be a given due to the Western Conference's incredible depth of potential playoff contenders, the soon-to-be 28-year-old combo guard is likely entering the prime of his career and remains an excellent option across all fantasy formats.
GSW (F, C, PF)
G
74
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,468.0
REB
602.0
AST
540.0
STL
108.0
BLK
86.0
TO
207.0
FGM
267.0
FGA
599.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
164.0
Green, who appeared in only 66 games due to injuries, is coming off the lowest usage season of his career (13.1%). That was reflected in four-year lows in points (7.4), rebounds (7.3) and assists (6.9) per game. His three-point shooting also continued to slide, as Green's 28.5 percent mark represented the third straight year of decreased efficiency from beyond the arc. But much of Green's value comes on defense. He was selected to his fifth All-Defensive team, averaging a combined 2.5 steals/blocks. And Green's declining offensive stats can probably be attributed to the presence of Kevin Durant over the past three seasons. With Durant now in Brooklyn and Klay Thompson out for much of 2019-20 due to a torn ACL, Green's usage could vault back up to 2015-16 levels. That season marked Green's first All-NBA selection, and he averaged 14.0 points, 9.5 rebounds, 7.4 assists, a combined 2.9 steals/blocks and 1.2 made threes.
Green, who appeared in only 66 games due to injuries, is coming off the lowest usage season of his career (13.1%). That was reflected in four-year lows in points (7.4), rebounds (7.3) and assists (6.9) per game. His three-point shooting also continued to slide, as Green's 28.5 percent mark represented the third straight year of decreased efficiency from beyond the arc. But much of Green's value comes on defense. He was selected to his fifth All-Defensive team, averaging a combined 2.5 steals/blocks. And Green's declining offensive stats can probably be attributed to the presence of Kevin Durant over the past three seasons. With Durant now in Brooklyn and Klay Thompson out for much of 2019-20 due to a torn ACL, Green's usage could vault back up to 2015-16 levels. That season marked Green's first All-NBA selection, and he averaged 14.0 points, 9.5 rebounds, 7.4 assists, a combined 2.9 steals/blocks and 1.2 made threes.
NOR (F, C, PF)
G
64
Min
31.0
FPTS
1,468.0
REB
541.0
AST
159.0
STL
79.0
BLK
83.0
TO
171.0
FGM
488.0
FGA
857.0
FTM
222.0
FTA
318.0
The Pelicans took no chances during the 2019 NBA Draft, selecting Williamson with the No. 1 overall pick. Williamson enters the league as one of the most-hyped prospects in recent memory -- possibly going as far back as LeBron James in 2003. The Duke one-and-done averaged 22.6 points on an absurd 68.0 percent shooting, 8.9 rebounds, 2.1 assists, and 1.8 blocks in 33 collegiate games. Williamson will be the focal point of the Pelicans' mini-rebuild in the aftermath of trading Anthony Davis to the Lakers. Williamson is a virtual lock to start from Day 1, though what his true position is at the NBA level remains somewhat of a mystery. At 285 pounds, Williamson has the bulk to play center, but his 6-foot-7 frame suggests he's more of a forward. Complicating things further, Williamson's jumpshot is a clear work in progress, and the Pelicans may have to work to put four floor-spacers around him at all times. What we do know is that he has the potential to be one of the best athletes we've ever seen on the hardwood, and there should be no shortage of gravity-defying dunks, blocks and rebounds. From a fantasy perspective, counting on the rookie to have a high floor as a rebounder, defender and efficient inside scorer seems safe. The other things -- volume scoring, passing, three-point shooting, free-throw percentage -- are cloudy.
The Pelicans took no chances during the 2019 NBA Draft, selecting Williamson with the No. 1 overall pick. Williamson enters the league as one of the most-hyped prospects in recent memory -- possibly going as far back as LeBron James in 2003. The Duke one-and-done averaged 22.6 points on an absurd 68.0 percent shooting, 8.9 rebounds, 2.1 assists, and 1.8 blocks in 33 collegiate games. Williamson will be the focal point of the Pelicans' mini-rebuild in the aftermath of trading Anthony Davis to the Lakers. Williamson is a virtual lock to start from Day 1, though what his true position is at the NBA level remains somewhat of a mystery. At 285 pounds, Williamson has the bulk to play center, but his 6-foot-7 frame suggests he's more of a forward. Complicating things further, Williamson's jumpshot is a clear work in progress, and the Pelicans may have to work to put four floor-spacers around him at all times. What we do know is that he has the potential to be one of the best athletes we've ever seen on the hardwood, and there should be no shortage of gravity-defying dunks, blocks and rebounds. From a fantasy perspective, counting on the rookie to have a high floor as a rebounder, defender and efficient inside scorer seems safe. The other things -- volume scoring, passing, three-point shooting, free-throw percentage -- are cloudy.
MIL (G, PG)
G
73
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,448.0
REB
371.0
AST
441.0
STL
119.0
BLK
37.0
TO
220.0
FGM
468.0
FGA
986.0
FTM
209.0
FTA
265.0
In his first full season with the Bucks, Bledsoe was selected to his first All-Defensive team. He ranked 14th in the NBA in total steals and racked up 13 games with at least three swipes. He also set a career high in field-goal percentage (48.4) while averaging 15.9 points, 5.5 assists and 4.6 rebounds in 29.1 minutes. Bledsoe's upside is somewhat capped given the presence of Giannis Antetokounmpo, but the point guard could be relied upon more this season given the departure of Malcolm Brogdon. With Brogdon off the court last season, Bledsoe gained 5.6 percent extra usage and averaged 21.1 points, 7.0 assists, 5.9 rebounds and 1.9 steals per 36 minutes. While it's unclear if Bledsoe will see more time on the floor with Brogdon gone, it's certainly a possibility. Fantasy owners shouldn't expect huge improvements from Bledsoe in his age 30 season, but his role in the Bucks' offense seems as secure as ever.
In his first full season with the Bucks, Bledsoe was selected to his first All-Defensive team. He ranked 14th in the NBA in total steals and racked up 13 games with at least three swipes. He also set a career high in field-goal percentage (48.4) while averaging 15.9 points, 5.5 assists and 4.6 rebounds in 29.1 minutes. Bledsoe's upside is somewhat capped given the presence of Giannis Antetokounmpo, but the point guard could be relied upon more this season given the departure of Malcolm Brogdon. With Brogdon off the court last season, Bledsoe gained 5.6 percent extra usage and averaged 21.1 points, 7.0 assists, 5.9 rebounds and 1.9 steals per 36 minutes. While it's unclear if Bledsoe will see more time on the floor with Brogdon gone, it's certainly a possibility. Fantasy owners shouldn't expect huge improvements from Bledsoe in his age 30 season, but his role in the Bucks' offense seems as secure as ever.
BRO (C, C)
G
78
Min
26.7
FPTS
1,443.0
REB
668.0
AST
109.0
STL
43.0
BLK
119.0
TO
102.0
FGM
348.0
FGA
585.0
FTM
204.0
FTA
276.0
Allen saw improvement across the board in his sophomore campaign, emerging as the Nets' full-time starting center as the team made the postseason for the first time since 2015. The former Texas one-and-done posted career-highs in points (10.9), rebounds (8.4), assists (1.4) and blocks (1.5) across 26.2 minutes per game while shooting 59 percent from the floor. While under most circumstances, the expectation would be for Allen's role to grow even more in his third season, the Nets signed center DeAndre Jordan to a four-year, $40 million contract this offseason. And with the Nets shifting from the mindset of wanting to develop young talent to being a legitimate contender in the Eastern Conference, Allen will have to earn every minute he plays this season while facing legitimate competition at center from the veteran Jordan. While it's certainly not an ideal situation for the third-year player, Allen still has the trust of and experience of working with head coach Kenny Atkinson on his side, plus built-in chemistry with Brooklyn's returning personnel, so the big man should still be in line to see minutes in the high-20s again this season.
Allen saw improvement across the board in his sophomore campaign, emerging as the Nets' full-time starting center as the team made the postseason for the first time since 2015. The former Texas one-and-done posted career-highs in points (10.9), rebounds (8.4), assists (1.4) and blocks (1.5) across 26.2 minutes per game while shooting 59 percent from the floor. While under most circumstances, the expectation would be for Allen's role to grow even more in his third season, the Nets signed center DeAndre Jordan to a four-year, $40 million contract this offseason. And with the Nets shifting from the mindset of wanting to develop young talent to being a legitimate contender in the Eastern Conference, Allen will have to earn every minute he plays this season while facing legitimate competition at center from the veteran Jordan. While it's certainly not an ideal situation for the third-year player, Allen still has the trust of and experience of working with head coach Kenny Atkinson on his side, plus built-in chemistry with Brooklyn's returning personnel, so the big man should still be in line to see minutes in the high-20s again this season.
CHI (G, PG, SG)
G
72
Min
34.0
FPTS
1,437.0
REB
332.0
AST
288.0
STL
68.0
BLK
29.0
TO
211.0
FGM
607.0
FGA
1,327.0
FTM
352.0
FTA
418.0
LaVine had the most productive season of his career in 2018-19, though he still dealt with missed time due to injury, playing in just 63 games. He posted a career-high in points (24.7) per 36 minutes and scored at a much more efficient clip than he did the year prior. LaVine shot a career-best 46.7 percent from the floor on 18.8 shots per 36 (second most of his career) while draining a respectable 2.0 threes per game at 37.4 percent from deep. Both his rebound (4.9) and assist (4.7) averages per 36 were the second-highest of his five-year career, and LaVine's efficiency extended to the charity stripe, where he shot 83.2 percent. But LaVine will have increased competition on offense this season. The arrival of offensive-minded guard Coby White (20.3 points per 36 minutes at UNC) may reduce LaVine's offensive opportunities, as could a full season next to Otto Porter, who appeared in just 15 games for Chicago after being traded by the Wizards. Lauri Markkanen, who averaged career-highs in points (18.7) and rebounds (9.0) last season, may continue to ascend, further limiting LaVine's upside. However, Chicago was one of the worst defensive teams in the NBA last season (112.8 Defensive Rating), and the Bulls may need to continue relying on scoring to stay in games. Ultimately, LaVine should still be a valuable fantasy contributor, even if he takes on a lesser offensive role. LaVine has played in just 134 of a possible 246 games over the last three seasons, so his availability presents some concern, but has proven to be capable of a high-usage role when on the court.
LaVine had the most productive season of his career in 2018-19, though he still dealt with missed time due to injury, playing in just 63 games. He posted a career-high in points (24.7) per 36 minutes and scored at a much more efficient clip than he did the year prior. LaVine shot a career-best 46.7 percent from the floor on 18.8 shots per 36 (second most of his career) while draining a respectable 2.0 threes per game at 37.4 percent from deep. Both his rebound (4.9) and assist (4.7) averages per 36 were the second-highest of his five-year career, and LaVine's efficiency extended to the charity stripe, where he shot 83.2 percent. But LaVine will have increased competition on offense this season. The arrival of offensive-minded guard Coby White (20.3 points per 36 minutes at UNC) may reduce LaVine's offensive opportunities, as could a full season next to Otto Porter, who appeared in just 15 games for Chicago after being traded by the Wizards. Lauri Markkanen, who averaged career-highs in points (18.7) and rebounds (9.0) last season, may continue to ascend, further limiting LaVine's upside. However, Chicago was one of the worst defensive teams in the NBA last season (112.8 Defensive Rating), and the Bulls may need to continue relying on scoring to stay in games. Ultimately, LaVine should still be a valuable fantasy contributor, even if he takes on a lesser offensive role. LaVine has played in just 134 of a possible 246 games over the last three seasons, so his availability presents some concern, but has proven to be capable of a high-usage role when on the court.
SAC (F, PF, C)
G
72
Min
28.4
FPTS
1,426.0
REB
615.0
AST
81.0
STL
43.0
BLK
93.0
TO
128.0
FGM
506.0
FGA
979.0
FTM
254.0
FTA
379.0
Prior to February, Bagley dealt with injury issues and was eased into a role, seeing just 23.5 minutes per game across 37 appearances. Things opened up for the rookie once February hit, however. Across the final three months of the season, the Duke product averaged 17.8 points on 14.0 shots, 9.1 rebounds and 1.2 assists in 27.7 minutes. He kept up the great production during his four starts, averaging 20.0 points, 11.5 rebounds and 1.3 assists. At the age of 19, Bagley has already demonstrated upside as one of the league's better offensive rebounders, ranking 17th in offensive rebound percentage (10.4). Heading into his second season, Bagley's role as the Kings' starting power forward seems cemented, and it would be surprising if he saw much fewer than 30 minutes per contest. While his three-pointer (30-for-96, 31.3%) and free-throw shooting (181-for-262, 69.1%) need some work, he was able to shoot an impressive 50.4 percent from the field overall. As is the case with many promising second-year players, he'll likely have an aggressive ADP come draft season, and fantasy owners may have to take on some risk if they want land Bagley for certain.
Prior to February, Bagley dealt with injury issues and was eased into a role, seeing just 23.5 minutes per game across 37 appearances. Things opened up for the rookie once February hit, however. Across the final three months of the season, the Duke product averaged 17.8 points on 14.0 shots, 9.1 rebounds and 1.2 assists in 27.7 minutes. He kept up the great production during his four starts, averaging 20.0 points, 11.5 rebounds and 1.3 assists. At the age of 19, Bagley has already demonstrated upside as one of the league's better offensive rebounders, ranking 17th in offensive rebound percentage (10.4). Heading into his second season, Bagley's role as the Kings' starting power forward seems cemented, and it would be surprising if he saw much fewer than 30 minutes per contest. While his three-pointer (30-for-96, 31.3%) and free-throw shooting (181-for-262, 69.1%) need some work, he was able to shoot an impressive 50.4 percent from the field overall. As is the case with many promising second-year players, he'll likely have an aggressive ADP come draft season, and fantasy owners may have to take on some risk if they want land Bagley for certain.
DEN (G, PG, SG)
G
78
Min
32.1
FPTS
1,403.0
REB
309.0
AST
391.0
STL
69.0
BLK
23.0
TO
184.0
FGM
578.0
FGA
1,293.0
FTM
218.0
FTA
246.0
Murray managed career-high per-game averages in points (18.2), assists (4.8), rebounds (4.2), blocks (0.4) and minutes (32.6) last season. Moreover, the 22-year-old combo guard took his scoring to another level in the playoffs, posting 21.3 points per game across 14 contests. Denver's offense will almost certainly continue to run through Nikola Jokic. Nevertheless, the sturdy Murray (82, 81 and 75 games played in his first three seasons, respectively) remains the clear second option behind one of the most pass-happy stars in the league, and another leap in year four would elevate his fantasy value toward elite status. In order for that to happen though, Murray may need to improve his field goal percentage (43.7), which fell from 45.1 percent during 2017-18. It's not abnormal for young players to suffer a small regression in efficiency when taking on more responsibility, which is what happened to Murray, whose shot attempts rose from 13.1 to 15.6 per tilt. Furthermore, like most young players, Murray developed a reputation for being somewhat inconsistent, as he was limited to single digits in scoring eight times in 2018-19. Overall, Murray is still arguably one of the better bets to enjoy a breakout campaign and could prove worthy of a fairly high selection on draft day.
Murray managed career-high per-game averages in points (18.2), assists (4.8), rebounds (4.2), blocks (0.4) and minutes (32.6) last season. Moreover, the 22-year-old combo guard took his scoring to another level in the playoffs, posting 21.3 points per game across 14 contests. Denver's offense will almost certainly continue to run through Nikola Jokic. Nevertheless, the sturdy Murray (82, 81 and 75 games played in his first three seasons, respectively) remains the clear second option behind one of the most pass-happy stars in the league, and another leap in year four would elevate his fantasy value toward elite status. In order for that to happen though, Murray may need to improve his field goal percentage (43.7), which fell from 45.1 percent during 2017-18. It's not abnormal for young players to suffer a small regression in efficiency when taking on more responsibility, which is what happened to Murray, whose shot attempts rose from 13.1 to 15.6 per tilt. Furthermore, like most young players, Murray developed a reputation for being somewhat inconsistent, as he was limited to single digits in scoring eight times in 2018-19. Overall, Murray is still arguably one of the better bets to enjoy a breakout campaign and could prove worthy of a fairly high selection on draft day.
POR (C, C)
G
72
Min
23.5
FPTS
1,381.0
REB
777.0
AST
37.0
STL
44.0
BLK
129.0
TO
92.0
FGM
369.0
FGA
648.0
FTM
129.0
FTA
231.0
The 2018-19 campaign wasn't kind to Whiteside, who once again saw his fantasy production dip despite playing in 72 contests. Most notably, he finished the year averaging 12.3 points, which marked his lowest scoring total since the 2014-15 season. On the bright side, he remained a monster on the defensive end of the court, hauling down 11.3 boards while swatting 1.9 blocks on the year. The 7-foot center was shipped off to Portland in July, giving the big man a much-needed change of scenery. Whiteside saw his playing time drop to 23.3 minutes per game a season ago in his fifth year with the Heat, which is something fantasy owners may not need to worry about as a member of the Trail Blazers. He figures to immediately slot in as the starting center, and he shouldn't have too much competition for playing time while Jusuf Nurkic recovers from a devastating leg injury for much of the upcoming season. While Whiteside won't be at the top of many draft boards, he could be an intriguing pick in a brand new environment, and he'll have a chance to take some of the focus off Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum.
The 2018-19 campaign wasn't kind to Whiteside, who once again saw his fantasy production dip despite playing in 72 contests. Most notably, he finished the year averaging 12.3 points, which marked his lowest scoring total since the 2014-15 season. On the bright side, he remained a monster on the defensive end of the court, hauling down 11.3 boards while swatting 1.9 blocks on the year. The 7-foot center was shipped off to Portland in July, giving the big man a much-needed change of scenery. Whiteside saw his playing time drop to 23.3 minutes per game a season ago in his fifth year with the Heat, which is something fantasy owners may not need to worry about as a member of the Trail Blazers. He figures to immediately slot in as the starting center, and he shouldn't have too much competition for playing time while Jusuf Nurkic recovers from a devastating leg injury for much of the upcoming season. While Whiteside won't be at the top of many draft boards, he could be an intriguing pick in a brand new environment, and he'll have a chance to take some of the focus off Damian Lillard and C.J. McCollum.
DAL (F, PF, C)
G
67
Min
33.1
FPTS
1,372.0
REB
492.0
AST
103.0
STL
49.0
BLK
133.0
TO
115.0
FGM
513.0
FGA
1,154.0
FTM
254.0
FTA
316.0
Porzingis didn't play during the 2018-19 campaign as he recovered from a torn ACL suffered in February of 2018. He was in the midst of a career year when he suffered the injury, averaging 22.7 points, 6.6 rebounds, 2.4 blocks and 1.2 steals. Reportedly unhappy with the Knicks, Porzingis requested a trade last season, and he was dealt to the Mavericks. He and Luka Doncic look to make up one of the better young cores in the NBA, and all signs are pointing toward Porzingis being ready for the start of the 2019-20 season. In his 186 career appearances, the 24-year-old has racked up 14 performances with at least 30 points, 38 efforts with double-digit rebounds and 16 games with five-plus blocks. For fantasy owners, injury concern with Porzingis is legitimate, but the upside is impossible to ignore for the 7-foot-3 big man.
Porzingis didn't play during the 2018-19 campaign as he recovered from a torn ACL suffered in February of 2018. He was in the midst of a career year when he suffered the injury, averaging 22.7 points, 6.6 rebounds, 2.4 blocks and 1.2 steals. Reportedly unhappy with the Knicks, Porzingis requested a trade last season, and he was dealt to the Mavericks. He and Luka Doncic look to make up one of the better young cores in the NBA, and all signs are pointing toward Porzingis being ready for the start of the 2019-20 season. In his 186 career appearances, the 24-year-old has racked up 14 performances with at least 30 points, 38 efforts with double-digit rebounds and 16 games with five-plus blocks. For fantasy owners, injury concern with Porzingis is legitimate, but the upside is impossible to ignore for the 7-foot-3 big man.
OKC (G, PG)
G
63
Min
31.7
FPTS
1,360.0
REB
285.0
AST
549.0
STL
123.0
BLK
13.0
TO
163.0
FGM
377.0
FGA
894.0
FTM
193.0
FTA
218.0
Heading into his age 34 season, Paul is coming off arguably the least productive year of his professional tenure. He set career lows in points (15.6) and made free throws (3.0) per game, plus field-goal percentage (41.9). His health continues to be a problem as well, with Paul playing in fewer than 62 games for the third straight season, and he's averaging just 66.4 appearances across the past seven campaigns. The eight-time All-NBA selection will be joining a new team in 2019-20 after being traded to the Thunder from the Rockets. While Oklahoma City has transitioned into a rebuild, all signs are pointing toward Paul beginning the season with the Thunder. Assuming that's the case, he'll presumably be in line for his biggest role since leaving the Clippers. During Paul's final two seasons in LA, he averaged 18.9 points, 9.6 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 2.0 steals. While it would be surprising for him to put up those types of numbers again given his age, Paul's vision and basketball IQ should at least lead him to plenty of assists. Fantasy owners need to take into consideration Paul's injury history and age before drafting him, but it's possible we see him take on more of an expanded role with the Thunder than we saw with the Rockets.
Heading into his age 34 season, Paul is coming off arguably the least productive year of his professional tenure. He set career lows in points (15.6) and made free throws (3.0) per game, plus field-goal percentage (41.9). His health continues to be a problem as well, with Paul playing in fewer than 62 games for the third straight season, and he's averaging just 66.4 appearances across the past seven campaigns. The eight-time All-NBA selection will be joining a new team in 2019-20 after being traded to the Thunder from the Rockets. While Oklahoma City has transitioned into a rebuild, all signs are pointing toward Paul beginning the season with the Thunder. Assuming that's the case, he'll presumably be in line for his biggest role since leaving the Clippers. During Paul's final two seasons in LA, he averaged 18.9 points, 9.6 assists, 4.5 rebounds and 2.0 steals. While it would be surprising for him to put up those types of numbers again given his age, Paul's vision and basketball IQ should at least lead him to plenty of assists. Fantasy owners need to take into consideration Paul's injury history and age before drafting him, but it's possible we see him take on more of an expanded role with the Thunder than we saw with the Rockets.
GSW (G, PG, SG)
G
77
Min
33.2
FPTS
1,356.0
REB
329.0
AST
439.0
STL
110.0
BLK
21.0
TO
264.0
FGM
587.0
FGA
1,403.0
FTM
171.0
FTA
222.0
Russell's second and final season with the Nets was by far the best of his career, as he became the undisputed leader of a playoff team on his way to his first All-Star selection. The point guard took a massive leap in 2018-19, posting career-highs in points (21.1 per game), assists (7.0 per game) and three-point shooting (36.9 percent) while starting in 81 regular-season games for Brooklyn. Despite that, one of the highlights of the Nets' monster offseason was signing All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving, and to go along with that, the team shipped Russell off to Golden State in a sign-and-trade. However, with Klay Thompson nursing a torn ACL that is expected to keep him out for most of the 2019-20 season, head coach Steve Kerr said that he sees Russell as a long-term starter alongside Steph Curry in the backcourt. With that, for as long as Thompson is sidelined, Russell should have the opportunity to post similar numbers to those of his 2018-19 campaign, although a slight dip within the confines of Golden State's offense seems likely. Barring any significant injuries to Curry, where Russell will likely see the biggest dip will be in his sky-high usage rate, which was at 31.9 percent last season and was the sixth-highest rate in all of the NBA.
Russell's second and final season with the Nets was by far the best of his career, as he became the undisputed leader of a playoff team on his way to his first All-Star selection. The point guard took a massive leap in 2018-19, posting career-highs in points (21.1 per game), assists (7.0 per game) and three-point shooting (36.9 percent) while starting in 81 regular-season games for Brooklyn. Despite that, one of the highlights of the Nets' monster offseason was signing All-Star point guard Kyrie Irving, and to go along with that, the team shipped Russell off to Golden State in a sign-and-trade. However, with Klay Thompson nursing a torn ACL that is expected to keep him out for most of the 2019-20 season, head coach Steve Kerr said that he sees Russell as a long-term starter alongside Steph Curry in the backcourt. With that, for as long as Thompson is sidelined, Russell should have the opportunity to post similar numbers to those of his 2018-19 campaign, although a slight dip within the confines of Golden State's offense seems likely. Barring any significant injuries to Curry, where Russell will likely see the biggest dip will be in his sky-high usage rate, which was at 31.9 percent last season and was the sixth-highest rate in all of the NBA.
NOR (F, C, PF)
G
74
Min
26.8
FPTS
1,353.0
REB
595.0
AST
100.0
STL
63.0
BLK
119.0
TO
94.0
FGM
388.0
FGA
695.0
FTM
168.0
FTA
256.0
Favors was traded to the Pelicans in the offseason after nine seasons with the Jazz. The Pelicans could boast one of the better defensive units in the NBA, and Favors will anchor it with rookie Zion Williamson. Favors has little competition for playing time this season, with Jahlil Okafor and rookie Jaxson Hayes likely backing him up. Despite starting 70 games last season, Favors averaged just 23.2 minutes per game -- a six-year low. He's played the majority of his minutes at power forward, but Favors can play the five, too. He's slated to start at center this season, and an increase in playing time seems like a reasonable expectation. Favors averaged 18.3 points, 11.4 rebounds and 3.3 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes in 2018-19. He's provided a steady source of rebounds and defense throughout his career, and he's usually good for double-digit points on top of that.
Favors was traded to the Pelicans in the offseason after nine seasons with the Jazz. The Pelicans could boast one of the better defensive units in the NBA, and Favors will anchor it with rookie Zion Williamson. Favors has little competition for playing time this season, with Jahlil Okafor and rookie Jaxson Hayes likely backing him up. Despite starting 70 games last season, Favors averaged just 23.2 minutes per game -- a six-year low. He's played the majority of his minutes at power forward, but Favors can play the five, too. He's slated to start at center this season, and an increase in playing time seems like a reasonable expectation. Favors averaged 18.3 points, 11.4 rebounds and 3.3 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes in 2018-19. He's provided a steady source of rebounds and defense throughout his career, and he's usually good for double-digit points on top of that.
MEM (F, PF, C)
G
72
Min
31.8
FPTS
1,348.0
REB
411.0
AST
143.0
STL
79.0
BLK
121.0
TO
148.0
FGM
446.0
FGA
867.0
FTM
260.0
FTA
330.0
Jackson's rookie season was cut short due to injury, but he was impressive in 58 appearances. The Michigan State product averaged 13.8 points, 4.7 boards and 2.3 combined blocks/steals across 26.1 minutes per contest en route to an All-Rookie First Team selection. Those averages increased substantially in 20 games with at least 30 minutes, going for 18.7 points, 6.0 boards and 3.0 combined steals/blocks. The big man showed promise as a three-point shooter, canning 1.0 triples per game at a serviceable 35.9 percent clip. Jackson has enormous upside as the starting power forward on a rebuilding team, and he's likely to see an increase in playing time in his sophomore campaign. Jackson is an excellent two-way player who can provide valuable fantasy production on both ends of the court. The 19-year-old projects as an early-to-mid round pick across most season-long formats and even more valuable as a dynasty league prospect.
Jackson's rookie season was cut short due to injury, but he was impressive in 58 appearances. The Michigan State product averaged 13.8 points, 4.7 boards and 2.3 combined blocks/steals across 26.1 minutes per contest en route to an All-Rookie First Team selection. Those averages increased substantially in 20 games with at least 30 minutes, going for 18.7 points, 6.0 boards and 3.0 combined steals/blocks. The big man showed promise as a three-point shooter, canning 1.0 triples per game at a serviceable 35.9 percent clip. Jackson has enormous upside as the starting power forward on a rebuilding team, and he's likely to see an increase in playing time in his sophomore campaign. Jackson is an excellent two-way player who can provide valuable fantasy production on both ends of the court. The 19-year-old projects as an early-to-mid round pick across most season-long formats and even more valuable as a dynasty league prospect.
BRO (C, C)
G
74
Min
23.8
FPTS
1,344.0
REB
786.0
AST
134.0
STL
41.0
BLK
66.0
TO
132.0
FGM
250.0
FGA
374.0
FTM
150.0
FTA
227.0
Jordan joined the Nets on a four-year, $40 million deal after playing last season with the Mavericks and Knicks following 10 seasons with the Clippers. He concluded the 2018-19 campaign with 11.0 points and 13.1 rebounds, finishing among the top five in the league in total rebounds for the sixth straight season. In these six years, Jordan has won two rebounding titles and pulled down 14.1 boards per contest. Though he's lost a step defensively over the last two seasons, Jordan still offers highly valuable rebounding numbers with a good chance of double-digit points. He's likely to open as the starting center for the Nets this season, but the question as to who is the better center -- he, or third-year Jarrett Allen -- is debatable. What's not debatable is the new contract Jordan signed, which all but assures him the starting job. A statistical season similar to what he produced last year wouldn't be unreasonable to expect from Jordan.
Jordan joined the Nets on a four-year, $40 million deal after playing last season with the Mavericks and Knicks following 10 seasons with the Clippers. He concluded the 2018-19 campaign with 11.0 points and 13.1 rebounds, finishing among the top five in the league in total rebounds for the sixth straight season. In these six years, Jordan has won two rebounding titles and pulled down 14.1 boards per contest. Though he's lost a step defensively over the last two seasons, Jordan still offers highly valuable rebounding numbers with a good chance of double-digit points. He's likely to open as the starting center for the Nets this season, but the question as to who is the better center -- he, or third-year Jarrett Allen -- is debatable. What's not debatable is the new contract Jordan signed, which all but assures him the starting job. A statistical season similar to what he produced last year wouldn't be unreasonable to expect from Jordan.
CHA (G, PG, SG)
G
81
Min
33.8
FPTS
1,344.0
REB
469.0
AST
353.0
STL
104.0
BLK
32.0
TO
172.0
FGM
488.0
FGA
1,229.0
FTM
204.0
FTA
254.0
Rozier saw his workload decrease last season as the Celtics were healthier compared to 2017-18. Still, he drew 14 starts and garnered a solid 22.7 minutes per contest. But Boston was not ready to commit to Rozier as their point guard of the future and instead acquired Kemba Walker in a sign-and-trade that sent Rozier to Charlotte. With the Hornets, Rozier figures to be the focal point of the rebuilding franchise. In 30 career games as a starter, the 25-year-old has averaged 14.4 points, 5.9 rebounds, 5.1 assists and 1.4 steals. His 40.1 FG% in those starts leaves something to be desired, but he managed an impressive 39.6 3P% on 192 attempts. It's reasonable to think Rozier could play above those numbers, as he'll have less talent surrounding him on the Hornets than he did with the Celtics. While he likely won't turn into a great passer or dynamic scorer overnight, fantasy owners can look toward Rozier as an above-average rebounder at the point guard spot, plus a solid source of threes and steals.
Rozier saw his workload decrease last season as the Celtics were healthier compared to 2017-18. Still, he drew 14 starts and garnered a solid 22.7 minutes per contest. But Boston was not ready to commit to Rozier as their point guard of the future and instead acquired Kemba Walker in a sign-and-trade that sent Rozier to Charlotte. With the Hornets, Rozier figures to be the focal point of the rebuilding franchise. In 30 career games as a starter, the 25-year-old has averaged 14.4 points, 5.9 rebounds, 5.1 assists and 1.4 steals. His 40.1 FG% in those starts leaves something to be desired, but he managed an impressive 39.6 3P% on 192 attempts. It's reasonable to think Rozier could play above those numbers, as he'll have less talent surrounding him on the Hornets than he did with the Celtics. While he likely won't turn into a great passer or dynamic scorer overnight, fantasy owners can look toward Rozier as an above-average rebounder at the point guard spot, plus a solid source of threes and steals.
DAL (C, C)
G
80
Min
25.8
FPTS
1,337.0
REB
510.0
AST
139.0
STL
55.0
BLK
62.0
TO
83.0
FGM
350.0
FGA
604.0
FTM
236.0
FTA
315.0
The 45th overall pick out of Stanford in the 2014 NBA Draft, Powell's role has been consistently growing year-to-year. He saw a career-high 21.6 minutes per game last season, and he drew 22 starts across 77 appearances. While Powell's season numbers (10.6 PPG, 5.3 RPG, 1.5 APG) don't jump off the page, it's important to look at what he accomplished as a starter. In his 22 starts, he averaged 14.7 points, 7.6 rebounds, 2.4 assists and a combined 1.7 blocks/steals. Maybe most impressive is his efficiency, with Powell shooting 64.6 percent from the field as a starter, plus 44.4 percent from three and 73.8 percent from the charity stripe. With DeAndre Jordan signing in Brooklyn during the offseason, Powell figures to transition into a full-time starting role during 2019-20. As a result, his fantasy value should hit a new high. He's a relatively low-usage player, but will be a strong contributor in the field-goal and free-throw percentage categories as a big man.
The 45th overall pick out of Stanford in the 2014 NBA Draft, Powell's role has been consistently growing year-to-year. He saw a career-high 21.6 minutes per game last season, and he drew 22 starts across 77 appearances. While Powell's season numbers (10.6 PPG, 5.3 RPG, 1.5 APG) don't jump off the page, it's important to look at what he accomplished as a starter. In his 22 starts, he averaged 14.7 points, 7.6 rebounds, 2.4 assists and a combined 1.7 blocks/steals. Maybe most impressive is his efficiency, with Powell shooting 64.6 percent from the field as a starter, plus 44.4 percent from three and 73.8 percent from the charity stripe. With DeAndre Jordan signing in Brooklyn during the offseason, Powell figures to transition into a full-time starting role during 2019-20. As a result, his fantasy value should hit a new high. He's a relatively low-usage player, but will be a strong contributor in the field-goal and free-throw percentage categories as a big man.
IND (G, PG, SG)
G
69
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,337.0
REB
343.0
AST
315.0
STL
56.0
BLK
29.0
TO
110.0
FGM
440.0
FGA
907.0
FTM
189.0
FTA
207.0
Brogdon is coming off an impressive third season, where he joined the elite 50/40/90 club. He posted career highs in points (15.6), rebounds (4.5), threes (1.6) and, unsurprisingly, true shooting percentage (61.4). While Brogdon is a relatively low-usage player, he's shown potential as top offensive option. In 64 appearances last season, he posted 12 games with at least 20 points and 13 games with more than four dimes. In joining the Pacers, Brogdon will need to showcase that ability more often, as Indiana will be without Victor Oladipo (knee) until around December. Whether Brogdon can transition into a bigger role is one question, but whether he can stay healthy is another. Through his first three seasons, Brogdon is averaging just 62.3 games played. We know that he'll be able to provide value as an efficient all-around shooter, but can he take on a bigger role and stay on the court?
Brogdon is coming off an impressive third season, where he joined the elite 50/40/90 club. He posted career highs in points (15.6), rebounds (4.5), threes (1.6) and, unsurprisingly, true shooting percentage (61.4). While Brogdon is a relatively low-usage player, he's shown potential as top offensive option. In 64 appearances last season, he posted 12 games with at least 20 points and 13 games with more than four dimes. In joining the Pacers, Brogdon will need to showcase that ability more often, as Indiana will be without Victor Oladipo (knee) until around December. Whether Brogdon can transition into a bigger role is one question, but whether he can stay healthy is another. Through his first three seasons, Brogdon is averaging just 62.3 games played. We know that he'll be able to provide value as an efficient all-around shooter, but can he take on a bigger role and stay on the court?
CLE (C, PF, C)
G
70
Min
28.2
FPTS
1,326.0
REB
607.0
AST
235.0
STL
110.0
BLK
68.0
TO
107.0
FGM
283.0
FGA
535.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
147.0
During Nance's first full season in Cleveland, he set career highs in points (9.4), rebounds (8.2), assists (3.2) and minutes (26.8) over 67 contests. Though the Cavs finished near the bottom of the league in the standings, that didn't really impact the big man's overall production. In fact, it may have given him even more opportunities to succeed, especially considering the injury bug that bit Cleveland during the 2018-19 campaign. While Kevin Love and Tristan Thompson will both be back for the upcoming season, Nance figures to slot in as one of the first players off the bench in the frontcourt, likely allowing him to rack up minutes in the mid-20s on a nightly basis. That's assuming he stays healthy, however. Nance hasn't cracked more than 67 games in his first four seasons. On a positive note, Nance's shot from three improved drastically in 2018, as he knocked down a career-best 33.7 percent of his triples, sinking an average of 1.5 per matchup. The former first-round pick out of Wyoming continues to trend upward as he gains NBA experience, and he'll take that momentum into the 2019-20 season.
During Nance's first full season in Cleveland, he set career highs in points (9.4), rebounds (8.2), assists (3.2) and minutes (26.8) over 67 contests. Though the Cavs finished near the bottom of the league in the standings, that didn't really impact the big man's overall production. In fact, it may have given him even more opportunities to succeed, especially considering the injury bug that bit Cleveland during the 2018-19 campaign. While Kevin Love and Tristan Thompson will both be back for the upcoming season, Nance figures to slot in as one of the first players off the bench in the frontcourt, likely allowing him to rack up minutes in the mid-20s on a nightly basis. That's assuming he stays healthy, however. Nance hasn't cracked more than 67 games in his first four seasons. On a positive note, Nance's shot from three improved drastically in 2018, as he knocked down a career-best 33.7 percent of his triples, sinking an average of 1.5 per matchup. The former first-round pick out of Wyoming continues to trend upward as he gains NBA experience, and he'll take that momentum into the 2019-20 season.
CHI (C, PF, C)
G
73
Min
28.7
FPTS
1,323.0
REB
579.0
AST
164.0
STL
49.0
BLK
116.0
TO
123.0
FGM
361.0
FGA
717.0
FTM
173.0
FTA
211.0
Carter's rookie campaign was cut short by injury, with the seventh overall pick appearing in just 44 games. He started each one, however, seeing 25.2 minutes per contest. While his season averages don't jump off the page, a deeper look reveals why he's considered a promising young center. Carter racked up seven double-doubles, three 20-point games, nine performances with double-digit boards, and seven outings with three or more blocks. He demonstrated his full skillset against the Nuggets in late October, dropping 25 points, eight rebounds, five assists, two threes and a combined six steals/blocks in 38 minutes. The Bulls will be looking for Carter to showcase those skills even more in 2019-20, as Robin Lopez has moved on to Milwaukee, making Carter the clear-cut option at center. It seems likely Carter will see 30-plus minutes per contest, and he averaged 13.5 points, 10.4 rebounds, 2.4 assists and a combined 2.6 blocks/steals when seeing minutes in the 30s last year. But fantasy owners should remain patient with Carter, as he'll be entering just his age 20 season in 2019-20.
Carter's rookie campaign was cut short by injury, with the seventh overall pick appearing in just 44 games. He started each one, however, seeing 25.2 minutes per contest. While his season averages don't jump off the page, a deeper look reveals why he's considered a promising young center. Carter racked up seven double-doubles, three 20-point games, nine performances with double-digit boards, and seven outings with three or more blocks. He demonstrated his full skillset against the Nuggets in late October, dropping 25 points, eight rebounds, five assists, two threes and a combined six steals/blocks in 38 minutes. The Bulls will be looking for Carter to showcase those skills even more in 2019-20, as Robin Lopez has moved on to Milwaukee, making Carter the clear-cut option at center. It seems likely Carter will see 30-plus minutes per contest, and he averaged 13.5 points, 10.4 rebounds, 2.4 assists and a combined 2.6 blocks/steals when seeing minutes in the 30s last year. But fantasy owners should remain patient with Carter, as he'll be entering just his age 20 season in 2019-20.
UTA (G, PG)
G
68
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,316.0
REB
221.0
AST
416.0
STL
87.0
BLK
20.0
TO
120.0
FGM
421.0
FGA
970.0
FTM
314.0
FTA
376.0
After spending the first 12 years of his career in Memphis, Conley was traded to Utah over the summer in exchange for rebuilding pieces. Conley will bring in a much-needed veteran point guard presence to the Jazz, who were scraping by with Ricky Rubio, and coach Quin Snyder often put the ball into Donovan Mitchell's hands. Last season, Conley posted career highs in points (21.1) while playing at least 70 games for the first time since 2014-15. He also racked up nine outings with 30-plus points, including one 40-point game, plus 11 performances with double-digit assists and 10 games with at least three steals. But it seems likely Conley's role will be reduced in Utah, as he'll be playing with a more talented team that has won at least 50 games in two of the past three seasons. The situation is expected to result in fewer counting stats for Conley, but the 32-year-old could see good looks more consistently, which may boost his efficiency. Conley's new role and injury history are worth considering -- he's averaging 55.4 games played over the past five seasons -- but fantasy owners shouldn't be afraid to take a shot on the veteran, who has proven to be one of the better point guards in the NBA over the past half-decade.
After spending the first 12 years of his career in Memphis, Conley was traded to Utah over the summer in exchange for rebuilding pieces. Conley will bring in a much-needed veteran point guard presence to the Jazz, who were scraping by with Ricky Rubio, and coach Quin Snyder often put the ball into Donovan Mitchell's hands. Last season, Conley posted career highs in points (21.1) while playing at least 70 games for the first time since 2014-15. He also racked up nine outings with 30-plus points, including one 40-point game, plus 11 performances with double-digit assists and 10 games with at least three steals. But it seems likely Conley's role will be reduced in Utah, as he'll be playing with a more talented team that has won at least 50 games in two of the past three seasons. The situation is expected to result in fewer counting stats for Conley, but the 32-year-old could see good looks more consistently, which may boost his efficiency. Conley's new role and injury history are worth considering -- he's averaging 55.4 games played over the past five seasons -- but fantasy owners shouldn't be afraid to take a shot on the veteran, who has proven to be one of the better point guards in the NBA over the past half-decade.
TOR (C, C)
G
75
Min
26.9
FPTS
1,294.0
REB
519.0
AST
337.0
STL
70.0
BLK
77.0
TO
128.0
FGM
323.0
FGA
721.0
FTM
121.0
FTA
157.0
Gasol exercised his $25.6 million player option to remain with the Toronto Raptors in 2019-20. It will be the first of his 12 seasons not opening the year with the Grizzlies after he was traded to the Raptors at last February's trade deadline. Though age is beginning to take a toll on his play, Gasol can still be an impactful player on both ends of the court. He averaged 9.1 points, 6.6 rebounds and 3.9 assists in 26 regular-season games after arriving in Toronto. Gasol added 2.2 combined blocks/steals and 1.3 threes as well, shooting 44.8 percent from the field and 36.3 percent from distance. He also started all of Toronto's playoff games en route to the franchise's first championship. It's worth noting that he averaged 15.7 points, 8.6 rebounds and 4.7 assists in 53 games with Memphis last season, so the former All-NBA selection and Defensive Player of the Year still has a lot to offer. With Kawhi Leonard gone, Gasol should get more opportunities to touch the ball, and he should be a safe fantasy selection as a big who can score, rebound, defend and step out for a three.
Gasol exercised his $25.6 million player option to remain with the Toronto Raptors in 2019-20. It will be the first of his 12 seasons not opening the year with the Grizzlies after he was traded to the Raptors at last February's trade deadline. Though age is beginning to take a toll on his play, Gasol can still be an impactful player on both ends of the court. He averaged 9.1 points, 6.6 rebounds and 3.9 assists in 26 regular-season games after arriving in Toronto. Gasol added 2.2 combined blocks/steals and 1.3 threes as well, shooting 44.8 percent from the field and 36.3 percent from distance. He also started all of Toronto's playoff games en route to the franchise's first championship. It's worth noting that he averaged 15.7 points, 8.6 rebounds and 4.7 assists in 53 games with Memphis last season, so the former All-NBA selection and Defensive Player of the Year still has a lot to offer. With Kawhi Leonard gone, Gasol should get more opportunities to touch the ball, and he should be a safe fantasy selection as a big who can score, rebound, defend and step out for a three.
ATL (C, C)
G
75
Min
26.8
FPTS
1,282.0
REB
575.0
AST
112.0
STL
35.0
BLK
108.0
TO
126.0
FGM
407.0
FGA
844.0
FTM
195.0
FTA
281.0
Len finished his first season in Atlanta with a career high in points (11.1) to go with 5.5 rebounds, 1.3 combined blocks/steals and 1.0 three-pointers per game. Len split time with Dewayne Dedmon for most of the season, but he filled in for an injured Dedmon admirably at the end of the season, averaging 18.6 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.0 assists, 1.0 blocks and 3.1 threes over his final seven games of the season. With Dedmon donning a Kings jersey this season, Len is likely to open the season as the starter, where he'll have to fend off new addition Damian Jones and upstart rookie Bruno Fernando to retain that starting job. More playing time could mean a bump in production, and Len averaged 19.9 points, 9.9 rebounds, and 2.2 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes in 2018-19.
Len finished his first season in Atlanta with a career high in points (11.1) to go with 5.5 rebounds, 1.3 combined blocks/steals and 1.0 three-pointers per game. Len split time with Dewayne Dedmon for most of the season, but he filled in for an injured Dedmon admirably at the end of the season, averaging 18.6 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.0 assists, 1.0 blocks and 3.1 threes over his final seven games of the season. With Dedmon donning a Kings jersey this season, Len is likely to open the season as the starter, where he'll have to fend off new addition Damian Jones and upstart rookie Bruno Fernando to retain that starting job. More playing time could mean a bump in production, and Len averaged 19.9 points, 9.9 rebounds, and 2.2 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes in 2018-19.
CHI (F, PF, SF)
G
72
Min
32.6
FPTS
1,275.0
REB
414.0
AST
177.0
STL
103.0
BLK
43.0
TO
114.0
FGM
441.0
FGA
920.0
FTM
111.0
FTA
134.0
Despite struggling (by his standards) through 41 games with the Wizards in 2018-19, Porter played arguably the best basketball of his career across 15 appearances for the Bulls after being acquired prior to the trade deadline. Although his season was cut short by knee and shoulder injuries that kept him sidelined for the final 11 contests, Porter proved to be a strong fit on both ends of the court for Chicago, pouring in career-high averages in points (17.5), assists (2.7), made threes (2.6) and minutes (32.8) while connecting on career-best shooting percentages from beyond the arc (48.8) and the charity stripe (90.6). The sample size is obviously small, and this was the first time since his rookie year that he appeared in less than 74 games. However, the Bulls empowered Porter, allowing him to showcase a more impressive and well-rounded offensive skillset than he ever had a chance to display during his five-and-a-half-year tenure with the Wizards. Moreover, Chicago's key offseason additions (Tomas Satoransky and Thaddeus Young) are both low-usage offensive players with unselfish tendencies, so Porter can be expected to maintain plenty of responsibility as a scorer going forward. As a result, there's a decent chance the 26-year-old wing builds off the positive momentum and turns in his best statistical campaign in 2019-20.
Despite struggling (by his standards) through 41 games with the Wizards in 2018-19, Porter played arguably the best basketball of his career across 15 appearances for the Bulls after being acquired prior to the trade deadline. Although his season was cut short by knee and shoulder injuries that kept him sidelined for the final 11 contests, Porter proved to be a strong fit on both ends of the court for Chicago, pouring in career-high averages in points (17.5), assists (2.7), made threes (2.6) and minutes (32.8) while connecting on career-best shooting percentages from beyond the arc (48.8) and the charity stripe (90.6). The sample size is obviously small, and this was the first time since his rookie year that he appeared in less than 74 games. However, the Bulls empowered Porter, allowing him to showcase a more impressive and well-rounded offensive skillset than he ever had a chance to display during his five-and-a-half-year tenure with the Wizards. Moreover, Chicago's key offseason additions (Tomas Satoransky and Thaddeus Young) are both low-usage offensive players with unselfish tendencies, so Porter can be expected to maintain plenty of responsibility as a scorer going forward. As a result, there's a decent chance the 26-year-old wing builds off the positive momentum and turns in his best statistical campaign in 2019-20.
MIN (G, PG)
G
73
Min
32.8
FPTS
1,263.0
REB
201.0
AST
585.0
STL
86.0
BLK
34.0
TO
184.0
FGM
367.0
FGA
847.0
FTM
242.0
FTA
290.0
A model of consistency and relatively good health for the majority of his career, Teague endured a somewhat atypical campaign last season in various aspects. To begin with, he suited up for a career-low 42 games as a result of ankle and foot issues. He also averaged his fewest points in nearly a decade, with his 12.1 per contest ranking as his lowest since the 2010-11 campaign. Unsurprisingly, that downturn was accompanied by an inefficient shot -- Teague's 42.3 percent success rate from the floor was the second-lowest of his career, exceeding only the 39.6 percent figure he'd mustered in his rookie 2009-10 season. On the brighter side, the veteran did dish out a career-best 8.2 assists per game, helping make up for his offensive struggles from both a real-world and fantasy perspective. Looking ahead to the coming season, Teague projects as the unquestioned starter at point guard once again, although the talented Shabazz Napier does loom as his backup. An uptick in health alone should lead to an improvement in Teague's overall numbers, as he's never averaged fewer than 14.7 points per game when playing at least 70 contests in a season. Talented first-round pick Jarrett Culver, Andrew Wiggins, Robert Covington and Karl-Anthony Towns should also help keep Teague's assists upside high, making a resurgence highly conceivable if he can avoid the injury bug.
A model of consistency and relatively good health for the majority of his career, Teague endured a somewhat atypical campaign last season in various aspects. To begin with, he suited up for a career-low 42 games as a result of ankle and foot issues. He also averaged his fewest points in nearly a decade, with his 12.1 per contest ranking as his lowest since the 2010-11 campaign. Unsurprisingly, that downturn was accompanied by an inefficient shot -- Teague's 42.3 percent success rate from the floor was the second-lowest of his career, exceeding only the 39.6 percent figure he'd mustered in his rookie 2009-10 season. On the brighter side, the veteran did dish out a career-best 8.2 assists per game, helping make up for his offensive struggles from both a real-world and fantasy perspective. Looking ahead to the coming season, Teague projects as the unquestioned starter at point guard once again, although the talented Shabazz Napier does loom as his backup. An uptick in health alone should lead to an improvement in Teague's overall numbers, as he's never averaged fewer than 14.7 points per game when playing at least 70 contests in a season. Talented first-round pick Jarrett Culver, Andrew Wiggins, Robert Covington and Karl-Anthony Towns should also help keep Teague's assists upside high, making a resurgence highly conceivable if he can avoid the injury bug.
IND (G, SF, SG)
G
77
Min
27.1
FPTS
1,245.0
REB
403.0
AST
180.0
STL
82.0
BLK
30.0
TO
74.0
FGM
423.0
FGA
929.0
FTM
209.0
FTA
241.0
Lamb agreed to a three-year, $31.5 million deal with the Pacers after spending the last four years of his career with the Hornets. Lamb had the best statistical season of his career in 2018-19, with averages of 15.3 points, 5.5 rebounds, 2.2 assists, 1.5 threes and 1.1 steals in 28.5 minutes per contest. He was the second-leading scorer on Charlotte and shot 44.0 percent from the field, 34.8 percent from three and 88.8 percent from the charity stripe. The 6-foot-5 wing can play either shooting guard or small forward and is likely to be the top backup to Victor Oladipo, where he could come off the bench as the Pacers' sixth man. He's likely to get a similar share of minutes in Indiana as he did in Charlotte, but with other quality scoring options on the roster, it's not unreasonable to expect a decline in points. Lamb will have to be productive in other facets of the game to make more of fantasy impact in 2019-20.
Lamb agreed to a three-year, $31.5 million deal with the Pacers after spending the last four years of his career with the Hornets. Lamb had the best statistical season of his career in 2018-19, with averages of 15.3 points, 5.5 rebounds, 2.2 assists, 1.5 threes and 1.1 steals in 28.5 minutes per contest. He was the second-leading scorer on Charlotte and shot 44.0 percent from the field, 34.8 percent from three and 88.8 percent from the charity stripe. The 6-foot-5 wing can play either shooting guard or small forward and is likely to be the top backup to Victor Oladipo, where he could come off the bench as the Pacers' sixth man. He's likely to get a similar share of minutes in Indiana as he did in Charlotte, but with other quality scoring options on the roster, it's not unreasonable to expect a decline in points. Lamb will have to be productive in other facets of the game to make more of fantasy impact in 2019-20.
CLE (C, C)
G
71
Min
26.4
FPTS
1,244.0
REB
721.0
AST
135.0
STL
44.0
BLK
25.0
TO
92.0
FGM
324.0
FGA
595.0
FTM
100.0
FTA
166.0
In terms of pure production, Thompson is coming off his best season since 2013-14, and he averaged 10.9 points and 10.2 rebounds across 27.9 minutes per game. However, he only appeared in 43 games for the Cavaliers. The 28-year-old's biggest concern heading into the 2019-20 season is his durability, as he has now played in just 96 regular-season games over the last two seasons. Last year, Thompson was plagued with a foot injury, and the season before it was both his calf and ankle. The good news for Thompson is that when he was active last year, he was a starter, and the Cavaliers' frontcourt personnel remains relatively unchanged entering this season. So, if Thompson is healthy, he will likely be heavily featured in the center rotation along with Larry Nance and Ante Zizic. Thompson's future with Cleveland, however, is another story, as he is entering the final year of the lucrative five-year deal he signed with the team back in 2015. As a large expiring deal on a team that is focused on the development of younger talent, Thompson could potentially end up being traded at some point this season.
In terms of pure production, Thompson is coming off his best season since 2013-14, and he averaged 10.9 points and 10.2 rebounds across 27.9 minutes per game. However, he only appeared in 43 games for the Cavaliers. The 28-year-old's biggest concern heading into the 2019-20 season is his durability, as he has now played in just 96 regular-season games over the last two seasons. Last year, Thompson was plagued with a foot injury, and the season before it was both his calf and ankle. The good news for Thompson is that when he was active last year, he was a starter, and the Cavaliers' frontcourt personnel remains relatively unchanged entering this season. So, if Thompson is healthy, he will likely be heavily featured in the center rotation along with Larry Nance and Ante Zizic. Thompson's future with Cleveland, however, is another story, as he is entering the final year of the lucrative five-year deal he signed with the team back in 2015. As a large expiring deal on a team that is focused on the development of younger talent, Thompson could potentially end up being traded at some point this season.
PHI (F, C, PF)
G
67
Min
28.6
FPTS
1,232.0
REB
412.0
AST
275.0
STL
57.0
BLK
86.0
TO
99.0
FGM
331.0
FGA
645.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
127.0
Another solid defensive season and his best shooting percentage (53.5) since the 2014-15 campaign helped Horford earn a four-year, $109 million deal this offseason from the division-rival 76ers, who'll team him with Joel Embiid to form a highly versatile frontcourt tandem. The 33-year-old left no doubt he still had plenty left in the tank last season with the Celtics, even posting a career-best 82.1 percent free-throw percentage while keeping his production in non-scoring categories at serviceable-to-above-average levels. Horford also continued his latter-career trend of spacing the floor effectively, attempting just over three three-point attempts per contest for the fourth consecutive season and draining them at a 36.0 percent clip. With both Jimmy Butler and J.J. Redick having exited Philadelphia this offseason, Horford could see an appreciable bump in the 10.6 shot attempts he averaged last season. Furthermore, he could certainly benefit from the double teams Embiid projects to see, as well as from playing with a more willing passer at point guard in Ben Simmons than he did the last two seasons while sharing the floor with Kyrie Irving. Lining up alongside an elite big man in Embiid also allows Horford to slide into his more natural floor-stretching power forward role, even as his rebounds, already at a career-low 6.7 last year, potentially take another hit in the coming season.
Another solid defensive season and his best shooting percentage (53.5) since the 2014-15 campaign helped Horford earn a four-year, $109 million deal this offseason from the division-rival 76ers, who'll team him with Joel Embiid to form a highly versatile frontcourt tandem. The 33-year-old left no doubt he still had plenty left in the tank last season with the Celtics, even posting a career-best 82.1 percent free-throw percentage while keeping his production in non-scoring categories at serviceable-to-above-average levels. Horford also continued his latter-career trend of spacing the floor effectively, attempting just over three three-point attempts per contest for the fourth consecutive season and draining them at a 36.0 percent clip. With both Jimmy Butler and J.J. Redick having exited Philadelphia this offseason, Horford could see an appreciable bump in the 10.6 shot attempts he averaged last season. Furthermore, he could certainly benefit from the double teams Embiid projects to see, as well as from playing with a more willing passer at point guard in Ben Simmons than he did the last two seasons while sharing the floor with Kyrie Irving. Lining up alongside an elite big man in Embiid also allows Horford to slide into his more natural floor-stretching power forward role, even as his rebounds, already at a career-low 6.7 last year, potentially take another hit in the coming season.
BOS (F, SG, SF)
G
72
Min
28.4
FPTS
1,231.0
REB
366.0
AST
294.0
STL
67.0
BLK
26.0
TO
115.0
FGM
398.0
FGA
861.0
FTM
173.0
FTA
205.0
Expectations were high last fall when Hayward returned to the starting lineup in October after essentially missing all of 2017-18 to an ugly ankle injury. But after 15 starts, it was clear that Hayward had yet to return to his pre-injury form. Then coach Brad Stevens inserted Marcus Morris and Marcus Smart into the starting lineup, moving Hayward and Jaylen Brown to the bench. Hayward appeared relieved, but his play was inconsistent all winter long. He closed the season out with an eight-game run of 16.4 points on 58.5 percent shooting, 6.0 rebounds and 3.0 assists, sparking hope he might return to almost-star-level performance just in time for the playoffs. But his inconsistencies returned during the postseason. Now, combined with new arrival Kemba Walker, the triumvirate of Hayward, Jayson Tatum and Walker are expected to lead Boston's scoring efforts. But another slow start from Hayward could once again force him to the bench, especially if Jaylen Brown returns to 2017-18 form.
Expectations were high last fall when Hayward returned to the starting lineup in October after essentially missing all of 2017-18 to an ugly ankle injury. But after 15 starts, it was clear that Hayward had yet to return to his pre-injury form. Then coach Brad Stevens inserted Marcus Morris and Marcus Smart into the starting lineup, moving Hayward and Jaylen Brown to the bench. Hayward appeared relieved, but his play was inconsistent all winter long. He closed the season out with an eight-game run of 16.4 points on 58.5 percent shooting, 6.0 rebounds and 3.0 assists, sparking hope he might return to almost-star-level performance just in time for the playoffs. But his inconsistencies returned during the postseason. Now, combined with new arrival Kemba Walker, the triumvirate of Hayward, Jayson Tatum and Walker are expected to lead Boston's scoring efforts. But another slow start from Hayward could once again force him to the bench, especially if Jaylen Brown returns to 2017-18 form.
TOR (C, C, PF)
G
76
Min
23.4
FPTS
1,229.0
REB
538.0
AST
79.0
STL
26.0
BLK
93.0
TO
101.0
FGM
435.0
FGA
864.0
FTM
136.0
FTA
174.0
After being a fixture in the Raptors' starting lineup for the first half of the 2018-19 regular season, Ibaka was forced to take on a role off the bench in the second half after the team acquired All-Star center Marc Gasol at the trade deadline. As a result, Ibaka started seeing six fewer minutes per game and his points per game average dropped from 16.0 to 12.3. He did, however, maintain strong rebounding numbers. In fact, increased his average from 8.0 per game to 8.5. While Ibaka still boasts a solid mid-range game, he shot under 30 percent from behind the arc for the first time in his career, which was likely a big factor in the team going after Gasol. But with Kawhi Leonard leaving over the summer, there may be more opportunities for Ibaka. Leonard's absence shorts the Raptors 34.0 minutes at forward, as well as 26.6 points and 7.3 rebounds per game. The loss of Danny Green also opens up extra wing minutes, and it's possible coach Nick Nurse ends up sliding Pascal Siakam to small forward, allowing Ibaka to reclaim a starting role in the frontcourt next to Gasol. That's a best-case, but realistic, scenario. When both Green and Leonard were off the court last season, Ibaka collected an additional 7.9 fantasy points per 36 minutes, which is a meaningful increase. If he can pair that with a starting role, a better fantasy season might be in the cards.
After being a fixture in the Raptors' starting lineup for the first half of the 2018-19 regular season, Ibaka was forced to take on a role off the bench in the second half after the team acquired All-Star center Marc Gasol at the trade deadline. As a result, Ibaka started seeing six fewer minutes per game and his points per game average dropped from 16.0 to 12.3. He did, however, maintain strong rebounding numbers. In fact, increased his average from 8.0 per game to 8.5. While Ibaka still boasts a solid mid-range game, he shot under 30 percent from behind the arc for the first time in his career, which was likely a big factor in the team going after Gasol. But with Kawhi Leonard leaving over the summer, there may be more opportunities for Ibaka. Leonard's absence shorts the Raptors 34.0 minutes at forward, as well as 26.6 points and 7.3 rebounds per game. The loss of Danny Green also opens up extra wing minutes, and it's possible coach Nick Nurse ends up sliding Pascal Siakam to small forward, allowing Ibaka to reclaim a starting role in the frontcourt next to Gasol. That's a best-case, but realistic, scenario. When both Green and Leonard were off the court last season, Ibaka collected an additional 7.9 fantasy points per 36 minutes, which is a meaningful increase. If he can pair that with a starting role, a better fantasy season might be in the cards.
SAN (G, PG)
G
70
Min
30.1
FPTS
1,218.0
REB
555.0
AST
316.0
STL
129.0
BLK
42.0
TO
162.0
FGM
291.0
FGA
659.0
FTM
151.0
FTA
206.0
Big things were expected from Murray last season after the Spurs moved on from Tony Parker at point guard. Murray had shown some promise in a starting role, averaging 10.1 points, 7.0 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.6 steals over 48 games during the 2017-18 season. Unfortunately for him and the Spurs, their hopes of him putting together a productive full season as a starter went up in smoke when he suffered a torn ACL during the preseason. If there is a silver lining, it's that the injury happened so early that he should be completely healthy this season. The Spurs haven't made any moves to bring in more competition at the position, leaving him as the projected starter over Derrick White and Patty Mills. Don't count on him to provide volume in terms of three-pointers, but his ability to be an above-average contributor on the boards and defensively for a point guard should once again make him an intriguing fantasy option. It would also be nice to see him improve on his career 70.8% shooting from the charity stripe, which can be a drag on a fantasy squad coming from a guard spot.
Big things were expected from Murray last season after the Spurs moved on from Tony Parker at point guard. Murray had shown some promise in a starting role, averaging 10.1 points, 7.0 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.6 steals over 48 games during the 2017-18 season. Unfortunately for him and the Spurs, their hopes of him putting together a productive full season as a starter went up in smoke when he suffered a torn ACL during the preseason. If there is a silver lining, it's that the injury happened so early that he should be completely healthy this season. The Spurs haven't made any moves to bring in more competition at the position, leaving him as the projected starter over Derrick White and Patty Mills. Don't count on him to provide volume in terms of three-pointers, but his ability to be an above-average contributor on the boards and defensively for a point guard should once again make him an intriguing fantasy option. It would also be nice to see him improve on his career 70.8% shooting from the charity stripe, which can be a drag on a fantasy squad coming from a guard spot.
UTA (F, SG, SF, PF)
G
82
Min
31.1
FPTS
1,210.0
REB
328.0
AST
412.0
STL
97.0
BLK
20.0
TO
159.0
FGM
346.0
FGA
771.0
FTM
90.0
FTA
122.0
Ingles put up a career-best 12.1 points over 82 contests last year, once again showcasing his durability and ability to pack the stat sheet on a nightly basis. He also finished 14th in the league in total assists by averaging 5.7 dimes, which is another career-high. There's no doubt that Ingles struggled to shoot the basketball from beyond the arc in comparison to recent years, sinking 39.1 percent of his attempts compared to a combined 44.0 percent over the prior two seasons. That said, he still averaged 2.3 made threes per matchup, and he owns an impressive 40.8 percent 3-point clip for his career, which is good enough for 20th all-time. Despite experiencing a down shooting year across the board, there's no reason to believe he won't have an opportunity to bounce back in the upcoming season, as he's expected to remain in a key role for the Jazz, though his opportunity for assists may decrease with the addition of Mike Conley. Ingles has also proven to be a fantasy asset by remaining healthy. He's played all 82 games in each of the last three seasons and has missed just four total games over his five-year career.
Ingles put up a career-best 12.1 points over 82 contests last year, once again showcasing his durability and ability to pack the stat sheet on a nightly basis. He also finished 14th in the league in total assists by averaging 5.7 dimes, which is another career-high. There's no doubt that Ingles struggled to shoot the basketball from beyond the arc in comparison to recent years, sinking 39.1 percent of his attempts compared to a combined 44.0 percent over the prior two seasons. That said, he still averaged 2.3 made threes per matchup, and he owns an impressive 40.8 percent 3-point clip for his career, which is good enough for 20th all-time. Despite experiencing a down shooting year across the board, there's no reason to believe he won't have an opportunity to bounce back in the upcoming season, as he's expected to remain in a key role for the Jazz, though his opportunity for assists may decrease with the addition of Mike Conley. Ingles has also proven to be a fantasy asset by remaining healthy. He's played all 82 games in each of the last three seasons and has missed just four total games over his five-year career.
MEM (F, PF, C)
G
78
Min
24.9
FPTS
1,207.0
REB
529.0
AST
124.0
STL
56.0
BLK
98.0
TO
87.0
FGM
331.0
FGA
598.0
FTM
148.0
FTA
225.0
Clarke transferred to Gonzaga last season after two years with San Jose State, and he won the WCC Rookie of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year behind versatile play on both ends of the court. Over his last two collegiate seasons, Clarke put up 17.1 points, 8.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists on 64.0 percent shooting from the field. On top of the near double-double he averaged on offense, Clarke also posted a healthy 4.1 combined blocks/steals. He was a standout in the NCAA tournament, leading the Bulldogs on a deep run. The No. 21 overall pick in 2019 should be the primary backup at one of the frontcourt positions behind Jonas Valanciunas and Jaren Jackson, where he'll likely find a rotational role with minutes in the 20s. His rebounding, shooting and defensive numbers should provide him a high floor as a rookie on an up-and-coming Memphis team.
Clarke transferred to Gonzaga last season after two years with San Jose State, and he won the WCC Rookie of the Year and Defensive Player of the Year behind versatile play on both ends of the court. Over his last two collegiate seasons, Clarke put up 17.1 points, 8.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists on 64.0 percent shooting from the field. On top of the near double-double he averaged on offense, Clarke also posted a healthy 4.1 combined blocks/steals. He was a standout in the NCAA tournament, leading the Bulldogs on a deep run. The No. 21 overall pick in 2019 should be the primary backup at one of the frontcourt positions behind Jonas Valanciunas and Jaren Jackson, where he'll likely find a rotational role with minutes in the 20s. His rebounding, shooting and defensive numbers should provide him a high floor as a rookie on an up-and-coming Memphis team.
OKC (G, PG, SG)
G
81
Min
29.2
FPTS
1,198.0
REB
323.0
AST
365.0
STL
114.0
BLK
49.0
TO
153.0
FGM
363.0
FGA
791.0
FTM
182.0
FTA
222.0
The Kentucky product had a much more productive rookie year than anticipated with the Clippers, and his role is likely to grow with the Thunder. Gilgeous-Alexander was traded to Oklahoma City in the offseason as part of the Paul George deal, and he's slated to be the Thunder's starting two-guard for the upcoming season. He averaged 10.8 points, 3.3 assists, 2.8 boards and 1.2 steals as a rookie, logging 26.5 minutes per night and appearing in all 82 regular-season games. He looked more comfortable as the season went on, finding his rhythm within the offense and making solid contributions in the playoffs, including a career-high 25 points against Golden State on April 21. He shot a respectable field goal percentage (47.6) and three-point percentage (36.7) in his first season, and he should be afforded more shots per game with OKC. Though he'll likely start the season at shooting guard opposite Chris Paul in the backcourt, Paul's continuing inability to stay healthy may thrust Gilgeous-Alexander into the point guard role at some point, which would increase his value. Expect the second-year guard to take on a prominent role with the rebuilding Thunder, making him an interesting late-round selection in standard fantasy formats.
The Kentucky product had a much more productive rookie year than anticipated with the Clippers, and his role is likely to grow with the Thunder. Gilgeous-Alexander was traded to Oklahoma City in the offseason as part of the Paul George deal, and he's slated to be the Thunder's starting two-guard for the upcoming season. He averaged 10.8 points, 3.3 assists, 2.8 boards and 1.2 steals as a rookie, logging 26.5 minutes per night and appearing in all 82 regular-season games. He looked more comfortable as the season went on, finding his rhythm within the offense and making solid contributions in the playoffs, including a career-high 25 points against Golden State on April 21. He shot a respectable field goal percentage (47.6) and three-point percentage (36.7) in his first season, and he should be afforded more shots per game with OKC. Though he'll likely start the season at shooting guard opposite Chris Paul in the backcourt, Paul's continuing inability to stay healthy may thrust Gilgeous-Alexander into the point guard role at some point, which would increase his value. Expect the second-year guard to take on a prominent role with the rebuilding Thunder, making him an interesting late-round selection in standard fantasy formats.
GSW (C, C)
G
77
Min
24.5
FPTS
1,196.0
REB
484.0
AST
162.0
STL
82.0
BLK
47.0
TO
72.0
FGM
367.0
FGA
654.0
FTM
128.0
FTA
217.0
Cauley-Stein should have no shortage of motivation this coming season, as long-term job security eludes him for the time being. The fifth-year big man signed a one-year deal with the Warriors for slightly more than the league minimum after four so-so seasons in Sacramento to open his career. The seven-footer played more up to his size over his last two campaigns, averaging a career-best 8.4 rebounds last season and pairing them with a new high-water mark in steals (1.2). However, he's disappointingly averaged less than a block per game in each pro campaign thus far and also drained a career-worst 55.6 percent of his free-throw attempts last season. The center position has mostly taken a back seat offensively in Golden State for the last several seasons, given the plethora of talent elsewhere in the starting five. Yet, with Klay Thompson likely out until sometime after the All-Star break with his knee injury and Kevin Durant (Achilles) now in Brooklyn, that may change to an extent in the 2019-20 campaign. Whether Cauley-Stein will see enough minutes to capitalize is firmly up in the air, however. A fellow big who's almost three years younger and has considerably more experience in coach Steve Kerr's system, Kevon Looney, will be splitting time with Cauley-Stein at center. Cauley-Stein certainly has much more prototypical size for the position than the 6-foot-9 Looney, but the latter has proven capable of handling center duties in the way the position is deployed in Golden State's fast-paced attack. Ultimately, a drop in production across the board for Cauley-Stein is very possible, considering Warriors centers in the Kerr Era have typically averaged considerably fewer than the respective 10.6 and 9.1 attempts the big man put up during his last two Kings seasons.
Cauley-Stein should have no shortage of motivation this coming season, as long-term job security eludes him for the time being. The fifth-year big man signed a one-year deal with the Warriors for slightly more than the league minimum after four so-so seasons in Sacramento to open his career. The seven-footer played more up to his size over his last two campaigns, averaging a career-best 8.4 rebounds last season and pairing them with a new high-water mark in steals (1.2). However, he's disappointingly averaged less than a block per game in each pro campaign thus far and also drained a career-worst 55.6 percent of his free-throw attempts last season. The center position has mostly taken a back seat offensively in Golden State for the last several seasons, given the plethora of talent elsewhere in the starting five. Yet, with Klay Thompson likely out until sometime after the All-Star break with his knee injury and Kevin Durant (Achilles) now in Brooklyn, that may change to an extent in the 2019-20 campaign. Whether Cauley-Stein will see enough minutes to capitalize is firmly up in the air, however. A fellow big who's almost three years younger and has considerably more experience in coach Steve Kerr's system, Kevon Looney, will be splitting time with Cauley-Stein at center. Cauley-Stein certainly has much more prototypical size for the position than the 6-foot-9 Looney, but the latter has proven capable of handling center duties in the way the position is deployed in Golden State's fast-paced attack. Ultimately, a drop in production across the board for Cauley-Stein is very possible, considering Warriors centers in the Kerr Era have typically averaged considerably fewer than the respective 10.6 and 9.1 attempts the big man put up during his last two Kings seasons.
TOR (G, PG)
G
70
Min
32.0
FPTS
1,195.0
REB
316.0
AST
497.0
STL
92.0
BLK
18.0
TO
184.0
FGM
310.0
FGA
770.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
196.0
It's not too surprising that this past season Lowry averaged his lowest points per game (14.2) since 2010-11 with the Rockets, as the point guard was joined by ball-dominant scorer Kawhi Leonard for the team's championship run. However, with the uptick in talent surrounding him last season, Lowry did average a career-high 8.7 assists per game. Now, entering his 14th NBA season, not only is Leonard gone, but so is sharp-shooter Danny Green, and Lowry may once again have to shoulder a larger offensive load at 33 years old. While that may add to Lowry's fantasy upside, it's unclear if the aging point guard has the ability to do so over the course of an 82-game season. Lowry is coming off a year where he shot just 34.7 percent from behind the arc, which is a significant drop in accuracy for a player who had shot 40.4 percent from deep over the course of his last three seasons. Also, with young point guard Fred VanVleet having a breakout 2018-19 campaign and a historic postseason, the Raptors now have the ability to put a limit on Lowry's regular-season. All things considered, if Lowry can stay healthy, he has the potential to increase his fantasy value given a presumed higher usage rate.
It's not too surprising that this past season Lowry averaged his lowest points per game (14.2) since 2010-11 with the Rockets, as the point guard was joined by ball-dominant scorer Kawhi Leonard for the team's championship run. However, with the uptick in talent surrounding him last season, Lowry did average a career-high 8.7 assists per game. Now, entering his 14th NBA season, not only is Leonard gone, but so is sharp-shooter Danny Green, and Lowry may once again have to shoulder a larger offensive load at 33 years old. While that may add to Lowry's fantasy upside, it's unclear if the aging point guard has the ability to do so over the course of an 82-game season. Lowry is coming off a year where he shot just 34.7 percent from behind the arc, which is a significant drop in accuracy for a player who had shot 40.4 percent from deep over the course of his last three seasons. Also, with young point guard Fred VanVleet having a breakout 2018-19 campaign and a historic postseason, the Raptors now have the ability to put a limit on Lowry's regular-season. All things considered, if Lowry can stay healthy, he has the potential to increase his fantasy value given a presumed higher usage rate.
MIN (F, SG, SF)
G
80
Min
35.1
FPTS
1,194.0
REB
389.0
AST
192.0
STL
77.0
BLK
53.0
TO
161.0
FGM
569.0
FGA
1,344.0
FTM
232.0
FTA
327.0
Wiggins only minimally increased his field goal attempts and scoring average last year, despite Jimmy Butler's trade to the 76ers 10 games into the season. After his No. 1 selection in 2014 and Rookie of the Year honors, Wiggins increased his scoring average in each of his first three seasons, reaching an apex of 23.6 points in the 2016-17 season. He's failed to hit the 20-point threshold since, but his production in 2018-19 was encouraging. Wiggins played a career-low 34.8 minutes per game in 73 appearances, and his averages per 36 minutes were up across the board. He averaged career bests in rebounds (4.8), assists (2.5) and three-pointers (1.6) per game. Wiggins closed the season on a tear, averaging 21.3 points, 5.0 rebounds and 3.6 assists over the final 12 games. His career-best 1.7 combined blocks/steals should give fantasy owners hope that Wiggins can improve upon defensive deficiencies that have nagged him throughout his career, though Wiggins is far more valuable on the offensive end of the floor. A volume scorer throughout his career, he'll be the clear number two option in the Minnesota offense behind Karl-Anthony Towns.
Wiggins only minimally increased his field goal attempts and scoring average last year, despite Jimmy Butler's trade to the 76ers 10 games into the season. After his No. 1 selection in 2014 and Rookie of the Year honors, Wiggins increased his scoring average in each of his first three seasons, reaching an apex of 23.6 points in the 2016-17 season. He's failed to hit the 20-point threshold since, but his production in 2018-19 was encouraging. Wiggins played a career-low 34.8 minutes per game in 73 appearances, and his averages per 36 minutes were up across the board. He averaged career bests in rebounds (4.8), assists (2.5) and three-pointers (1.6) per game. Wiggins closed the season on a tear, averaging 21.3 points, 5.0 rebounds and 3.6 assists over the final 12 games. His career-best 1.7 combined blocks/steals should give fantasy owners hope that Wiggins can improve upon defensive deficiencies that have nagged him throughout his career, though Wiggins is far more valuable on the offensive end of the floor. A volume scorer throughout his career, he'll be the clear number two option in the Minnesota offense behind Karl-Anthony Towns.
NYK (G, PG, SG, SF)
G
81
Min
33.7
FPTS
1,185.0
REB
487.0
AST
358.0
STL
55.0
BLK
19.0
TO
248.0
FGM
507.0
FGA
1,264.0
FTM
228.0
FTA
330.0
Barrett will step into the New York spotlight after an impressive freshman campaign at Duke where he averaged 22.6 points, 7.6 rebounds and 4.3 assists while shooting 30.8 percent from deep -- a mark feels like it needs to improve given the importance of three-point shooting, especially for guards, in the NBA. Barrett appears to be in line to play a high-volume role as both a scorer and playmaker in his rookie season, though the Knicks do have other, more experienced ball-dependent players on the roster, including Dennis Smith Jr., Elfrid Payton and Julius Randle. Barrett showed off his potential in summer league, averaging 16.8 points, 9.3 rebounds, 5.0 assists and 1.0 block in four games. However, he shot an extremely underwhelming 37.3 percent from the field, 28.6 percent from three and 65.4 percent from the charity stripe. On one hand, it feels like there's a clear avenue for Barrett to take control of the Knicks' offense and be the face of the franchise as a rookie. On the other hand, the number of other options New York has to score and distribute the basketball means Barrett could get lost in the shuffle if his efficiency, playmaking and/or defense are worse than anticipated.
Barrett will step into the New York spotlight after an impressive freshman campaign at Duke where he averaged 22.6 points, 7.6 rebounds and 4.3 assists while shooting 30.8 percent from deep -- a mark feels like it needs to improve given the importance of three-point shooting, especially for guards, in the NBA. Barrett appears to be in line to play a high-volume role as both a scorer and playmaker in his rookie season, though the Knicks do have other, more experienced ball-dependent players on the roster, including Dennis Smith Jr., Elfrid Payton and Julius Randle. Barrett showed off his potential in summer league, averaging 16.8 points, 9.3 rebounds, 5.0 assists and 1.0 block in four games. However, he shot an extremely underwhelming 37.3 percent from the field, 28.6 percent from three and 65.4 percent from the charity stripe. On one hand, it feels like there's a clear avenue for Barrett to take control of the Knicks' offense and be the face of the franchise as a rookie. On the other hand, the number of other options New York has to score and distribute the basketball means Barrett could get lost in the shuffle if his efficiency, playmaking and/or defense are worse than anticipated.
LAL (F, SF, PF)
G
75
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,183.0
REB
394.0
AST
153.0
STL
45.0
BLK
44.0
TO
146.0
FGM
482.0
FGA
1,072.0
FTM
210.0
FTA
272.0
There weren't a lot of bright spots for the Lakers last year, as Los Angeles missed the playoffs despite adding LeBron James. Injuries and trade rumors proved to be their eventual downfall. However, one of the bright spots was Kuzma, who appeared in 70 games during his second season in the league. He averaged 18.7 points per game and was once again a weapon from behind the arc by averaging 1.8 three-pointers per contest. The problem was he only shot 30.3% on three-pointers, which was down from 36.6% during his rookie season. His rebounding numbers also declined while he provided very few contributions defensively. Still, he's going to remain one of the key offensive weapons on the team, especially after they dealt away much of their depth to acquire Anthony Davis. While the Lakers will still rely on Kuzma to provide spacing, it wouldn't be a surprise to see his scoring numbers and usage rate decline with Davis now in the fold. Rebounds might also be harder for him to come by with so much size on the floor around him.
There weren't a lot of bright spots for the Lakers last year, as Los Angeles missed the playoffs despite adding LeBron James. Injuries and trade rumors proved to be their eventual downfall. However, one of the bright spots was Kuzma, who appeared in 70 games during his second season in the league. He averaged 18.7 points per game and was once again a weapon from behind the arc by averaging 1.8 three-pointers per contest. The problem was he only shot 30.3% on three-pointers, which was down from 36.6% during his rookie season. His rebounding numbers also declined while he provided very few contributions defensively. Still, he's going to remain one of the key offensive weapons on the team, especially after they dealt away much of their depth to acquire Anthony Davis. While the Lakers will still rely on Kuzma to provide spacing, it wouldn't be a surprise to see his scoring numbers and usage rate decline with Davis now in the fold. Rebounds might also be harder for him to come by with so much size on the floor around him.
CHA (F, SF, PF)
G
82
Min
29.2
FPTS
1,177.0
REB
456.0
AST
134.0
STL
78.0
BLK
69.0
TO
71.0
FGM
376.0
FGA
818.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
181.0
The 12th overall pick in 2018, Bridges had a solid rookie season. Once the Hornets were clearly out of postseason contention, he was given more run, securing 25 starts and 10 games seeing at least 30 minutes. In those 10 games, Bridges averaged 12.7 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 1.3 steals. Though he was a low-usage player as a rookie, taking 10.8 shots per 36 minutes, he posted quality efficiency with shooting splits of 46.4 FG%, 32.5 3P% and 75.3 FT%. With the Hornets' two leading scorers from last season (Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb) moving on, Bridges may be asked to handle a bigger offensive burden in 2019-20. On one hand, based on Bridges' rookie year, we shouldn't expect him to turn into a volume scorer. On the other hand, someone has to take shots for this Hornets team, and it can't just be Terry Rozier and Nicolas Batum. It's tough to gauge what to expect from Bridges in Year 2, but it's nearly a guarantee he'll take on some sort of expanded role, making him an intriguing late-round flier.
The 12th overall pick in 2018, Bridges had a solid rookie season. Once the Hornets were clearly out of postseason contention, he was given more run, securing 25 starts and 10 games seeing at least 30 minutes. In those 10 games, Bridges averaged 12.7 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 1.3 steals. Though he was a low-usage player as a rookie, taking 10.8 shots per 36 minutes, he posted quality efficiency with shooting splits of 46.4 FG%, 32.5 3P% and 75.3 FT%. With the Hornets' two leading scorers from last season (Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb) moving on, Bridges may be asked to handle a bigger offensive burden in 2019-20. On one hand, based on Bridges' rookie year, we shouldn't expect him to turn into a volume scorer. On the other hand, someone has to take shots for this Hornets team, and it can't just be Terry Rozier and Nicolas Batum. It's tough to gauge what to expect from Bridges in Year 2, but it's nearly a guarantee he'll take on some sort of expanded role, making him an intriguing late-round flier.
IND (G, PG, SG)
G
60
Min
19.6
FPTS
1,163.0
REB
338.0
AST
272.0
STL
97.0
BLK
18.0
TO
144.0
FGM
433.0
FGA
973.0
FTM
186.0
FTA
236.0
Oladipo saw his 2018-19 season cut short by a torn quadriceps tendon after 36 games, which could keep him out until January if the Pacers are especially cautious. The 2013 second overall pick was in the midst of one of his more inefficient seasons at the time he went down, as he was shooting just 42.3 percent -- his poorest figure since his rookie 2013-14 campaign. That led to a sharp downturn for Oladipo after he'd averaged a career-best 23.1 points during the 2017-18 season while also furnishing a then-career-high 4.3 assists and 2.4 steals. The 27-year-old guard offset some of his shooting struggles by one-upping himself in a pair of categories during his injury-shortened season, pulling down 5.6 boards and dishing out 5.2 dimes. Oladipo has been checking off recovery boxes consistently over the last few months, shedding his brace and crutches in late March, progressing to running in early June and resuming on-court work shortly thereafter. However, if recent comments from Pacers brass are any indication, the latter stages of Oladipo's rehab are likely to be a lot more deliberate, and Oladipo's minutes will reportedly be carefully monitored once he's back. In the interim, the capable Jeremy Lamb will fill the shooting guard spot, while former two-guard Malcolm Brogdon projects as Lamb's -- and eventually, Oladipo's -- backcourt mate. Factoring in the offseason acquisition of T.J. Warren and Brogdon's elite shooting (50.5 percent, including 42.6 percent from three-point range, in 2018-19), Oladipo could underwhelm this season for anyone drafting him with the expectation of a prior level of production.
Oladipo saw his 2018-19 season cut short by a torn quadriceps tendon after 36 games, which could keep him out until January if the Pacers are especially cautious. The 2013 second overall pick was in the midst of one of his more inefficient seasons at the time he went down, as he was shooting just 42.3 percent -- his poorest figure since his rookie 2013-14 campaign. That led to a sharp downturn for Oladipo after he'd averaged a career-best 23.1 points during the 2017-18 season while also furnishing a then-career-high 4.3 assists and 2.4 steals. The 27-year-old guard offset some of his shooting struggles by one-upping himself in a pair of categories during his injury-shortened season, pulling down 5.6 boards and dishing out 5.2 dimes. Oladipo has been checking off recovery boxes consistently over the last few months, shedding his brace and crutches in late March, progressing to running in early June and resuming on-court work shortly thereafter. However, if recent comments from Pacers brass are any indication, the latter stages of Oladipo's rehab are likely to be a lot more deliberate, and Oladipo's minutes will reportedly be carefully monitored once he's back. In the interim, the capable Jeremy Lamb will fill the shooting guard spot, while former two-guard Malcolm Brogdon projects as Lamb's -- and eventually, Oladipo's -- backcourt mate. Factoring in the offseason acquisition of T.J. Warren and Brogdon's elite shooting (50.5 percent, including 42.6 percent from three-point range, in 2018-19), Oladipo could underwhelm this season for anyone drafting him with the expectation of a prior level of production.
MIA (G, SF, SG)
G
76
Min
35.7
FPTS
1,163.0
REB
253.0
AST
248.0
STL
84.0
BLK
63.0
TO
121.0
FGM
465.0
FGA
1,096.0
FTM
193.0
FTA
228.0
Richardson is coming off a breakout campaign in which he contributed career highs in points (16.6), assists (4.1), rebounds (3.6), made threes (2.2) and minutes (34.8) per game. He also converted a career-best 86.1 percent from the charity stripe. Though his field goal and three-point shooting percentages were both below his career marks, he committed only 1.5 turnovers per showing after posting 2.9 assists versus 1.7 turnovers in 2017-18. It's fair to wonder whether Richardson will be able to maintain or improve upon those impressive offensive counting stats since he's now more of a fourth or even fifth option for the 76ers, rather than the primary option for the Heat. Still, Richardson could benefit from an efficiency standpoint while turning in more steals and blocks given that his likely role as a complementary offensive player will theoretically allow him to allocate more of his energy to the defensive end. Even if a slight regression is to be expected, Richardson remains an appealing option in the middle rounds of fantasy drafts thanks to his well-rounded skillset and willingness to get after it on both ends of the court.
Richardson is coming off a breakout campaign in which he contributed career highs in points (16.6), assists (4.1), rebounds (3.6), made threes (2.2) and minutes (34.8) per game. He also converted a career-best 86.1 percent from the charity stripe. Though his field goal and three-point shooting percentages were both below his career marks, he committed only 1.5 turnovers per showing after posting 2.9 assists versus 1.7 turnovers in 2017-18. It's fair to wonder whether Richardson will be able to maintain or improve upon those impressive offensive counting stats since he's now more of a fourth or even fifth option for the 76ers, rather than the primary option for the Heat. Still, Richardson could benefit from an efficiency standpoint while turning in more steals and blocks given that his likely role as a complementary offensive player will theoretically allow him to allocate more of his energy to the defensive end. Even if a slight regression is to be expected, Richardson remains an appealing option in the middle rounds of fantasy drafts thanks to his well-rounded skillset and willingness to get after it on both ends of the court.
MIA (C, C)
G
77
Min
29.3
FPTS
1,157.0
REB
385.0
AST
95.0
STL
50.0
BLK
168.0
TO
80.0
FGM
353.0
FGA
791.0
FTM
106.0
FTA
129.0
After a productive first season in Milwaukee, Lopez signed a four-year, $52 million extension to stay with the team. Lopez played a key role for the Bucks last season, starting opposite Giannis Antetokounmpo in the frontcourt, where he averaged 12.5 points, 4.5 rebounds, and career highs in blocks (2.2), threes (2.3), three-point percentage (36.5) and free-throw percentage (84.2). Lopez was deadly from long range and provided spacing as a stretch-five. He was up-and-down in his scoring because of his increased reliance on the three-ball, but he produced some big nights when his shot was falling. He's never been an adept rebounder despite his 7-foot frame, having averaged just 4.8 boards over the last three seasons and 6.5 for his career. But his rebounding numbers are serviceable given his contributions in other categories. Lopez should continue to provide quality three-point stats and blocks in addition to double-digit scoring. He started 81 games last season and logged 28.7 minutes per tilt, and he's likely to maintain a similar workload in 2019-20 as the Bucks' starting center.
After a productive first season in Milwaukee, Lopez signed a four-year, $52 million extension to stay with the team. Lopez played a key role for the Bucks last season, starting opposite Giannis Antetokounmpo in the frontcourt, where he averaged 12.5 points, 4.5 rebounds, and career highs in blocks (2.2), threes (2.3), three-point percentage (36.5) and free-throw percentage (84.2). Lopez was deadly from long range and provided spacing as a stretch-five. He was up-and-down in his scoring because of his increased reliance on the three-ball, but he produced some big nights when his shot was falling. He's never been an adept rebounder despite his 7-foot frame, having averaged just 4.8 boards over the last three seasons and 6.5 for his career. But his rebounding numbers are serviceable given his contributions in other categories. Lopez should continue to provide quality three-point stats and blocks in addition to double-digit scoring. He started 81 games last season and logged 28.7 minutes per tilt, and he's likely to maintain a similar workload in 2019-20 as the Bucks' starting center.
LAC (G, SG, PG)
G
78
Min
27.1
FPTS
1,148.0
REB
193.0
AST
319.0
STL
60.0
BLK
12.0
TO
144.0
FGM
400.0
FGA
960.0
FTM
381.0
FTA
430.0
Williams is coming off the two most productive seasons of his NBA career with the Clippers, and he most recently averaged 20.0 points and a career-high 5.4 assists across 26.6 minutes per game on his way to winning the league's Sixth Man of the Year award. On top of all that, he shot at least 36 percent from behind the arc for the third straight year. Now, after two years of being the top scoring option in Los Angeles, things are about to change dramatically for Williams with the arrival of superstars Kawhi Leonard and Paul George to the west coast in what was a franchise-altering offseason for the Clippers. While Williams' minutes load will probably remain relatively unchanged with the team's backcourt personnel staying the same as last season, the scoring burden on the 32-year-old's shoulders will be drastically lighter with Leonard and George serving as two of the league's most elite offensive players. Williams, as he always has been wherever he's playing, will undoubtedly be the leader of the team's second unit, but his value will likely resemble that of the last two seasons only when, and if, he is ever on the floor without either Leonard or George.
Williams is coming off the two most productive seasons of his NBA career with the Clippers, and he most recently averaged 20.0 points and a career-high 5.4 assists across 26.6 minutes per game on his way to winning the league's Sixth Man of the Year award. On top of all that, he shot at least 36 percent from behind the arc for the third straight year. Now, after two years of being the top scoring option in Los Angeles, things are about to change dramatically for Williams with the arrival of superstars Kawhi Leonard and Paul George to the west coast in what was a franchise-altering offseason for the Clippers. While Williams' minutes load will probably remain relatively unchanged with the team's backcourt personnel staying the same as last season, the scoring burden on the 32-year-old's shoulders will be drastically lighter with Leonard and George serving as two of the league's most elite offensive players. Williams, as he always has been wherever he's playing, will undoubtedly be the leader of the team's second unit, but his value will likely resemble that of the last two seasons only when, and if, he is ever on the floor without either Leonard or George.
LAC (C, C)
G
72
Min
21.2
FPTS
1,142.0
REB
531.0
AST
92.0
STL
21.0
BLK
75.0
TO
103.0
FGM
321.0
FGA
556.0
FTM
152.0
FTA
185.0
After being dealt from the Lakers to the Clippers at last season's trade deadline, Zubac operated as the team's full-time starting center for the final stretch of the season. In those 26 appearances, Zubac averaged 9.4 points, 7.7 rebounds and 1.5 assists across 20.2 minutes per game, all of which would be career-highs. With production like that in fairly limited minutes, his per 36 averages of 16.8 points and 13.7 rebounds per game certainly jump off the page. His play impressed the Clippers and resulted in the big man signing a four-year, $28 million contract with LA this offseason, and his role should remain relatively unchanged. While Zubac will most likely be the starter given the success he had in the role last season, Montrezl Harrell, who put together a breakout campaign in 2018-19, may end up closing games out for the Clippers. That, on top of JaMychal Green potentially operating as a small-ball five at times, will put a cap on the 22-year-old's upside heading into his fourth NBA season, but he should still be good for at least 20 minutes per game in Los Angeles.
After being dealt from the Lakers to the Clippers at last season's trade deadline, Zubac operated as the team's full-time starting center for the final stretch of the season. In those 26 appearances, Zubac averaged 9.4 points, 7.7 rebounds and 1.5 assists across 20.2 minutes per game, all of which would be career-highs. With production like that in fairly limited minutes, his per 36 averages of 16.8 points and 13.7 rebounds per game certainly jump off the page. His play impressed the Clippers and resulted in the big man signing a four-year, $28 million contract with LA this offseason, and his role should remain relatively unchanged. While Zubac will most likely be the starter given the success he had in the role last season, Montrezl Harrell, who put together a breakout campaign in 2018-19, may end up closing games out for the Clippers. That, on top of JaMychal Green potentially operating as a small-ball five at times, will put a cap on the 22-year-old's upside heading into his fourth NBA season, but he should still be good for at least 20 minutes per game in Los Angeles.
UTA (F, PF, SG, SF)
G
80
Min
31.1
FPTS
1,141.0
REB
297.0
AST
131.0
STL
67.0
BLK
1.0
TO
102.0
FGM
449.0
FGA
947.0
FTM
228.0
FTA
270.0
Bogdanovic signed a four-year, $73 million deal with the Jazz in the offseason after two highly productive years with Indiana. Last season, the forward averaged career highs in points (18.0), rebounds (4.1) and assists (2.0) across 31.8 minutes, appearing in 81 games. He knocked down 2.0 threes and shot 42.5 percent from deep -- both career highs. He took on a larger role offensively once Victor Oladipo (knee) was out of action, attempting 15.0 field goals per contest. Bogdanovic figures to be a starter with the Jazz immediately, though it's unclear which forward spot he will occupy. Playing on a loaded team with Mike Conley, Joe Ingles, Donavan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert figures to eat into his shot opportunities and offensive production, and it's not unreasonable to expect a decline in points in 2019-20. Conley and Mitchell in particular figure to see high usage, further limiting Bogdanovic. That said, Bogdanovic should still be a steady source of points, threes and shooting percentages.
Bogdanovic signed a four-year, $73 million deal with the Jazz in the offseason after two highly productive years with Indiana. Last season, the forward averaged career highs in points (18.0), rebounds (4.1) and assists (2.0) across 31.8 minutes, appearing in 81 games. He knocked down 2.0 threes and shot 42.5 percent from deep -- both career highs. He took on a larger role offensively once Victor Oladipo (knee) was out of action, attempting 15.0 field goals per contest. Bogdanovic figures to be a starter with the Jazz immediately, though it's unclear which forward spot he will occupy. Playing on a loaded team with Mike Conley, Joe Ingles, Donavan Mitchell and Rudy Gobert figures to eat into his shot opportunities and offensive production, and it's not unreasonable to expect a decline in points in 2019-20. Conley and Mitchell in particular figure to see high usage, further limiting Bogdanovic. That said, Bogdanovic should still be a steady source of points, threes and shooting percentages.
OKC (F, SF, PF)
G
58
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,139.0
REB
346.0
AST
137.0
STL
30.0
BLK
21.0
TO
91.0
FGM
359.0
FGA
828.0
FTM
339.0
FTA
372.0
Playing 68 games last season, Gallinari had his healthiest campaign since 2012-13 (71 games). While health issues have plagued his career (averaging 52.8 appearances over the past five seasons), Gallinari has proven to be a solid scorer when healthy. He reached new heights in 2018-19, posting career highs in points (19.8), rebounds (6.1) and threes (2.4) per game, as well as field-goal percentage (46.3). He also logged two 30-point games, seven outings with double-digit rebounds and eight games with five-plus assists. Gallinari will be joining a new team in 2019-20, as he was included in the trade that brought Paul George to the Clippers from the Thunder. In Oklahoma City, Gallinari looks to be the No. 1 scoring option, though Chris Paul will undoubtedly have control of the offense. The situation could result in Gallinari posting similar numbers to last season, but fantasy owners need to take into account his injury history.
Playing 68 games last season, Gallinari had his healthiest campaign since 2012-13 (71 games). While health issues have plagued his career (averaging 52.8 appearances over the past five seasons), Gallinari has proven to be a solid scorer when healthy. He reached new heights in 2018-19, posting career highs in points (19.8), rebounds (6.1) and threes (2.4) per game, as well as field-goal percentage (46.3). He also logged two 30-point games, seven outings with double-digit rebounds and eight games with five-plus assists. Gallinari will be joining a new team in 2019-20, as he was included in the trade that brought Paul George to the Clippers from the Thunder. In Oklahoma City, Gallinari looks to be the No. 1 scoring option, though Chris Paul will undoubtedly have control of the offense. The situation could result in Gallinari posting similar numbers to last season, but fantasy owners need to take into account his injury history.
PHO (G, PG)
G
74
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,134.0
REB
280.0
AST
502.0
STL
105.0
BLK
12.0
TO
208.0
FGM
302.0
FGA
755.0
FTM
230.0
FTA
263.0
Rubio bounced back in the assist department in 2018-19 (6.1 APG) after a down year in 2017-18 (5.3 APG). He scored at the second-highest clip of his career, with 12.7 points per game, though his 16.4 PPG per 36 minutes was a new career best. While he took a step in the right direction scoring and assisting, Rubio's shooting percentages waned from 41.8 percent from the field to 40.4 percent and 35.2 percent from three to 31.1 percent. He also recorded career lows in rebounds (3.6) and steals (1.3). His underwhelming stint in Utah is over after two years, where he leaves behind averages of 12.9 points, 5.7 assists and 1.5 steals after averaging 10.4 points, 8.5 assists and 2.1 steals in six seasons with Minnesota. A likely explanation for the sharp drop off in assists in Utah is the high usage of Donovan Mitchell. In 2018, Mitchell had a 30.9 usage rate, seventh highest among players with at least 1900 minutes. Though he will join another high-usage two-guard in Devin Booker, it's possible that Rubio is given the keys to run the offense and play a more traditional point guard role as he did for the Timberwolves. The Suns hope Rubio can be the floor general they've been looking for, and with a talented young core in Booker, DeAndre Ayton, Kelly Oubre and Cam Johnson, he'll have no shortage of playmakers to assist.
Rubio bounced back in the assist department in 2018-19 (6.1 APG) after a down year in 2017-18 (5.3 APG). He scored at the second-highest clip of his career, with 12.7 points per game, though his 16.4 PPG per 36 minutes was a new career best. While he took a step in the right direction scoring and assisting, Rubio's shooting percentages waned from 41.8 percent from the field to 40.4 percent and 35.2 percent from three to 31.1 percent. He also recorded career lows in rebounds (3.6) and steals (1.3). His underwhelming stint in Utah is over after two years, where he leaves behind averages of 12.9 points, 5.7 assists and 1.5 steals after averaging 10.4 points, 8.5 assists and 2.1 steals in six seasons with Minnesota. A likely explanation for the sharp drop off in assists in Utah is the high usage of Donovan Mitchell. In 2018, Mitchell had a 30.9 usage rate, seventh highest among players with at least 1900 minutes. Though he will join another high-usage two-guard in Devin Booker, it's possible that Rubio is given the keys to run the offense and play a more traditional point guard role as he did for the Timberwolves. The Suns hope Rubio can be the floor general they've been looking for, and with a talented young core in Booker, DeAndre Ayton, Kelly Oubre and Cam Johnson, he'll have no shortage of playmakers to assist.
UTA (C, C)
G
80
Min
19.1
FPTS
1,130.0
REB
732.0
AST
64.0
STL
37.0
BLK
51.0
TO
68.0
FGM
194.0
FGA
319.0
FTM
111.0
FTA
171.0
For the third time in his nine-year career, Davis appeared in exactly 81 games last season. He has proven himself to be one of the most durable backup big men, and he hauled in a career-best 8.6 rebounds in only 17.9 minutes per tilt during 2018-19. Furthermore, Davis thrived in his modest role offensively, shooting a career-high 61.6 percent from the field. He's likely to continue grabbing plenty of boards relative to his playing time while feasting on easy opportunities around the rim offensively. Still, Davis shouldn't be expected to log lots of minutes next to Rudy Gobert, like former Jazz big man Derrick Favors did over the last several years. As a result, barring an injury to Gobert, it's somewhat unlikely that Davis will be able to improve upon last year's production.
For the third time in his nine-year career, Davis appeared in exactly 81 games last season. He has proven himself to be one of the most durable backup big men, and he hauled in a career-best 8.6 rebounds in only 17.9 minutes per tilt during 2018-19. Furthermore, Davis thrived in his modest role offensively, shooting a career-high 61.6 percent from the field. He's likely to continue grabbing plenty of boards relative to his playing time while feasting on easy opportunities around the rim offensively. Still, Davis shouldn't be expected to log lots of minutes next to Rudy Gobert, like former Jazz big man Derrick Favors did over the last several years. As a result, barring an injury to Gobert, it's somewhat unlikely that Davis will be able to improve upon last year's production.
PHO (F, SF, SG)
G
71
Min
30.1
FPTS
1,128.0
REB
359.0
AST
131.0
STL
110.0
BLK
65.0
TO
114.0
FGM
405.0
FGA
921.0
FTM
202.0
FTA
251.0
Oubre contributed career-high averages in points (15.2), rebounds (4.7), steals (1.2), blocks (0.9) and minutes (29.5) while matching his career highs in threes (1.6) and assists (1.2) in 2018-19. Oubre also splashed in a career-best field goal percentage (44.5), delivering the rarely accomplished boost in both production and efficiency. He was already on pace to set career highs across most categories through 29 appearances with the Wizards, and his counting stats and field goal percentage only improved following his trade to the Suns. Across 40 contests for Phoenix, Oubre averaged 16.9 points (45.3 FG%, 32.5 3P%, 76.1 FT%), 4.9 rebounds, 1.7 threes, 1.6 assists, 1.4 steals and 1.0 block in 29.5 minutes per game. Moreover, he turned it up another notch after the All-Star break, pouring in 20.2 points (46.9 FG%, 34.3 3P%, 75.0 FT%), 5.7 rebounds, 2.1 steals, 1.9 threes, 1.6 assists and 0.9 blocks in 32.9 minutes per game, albeit in just 12 matchups. Oubre's second-half surge provides a reason for optimism about his progression going forward, as does the team's decision to re-sign him to a healthy two-year contract. Whether Oubre earns a starting role or not, he's likely to continue earning plenty of minutes on the wing thanks to his versatility on both ends of the floor.
Oubre contributed career-high averages in points (15.2), rebounds (4.7), steals (1.2), blocks (0.9) and minutes (29.5) while matching his career highs in threes (1.6) and assists (1.2) in 2018-19. Oubre also splashed in a career-best field goal percentage (44.5), delivering the rarely accomplished boost in both production and efficiency. He was already on pace to set career highs across most categories through 29 appearances with the Wizards, and his counting stats and field goal percentage only improved following his trade to the Suns. Across 40 contests for Phoenix, Oubre averaged 16.9 points (45.3 FG%, 32.5 3P%, 76.1 FT%), 4.9 rebounds, 1.7 threes, 1.6 assists, 1.4 steals and 1.0 block in 29.5 minutes per game. Moreover, he turned it up another notch after the All-Star break, pouring in 20.2 points (46.9 FG%, 34.3 3P%, 75.0 FT%), 5.7 rebounds, 2.1 steals, 1.9 threes, 1.6 assists and 0.9 blocks in 32.9 minutes per game, albeit in just 12 matchups. Oubre's second-half surge provides a reason for optimism about his progression going forward, as does the team's decision to re-sign him to a healthy two-year contract. Whether Oubre earns a starting role or not, he's likely to continue earning plenty of minutes on the wing thanks to his versatility on both ends of the floor.
MIA (C, C, PF)
G
79
Min
26.2
FPTS
1,122.0
REB
428.0
AST
197.0
STL
61.0
BLK
42.0
TO
130.0
FGM
303.0
FGA
644.0
FTM
169.0
FTA
211.0
Olynyk took on an expanded role in Miami last season with Hassan Whiteside in and out of the lineup. The former started the most games of his career (36) while playing the second-most minutes of his career (22.9). A role player throughout his NBA tenure, Olynyk was solid when in the starting five, averaging 11.0 points, 5.0 rebounds and 2.1 assists per tilt. He's not a high-volume rebounder or scorer, but he's serviceable in those categories and capable of producing some big games when needed. He's also a solid shooter (47.8 FG%, 36.7 3P%, 76.5 FT%) who has a good chance to maintain his efficiency. With Whiteside now in Portland and the Heat failing to add more frontcourt depth, it's reasonable to expect Olynyk to see an increase in workload and production as the primary option behind Bam Adebayo
Olynyk took on an expanded role in Miami last season with Hassan Whiteside in and out of the lineup. The former started the most games of his career (36) while playing the second-most minutes of his career (22.9). A role player throughout his NBA tenure, Olynyk was solid when in the starting five, averaging 11.0 points, 5.0 rebounds and 2.1 assists per tilt. He's not a high-volume rebounder or scorer, but he's serviceable in those categories and capable of producing some big games when needed. He's also a solid shooter (47.8 FG%, 36.7 3P%, 76.5 FT%) who has a good chance to maintain his efficiency. With Whiteside now in Portland and the Heat failing to add more frontcourt depth, it's reasonable to expect Olynyk to see an increase in workload and production as the primary option behind Bam Adebayo
SAC (F, PF, SF)
G
79
Min
33.1
FPTS
1,111.0
REB
412.0
AST
119.0
STL
52.0
BLK
13.0
TO
101.0
FGM
401.0
FGA
929.0
FTM
239.0
FTA
287.0
Barnes was putting up 17.7 points over 49 games with Dallas before being dealt to the Kings in February of last season. He saw a slight decrease in production following the trade (14.3 PPG in 28 contests), despite playing 1.6 more minutes per matchup. After re-signing with Sacramento over the offseason, the 27-year-old forward is expected to slot into a similar role during the 2019-20 campaign as the team's starting small forward. He converted on 39.5 percent of his threes over the course of last year -- his best shooting performance since the 2014-15 season when he shot 40.5 percent from downtown. Barnes also knocked down a career-best 2.3 treys per contest a season ago, which is quite the improvement from 1.5 threes per game during 2017-18. The Kings didn't make any jaw-dropping moves in free agency, which is good news for Barnes, who should continue to see plenty of opportunities to shoot the basketball alongside De'Aaron Fox and Buddy Hield at the two guard spots.
Barnes was putting up 17.7 points over 49 games with Dallas before being dealt to the Kings in February of last season. He saw a slight decrease in production following the trade (14.3 PPG in 28 contests), despite playing 1.6 more minutes per matchup. After re-signing with Sacramento over the offseason, the 27-year-old forward is expected to slot into a similar role during the 2019-20 campaign as the team's starting small forward. He converted on 39.5 percent of his threes over the course of last year -- his best shooting performance since the 2014-15 season when he shot 40.5 percent from downtown. Barnes also knocked down a career-best 2.3 treys per contest a season ago, which is quite the improvement from 1.5 threes per game during 2017-18. The Kings didn't make any jaw-dropping moves in free agency, which is good news for Barnes, who should continue to see plenty of opportunities to shoot the basketball alongside De'Aaron Fox and Buddy Hield at the two guard spots.
MEM (G, PG)
G
72
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,108.0
REB
272.0
AST
510.0
STL
70.0
BLK
29.0
TO
219.0
FGM
400.0
FGA
990.0
FTM
168.0
FTA
216.0
Morant will presumably take over the Grizzlies' starting point guard spot, which was vacated as a result of the trade of Mike Conley to the Jazz. Morant, the 2018-19 OVC Player of the Year and Consensus All-American, averaged 24.5 points, 10.0 assists, 5.7 rebounds and 1.8 steals across 36.6 minutes last year with Murray State. He's lauded for his athleticism and playmaking ability, but an underdeveloped jumpshot and tendency to turn the ball over could be a cause of early struggles in the NBA. Rookie point guards can often get off to a rough start, but fantasy owners should be confident that the rookie will have a big role with the Grizzlies right out of the gate, and Memphis is likely to let Morant get plenty of reps considering the team's rebuilding status. Morant makes for a safer pick in points leagues, where a potentially troublesome field-goal percentage and lack of threes won't damage his fantasy value.
Morant will presumably take over the Grizzlies' starting point guard spot, which was vacated as a result of the trade of Mike Conley to the Jazz. Morant, the 2018-19 OVC Player of the Year and Consensus All-American, averaged 24.5 points, 10.0 assists, 5.7 rebounds and 1.8 steals across 36.6 minutes last year with Murray State. He's lauded for his athleticism and playmaking ability, but an underdeveloped jumpshot and tendency to turn the ball over could be a cause of early struggles in the NBA. Rookie point guards can often get off to a rough start, but fantasy owners should be confident that the rookie will have a big role with the Grizzlies right out of the gate, and Memphis is likely to let Morant get plenty of reps considering the team's rebuilding status. Morant makes for a safer pick in points leagues, where a potentially troublesome field-goal percentage and lack of threes won't damage his fantasy value.
POR (C, PF, C)
G
80
Min
24.8
FPTS
1,099.0
REB
514.0
AST
104.0
STL
37.0
BLK
97.0
TO
113.0
FGM
310.0
FGA
641.0
FTM
140.0
FTA
184.0
With Jusuf Nurkic expected to miss a significant portion of the 2019-20 season after undergoing surgery to repair compound fractures in his left leg, Collins was in line to operate as the leader of Portland's frontcourt. This offseason, however, the Trail Blazers elected to trade for big man Hassan Whiteside, which leaves Collins' role murky heading into his third NBA season. Collins saw an increase in production across the board in his second season, averaging 6.6 points and 4.2 rebounds across 17.6 minutes. He also found more accuracy in his jump shot, as his three-point percentage jumped from 31.0 percent to 33.1 percent on a similar number of attempts. This helped his true shooting percentage get a huge boost last season, as he went from 47.5 percent as a rookie to an impressive 56.2 percent. Collins' growth is heading in a positive direction, but with Whiteside's presence in the rotation, Collins could end up playing a similar role to that he played alongside Enes Kanter down the final stretch of last year's regular season and playoffs. Conversely, given that Collins showed huge improvement as a floor spacer last season and that Portland lost a lot of its frontcourt depth from last season, it is very possible that the two could, and may have to, co-exist on the floor together. While there's real risk involved in drafting Collins, it's hard to argue against taking a late-round flier on the improving big man on the chance he gets real minutes at power forward.
With Jusuf Nurkic expected to miss a significant portion of the 2019-20 season after undergoing surgery to repair compound fractures in his left leg, Collins was in line to operate as the leader of Portland's frontcourt. This offseason, however, the Trail Blazers elected to trade for big man Hassan Whiteside, which leaves Collins' role murky heading into his third NBA season. Collins saw an increase in production across the board in his second season, averaging 6.6 points and 4.2 rebounds across 17.6 minutes. He also found more accuracy in his jump shot, as his three-point percentage jumped from 31.0 percent to 33.1 percent on a similar number of attempts. This helped his true shooting percentage get a huge boost last season, as he went from 47.5 percent as a rookie to an impressive 56.2 percent. Collins' growth is heading in a positive direction, but with Whiteside's presence in the rotation, Collins could end up playing a similar role to that he played alongside Enes Kanter down the final stretch of last year's regular season and playoffs. Conversely, given that Collins showed huge improvement as a floor spacer last season and that Portland lost a lot of its frontcourt depth from last season, it is very possible that the two could, and may have to, co-exist on the floor together. While there's real risk involved in drafting Collins, it's hard to argue against taking a late-round flier on the improving big man on the chance he gets real minutes at power forward.
CHI (F, PF, SF)
G
79
Min
26.2
FPTS
1,098.0
REB
435.0
AST
170.0
STL
133.0
BLK
30.0
TO
102.0
FGM
354.0
FGA
699.0
FTM
70.0
FTA
112.0
After spending each of the last four seasons of his NBA career as a full-time starter for both Brooklyn and Indiana, Young may be in line for a slightly different role in his first season with the Chicago, where he signed a three-year, $41 million contract this offseason. Young has been a consistently solid scorer and rebounder over the course of his NBA career, and he is coming off a 2018-19 campaign with the Pacers where he averaged 12.6 points, 6.5 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.5 steals across 30.7 minutes per game in 81 starts. He's also slowly added a three-point shot to his reliable mid-range game, as he shot 34.9 percent from deep on 1.8 attempts per game. Now, with the Bulls expected to start Lauri Markkanen at power forward and Otto Porter on the wing, Young will likely be taking on a role off the bench in Chicago for the first time in a while. However, given that the Bulls are looking to be competitive this season and that neither Markkanen nor Porter have the cleanest sheet when it comes to their injury histories, Young should definitely still be in line for plenty of minutes in his inaugural season with the team. His workload may just not be consistently above 30 minutes like it has in recent years.
After spending each of the last four seasons of his NBA career as a full-time starter for both Brooklyn and Indiana, Young may be in line for a slightly different role in his first season with the Chicago, where he signed a three-year, $41 million contract this offseason. Young has been a consistently solid scorer and rebounder over the course of his NBA career, and he is coming off a 2018-19 campaign with the Pacers where he averaged 12.6 points, 6.5 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.5 steals across 30.7 minutes per game in 81 starts. He's also slowly added a three-point shot to his reliable mid-range game, as he shot 34.9 percent from deep on 1.8 attempts per game. Now, with the Bulls expected to start Lauri Markkanen at power forward and Otto Porter on the wing, Young will likely be taking on a role off the bench in Chicago for the first time in a while. However, given that the Bulls are looking to be competitive this season and that neither Markkanen nor Porter have the cleanest sheet when it comes to their injury histories, Young should definitely still be in line for plenty of minutes in his inaugural season with the team. His workload may just not be consistently above 30 minutes like it has in recent years.
WAS (G, PG)
G
80
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,097.0
REB
274.0
AST
432.0
STL
53.0
BLK
21.0
TO
115.0
FGM
400.0
FGA
926.0
FTM
119.0
FTA
165.0
Smith had played at least 81 games in back-to-back seasons, but he was limited to just 56 contests last season. His playing time was also reduced to just 22 minutes per game, leaving him with averages of 8.9 points, 3.6 assists and 2.6 rebounds. After spending three seasons with the Pistons, Smith now finds himself with a new team -- the Wizards. It's a great situation for his fantasy value since he has a favorable opportunity to be the starting point with John Wall (Achilles) expected to miss the entire season. The Wizards did also add Isaiah Thomas, who could press Smith for the role. However, the more likely scenario is that Thomas serves as the team's sixth man and primary offensive weapon off the bench. Smith has shown he can be productive as a starter, averaging 12.1 points, 4.7 assists and 3.2 rebounds across 35 starts during the 2017-18 season. However, his lack of contributions in steals, blocks and three-pointers still makes him a late-round target.
Smith had played at least 81 games in back-to-back seasons, but he was limited to just 56 contests last season. His playing time was also reduced to just 22 minutes per game, leaving him with averages of 8.9 points, 3.6 assists and 2.6 rebounds. After spending three seasons with the Pistons, Smith now finds himself with a new team -- the Wizards. It's a great situation for his fantasy value since he has a favorable opportunity to be the starting point with John Wall (Achilles) expected to miss the entire season. The Wizards did also add Isaiah Thomas, who could press Smith for the role. However, the more likely scenario is that Thomas serves as the team's sixth man and primary offensive weapon off the bench. Smith has shown he can be productive as a starter, averaging 12.1 points, 4.7 assists and 3.2 rebounds across 35 starts during the 2017-18 season. However, his lack of contributions in steals, blocks and three-pointers still makes him a late-round target.
CHI (G, PG, SG, SF)
G
76
Min
28.4
FPTS
1,094.0
REB
278.0
AST
420.0
STL
82.0
BLK
13.0
TO
120.0
FGM
263.0
FGA
529.0
FTM
127.0
FTA
160.0
For the second year in a row, Satoransky saw his workload increase with the Wizards. That resulted in career highs nearly across the board for the former 32nd overall pick. His role truly opened up once John Wall was lost due to injury, and Satoransky posted 10.7 points, 6.2 assists, 4.3 rebounds and 1.1 steals as a starter. But Washington decided to move on from Satoransky during the offseason, and the Bulls swooped in to sign him to a three-year, $30 million deal. While Chicago has young point guard options in Kris Dunn and rookie Coby White, the organization has openly place Dunn on the trading block, and starting a rookie point guard is a high-risk move for a team hoping for a postseason berth. So it appears Satoransky will join Chicago's starting five, possibly allowing him a bigger role than he's seen up to this point. Even on the off-chance that Satoransky isn't the Bulls' full-time starter, he can play three positions and could make for a great sixth man off the bench. At 6-foot-7 with a well-rounded skillset, Satoransky can play both guard spots, as well as small forward.
For the second year in a row, Satoransky saw his workload increase with the Wizards. That resulted in career highs nearly across the board for the former 32nd overall pick. His role truly opened up once John Wall was lost due to injury, and Satoransky posted 10.7 points, 6.2 assists, 4.3 rebounds and 1.1 steals as a starter. But Washington decided to move on from Satoransky during the offseason, and the Bulls swooped in to sign him to a three-year, $30 million deal. While Chicago has young point guard options in Kris Dunn and rookie Coby White, the organization has openly place Dunn on the trading block, and starting a rookie point guard is a high-risk move for a team hoping for a postseason berth. So it appears Satoransky will join Chicago's starting five, possibly allowing him a bigger role than he's seen up to this point. Even on the off-chance that Satoransky isn't the Bulls' full-time starter, he can play three positions and could make for a great sixth man off the bench. At 6-foot-7 with a well-rounded skillset, Satoransky can play both guard spots, as well as small forward.
DEN (C, C, PF)
G
80
Min
19.6
FPTS
1,085.0
REB
475.0
AST
220.0
STL
60.0
BLK
78.0
TO
114.0
FGM
245.0
FGA
400.0
FTM
104.0
FTA
179.0
Plumlee averaged 7.8 points and 6.4 rebounds in 21.1 minutes for the Nuggets last season, shooting 59.3 percent from the floor and adding 3.0 assists and 1.7 combined blocks/steals. Much like his teammate Nikola Jokic, Plumlee is an adept passing big man, which boosts his overall value. Plumlee is the clear backup to Jokic, but in 17 starts last season, he averaged a healthy 10.5 points, 8.0 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 2.2 combined blocks/steals per contest. He has upside as an all-around player, and he displayed that with seven games of at least 10 points, six rebounds and five assists. He was one of only five centers to average at least 7.8 points, 6.4 boards and 3.0 assists last season, and he played the fewest minutes of any of them. For now, he is stuck firmly behind Jokic, but he is a high-end backup who could provide immediate production if the latter misses time. Ultimately, Plumlee has some standalone value in deeper leagues.
Plumlee averaged 7.8 points and 6.4 rebounds in 21.1 minutes for the Nuggets last season, shooting 59.3 percent from the floor and adding 3.0 assists and 1.7 combined blocks/steals. Much like his teammate Nikola Jokic, Plumlee is an adept passing big man, which boosts his overall value. Plumlee is the clear backup to Jokic, but in 17 starts last season, he averaged a healthy 10.5 points, 8.0 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 2.2 combined blocks/steals per contest. He has upside as an all-around player, and he displayed that with seven games of at least 10 points, six rebounds and five assists. He was one of only five centers to average at least 7.8 points, 6.4 boards and 3.0 assists last season, and he played the fewest minutes of any of them. For now, he is stuck firmly behind Jokic, but he is a high-end backup who could provide immediate production if the latter misses time. Ultimately, Plumlee has some standalone value in deeper leagues.
SAN (G, PG, SG)
G
76
Min
27.7
FPTS
1,085.0
REB
301.0
AST
316.0
STL
92.0
BLK
44.0
TO
118.0
FGM
325.0
FGA
662.0
FTM
113.0
FTA
150.0
White took a big step forward in his second year with San Antonio, averaging 25.8 minutes across 67 contests, starting 55 of them. He averaged 9.9 points, 3.9 assists and 3.7 rebounds -- all career highs. He also contributed 1.7 combined blocks/steals and shot a respectable 47.9 field goal percentage and 33.8 three-point percentage. White showed off his all-around game as a sophomore, with the ability to play both ends of the court at a high level and contribute valuable numbers across multiple categories. He turned his scoring up in the playoffs, averaging 15.1 points in seven games against Denver, displaying his upside with a 36-point, five-rebound, five-assist explosion in Game 3. White will look to carry the momentum from a big season into 2019-20. The return of point guard Dejounte Murray to the backcourt could cut into White's overall production, but the latter is still a breakout candidate as the Spurs' starting two-guard.
White took a big step forward in his second year with San Antonio, averaging 25.8 minutes across 67 contests, starting 55 of them. He averaged 9.9 points, 3.9 assists and 3.7 rebounds -- all career highs. He also contributed 1.7 combined blocks/steals and shot a respectable 47.9 field goal percentage and 33.8 three-point percentage. White showed off his all-around game as a sophomore, with the ability to play both ends of the court at a high level and contribute valuable numbers across multiple categories. He turned his scoring up in the playoffs, averaging 15.1 points in seven games against Denver, displaying his upside with a 36-point, five-rebound, five-assist explosion in Game 3. White will look to carry the momentum from a big season into 2019-20. The return of point guard Dejounte Murray to the backcourt could cut into White's overall production, but the latter is still a breakout candidate as the Spurs' starting two-guard.
SAC (G, SG)
G
77
Min
26.8
FPTS
1,083.0
REB
257.0
AST
283.0
STL
76.0
BLK
16.0
TO
124.0
FGM
416.0
FGA
956.0
FTM
167.0
FTA
199.0
After starting 53 games during his rookie season, Bogdanovic started only 17 games during the 2018-19 campaign. Still, he had a substantial role by averaging 28 minutes per night. With the Kings playing at an up-tempo pace and his increased usage rate of 22.3 percent, he was able to average 14.1 points and 1.9 three-pointers per contest. On the downside, his increased shot attempts resulted in his shooting percentage dropping to 41.8 percent. While not a major factor in other areas, his respectable averages of 3.5 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.0 steal made him a viable fantasy asset. The problem for him heading into this season is the Kings' deep depth chart. Minutes at small forward figure to be hard for him to come by with Harrison Barnes and Trevor Ariza now in the fold. Bogdanovic should be the primary backup at shooting guard behind Buddy Hield, but it's not unreasonable to think that he could have a decline in both playing time and usage rate this season.
After starting 53 games during his rookie season, Bogdanovic started only 17 games during the 2018-19 campaign. Still, he had a substantial role by averaging 28 minutes per night. With the Kings playing at an up-tempo pace and his increased usage rate of 22.3 percent, he was able to average 14.1 points and 1.9 three-pointers per contest. On the downside, his increased shot attempts resulted in his shooting percentage dropping to 41.8 percent. While not a major factor in other areas, his respectable averages of 3.5 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 1.0 steal made him a viable fantasy asset. The problem for him heading into this season is the Kings' deep depth chart. Minutes at small forward figure to be hard for him to come by with Harrison Barnes and Trevor Ariza now in the fold. Bogdanovic should be the primary backup at shooting guard behind Buddy Hield, but it's not unreasonable to think that he could have a decline in both playing time and usage rate this season.
BRO (G, SG, PG)
G
74
Min
27.4
FPTS
1,079.0
REB
176.0
AST
370.0
STL
42.0
BLK
18.0
TO
151.0
FGM
378.0
FGA
877.0
FTM
299.0
FTA
365.0
Dinwiddie's production continued to ascend during his third year with Brooklyn. He logged at least 28.1 minutes per night for the second straight season and appeared in 68 contests. He took a more aggressive offensive approach in 2018-19, scoring a career-high 16.8 points to go along with 4.6 assists -- fewer than his 6.6 dimes from the season prior -- and 2.4 rebounds. He also drained 1.8 threes for the second straight season at a respectable 33.5 percent clip. It was very encouraging to see Dinwiddie's usage remain steady even playing with a healthy D'Angelo Russell, who earned his first All-Star selection. Dinwiddie seems to have shown enough last season to warrant similar playing time in 2019-20 as a sixth man, giving him real fantasy value. The swap of high-usage point guards from Russell to Kyrie Irving shouldn't have a major impact on Dinwiddie's production, and he could be in for another big role on offense.
Dinwiddie's production continued to ascend during his third year with Brooklyn. He logged at least 28.1 minutes per night for the second straight season and appeared in 68 contests. He took a more aggressive offensive approach in 2018-19, scoring a career-high 16.8 points to go along with 4.6 assists -- fewer than his 6.6 dimes from the season prior -- and 2.4 rebounds. He also drained 1.8 threes for the second straight season at a respectable 33.5 percent clip. It was very encouraging to see Dinwiddie's usage remain steady even playing with a healthy D'Angelo Russell, who earned his first All-Star selection. Dinwiddie seems to have shown enough last season to warrant similar playing time in 2019-20 as a sixth man, giving him real fantasy value. The swap of high-usage point guards from Russell to Kyrie Irving shouldn't have a major impact on Dinwiddie's production, and he could be in for another big role on offense.
BRO (G, SG, SF, PG)
G
70
Min
28.4
FPTS
1,078.0
REB
282.0
AST
298.0
STL
79.0
BLK
26.0
TO
129.0
FGM
403.0
FGA
903.0
FTM
180.0
FTA
244.0
The 2018-19 season was shaping up as a breakout campaign for LeVert early on. The talented 2016 first-round pick was often leading the charge for a Nets team that had the look of a team that was capable of exceeding expectations early, but disaster struck in the form of a right foot dislocation against the Timberwolves on Nov. 12. The versatile wing was back in action by Feb. 8 after missing 42 games, but it naturally took some time for LeVert to look like himself again and reclaim something resembling starter's minutes. LeVert played 30 minutes or fewer in the first 15 games subsequent to his return, scoring no more than 18 points and posting six single-digit tallies along with one scoreless effort over that span. However, the 24-year-old picked up the pace significantly over the last three weeks of the regular campaign and through the postseason, averaging 15.7 points (on 46.4 percent shooting, including 40.0 percent from three-point range), 4.1 assists and 3.6 rebounds over his last 16 contests, including the five playoff games against the 76ers. Now having had a full offseason to further regain strength in his foot, LeVert could be set up for that career-changing season, albeit one year later. D'Angelo Russell's departure is heavily negated by the arrival of Kyrie Irving in terms of usage, but LeVert should be the second option in the offense alongside the prized offseason acquisition with Kevin Durant (Achilles) set to sit out the entire year. Improved efficiency figures to be key to LeVert maximizing his potential, as he's actually seen his shooting percentage drop in each of his first three seasons, bottoming out at last season's career-low 42.9.
The 2018-19 season was shaping up as a breakout campaign for LeVert early on. The talented 2016 first-round pick was often leading the charge for a Nets team that had the look of a team that was capable of exceeding expectations early, but disaster struck in the form of a right foot dislocation against the Timberwolves on Nov. 12. The versatile wing was back in action by Feb. 8 after missing 42 games, but it naturally took some time for LeVert to look like himself again and reclaim something resembling starter's minutes. LeVert played 30 minutes or fewer in the first 15 games subsequent to his return, scoring no more than 18 points and posting six single-digit tallies along with one scoreless effort over that span. However, the 24-year-old picked up the pace significantly over the last three weeks of the regular campaign and through the postseason, averaging 15.7 points (on 46.4 percent shooting, including 40.0 percent from three-point range), 4.1 assists and 3.6 rebounds over his last 16 contests, including the five playoff games against the 76ers. Now having had a full offseason to further regain strength in his foot, LeVert could be set up for that career-changing season, albeit one year later. D'Angelo Russell's departure is heavily negated by the arrival of Kyrie Irving in terms of usage, but LeVert should be the second option in the offense alongside the prized offseason acquisition with Kevin Durant (Achilles) set to sit out the entire year. Improved efficiency figures to be key to LeVert maximizing his potential, as he's actually seen his shooting percentage drop in each of his first three seasons, bottoming out at last season's career-low 42.9.
ORL (F, SF, PF)
G
73
Min
28.2
FPTS
1,074.0
REB
436.0
AST
83.0
STL
79.0
BLK
111.0
TO
77.0
FGM
293.0
FGA
651.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
168.0
Isaac improved his per-game averages across every statistical category except steals as a sophomore in 2018-19. Perhaps more importantly, he established himself as a fixture in the starting lineup, showcasing his superb defensive acumen while improving offensively as well through 75 games and 64 starts. Having reportedly gained a whopping 25 pounds of muscle this summer, the young combo forward turns 22 in October and could see a sizable uptick in playing time for the second straight season, as he logged 26.6 minutes per game last year compared to 19.9 per night as a rookie. In order for Isaac to be a consistently positive factor for fantasy purposes, he'll likely need to provide more steady offensive production, which has been the big question mark for him since entering the league, and it reared its ugly head in the playoffs. Regardless, it's clear that the Magic have high hopes for Isaac and view him as a key cog going forward. As a result, those who take the plunge and decide to invest in him on draft day can at least take comfort in the fact that Orlando is very likely to continue allowing Isaac to play through mental mistakes and off nights offensively.
Isaac improved his per-game averages across every statistical category except steals as a sophomore in 2018-19. Perhaps more importantly, he established himself as a fixture in the starting lineup, showcasing his superb defensive acumen while improving offensively as well through 75 games and 64 starts. Having reportedly gained a whopping 25 pounds of muscle this summer, the young combo forward turns 22 in October and could see a sizable uptick in playing time for the second straight season, as he logged 26.6 minutes per game last year compared to 19.9 per night as a rookie. In order for Isaac to be a consistently positive factor for fantasy purposes, he'll likely need to provide more steady offensive production, which has been the big question mark for him since entering the league, and it reared its ugly head in the playoffs. Regardless, it's clear that the Magic have high hopes for Isaac and view him as a key cog going forward. As a result, those who take the plunge and decide to invest in him on draft day can at least take comfort in the fact that Orlando is very likely to continue allowing Isaac to play through mental mistakes and off nights offensively.
WAS (F, PF)
G
76
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,073.0
REB
478.0
AST
101.0
STL
47.0
BLK
44.0
TO
128.0
FGM
368.0
FGA
706.0
FTM
159.0
FTA
221.0
Hachimura was selected with the ninth overall pick in the 2019 draft, and he figures to be the Wizards' starting power forward immediately. He averaged 19.7 points, 6.5 rebounds and 1.5 assists as a junior with Gonzaga, winning the WCC Player of the Year award behind his strong play. He's a serviceable defender (1.6 combined blocks/steals in 2018-19) and shooter (57.9 FG percentage in collegiate career). Though he shot 41.7 percent from three last season, it was his first year shooting better than 28.6 percent from beyond the arc. The long range game is not his specialty, but Hachimura can step out and get a bucket at times. With a dearth of playmakers in Washington, Hachimura's natural scoring and rebounding abilities should afford him a fairly high fantasy ceiling, especially considering he'll probably see minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s. He's a late-round pick in standard formats who could surpass his current ADP.
Hachimura was selected with the ninth overall pick in the 2019 draft, and he figures to be the Wizards' starting power forward immediately. He averaged 19.7 points, 6.5 rebounds and 1.5 assists as a junior with Gonzaga, winning the WCC Player of the Year award behind his strong play. He's a serviceable defender (1.6 combined blocks/steals in 2018-19) and shooter (57.9 FG percentage in collegiate career). Though he shot 41.7 percent from three last season, it was his first year shooting better than 28.6 percent from beyond the arc. The long range game is not his specialty, but Hachimura can step out and get a bucket at times. With a dearth of playmakers in Washington, Hachimura's natural scoring and rebounding abilities should afford him a fairly high fantasy ceiling, especially considering he'll probably see minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s. He's a late-round pick in standard formats who could surpass his current ADP.
MIN (F, SF, PF)
G
66
Min
35.2
FPTS
1,073.0
REB
373.0
AST
89.0
STL
143.0
BLK
91.0
TO
91.0
FGM
305.0
FGA
699.0
FTM
128.0
FTA
172.0
A knee injury kept Covington out of the 2019 portion of last season, though not before he was dealt to the Timberwolves from the 76ers in the Jimmy Butler trade. He played 22 games for the Wolves, starting each one, averaging 14.5 points, 5.7 rebounds, 2.5 threes, 2.3 steals, 1.5 assists and 1.1 blocks. He'll look to get healthy ahead of the 2019-20 season, and it appears he'll be Minnesota's starting power forward. While Covington has started every appearance over the past three seasons, his health is of some concern, as he's averaging just 63.8 games played across the past five years. Still, Covington has established himself as one of the NBA's premier three-and-D specialists, giving him plenty of fantasy value. He should hold an extremely similar role to the one he's had lately, making him a relatively safe pick come draft day.
A knee injury kept Covington out of the 2019 portion of last season, though not before he was dealt to the Timberwolves from the 76ers in the Jimmy Butler trade. He played 22 games for the Wolves, starting each one, averaging 14.5 points, 5.7 rebounds, 2.5 threes, 2.3 steals, 1.5 assists and 1.1 blocks. He'll look to get healthy ahead of the 2019-20 season, and it appears he'll be Minnesota's starting power forward. While Covington has started every appearance over the past three seasons, his health is of some concern, as he's averaging just 63.8 games played across the past five years. Still, Covington has established himself as one of the NBA's premier three-and-D specialists, giving him plenty of fantasy value. He should hold an extremely similar role to the one he's had lately, making him a relatively safe pick come draft day.
CHA (C, C)
G
64
Min
27.9
FPTS
1,072.0
REB
478.0
AST
147.0
STL
55.0
BLK
62.0
TO
89.0
FGM
269.0
FGA
505.0
FTM
154.0
FTA
203.0
Zeller will anchor the frontcourt of a rebuilding Hornets team in the post-Kemba-Walker era. The big man averaged 10.1 points, 6.8 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.6 blocks/steals per contest last season, playing just 25.4 minutes in 49 games. Zeller's health is a big concern heading into the 2019-20 season, as he's now appeared in just 82 games combined over the last two seasons and failed to finish a full season since his rookie year in 2013-14. The Hornets' frontcourt roster still includes Bismack Biyombo and Willie Hernangomez, who may take time away from Zeller. Biyombo is the better rim-protector and overall defender, and Hernangomez is a quality rebounder. Despite the likely competition for minutes, Zeller is still projected to be the starting center. And without leading scorers Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb, Charlotte will have to get the most out of every player on the roster, meaning a possible bump in production if he can stay on the court. Zeller is not an exciting fantasy option, but the lack of depth on the Hornets roster paired with a potential starting job makes him a value option in later rounds of drafts.
Zeller will anchor the frontcourt of a rebuilding Hornets team in the post-Kemba-Walker era. The big man averaged 10.1 points, 6.8 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.6 blocks/steals per contest last season, playing just 25.4 minutes in 49 games. Zeller's health is a big concern heading into the 2019-20 season, as he's now appeared in just 82 games combined over the last two seasons and failed to finish a full season since his rookie year in 2013-14. The Hornets' frontcourt roster still includes Bismack Biyombo and Willie Hernangomez, who may take time away from Zeller. Biyombo is the better rim-protector and overall defender, and Hernangomez is a quality rebounder. Despite the likely competition for minutes, Zeller is still projected to be the starting center. And without leading scorers Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb, Charlotte will have to get the most out of every player on the roster, meaning a possible bump in production if he can stay on the court. Zeller is not an exciting fantasy option, but the lack of depth on the Hornets roster paired with a potential starting job makes him a value option in later rounds of drafts.
BRO (G, SG, SF)
G
77
Min
29.5
FPTS
1,065.0
REB
288.0
AST
179.0
STL
38.0
BLK
17.0
TO
115.0
FGM
384.0
FGA
789.0
FTM
111.0
FTA
132.0
Harris has increased his averages across all categories for the second straight year. He made a name for himself as one of the league's best long-range shooters in 2018-19, as the Virginia product won the Three-Point Shootout at All-Star Weekend and led the NBA in three-point efficiency with an excellent 47.4 percent mark. He finished his fifth season with career-highs in points (13.7), rebounds (3.8) and assists (2.4). Harris also shot 50.0 percent from the floor, despite more than half of his shot attempts coming from downtown, and he canned 2.4 threes per contest. He played 30.2 minutes per game in 76 starts -- both career-best marks -- and he's likely to open the season as Brooklyn's starting shooting guard. The arrivals of Kyrie Irving and DeAndre Jordan may be a positive for Harris, who could see more open looks as a result of increased defensive attention to his teammates. Harris doesn't offer much on defense, but he's become a well-rounded player on offense thanks to his elevated play and could take yet another step forward in 2019-20, making him an interesting fantasy prospect.
Harris has increased his averages across all categories for the second straight year. He made a name for himself as one of the league's best long-range shooters in 2018-19, as the Virginia product won the Three-Point Shootout at All-Star Weekend and led the NBA in three-point efficiency with an excellent 47.4 percent mark. He finished his fifth season with career-highs in points (13.7), rebounds (3.8) and assists (2.4). Harris also shot 50.0 percent from the floor, despite more than half of his shot attempts coming from downtown, and he canned 2.4 threes per contest. He played 30.2 minutes per game in 76 starts -- both career-best marks -- and he's likely to open the season as Brooklyn's starting shooting guard. The arrivals of Kyrie Irving and DeAndre Jordan may be a positive for Harris, who could see more open looks as a result of increased defensive attention to his teammates. Harris doesn't offer much on defense, but he's become a well-rounded player on offense thanks to his elevated play and could take yet another step forward in 2019-20, making him an interesting fantasy prospect.
CLE (F, SG, PF, SF)
G
74
Min
33.3
FPTS
1,062.0
REB
360.0
AST
204.0
STL
63.0
BLK
11.0
TO
115.0
FGM
397.0
FGA
900.0
FTM
167.0
FTA
219.0
After averaging just 11.0 minutes in his first season with Cleveland in 2017-18, the former second-round pick logged 32.2 minutes per game in 2018-19. Osman's role grew tremendously in the wake of LeBron James' departure, and he could be in line for a sizeable workload in 2019-20 as the Cavaliers continue the rebuilding process. Osman averaged 13.0 points, 4.7 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 1.7 threes on 42.7 percent from the floor and 34.8 percent from three. He finished with 13 games scoring at least 20 points, including a career-high 29 point outburst on Jan. 25. Osman is a solid all-around shooter who notched 16 games with at least three made three-pointers. The third-year pro from Turkey has likely done enough to earn the starting nod at small forward, but he'll face competition from rookies Dylan Windler and Kevin Porter. With Kevin Love healthy again, Osman's minutes at power forward will be limited. A decrease in minutes wouldn't be surprising given the return of Love and talented rookies on the roster, but Osman will likely maintain his strong role in the rotation.
After averaging just 11.0 minutes in his first season with Cleveland in 2017-18, the former second-round pick logged 32.2 minutes per game in 2018-19. Osman's role grew tremendously in the wake of LeBron James' departure, and he could be in line for a sizeable workload in 2019-20 as the Cavaliers continue the rebuilding process. Osman averaged 13.0 points, 4.7 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 1.7 threes on 42.7 percent from the floor and 34.8 percent from three. He finished with 13 games scoring at least 20 points, including a career-high 29 point outburst on Jan. 25. Osman is a solid all-around shooter who notched 16 games with at least three made three-pointers. The third-year pro from Turkey has likely done enough to earn the starting nod at small forward, but he'll face competition from rookies Dylan Windler and Kevin Porter. With Kevin Love healthy again, Osman's minutes at power forward will be limited. A decrease in minutes wouldn't be surprising given the return of Love and talented rookies on the roster, but Osman will likely maintain his strong role in the rotation.
PHO (F, SF, PF)
G
78
Min
26.9
FPTS
1,057.0
REB
495.0
AST
132.0
STL
47.0
BLK
9.0
TO
122.0
FGM
329.0
FGA
747.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
156.0
Saric staggered through the first 13 games with the 76ers last season, then failed to make a consistent impact after being acquired by the Timberwolves. It's safe to say it was his worst statistical showing through three seasons, as Saric finished with career-low per-game averages in points (10.6), rebounds (5.6), assists (1.6), steals (0.6), blocks (0.1) and minutes (25.0). The lone positive was his career-high free throw percentage (88.0), albeit on only 1.9 attempts per contest. However, Saric could very well end up earning the starting power forward spot for the Suns in 2019-20. Despite the presence of Deandre Ayton, Phoenix also figures to be fairly fast-paced offensively, especially in the aftermath of Ricky Rubio's offseason signing. If both of those scenarios come to fruition and Saric occupies a starting role in an up-tempo attack, he is a decent candidate to enjoy a bounce-back year. Having averaged 14.6 points (45.3 FG%, 39.3 3P%, 86.0 FT%), 6.7 rebounds, 2.6 assists, 2.0 threes, 0.7 steals and 0.3 blocks in 29.6 minutes per game through 78 games (73 starts) as a sophomore in 2017-18, Saric has shown himself to be capable of filling up the box score. As a result, he could prove to be a solid sleeper if memories of last season's struggles persist in the minds of drafters.
Saric staggered through the first 13 games with the 76ers last season, then failed to make a consistent impact after being acquired by the Timberwolves. It's safe to say it was his worst statistical showing through three seasons, as Saric finished with career-low per-game averages in points (10.6), rebounds (5.6), assists (1.6), steals (0.6), blocks (0.1) and minutes (25.0). The lone positive was his career-high free throw percentage (88.0), albeit on only 1.9 attempts per contest. However, Saric could very well end up earning the starting power forward spot for the Suns in 2019-20. Despite the presence of Deandre Ayton, Phoenix also figures to be fairly fast-paced offensively, especially in the aftermath of Ricky Rubio's offseason signing. If both of those scenarios come to fruition and Saric occupies a starting role in an up-tempo attack, he is a decent candidate to enjoy a bounce-back year. Having averaged 14.6 points (45.3 FG%, 39.3 3P%, 86.0 FT%), 6.7 rebounds, 2.6 assists, 2.0 threes, 0.7 steals and 0.3 blocks in 29.6 minutes per game through 78 games (73 starts) as a sophomore in 2017-18, Saric has shown himself to be capable of filling up the box score. As a result, he could prove to be a solid sleeper if memories of last season's struggles persist in the minds of drafters.
SAN (C, C)
G
78
Min
19.9
FPTS
1,047.0
REB
500.0
AST
113.0
STL
35.0
BLK
98.0
TO
59.0
FGM
232.0
FGA
354.0
FTM
65.0
FTA
112.0
In his first season with the Spurs following last summer's blockbuster trade featuring Kawhi Leonard and DeMar DeRozan, Poeltl posted career-high per-game averages of 5.3 rebounds and 1.2 assists per game. He also noticeably improved his ball control (0.6 turnovers per game) after amassing 1.0 turnover versus 0.7 assists in 2017-18. However, Poeltl connected on a career-low 53.3 percent from the charity stripe. He appeared in 77 games in 2018-19 while drawing 24 starts, after coming off the bench in 132 of 136 tilts through two campaigns with the Raptors. However, he earned fewer minutes per night this past season (16.5) than he did in 2017-18 (18.6). Overall, Poeltl is a decent option for deeper category leagues thanks to his fairly well-rounded production and sky-high field-goal percentage (64.5). The young big man turns 24 in October and could be poised to make a leap if he's able to carve out more consistent and ample playing time, and he did see 25.3 minutes per game across seven playoff bouts against the Nuggets. Still, it remains to be seen whether that was mostly a matchup-based decision or a vote of confidence from coach Gregg Popovich going forward.
In his first season with the Spurs following last summer's blockbuster trade featuring Kawhi Leonard and DeMar DeRozan, Poeltl posted career-high per-game averages of 5.3 rebounds and 1.2 assists per game. He also noticeably improved his ball control (0.6 turnovers per game) after amassing 1.0 turnover versus 0.7 assists in 2017-18. However, Poeltl connected on a career-low 53.3 percent from the charity stripe. He appeared in 77 games in 2018-19 while drawing 24 starts, after coming off the bench in 132 of 136 tilts through two campaigns with the Raptors. However, he earned fewer minutes per night this past season (16.5) than he did in 2017-18 (18.6). Overall, Poeltl is a decent option for deeper category leagues thanks to his fairly well-rounded production and sky-high field-goal percentage (64.5). The young big man turns 24 in October and could be poised to make a leap if he's able to carve out more consistent and ample playing time, and he did see 25.3 minutes per game across seven playoff bouts against the Nuggets. Still, it remains to be seen whether that was mostly a matchup-based decision or a vote of confidence from coach Gregg Popovich going forward.
LAC (G, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
29.7
FPTS
1,042.0
REB
404.0
AST
313.0
STL
70.0
BLK
45.0
TO
89.0
FGM
202.0
FGA
497.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
128.0
After knee surgery forced Beverley to miss nearly all of the 2017-18 season, the point guard returned in 2018-19 to play a key role for the Clippers that resulted in him signing a three-year, $40 million with Los Angeles this offseason. Beverley's value continues to be his reputation as one of the best on-ball defenders in the league, but the point guard being a consistently effective three-point shooter has become an under-appreciated part of Beverley's game. After shooting 39.7 percent from behind the arc last season, Beverley has now shot at least 38 percent from three in each of the last four seasons. Now, with the arrival of Kawhi Leonard and Paul George this offseason, Beverley, even as the Clippers' starting point guard, will surely have the ball in his hands a whole lot less. But since the 31-year-old has excelled shooting from deep, it makes him a seamless off-ball fit in the presence of ball-dominant superstars like George and Leonard. His overall production, however, will certainly take a sizable hit next season. He was already coming off his lowest scoring average (7.6 PPG) since his rookie year.
After knee surgery forced Beverley to miss nearly all of the 2017-18 season, the point guard returned in 2018-19 to play a key role for the Clippers that resulted in him signing a three-year, $40 million with Los Angeles this offseason. Beverley's value continues to be his reputation as one of the best on-ball defenders in the league, but the point guard being a consistently effective three-point shooter has become an under-appreciated part of Beverley's game. After shooting 39.7 percent from behind the arc last season, Beverley has now shot at least 38 percent from three in each of the last four seasons. Now, with the arrival of Kawhi Leonard and Paul George this offseason, Beverley, even as the Clippers' starting point guard, will surely have the ball in his hands a whole lot less. But since the 31-year-old has excelled shooting from deep, it makes him a seamless off-ball fit in the presence of ball-dominant superstars like George and Leonard. His overall production, however, will certainly take a sizable hit next season. He was already coming off his lowest scoring average (7.6 PPG) since his rookie year.
BOS (F, SF, SG, PF)
G
76
Min
28.2
FPTS
1,036.0
REB
351.0
AST
112.0
STL
77.0
BLK
36.0
TO
111.0
FGM
417.0
FGA
909.0
FTM
188.0
FTA
269.0
Expectations for Brown before his third NBA season probably should have been tempered with the knowledge that Gordon Hayward and Kyrie Irving were returning to Boston's starting lineup. Brown went from 30.7 minutes per game and 70 starts in 2017-18 to 25.9 minutes per contest and only 25 starts last season. There were other concerns as well. Brown's three-point shooting dipped from 39.5% to 34.4%, and his poor free-throw shooting continued to hover around 66% -- unacceptable for a high-pedigree wing. The 3rd overall pick in 2016 lost his starting gig in late November to Marcus Smart and didn't recover until mid-April. But now the Celtic depth chart is considerably thinner due to the departure of Irving, Al Horford, Marcus Morris, Terry Rozier and Aron Baynes. And Smart will probably see more minutes at back-up point guard. Combine Smart's changing role with Morris' departure, and suddenly Brown has an opportunity to once again see 30 minutes per contest. Whether that's as a starter or leader of the second unit is yet to be determined. Smart's aggressive defense is an excellent complement to the offensive games of Kemba Walker and Jayson Tatum, leaving Brown as possibly the odd man out. The Cal product will be a restricted free agent at the end of this season. More consistent defensive intensity and improved free-throw shooting (maybe unlikely at this stage) would greatly increase the 22-year-old's market value. Brown will turn 23 in late October.
Expectations for Brown before his third NBA season probably should have been tempered with the knowledge that Gordon Hayward and Kyrie Irving were returning to Boston's starting lineup. Brown went from 30.7 minutes per game and 70 starts in 2017-18 to 25.9 minutes per contest and only 25 starts last season. There were other concerns as well. Brown's three-point shooting dipped from 39.5% to 34.4%, and his poor free-throw shooting continued to hover around 66% -- unacceptable for a high-pedigree wing. The 3rd overall pick in 2016 lost his starting gig in late November to Marcus Smart and didn't recover until mid-April. But now the Celtic depth chart is considerably thinner due to the departure of Irving, Al Horford, Marcus Morris, Terry Rozier and Aron Baynes. And Smart will probably see more minutes at back-up point guard. Combine Smart's changing role with Morris' departure, and suddenly Brown has an opportunity to once again see 30 minutes per contest. Whether that's as a starter or leader of the second unit is yet to be determined. Smart's aggressive defense is an excellent complement to the offensive games of Kemba Walker and Jayson Tatum, leaving Brown as possibly the odd man out. The Cal product will be a restricted free agent at the end of this season. More consistent defensive intensity and improved free-throw shooting (maybe unlikely at this stage) would greatly increase the 22-year-old's market value. Brown will turn 23 in late October.
TOR (G, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
28.9
FPTS
1,018.0
REB
206.0
AST
380.0
STL
70.0
BLK
25.0
TO
101.0
FGM
332.0
FGA
808.0
FTM
121.0
FTA
142.0
The hero of Game 6 of the NBA Finals, VanVleet comes into the new season with the chance to get more playing time and take on an expanded role with Toronto. He had a career year with the Raptors and averaged double-digit points for the first time, scoring 11.0 per game to go along with 4.8 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.8 threes. His production across almost every category has increased in each of his three seasons in the NBA, and that coincides with growth from back-of-the-bench rookie to invaluable reserve. After a strong showing in the postseason -- 14.0 points and 2.7 threes on 40.0% shooting from deep in the Finals -- it's possible VanVleet's role with Toronto progresses to starter in his fourth year. The Wichita State product will fight for a starting job at shooting guard with Norman Powell, but it was VanVleet -- not Powell -- who played heavy minutes in the Finals and has clearly earned the trust of the coaching staff. The absence of Kawhi Leonard will free up additional opportunities for VanVleet as well. Whether starting or coming off the bench, VanVleet can be reasonably projected to be a key part of the Raptors' rotation in 2019-20.
The hero of Game 6 of the NBA Finals, VanVleet comes into the new season with the chance to get more playing time and take on an expanded role with Toronto. He had a career year with the Raptors and averaged double-digit points for the first time, scoring 11.0 per game to go along with 4.8 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.8 threes. His production across almost every category has increased in each of his three seasons in the NBA, and that coincides with growth from back-of-the-bench rookie to invaluable reserve. After a strong showing in the postseason -- 14.0 points and 2.7 threes on 40.0% shooting from deep in the Finals -- it's possible VanVleet's role with Toronto progresses to starter in his fourth year. The Wichita State product will fight for a starting job at shooting guard with Norman Powell, but it was VanVleet -- not Powell -- who played heavy minutes in the Finals and has clearly earned the trust of the coaching staff. The absence of Kawhi Leonard will free up additional opportunities for VanVleet as well. Whether starting or coming off the bench, VanVleet can be reasonably projected to be a key part of the Raptors' rotation in 2019-20.
ORL (G, SF, SG)
G
75
Min
31.1
FPTS
1,011.0
REB
236.0
AST
246.0
STL
65.0
BLK
11.0
TO
141.0
FGM
440.0
FGA
977.0
FTM
128.0
FTA
155.0
Fournier finished last season with a slight decline in production from 2017-18. He averaged 15.1 points, 3.6 assists and 3.2 rebounds while canning 1.9 threes per game. He remained a fairly productive scorer, but his efficiency took a hit, shooting just 43.8 percent from the floor and 34.0 percent from three. There were signs of encouragement, however, especially with Fournier's health. He appeared in 81 games last season after missing 66 games in the prior four seasons combined. He also averaged 31.5 minutes and logged at least that many minutes for the fourth consecutive season. Fournier faces no real competition for playing time at shooting guard and should be in line for another starting role and 30-plus minutes per night. He's a backend draft choice in standard formats with a safe scoring floor but limited upside.
Fournier finished last season with a slight decline in production from 2017-18. He averaged 15.1 points, 3.6 assists and 3.2 rebounds while canning 1.9 threes per game. He remained a fairly productive scorer, but his efficiency took a hit, shooting just 43.8 percent from the floor and 34.0 percent from three. There were signs of encouragement, however, especially with Fournier's health. He appeared in 81 games last season after missing 66 games in the prior four seasons combined. He also averaged 31.5 minutes and logged at least that many minutes for the fourth consecutive season. Fournier faces no real competition for playing time at shooting guard and should be in line for another starting role and 30-plus minutes per night. He's a backend draft choice in standard formats with a safe scoring floor but limited upside.
BOS (G, SF, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
29.7
FPTS
1,009.0
REB
288.0
AST
325.0
STL
145.0
BLK
28.0
TO
125.0
FGM
231.0
FGA
574.0
FTM
152.0
FTA
197.0
Smart comes into the new season with more clarity in the Celtics' backcourt than he's had in three seasons. With Kyrie Irving and Terry Rozier no longer on the roster, Smart has a strong opportunity to start at the two-guard next to Kemba Walker. Known for his nagging defense, Smart recorded a career-high 2.0 combined blocks/steals per game in 2018-19 and finished third in the NBA in total steals en route to his first All-Defensive Team selection. He's recorded at least 1.7 combined blocks/steals in all five seasons in his career, and it's fair to expect that level of production to continue in 2019-20. Though Smart produced a four-year low in points (8.9), he improved his efficiency tremendously with career highs in field goal percentage (42.2) and three-point percentage (36.4). Smart has also averaged 3.9 assists and 3.6 rebounds in his career, and those numbers could see a bump in 2019-20 without Irving and Rozier. The defensive production should remain elite this season, but Smart's true value lies in his ability to continue improving his shooting.
Smart comes into the new season with more clarity in the Celtics' backcourt than he's had in three seasons. With Kyrie Irving and Terry Rozier no longer on the roster, Smart has a strong opportunity to start at the two-guard next to Kemba Walker. Known for his nagging defense, Smart recorded a career-high 2.0 combined blocks/steals per game in 2018-19 and finished third in the NBA in total steals en route to his first All-Defensive Team selection. He's recorded at least 1.7 combined blocks/steals in all five seasons in his career, and it's fair to expect that level of production to continue in 2019-20. Though Smart produced a four-year low in points (8.9), he improved his efficiency tremendously with career highs in field goal percentage (42.2) and three-point percentage (36.4). Smart has also averaged 3.9 assists and 3.6 rebounds in his career, and those numbers could see a bump in 2019-20 without Irving and Rozier. The defensive production should remain elite this season, but Smart's true value lies in his ability to continue improving his shooting.
CHA (F, SG, SF)
G
70
Min
32.5
FPTS
1,008.0
REB
377.0
AST
307.0
STL
69.0
BLK
42.0
TO
113.0
FGM
243.0
FGA
573.0
FTM
73.0
FTA
86.0
Batum is coming off the lowest-usage season of his career (13.2%), compiling four-year lows in points (9.9) and assists (3.3) per game. That said, he had the third-most efficient season of his career (58.1 true shooting percentage) and still saw 30-plus minutes for the ninth straight campaign. Heading into his age 31 season, Batum's declining usage would imply that he's no longer a significant offensive threat. However, with Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb (the Hornets' two leading scorers last season) moving on, Batum may have to help pick up some slack, as it's up for debate if he's now the best player on Charlotte. A best-case scenario would see him produce similar numbers to his first two seasons with the Hornets, where he averaged 15.0 points, 6.2 rebounds, 5.8 assists and 1.0 steals. The range of outcomes on Batum's 2019-20 campaign seem high considering his age and Charlotte's poor roster construction, but he's unquestionably worth a late-round flier in the majority of fantasy drafts.
Batum is coming off the lowest-usage season of his career (13.2%), compiling four-year lows in points (9.9) and assists (3.3) per game. That said, he had the third-most efficient season of his career (58.1 true shooting percentage) and still saw 30-plus minutes for the ninth straight campaign. Heading into his age 31 season, Batum's declining usage would imply that he's no longer a significant offensive threat. However, with Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb (the Hornets' two leading scorers last season) moving on, Batum may have to help pick up some slack, as it's up for debate if he's now the best player on Charlotte. A best-case scenario would see him produce similar numbers to his first two seasons with the Hornets, where he averaged 15.0 points, 6.2 rebounds, 5.8 assists and 1.0 steals. The range of outcomes on Batum's 2019-20 campaign seem high considering his age and Charlotte's poor roster construction, but he's unquestionably worth a late-round flier in the majority of fantasy drafts.
MIA (F, PG, SF, PF)
G
70
Min
30.1
FPTS
1,002.0
REB
382.0
AST
267.0
STL
99.0
BLK
20.0
TO
153.0
FGM
353.0
FGA
827.0
FTM
98.0
FTA
154.0
Winslow will be back for his fifth season with the Heat after a solid all-around showing in 2018-19. Last year, Winslow averaged 12.6 points, 5.4 rebounds, 4.3 assists, 1.5 threes and 1.1 steals in 66 games -- all career-highs. He also started a career-high 52 games and logged 29.7 minutes per contest. Winslow is a unique player in that he's comfortable at the four, but can also play point guard because he's a quality passer, and that's a role he occupied for stretches last season. Winslow figures to be the starting power forward for Miami this season, and with Hassan Whiteside out the door and no significant additions to the Heat's frontcourt, Winslow could see big minutes. His usage may decrease with superstar Jimmy Butler now on the roster, but Winslow is versatile enough to sustain fantasy value regardless. Because of his increased production last season across most categories and his slight improvement in shooting percentages, he is on the radar in standard leagues as a fringe top-100 player.
Winslow will be back for his fifth season with the Heat after a solid all-around showing in 2018-19. Last year, Winslow averaged 12.6 points, 5.4 rebounds, 4.3 assists, 1.5 threes and 1.1 steals in 66 games -- all career-highs. He also started a career-high 52 games and logged 29.7 minutes per contest. Winslow is a unique player in that he's comfortable at the four, but can also play point guard because he's a quality passer, and that's a role he occupied for stretches last season. Winslow figures to be the starting power forward for Miami this season, and with Hassan Whiteside out the door and no significant additions to the Heat's frontcourt, Winslow could see big minutes. His usage may decrease with superstar Jimmy Butler now on the roster, but Winslow is versatile enough to sustain fantasy value regardless. Because of his increased production last season across most categories and his slight improvement in shooting percentages, he is on the radar in standard leagues as a fringe top-100 player.
DAL (G, PG, SG)
G
68
Min
28.7
FPTS
994.0
REB
286.0
AST
282.0
STL
95.0
BLK
32.0
TO
83.0
FGM
281.0
FGA
623.0
FTM
130.0
FTA
161.0
Wright will take the court for Dallas this season after signing a three-year, $29 million deal. Wright spent his first three and a half years in the league in Toronto, playing primarily as a backup. He was traded to Memphis ahead of last season's deadline in the Marc Gasol trade and had a huge breakout for the Grizzlies to end the year. In 26 games for Memphis, Wright averaged career highs in points (12.2), rebounds (5.4) and assists (5.3), adding 2.2 combined blocks/steals across 30.8 minutes per contest. He's an athletic guard and an above-average rebounder who can score and assist when given the minutes. He's likely to open the season as Dallas' starting PG alongside Luka Doncic in the backcourt, though the Mavericks could choose to play Doncic at the three and Wright at the two. In either case, Wright seems to have a pretty clear path to minutes with his new team, and his all-around game makes him an interesting fantasy player across most formats.
Wright will take the court for Dallas this season after signing a three-year, $29 million deal. Wright spent his first three and a half years in the league in Toronto, playing primarily as a backup. He was traded to Memphis ahead of last season's deadline in the Marc Gasol trade and had a huge breakout for the Grizzlies to end the year. In 26 games for Memphis, Wright averaged career highs in points (12.2), rebounds (5.4) and assists (5.3), adding 2.2 combined blocks/steals across 30.8 minutes per contest. He's an athletic guard and an above-average rebounder who can score and assist when given the minutes. He's likely to open the season as Dallas' starting PG alongside Luka Doncic in the backcourt, though the Mavericks could choose to play Doncic at the three and Wright at the two. In either case, Wright seems to have a pretty clear path to minutes with his new team, and his all-around game makes him an interesting fantasy player across most formats.
DEN (F, SG, SF)
G
74
Min
28.3
FPTS
989.0
REB
351.0
AST
218.0
STL
55.0
BLK
39.0
TO
114.0
FGM
351.0
FGA
810.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
130.0
With expectations sky-high, Barton had a disappointing 2018 campaign. A hip injury suffered in the second game of the season caused Barton to miss 38 straight contests and 40 total on the year, and he played his fewest games since 2013. The injury factored significantly into his underwhelming play. Barton shot just 40.2 percent from the floor, his lowest mark since his rookie season. His 34.2 percent shooting from three was his lowest since 2015 -- his first full season with the Nuggets. Barton averaged 11.5 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.6 threes in 2018-19, which were decreases from 2017-18 in every category. It's important to note, however, that Barton's 27.7 minutes per game were his fewest since 2015. He actually averaged 15.0 points, 6.0 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 2.0 threes per 36 minutes in 2018-19 -- almost identical to his numbers from 2017-18. That's very encouraging for Barton's outlook as he heads into the new season with more competition than ever for playing time. He might be replaced by Torrey Craig in the starting five after yielding playing time to Craig toward the end of last season. Michael Porter Jr. could also eat into Barton's playing time if the former can finally get on the court. Assuming he's not hampered by injury in 2019-20, Barton has a chance to return similar production to what he averaged from 2015-2017 with Denver, though his place on the depth chart and his role in the rotation will ultimately determine his fantasy value.
With expectations sky-high, Barton had a disappointing 2018 campaign. A hip injury suffered in the second game of the season caused Barton to miss 38 straight contests and 40 total on the year, and he played his fewest games since 2013. The injury factored significantly into his underwhelming play. Barton shot just 40.2 percent from the floor, his lowest mark since his rookie season. His 34.2 percent shooting from three was his lowest since 2015 -- his first full season with the Nuggets. Barton averaged 11.5 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.6 threes in 2018-19, which were decreases from 2017-18 in every category. It's important to note, however, that Barton's 27.7 minutes per game were his fewest since 2015. He actually averaged 15.0 points, 6.0 rebounds, 3.8 assists and 2.0 threes per 36 minutes in 2018-19 -- almost identical to his numbers from 2017-18. That's very encouraging for Barton's outlook as he heads into the new season with more competition than ever for playing time. He might be replaced by Torrey Craig in the starting five after yielding playing time to Craig toward the end of last season. Michael Porter Jr. could also eat into Barton's playing time if the former can finally get on the court. Assuming he's not hampered by injury in 2019-20, Barton has a chance to return similar production to what he averaged from 2015-2017 with Denver, though his place on the depth chart and his role in the rotation will ultimately determine his fantasy value.
OKC (G, PG)
G
76
Min
26.6
FPTS
988.0
REB
248.0
AST
323.0
STL
57.0
BLK
10.0
TO
175.0
FGM
412.0
FGA
964.0
FTM
184.0
FTA
221.0
Schroder played an important role for Oklahoma City's second unit in his first season with the team in 2018-19. The former Atlanta Hawk averaged 15.5 points, 4.1 assists, 3.6 rebounds and 1.6 threes in 29.3 minutes and finished the season as a serviceable fantasy option because of his multi-category contributions. The Thunder made significant changes to the roster this offseason, trading Russell Westbrook and Paul George, and the team looks to be in full rebuild mode. Oklahoma City acquired Chris Paul and Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who are essentially locks to be the starters in the backcourt, leaving Schroder likely to fill a similar sixth-man role as he had last season. Heavy minutes can be expected, and with a limited array of playmakers on the roster, an increase in usage and scoring isn't an unreasonable expectation. Schroder is a solid pickup in the later rounds of standard drafts.
Schroder played an important role for Oklahoma City's second unit in his first season with the team in 2018-19. The former Atlanta Hawk averaged 15.5 points, 4.1 assists, 3.6 rebounds and 1.6 threes in 29.3 minutes and finished the season as a serviceable fantasy option because of his multi-category contributions. The Thunder made significant changes to the roster this offseason, trading Russell Westbrook and Paul George, and the team looks to be in full rebuild mode. Oklahoma City acquired Chris Paul and Shai Gilgeous-Alexander, who are essentially locks to be the starters in the backcourt, leaving Schroder likely to fill a similar sixth-man role as he had last season. Heavy minutes can be expected, and with a limited array of playmakers on the roster, an increase in usage and scoring isn't an unreasonable expectation. Schroder is a solid pickup in the later rounds of standard drafts.
NOR (F, PG, SG, SF)
G
68
Min
30.8
FPTS
983.0
REB
318.0
AST
183.0
STL
33.0
BLK
47.0
TO
149.0
FGM
394.0
FGA
815.0
FTM
245.0
FTA
352.0
The Lakers first season with LeBron James didn't go as planned. Not only was the roster poorly constructed around him, but injuries to several key players helped keep Los Angeles from making the playoffs. One of those players who missed time was Ingram, who played in only 52 games. That came on the heels of him playing 59 games in the 2017-18 season, so injuries have had an impact on his development. The good news is that when he was on the floor, he showed improvement by averaging 18.3 points, 5.1 rebounds and 3.0 assists. His shooting percentage has increased each season that he's been in the league, topping out at 49.7% last year. However, he's a liability with his career 66.2 percent shooting from the charity stripe, and he also provides very little in terms of defensive stats and three-pointers. Now a member of the Pelicans, expect him to start at small forward and serve as one of New Orleans' primary scoring options. With that being said, he'll need to show that he can stay healthy to take his fantasy value to the next level.
The Lakers first season with LeBron James didn't go as planned. Not only was the roster poorly constructed around him, but injuries to several key players helped keep Los Angeles from making the playoffs. One of those players who missed time was Ingram, who played in only 52 games. That came on the heels of him playing 59 games in the 2017-18 season, so injuries have had an impact on his development. The good news is that when he was on the floor, he showed improvement by averaging 18.3 points, 5.1 rebounds and 3.0 assists. His shooting percentage has increased each season that he's been in the league, topping out at 49.7% last year. However, he's a liability with his career 66.2 percent shooting from the charity stripe, and he also provides very little in terms of defensive stats and three-pointers. Now a member of the Pelicans, expect him to start at small forward and serve as one of New Orleans' primary scoring options. With that being said, he'll need to show that he can stay healthy to take his fantasy value to the next level.
LAL (C, C)
G
71
Min
17.4
FPTS
982.0
REB
418.0
AST
38.0
STL
35.0
BLK
109.0
TO
80.0
FGM
303.0
FGA
474.0
FTM
69.0
FTA
112.0
McGee re-upped with the Lakers on a two-year, $8.5 million deal after his first season with Los Angeles. He averaged a career-high 12.0 points per game in 2018-19 to go along with 7.5 rebounds. He also brought back the blocking prowess that he was known for early in his career, swatting 2.0 shots per game. McGee shot 62.4 percent from the floor in 2018, and he provides a high floor in field-goal percentage, thanks in large part to his athleticism and length leading to easy points around the rim. His three-point game is effectively non-existent, and he is not a reliable free-throw shooter (63.2 percent in 2018-19). The primary starter last season, McGee played 22.3 minutes per game -- a seven-year high. He has been a role player for most of his career, and his 62 starts last season were a career-high. While the additions of Anthony Davis and Dwight Howard might cut into McGee's role, if he can manage a 20-minute-per-night role, he should provide a steady source of rebounding and blocks while contributing to the Lakers' second unit.
McGee re-upped with the Lakers on a two-year, $8.5 million deal after his first season with Los Angeles. He averaged a career-high 12.0 points per game in 2018-19 to go along with 7.5 rebounds. He also brought back the blocking prowess that he was known for early in his career, swatting 2.0 shots per game. McGee shot 62.4 percent from the floor in 2018, and he provides a high floor in field-goal percentage, thanks in large part to his athleticism and length leading to easy points around the rim. His three-point game is effectively non-existent, and he is not a reliable free-throw shooter (63.2 percent in 2018-19). The primary starter last season, McGee played 22.3 minutes per game -- a seven-year high. He has been a role player for most of his career, and his 62 starts last season were a career-high. While the additions of Anthony Davis and Dwight Howard might cut into McGee's role, if he can manage a 20-minute-per-night role, he should provide a steady source of rebounding and blocks while contributing to the Lakers' second unit.
NOR (G, PG)
G
66
Min
28.9
FPTS
979.0
REB
336.0
AST
389.0
STL
104.0
BLK
25.0
TO
138.0
FGM
261.0
FGA
630.0
FTM
34.0
FTA
70.0
Ball once again struggled to remain healthy during the 2018-19 campaign, appearing in just 47 games for the Lakers. It's worth noting that he converted on 48.2 percent of his field-goal attempts, which is an improvement from a season ago (42 percent), though his 3-point shooting remained relatively the same, hitting on 32.9 percent of his shots from distance. He finished the year averaging 9.9 points, 5.4 assists, 5.3 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 30.3 minutes per contest -- all down from his rookie season. However, the former second-round pick out of UCLA figures to be ready to roll to begin the upcoming season, and he'll take the court with a whole new group of talent. After being traded to New Orleans in mid-June, the Pelicans went out and drafted Zion Williamson, and they were also able to draw in Derrick Favors and J.J. Redick to add to the mix. While a promising starting five certainly bodes well for Ball, it remains to be seen what kind of scoring impact he'll have when sharing the court with Zion and others, especially when considering Ball's shooting struggles during his first two years in the league. The good news is that he looks to be the starter for New Orleans at point guard, so the minutes should be plentiful, assuming he's able to avoid injury. Nonetheless, many questions surround Ball heading into his third season.
Ball once again struggled to remain healthy during the 2018-19 campaign, appearing in just 47 games for the Lakers. It's worth noting that he converted on 48.2 percent of his field-goal attempts, which is an improvement from a season ago (42 percent), though his 3-point shooting remained relatively the same, hitting on 32.9 percent of his shots from distance. He finished the year averaging 9.9 points, 5.4 assists, 5.3 rebounds and 1.5 steals in 30.3 minutes per contest -- all down from his rookie season. However, the former second-round pick out of UCLA figures to be ready to roll to begin the upcoming season, and he'll take the court with a whole new group of talent. After being traded to New Orleans in mid-June, the Pelicans went out and drafted Zion Williamson, and they were also able to draw in Derrick Favors and J.J. Redick to add to the mix. While a promising starting five certainly bodes well for Ball, it remains to be seen what kind of scoring impact he'll have when sharing the court with Zion and others, especially when considering Ball's shooting struggles during his first two years in the league. The good news is that he looks to be the starter for New Orleans at point guard, so the minutes should be plentiful, assuming he's able to avoid injury. Nonetheless, many questions surround Ball heading into his third season.
ORL (G, PG)
G
78
Min
26.4
FPTS
974.0
REB
184.0
AST
387.0
STL
47.0
BLK
4.0
TO
116.0
FGM
275.0
FGA
614.0
FTM
166.0
FTA
190.0
Augustin will return for his fourth season in Orlando after having his best season as a member of the Magic in 2018-19. Augustin posted 11.7 points, 5.3 assists and 2.5 rebounds in 28.0 minutes per tilt -- all career highs in his Orlando tenure. He also had the best shooting season of his entire career, going for new bests in field-goal percentage (47.0), three-point percentage (42.1) and threes made (1.6). The 32-year-old guard has been reliable, appearing in at least 71 games in six of the last seven seasons. Augustin had a firm grip on the starting point guard job last season, and he seems locked into that job again, unless Markelle Fultz can turn his fortunes around. While that is a possibility, it shouldn't be enough to completely scare fantasy owners off of Augustin.
Augustin will return for his fourth season in Orlando after having his best season as a member of the Magic in 2018-19. Augustin posted 11.7 points, 5.3 assists and 2.5 rebounds in 28.0 minutes per tilt -- all career highs in his Orlando tenure. He also had the best shooting season of his entire career, going for new bests in field-goal percentage (47.0), three-point percentage (42.1) and threes made (1.6). The 32-year-old guard has been reliable, appearing in at least 71 games in six of the last seven seasons. Augustin had a firm grip on the starting point guard job last season, and he seems locked into that job again, unless Markelle Fultz can turn his fortunes around. While that is a possibility, it shouldn't be enough to completely scare fantasy owners off of Augustin.
NYK (F, PF, C)
G
66
Min
22.4
FPTS
974.0
REB
503.0
AST
82.0
STL
40.0
BLK
23.0
TO
84.0
FGM
324.0
FGA
730.0
FTM
113.0
FTA
147.0
Portis supplied career-high averages of 14.2 points, 8.1 rebounds and 1.5 threes in 26.0 minutes while connecting on career-best three-point (39.3) and free throw (79.4) percentages in 2018-19. Portis also matched career highs in steals (0.7) and blocks (0.4). However, he regressed in a couple of areas, appearing in a career-low 50 games due to various injuries while averaging more turnovers (1.5) than assists (1.4) -- this after dishing out 1.7 dimes versus 1.4 giveaways in 2017-18. It's unclear exactly how New York's frontcourt rotation will shake out, but it seems somewhat reasonable to project Portis as a likely backup behind fellow free-agent addition Julius Randle and sophomore center Mitchell Robinson. It's entirely possible Portis will continue to increase his statistical production while carving out a considerable role for himself in 2019-20. But the plethora of frontcourt players (Randle, Robinson, Marcus Morris, Taj Gibson, Kevin Knox) who may be in the mix for minutes at power forward and center could be cause for concern for those considering Portis prior to the later rounds of fantasy drafts.
Portis supplied career-high averages of 14.2 points, 8.1 rebounds and 1.5 threes in 26.0 minutes while connecting on career-best three-point (39.3) and free throw (79.4) percentages in 2018-19. Portis also matched career highs in steals (0.7) and blocks (0.4). However, he regressed in a couple of areas, appearing in a career-low 50 games due to various injuries while averaging more turnovers (1.5) than assists (1.4) -- this after dishing out 1.7 dimes versus 1.4 giveaways in 2017-18. It's unclear exactly how New York's frontcourt rotation will shake out, but it seems somewhat reasonable to project Portis as a likely backup behind fellow free-agent addition Julius Randle and sophomore center Mitchell Robinson. It's entirely possible Portis will continue to increase his statistical production while carving out a considerable role for himself in 2019-20. But the plethora of frontcourt players (Randle, Robinson, Marcus Morris, Taj Gibson, Kevin Knox) who may be in the mix for minutes at power forward and center could be cause for concern for those considering Portis prior to the later rounds of fantasy drafts.
SAN (F, PF, SF)
G
65
Min
24.8
FPTS
973.0
REB
405.0
AST
156.0
STL
47.0
BLK
30.0
TO
100.0
FGM
317.0
FGA
669.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
145.0
Gay will be back in San Antonio this season after signing a two-year, $32 million deal to return to the Spurs. Despite starting 51 games last season, Gay played the second-fewest minutes (26.7) of his career. Gay enjoyed his most efficient shooting season as a pro, shooting 50.4 percent from the floor and 40.2 percent from downtown. He managed just 13.7 points per game -- the third-lowest mark in his career -- though he did that on a respectable 10.8 shots per contest. Gay was forced into the starting lineup frequently last season due to a variety of injuries to his teammates, though he is expected to primarily come off the bench in his 14th season. His defensive efforts have been minimal over the last two seasons, but Gay is still a good source of rebounds, pulling down a career-high 6.8 boards in 2018-19. The 33-year-old veteran may not put up the big point totals we saw in Memphis and Sacramento, but if he can maintain his newfound efficiency, he'll be a valuable fantasy asset.
Gay will be back in San Antonio this season after signing a two-year, $32 million deal to return to the Spurs. Despite starting 51 games last season, Gay played the second-fewest minutes (26.7) of his career. Gay enjoyed his most efficient shooting season as a pro, shooting 50.4 percent from the floor and 40.2 percent from downtown. He managed just 13.7 points per game -- the third-lowest mark in his career -- though he did that on a respectable 10.8 shots per contest. Gay was forced into the starting lineup frequently last season due to a variety of injuries to his teammates, though he is expected to primarily come off the bench in his 14th season. His defensive efforts have been minimal over the last two seasons, but Gay is still a good source of rebounds, pulling down a career-high 6.8 boards in 2018-19. The 33-year-old veteran may not put up the big point totals we saw in Memphis and Sacramento, but if he can maintain his newfound efficiency, he'll be a valuable fantasy asset.
DEN (F, PF)
G
81
Min
26.7
FPTS
972.0
REB
345.0
AST
65.0
STL
51.0
BLK
76.0
TO
55.0
FGM
337.0
FGA
681.0
FTM
126.0
FTA
183.0
After spending the majority of his career as a reserve, Grant finally received an opportunity to start for a Thunder team last year that didn't have much depth. He ended up averaging 32.7 minutes per game, which was nearly six more minutes per night than his career mark. While his numbers weren't off the charts, he was productive with averages of 13.6 points, 5.2 rebounds, 1.4 three-pointers and 1.3 blocks. This season, he finds himself in a much different situation as a member of a Nuggets team that has significant depth at forward and center. Immediately ahead of Grant is Paul Millsap, Nikola Jokic and Will Barton. Still, Grant's three-position upside should afford him a healthy floor of reserve minutes, likely in the low-20s. His true potential lies in whether he can outshine the likes of Mason Plumlee, Michael Porter Jr. and Torrey Craig.
After spending the majority of his career as a reserve, Grant finally received an opportunity to start for a Thunder team last year that didn't have much depth. He ended up averaging 32.7 minutes per game, which was nearly six more minutes per night than his career mark. While his numbers weren't off the charts, he was productive with averages of 13.6 points, 5.2 rebounds, 1.4 three-pointers and 1.3 blocks. This season, he finds himself in a much different situation as a member of a Nuggets team that has significant depth at forward and center. Immediately ahead of Grant is Paul Millsap, Nikola Jokic and Will Barton. Still, Grant's three-position upside should afford him a healthy floor of reserve minutes, likely in the low-20s. His true potential lies in whether he can outshine the likes of Mason Plumlee, Michael Porter Jr. and Torrey Craig.
IND (F, SF, PF)
G
67
Min
28.8
FPTS
969.0
REB
247.0
AST
91.0
STL
72.0
BLK
41.0
TO
74.0
FGM
409.0
FGA
840.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
176.0
After spending the first five years of his career in Phoenix, this will be Warren's first season on a likely playoff team after he was traded to the Pacers back in June. For the most part, Warren has shown steady improvement in each year since entering the league back in 2014, but his biggest drawback continues to be his inability to stay on the floor. He appeared in just 43 games across the 2018-19 season due to a lingering ankle injury, but he still averaged 18.0 points and 4.0 rebounds per game while shooting a career-best 42.8 percent from behind the arc on 4.2 attempts per game -- by far the highest volume of his young career. In Indiana, Warren will be surrounded by more offensive talent than he ever has before, but with star guard Victor Oladipo not expected to return until December while he recovers from knee surgery, Warren may be leaned upon in the first half of the season for a heavier workload offensively as the team's likely starter at small forward. The 25-year-old has shown flashes of being a great scorer in this league, but his fantasy value will always be limited due to the number of games he tends to be sidelined for and his lack of consistent production in the box score beyond the scoring column.
After spending the first five years of his career in Phoenix, this will be Warren's first season on a likely playoff team after he was traded to the Pacers back in June. For the most part, Warren has shown steady improvement in each year since entering the league back in 2014, but his biggest drawback continues to be his inability to stay on the floor. He appeared in just 43 games across the 2018-19 season due to a lingering ankle injury, but he still averaged 18.0 points and 4.0 rebounds per game while shooting a career-best 42.8 percent from behind the arc on 4.2 attempts per game -- by far the highest volume of his young career. In Indiana, Warren will be surrounded by more offensive talent than he ever has before, but with star guard Victor Oladipo not expected to return until December while he recovers from knee surgery, Warren may be leaned upon in the first half of the season for a heavier workload offensively as the team's likely starter at small forward. The 25-year-old has shown flashes of being a great scorer in this league, but his fantasy value will always be limited due to the number of games he tends to be sidelined for and his lack of consistent production in the box score beyond the scoring column.
CLE (G, PG)
G
73
Min
32.9
FPTS
969.0
REB
219.0
AST
391.0
STL
72.0
BLK
14.0
TO
219.0
FGM
415.0
FGA
1,010.0
FTM
156.0
FTA
185.0
Garland entered his freshman year at Vanderbilt as a five-star prospect but played just five games on the season due to a knee injury. He's reportedly back to 100 percent following knee surgery and will look to showcase in the NBA the talent he didn't have the chance to show much in college. In the five games he did play, he averaged 16.2 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.6 assists while shooting 53.7 percent from the field and 47.8 percent from three on 23 attempts. Though just 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds, Garland is expected to share the backcourt with last year's first-round pick, Collin Sexton, who is 6-foot-2 and 190 pounds himself. While the Cavaliers will be at a severe disadvantage on the defensive end, it's possible the offensive capabilities of the guards will outweigh that -- think Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum. Moreover, Cleveland is in a full rebuild, so expect Garland to be given plenty of reps.
Garland entered his freshman year at Vanderbilt as a five-star prospect but played just five games on the season due to a knee injury. He's reportedly back to 100 percent following knee surgery and will look to showcase in the NBA the talent he didn't have the chance to show much in college. In the five games he did play, he averaged 16.2 points, 3.8 rebounds and 2.6 assists while shooting 53.7 percent from the field and 47.8 percent from three on 23 attempts. Though just 6-foot-2 and 175 pounds, Garland is expected to share the backcourt with last year's first-round pick, Collin Sexton, who is 6-foot-2 and 190 pounds himself. While the Cavaliers will be at a severe disadvantage on the defensive end, it's possible the offensive capabilities of the guards will outweigh that -- think Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum. Moreover, Cleveland is in a full rebuild, so expect Garland to be given plenty of reps.
WAS (F, SG, SF)
G
75
Min
27.2
FPTS
967.0
REB
405.0
AST
224.0
STL
59.0
BLK
14.0
TO
84.0
FGM
322.0
FGA
768.0
FTM
89.0
FTA
131.0
Despite being selected No. 15 overall by the Wizards in the 2018 NBA Draft, it took a while for Brown become a regular member of Washington's rotation during his rookie season. After appearing in just 29 of the team's first 59 regular season outings and playing just 7.1 minutes per game during that stretch, the opportunity for playing time emerged for the final stretch of the regular season when the Wizards traded away starting small forward Otto Porter Jr. to the Bulls. As a result, Brown appeared in each of the last 23 games for Washington with his workload growing with every passing contest. He showed real promise in the last 10 games of the season, all of which he started, averaging 10.4 points, 4.6 rebounds and 2.2 assists across 30.3 minutes per game. Now, with the Wizards looking like a completely different team heading into 2019-20, Brown's continuity could put him at a real advantage. Brown will likely be competing with fellow swingman C.J. Miles, who the Wizards acquired via trade this offseason, for the starting small forward spot, but given that Washington is now a team built with a number of young pieces, the 20-year-old Brown should see usage in line with what he had during last year's final stretch.
Despite being selected No. 15 overall by the Wizards in the 2018 NBA Draft, it took a while for Brown become a regular member of Washington's rotation during his rookie season. After appearing in just 29 of the team's first 59 regular season outings and playing just 7.1 minutes per game during that stretch, the opportunity for playing time emerged for the final stretch of the regular season when the Wizards traded away starting small forward Otto Porter Jr. to the Bulls. As a result, Brown appeared in each of the last 23 games for Washington with his workload growing with every passing contest. He showed real promise in the last 10 games of the season, all of which he started, averaging 10.4 points, 4.6 rebounds and 2.2 assists across 30.3 minutes per game. Now, with the Wizards looking like a completely different team heading into 2019-20, Brown's continuity could put him at a real advantage. Brown will likely be competing with fellow swingman C.J. Miles, who the Wizards acquired via trade this offseason, for the starting small forward spot, but given that Washington is now a team built with a number of young pieces, the 20-year-old Brown should see usage in line with what he had during last year's final stretch.
NYK (F, SF, PF)
G
79
Min
25.4
FPTS
964.0
REB
440.0
AST
105.0
STL
41.0
BLK
24.0
TO
88.0
FGM
332.0
FGA
780.0
FTM
134.0
FTA
166.0
He might not have received a lot of headlines, but Morris was a key part of the Celtics' rotation last season. Although he didn't provide many defensive stats, he averaged 13.9 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.9 three-pointers across 28 minutes a game. He was excellent from the charity stripe, converting 84.4 percent of his attempts. With the Celtics choosing to move on, Morris now finds himself as a member of the Knicks. This isn't exactly an ideal situation with the likes of Kevin Knox, Wayne Ellington, Julius Randle, Bobby Portis and Taj Gibson all competing with him for playing time at the two forward spots. The Knicks also had one of the most inconsistent rotations in the league last year, so Morris' playing time could fluctuate dramatically. Barring injuries to some of his teammates, it's difficult to envision a path for Morris carving out significant fantasy value. If anything, this might be the season to only consider selecting him in deeper leagues.
He might not have received a lot of headlines, but Morris was a key part of the Celtics' rotation last season. Although he didn't provide many defensive stats, he averaged 13.9 points, 6.1 rebounds and 1.9 three-pointers across 28 minutes a game. He was excellent from the charity stripe, converting 84.4 percent of his attempts. With the Celtics choosing to move on, Morris now finds himself as a member of the Knicks. This isn't exactly an ideal situation with the likes of Kevin Knox, Wayne Ellington, Julius Randle, Bobby Portis and Taj Gibson all competing with him for playing time at the two forward spots. The Knicks also had one of the most inconsistent rotations in the league last year, so Morris' playing time could fluctuate dramatically. Barring injuries to some of his teammates, it's difficult to envision a path for Morris carving out significant fantasy value. If anything, this might be the season to only consider selecting him in deeper leagues.
CLE (G, PG)
G
80
Min
32.5
FPTS
960.0
REB
228.0
AST
217.0
STL
62.0
BLK
6.0
TO
200.0
FGM
482.0
FGA
1,110.0
FTM
215.0
FTA
255.0
The eighth overall pick in the 2018 draft, Sexton drew his first start on the 11th game of the 2018-19 campaign and never looked back. He played in all 82 games, leading the Cavaliers in total points (1,371) while shooting an impressive 40.2 percent from three and 83.9 percent from the charity stripe. Though Sexton showed off his scoring ability, racking up 27 performances with at least 20 points, he was a poor passer for a point guard. He dished five or more assists on only 12 occasions and averaged 2.3 turnovers to his 3.0 assists per game. Defense wasn't Sexton's strong suit, either, as he recorded just 44 steals on the year. Based on his first season, Sexton projects to be a score-first guard, though his 6-foot-2, 190-pound frame isn't made for a shift to shooting guard. Early indications are that Sexton and 6-foot-2, 174-pound rookie Darius Garland will share the backcourt together, so the two may divvy up ballhandling responsibilities. Ultimately, until Sexton develops as a passer and defender, his fantasy value is relatively minimal given his limited contributions outside of scoring.
The eighth overall pick in the 2018 draft, Sexton drew his first start on the 11th game of the 2018-19 campaign and never looked back. He played in all 82 games, leading the Cavaliers in total points (1,371) while shooting an impressive 40.2 percent from three and 83.9 percent from the charity stripe. Though Sexton showed off his scoring ability, racking up 27 performances with at least 20 points, he was a poor passer for a point guard. He dished five or more assists on only 12 occasions and averaged 2.3 turnovers to his 3.0 assists per game. Defense wasn't Sexton's strong suit, either, as he recorded just 44 steals on the year. Based on his first season, Sexton projects to be a score-first guard, though his 6-foot-2, 190-pound frame isn't made for a shift to shooting guard. Early indications are that Sexton and 6-foot-2, 174-pound rookie Darius Garland will share the backcourt together, so the two may divvy up ballhandling responsibilities. Ultimately, until Sexton develops as a passer and defender, his fantasy value is relatively minimal given his limited contributions outside of scoring.
MIA (G, PG)
G
67
Min
28.8
FPTS
957.0
REB
216.0
AST
320.0
STL
58.0
BLK
10.0
TO
138.0
FGM
367.0
FGA
843.0
FTM
158.0
FTA
197.0
Dragic is entering his 12th season after a knee injury forced him to play the fewest games of his career (36) in 2018-19. He played his fewest minutes (27.5) and grabbed his fewest rebounds (3.1) since 2011 while shooting his worst field goal percentage since his 2008 rookie season (41.3). Dragic had a knee scope performed during the season, and his recovery may have certainly contributed to the statistical downturns he experienced. From 2011-2017, he averaged 16.4 points, 5.6 assists, 3.4 rebounds and 1.2 steals while shooting 47.4 percent from the field and 36.0 percent from three. Returning to the Heat healthy, his numbers should be closer to the previous seven-year average than his injury-plagued 2018. He began to turn his efficiency around post-All-Star break by improving his shooting percentage from the field, shooting percentage from three, and assist/turnover ratio. While there is hope for a more efficient and productive 2019-20, the arrival of superstar Jimmy Butler will limit Dragic's usage. Dragic, sharing the backcourt with the newly acquired Butler, may have to be off-ball more than he ever has. In his prime and the new face of the franchise, Butler figures to be an extremely high-usage player who will dominate the ball. Dragic has proven to be a capable source of scoring, field goal shooting and three-point shooting throughout his career, and though Butler caps his upside, it seems fair to expect Dragic to return to his usual form this season.
Dragic is entering his 12th season after a knee injury forced him to play the fewest games of his career (36) in 2018-19. He played his fewest minutes (27.5) and grabbed his fewest rebounds (3.1) since 2011 while shooting his worst field goal percentage since his 2008 rookie season (41.3). Dragic had a knee scope performed during the season, and his recovery may have certainly contributed to the statistical downturns he experienced. From 2011-2017, he averaged 16.4 points, 5.6 assists, 3.4 rebounds and 1.2 steals while shooting 47.4 percent from the field and 36.0 percent from three. Returning to the Heat healthy, his numbers should be closer to the previous seven-year average than his injury-plagued 2018. He began to turn his efficiency around post-All-Star break by improving his shooting percentage from the field, shooting percentage from three, and assist/turnover ratio. While there is hope for a more efficient and productive 2019-20, the arrival of superstar Jimmy Butler will limit Dragic's usage. Dragic, sharing the backcourt with the newly acquired Butler, may have to be off-ball more than he ever has. In his prime and the new face of the franchise, Butler figures to be an extremely high-usage player who will dominate the ball. Dragic has proven to be a capable source of scoring, field goal shooting and three-point shooting throughout his career, and though Butler caps his upside, it seems fair to expect Dragic to return to his usual form this season.
WAS (F, SF, PF)
G
78
Min
27.5
FPTS
955.0
REB
347.0
AST
131.0
STL
46.0
BLK
43.0
TO
57.0
FGM
266.0
FGA
595.0
FTM
68.0
FTA
79.0
Bertans was traded to the Wizards this offseason after spending his first three seasons with the Spurs. He had a minimal role as a rookie, but got more playing time in each of the next two seasons as his game developed. Bertans was a key reserve for San Antonio last season, averaging 8.0 points, 3.5 rebounds and 1.9 threes in 21.5 minutes per contest -- all career highs. He shot a career-best 42.9 percent from three and has shot better than 37.0 percent from long distance all three years in the NBA. He's likely to backup No. 9 overall pick Rui Hachimura at power forward, but Bertans has a great chance of seeing quality playing time off the bench as he can play small forward in certain lineups. The best fit for the 6-foot-10 Bertans, however, is as a floor-stretching four -- a role he could fill immediately. More minutes could certainly lead to increased production, as Bertans has averaged 14.0 points, 5.1 rebounds and 3.1 threes per 36 minutes in his career.
Bertans was traded to the Wizards this offseason after spending his first three seasons with the Spurs. He had a minimal role as a rookie, but got more playing time in each of the next two seasons as his game developed. Bertans was a key reserve for San Antonio last season, averaging 8.0 points, 3.5 rebounds and 1.9 threes in 21.5 minutes per contest -- all career highs. He shot a career-best 42.9 percent from three and has shot better than 37.0 percent from long distance all three years in the NBA. He's likely to backup No. 9 overall pick Rui Hachimura at power forward, but Bertans has a great chance of seeing quality playing time off the bench as he can play small forward in certain lineups. The best fit for the 6-foot-10 Bertans, however, is as a floor-stretching four -- a role he could fill immediately. More minutes could certainly lead to increased production, as Bertans has averaged 14.0 points, 5.1 rebounds and 3.1 threes per 36 minutes in his career.
PHO (F, SG, SF)
G
78
Min
30.4
FPTS
955.0
REB
285.0
AST
170.0
STL
144.0
BLK
37.0
TO
69.0
FGM
258.0
FGA
581.0
FTM
97.0
FTA
119.0
Bridges is coming off a healthy and productive rookie season where he appeared in all 82 games for the Suns while also making 56 starts. He ended with averages of 8.3 points, 3.2 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.6 steals across 29.5 minutes per game. He shot 33.5 percent from behind the arc on 3.8 attempts per game and 43 percent from the floor overall. Entering his second NBA season, Bridges is looking at what will likely be a role off the bench for Phoenix, as star shooting guard Devin Booker and Kelly Oubre are expected to be locked in as starters on the wing to open the campaign. Beyond that, it doesn't appear Bridges will be facing much competition for playing time, especially with fellow wing Josh Jackson being traded to Memphis this offseason, so Bridges should still see plenty of minutes as a key reserve for the rebuilding Suns. Additionally, Booker has played 54 and 64 games in each of the last two seasons respectively due to injury, and Bridges would likely see a significant boost in usage whenever the star guard is unable to play.
Bridges is coming off a healthy and productive rookie season where he appeared in all 82 games for the Suns while also making 56 starts. He ended with averages of 8.3 points, 3.2 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.6 steals across 29.5 minutes per game. He shot 33.5 percent from behind the arc on 3.8 attempts per game and 43 percent from the floor overall. Entering his second NBA season, Bridges is looking at what will likely be a role off the bench for Phoenix, as star shooting guard Devin Booker and Kelly Oubre are expected to be locked in as starters on the wing to open the campaign. Beyond that, it doesn't appear Bridges will be facing much competition for playing time, especially with fellow wing Josh Jackson being traded to Memphis this offseason, so Bridges should still see plenty of minutes as a key reserve for the rebuilding Suns. Additionally, Booker has played 54 and 64 games in each of the last two seasons respectively due to injury, and Bridges would likely see a significant boost in usage whenever the star guard is unable to play.
NOR (G, SF, SG)
G
72
Min
29.1
FPTS
944.0
REB
164.0
AST
160.0
STL
28.0
BLK
15.0
TO
89.0
FGM
388.0
FGA
875.0
FTM
174.0
FTA
193.0
Redick signed a two-year, $26.5 million deal with the Pelicans in the offseason and leaves the 76ers after the most productive two-year stretch in his career. With the 76ers, Redick averaged 17.6 points and 3.0 threes per contest on 41.1 percent from deep. As a member of the Pelicans, Redick may come off the bench, which would be an adjustment for the 14-year vet after starting in 96.5 percent of his games over the last five seasons. He's averaged at least 15 points per contest over that stretch, and it's fair to think his production won't drop off sharply even if playing a sixth-man role. Despite his age, Redick is still in excellent shape and should fit in well with what figures to be an uptempo team. He'll likely be a solid contributor in all shooting categories, though he's limited on the defensive side of the ball. For fantasy owners in need of three-point help, Redick has made for an excellent option in that department for most of his career.
Redick signed a two-year, $26.5 million deal with the Pelicans in the offseason and leaves the 76ers after the most productive two-year stretch in his career. With the 76ers, Redick averaged 17.6 points and 3.0 threes per contest on 41.1 percent from deep. As a member of the Pelicans, Redick may come off the bench, which would be an adjustment for the 14-year vet after starting in 96.5 percent of his games over the last five seasons. He's averaged at least 15 points per contest over that stretch, and it's fair to think his production won't drop off sharply even if playing a sixth-man role. Despite his age, Redick is still in excellent shape and should fit in well with what figures to be an uptempo team. He'll likely be a solid contributor in all shooting categories, though he's limited on the defensive side of the ball. For fantasy owners in need of three-point help, Redick has made for an excellent option in that department for most of his career.
DEN (F, PF, C)
G
64
Min
25.8
FPTS
943.0
REB
407.0
AST
123.0
STL
72.0
BLK
47.0
TO
83.0
FGM
272.0
FGA
579.0
FTM
154.0
FTA
217.0
Millsap remains a versatile defender and highly-capable two-way player who consistently makes the right play and complements Nikola Jokic on both ends of the court. However, while Millsap is still a well-rounded statistical contributor, it seems he is no longer among the best options across all fantasy formats. Now entering his 14th season, the 34-year-old power forward did appear in 70 games in 2018-19 -- the first time he reached that threshold since 2015-16. But he earned his lowest allotment of minutes per game (27.1) since his sophomore year (2007-08), recorded his lowest per-game averages in scoring (12.6) and assists (2.0) since 2009-10, and had his worst blocks average (0.8) since 2011-12. The offseason acquisition of big man Jerami Grant could further cut into Millsap's playing time. Regardless, the fact that the Nuggets opted to pick up Millsap's expensive team option shows how much he is valued, and so long as he can stay healthy, there's little reason to expect another sizable drop-off in minutes or production from one of the most consistent players of the last decade.
Millsap remains a versatile defender and highly-capable two-way player who consistently makes the right play and complements Nikola Jokic on both ends of the court. However, while Millsap is still a well-rounded statistical contributor, it seems he is no longer among the best options across all fantasy formats. Now entering his 14th season, the 34-year-old power forward did appear in 70 games in 2018-19 -- the first time he reached that threshold since 2015-16. But he earned his lowest allotment of minutes per game (27.1) since his sophomore year (2007-08), recorded his lowest per-game averages in scoring (12.6) and assists (2.0) since 2009-10, and had his worst blocks average (0.8) since 2011-12. The offseason acquisition of big man Jerami Grant could further cut into Millsap's playing time. Regardless, the fact that the Nuggets opted to pick up Millsap's expensive team option shows how much he is valued, and so long as he can stay healthy, there's little reason to expect another sizable drop-off in minutes or production from one of the most consistent players of the last decade.
ORL (F, SF, SG)
G
74
Min
27.9
FPTS
940.0
REB
269.0
AST
99.0
STL
69.0
BLK
28.0
TO
86.0
FGM
420.0
FGA
997.0
FTM
117.0
FTA
138.0
Ross is back with the Magic after inking a four-year, $50 million deal in the offseason. He finished third on Orlando with 15.2 points per game, shooting just 42.8 percent from the field but canning 38.8 percent of his threes. He made at least five three-pointers in 16 games, draining a career-high 2.7 per contest. Despite finishing the year with a quality three-point shooting percentage, Ross struggled with consistency scoring from game to game. He managed 21 games of 20 or more points but totaled 22 games scoring less than 10 points. Ross will compete for playing time with Jonathan Isaac, Evan Fournier and newly-acquired Al-Farouq Aminu this season, though he was still able to carve out 26.5 minutes per contest last season off the bench. He could maintain a 20-minute-per game-role this season, as he provides a scoring punch for the second unit. Ross is an excellent source of threes, three-point percentage and free-throw percentage, though fantasy owners should be prepared for some up-and-down stretches of play throughout the season.
Ross is back with the Magic after inking a four-year, $50 million deal in the offseason. He finished third on Orlando with 15.2 points per game, shooting just 42.8 percent from the field but canning 38.8 percent of his threes. He made at least five three-pointers in 16 games, draining a career-high 2.7 per contest. Despite finishing the year with a quality three-point shooting percentage, Ross struggled with consistency scoring from game to game. He managed 21 games of 20 or more points but totaled 22 games scoring less than 10 points. Ross will compete for playing time with Jonathan Isaac, Evan Fournier and newly-acquired Al-Farouq Aminu this season, though he was still able to carve out 26.5 minutes per contest last season off the bench. He could maintain a 20-minute-per game-role this season, as he provides a scoring punch for the second unit. Ross is an excellent source of threes, three-point percentage and free-throw percentage, though fantasy owners should be prepared for some up-and-down stretches of play throughout the season.
DET (F, SF, PF, C)
G
74
Min
25.8
FPTS
931.0
REB
398.0
AST
119.0
STL
54.0
BLK
33.0
TO
81.0
FGM
316.0
FGA
728.0
FTM
109.0
FTA
138.0
Last season was a tough one for Morris, as he suffered a fairly serious neck injury while with Washington, was traded to and waived by the Pelicans, and then signed with the Thunder once he was medically cleared to play. The result was Morris appearing in just 58 games and posting his fewest points per game (9.4) since his second season in the NBA. He also shot just 33.5 percent from behind the arc after back-to-back seasons shooting over 36 percent. Now, Morris is headed to Detroit, where will have a lot to prove both health and skill-wise. But he should have a good opportunity to do so for a team that is looking to make the playoffs yet again. While Blake Griffin is locked in as the team's starting power forward, Morris should start the season as Griffin's primary backup, and Morris' versatility gives him the ability to play both small forward and the small-ball five. It's also worth noting that Griffin hasn't played a full season since his rookie year, and with the All-Star coming off arthroscopic knee surgery this offseason, Morris may have the opportunity to make some spot starts this year.
Last season was a tough one for Morris, as he suffered a fairly serious neck injury while with Washington, was traded to and waived by the Pelicans, and then signed with the Thunder once he was medically cleared to play. The result was Morris appearing in just 58 games and posting his fewest points per game (9.4) since his second season in the NBA. He also shot just 33.5 percent from behind the arc after back-to-back seasons shooting over 36 percent. Now, Morris is headed to Detroit, where will have a lot to prove both health and skill-wise. But he should have a good opportunity to do so for a team that is looking to make the playoffs yet again. While Blake Griffin is locked in as the team's starting power forward, Morris should start the season as Griffin's primary backup, and Morris' versatility gives him the ability to play both small forward and the small-ball five. It's also worth noting that Griffin hasn't played a full season since his rookie year, and with the All-Star coming off arthroscopic knee surgery this offseason, Morris may have the opportunity to make some spot starts this year.
MEM (F, SF, PF)
G
69
Min
28.2
FPTS
925.0
REB
381.0
AST
220.0
STL
82.0
BLK
56.0
TO
88.0
FGM
221.0
FGA
419.0
FTM
56.0
FTA
97.0
During the summer of 2018, the Grizzlies liked Anderson enough to sign him to a four-year, $37 million contract that the Spurs were not willing to match. He showed the ability to contribute in multiple areas during the 2017-18 season, averaging 7.9 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.6 steals across just 27 minutes per game. There was the potential for him to have an expanded role with the Grizzlies, but injuries limited him to just 43 games. When he was on the floor, he showed similar promise by averaging 8.0 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.3 steals over 30 minutes. He shot 54.3 percent from the field, but his free-throw shooting cratered at 57.8 percent. Considering he has shot 70.6 percent from the charity stripe for his career, he will likely improve in that category moving forward. However, the Grizzlies have made several offseason moves that put his role in doubt. Andre Iguodala might not start the season on the roster, but the Grizzlies also added Jae Crowder and Josh Jackson to potentially take away some of his minutes. Since he doesn't really excel in any one particular category, expect Anderson to once again have limited upside.
During the summer of 2018, the Grizzlies liked Anderson enough to sign him to a four-year, $37 million contract that the Spurs were not willing to match. He showed the ability to contribute in multiple areas during the 2017-18 season, averaging 7.9 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.6 steals across just 27 minutes per game. There was the potential for him to have an expanded role with the Grizzlies, but injuries limited him to just 43 games. When he was on the floor, he showed similar promise by averaging 8.0 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.0 assists and 1.3 steals over 30 minutes. He shot 54.3 percent from the field, but his free-throw shooting cratered at 57.8 percent. Considering he has shot 70.6 percent from the charity stripe for his career, he will likely improve in that category moving forward. However, the Grizzlies have made several offseason moves that put his role in doubt. Andre Iguodala might not start the season on the roster, but the Grizzlies also added Jae Crowder and Josh Jackson to potentially take away some of his minutes. Since he doesn't really excel in any one particular category, expect Anderson to once again have limited upside.
DET (G, SG, SF)
G
75
Min
27.9
FPTS
925.0
REB
266.0
AST
187.0
STL
38.0
BLK
15.0
TO
83.0
FGM
338.0
FGA
757.0
FTM
101.0
FTA
116.0
After two seasons primarily coming off the bench, Kennard is poised to take on a starting role with the Pistons this season. He could take a step forward in his third season given more playing time, as Kennard has averaged just 21.4 minutes per contest in his career, starting only 19 games. He's proven to be a deep threat, draining 1.7 threes per game on 39.4 percent shooting from deep, and he recorded 15 games with at least three triples last season. His 15.4 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 2.7 threes per 36 minutes offer a lot of encouragement if an expanded role is available, but he will compete with fellow wings Markieff Morris, Tony Snell, Bruce Brown and Derrick Rose for minutes. Kennard provides steady shooting from the field, from long distance and from the foul line, but until he proves he can be a consistent scorer, his value lies in his three-point game, as he doesn't offer a lot on defense.
After two seasons primarily coming off the bench, Kennard is poised to take on a starting role with the Pistons this season. He could take a step forward in his third season given more playing time, as Kennard has averaged just 21.4 minutes per contest in his career, starting only 19 games. He's proven to be a deep threat, draining 1.7 threes per game on 39.4 percent shooting from deep, and he recorded 15 games with at least three triples last season. His 15.4 points, 4.6 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 2.7 threes per 36 minutes offer a lot of encouragement if an expanded role is available, but he will compete with fellow wings Markieff Morris, Tony Snell, Bruce Brown and Derrick Rose for minutes. Kennard provides steady shooting from the field, from long distance and from the foul line, but until he proves he can be a consistent scorer, his value lies in his three-point game, as he doesn't offer a lot on defense.
SAC (C, PF, C)
G
61
Min
23.4
FPTS
924.0
REB
426.0
AST
80.0
STL
61.0
BLK
63.0
TO
75.0
FGM
235.0
FGA
467.0
FTM
80.0
FTA
100.0
Dedmon will join the Kings on a three-year, $41 million deal after two years with Atlanta. Dedmon will play for his fourth team in four years after stops in San Antonio and Orlando prior to playing with the Hawks. Dedmon averaged a career-best 10.8 points to go with 7.5 rebounds in 2018, draining 1.3 threes on 38.2 percent shooting from downtown -- both career-highs. Dedmon added a long-range game to his offensive repertoire, though his biggest stride came in his defensive production. He averaged 1.1 steals and 1.1 blocks per game in 2018, showcasing his potential as a rim-protector. The two-way player seems likely to be the Kings' starting center in 2019, and it's a role in which he could continue his growth on both ends of the floor. His biggest competition comes in the form of Harry Giles, though it's still reasonable to expect Dedmon to at least see the 26.2 minutes per game he averaged in 52 starts last season.
Dedmon will join the Kings on a three-year, $41 million deal after two years with Atlanta. Dedmon will play for his fourth team in four years after stops in San Antonio and Orlando prior to playing with the Hawks. Dedmon averaged a career-best 10.8 points to go with 7.5 rebounds in 2018, draining 1.3 threes on 38.2 percent shooting from downtown -- both career-highs. Dedmon added a long-range game to his offensive repertoire, though his biggest stride came in his defensive production. He averaged 1.1 steals and 1.1 blocks per game in 2018, showcasing his potential as a rim-protector. The two-way player seems likely to be the Kings' starting center in 2019, and it's a role in which he could continue his growth on both ends of the floor. His biggest competition comes in the form of Harry Giles, though it's still reasonable to expect Dedmon to at least see the 26.2 minutes per game he averaged in 52 starts last season.
CHA (F, PF, SF)
G
77
Min
26.0
FPTS
923.0
REB
382.0
AST
86.0
STL
67.0
BLK
57.0
TO
44.0
FGM
267.0
FGA
612.0
FTM
66.0
FTA
81.0
Unsurprisingly, Williams opted into his $15 million player option to remain with the Hornets for a sixth full season. The 6-foot-9 forward averaged 10.1 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.9 threes and 1.7 combined blocks/steals in his 14th NBA season. He's averaged 1.7 threes per game at a 38.2 percent clip over the last four seasons. Williams has been a stalwart in Charlotte's rotation, having played and started in at least 75 games over the last four seasons with minutes in the upper-20s. It's unclear what Williams' role will be on a rebuilding Hornets team that lost Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb and will feature arguably the worst roster in the Association. What's clear, however, is that Charlotte will desperately need guys to step up and make plays, and the experienced veteran presents some upside if his usage increases. He's a solid rebounder and a great source of threes who can usually chip in double-digit scoring, making him a late-round flier in standard formats who could outperform his draft position.
Unsurprisingly, Williams opted into his $15 million player option to remain with the Hornets for a sixth full season. The 6-foot-9 forward averaged 10.1 points, 5.4 rebounds, 1.9 threes and 1.7 combined blocks/steals in his 14th NBA season. He's averaged 1.7 threes per game at a 38.2 percent clip over the last four seasons. Williams has been a stalwart in Charlotte's rotation, having played and started in at least 75 games over the last four seasons with minutes in the upper-20s. It's unclear what Williams' role will be on a rebuilding Hornets team that lost Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb and will feature arguably the worst roster in the Association. What's clear, however, is that Charlotte will desperately need guys to step up and make plays, and the experienced veteran presents some upside if his usage increases. He's a solid rebounder and a great source of threes who can usually chip in double-digit scoring, making him a late-round flier in standard formats who could outperform his draft position.
DEN (G, PG)
G
81
Min
22.8
FPTS
920.0
REB
182.0
AST
278.0
STL
68.0
BLK
4.0
TO
49.0
FGM
320.0
FGA
660.0
FTM
63.0
FTA
76.0
Morris took a huge leap in playing time in his second year in the league. He appeared in only three NBA games as a rookie in 2017-18, playing on a two-way contract. His big-time play in the G League earned him a roster spot in 2018-19, and he averaged 24.0 minutes per night, appearing in all 82 games. Morris operated mainly as a reserve and averaged 10.4 points, 3.6 assists and 2.4 rebounds. He provided quality shooting as well, going 49.3 percent from the field and 41.4 percent from three while canning 1.1 triples per contest. Morris figures to have a similar role this season, serving as the primary backup point guard to franchise star Jamal Murray. Morris is a talented guard, but Denver has arguably the deepest roster in the Association, and his ceiling is capped by all of the quality options available around him.
Morris took a huge leap in playing time in his second year in the league. He appeared in only three NBA games as a rookie in 2017-18, playing on a two-way contract. His big-time play in the G League earned him a roster spot in 2018-19, and he averaged 24.0 minutes per night, appearing in all 82 games. Morris operated mainly as a reserve and averaged 10.4 points, 3.6 assists and 2.4 rebounds. He provided quality shooting as well, going 49.3 percent from the field and 41.4 percent from three while canning 1.1 triples per contest. Morris figures to have a similar role this season, serving as the primary backup point guard to franchise star Jamal Murray. Morris is a talented guard, but Denver has arguably the deepest roster in the Association, and his ceiling is capped by all of the quality options available around him.
GSW (C, PF, C)
G
72
Min
21.1
FPTS
918.0
REB
428.0
AST
126.0
STL
47.0
BLK
54.0
TO
52.0
FGM
218.0
FGA
364.0
FTM
65.0
FTA
108.0
Looney re-upped with Golden State on a three-year deal after spending his first four seasons with the Warriors. He's been a perennial backup, averaging fewer than 10 minutes per contest in each of his first two seasons in the league and playing a career-high 18.5 minutes in 2018-19. He produced career highs across the board with 6.3 points, 5.2 rebounds and 1.5 assists on 62.5 percent shooting in 80 appearances. The last time Looney was on the court, he showed a lot of heart, playing through a fractured collarbone in the Finals. Despite cementing his status as a Bay Area fan favorite, he's unlikely to be fantasy-relevant outside of deeper leagues. Golden State has typically employed a committee at the five rather than giving big minutes to one center, and the additions of Willie Cauley-Stein and Omari Spellman to the frontcourt don't bode well for Looney's playing time.
Looney re-upped with Golden State on a three-year deal after spending his first four seasons with the Warriors. He's been a perennial backup, averaging fewer than 10 minutes per contest in each of his first two seasons in the league and playing a career-high 18.5 minutes in 2018-19. He produced career highs across the board with 6.3 points, 5.2 rebounds and 1.5 assists on 62.5 percent shooting in 80 appearances. The last time Looney was on the court, he showed a lot of heart, playing through a fractured collarbone in the Finals. Despite cementing his status as a Bay Area fan favorite, he's unlikely to be fantasy-relevant outside of deeper leagues. Golden State has typically employed a committee at the five rather than giving big minutes to one center, and the additions of Willie Cauley-Stein and Omari Spellman to the frontcourt don't bode well for Looney's playing time.
LAL (G, PG)
G
68
Min
25.8
FPTS
915.0
REB
311.0
AST
470.0
STL
66.0
BLK
9.0
TO
163.0
FGM
234.0
FGA
554.0
FTM
29.0
FTA
46.0
After one year with the Lakers, Rondo signed a two-year deal over the summer to remain with the team. In 46 games, he averaged 9.2 points, 8.0 assists, 5.3 rebounds and 1.2 steals across 29.8 minutes. Rondo handed out at least 8.0 dimes in back-to-back seasons for the first time since 2013-14 and 2014-15, so his ability to still be a high-level passer is encouraging, though inefficient shooting remains an issue for Rondo (40.5 FG%). This season, Rondo figures to take a back seat to LeBron James, who is set to handle starting point guard duties. Rather than force Kyle Kuzma to come off the bench, the Lakers are likely to run James at point and round out the starting five with Danny Green, Kuzma, Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins. Rondo should still see some work with the second unit over Quinn Cook, as the team is in win-now mode, but a downturn in minutes and production seems like a reasonable expectation for Rondo in 2019-20.
After one year with the Lakers, Rondo signed a two-year deal over the summer to remain with the team. In 46 games, he averaged 9.2 points, 8.0 assists, 5.3 rebounds and 1.2 steals across 29.8 minutes. Rondo handed out at least 8.0 dimes in back-to-back seasons for the first time since 2013-14 and 2014-15, so his ability to still be a high-level passer is encouraging, though inefficient shooting remains an issue for Rondo (40.5 FG%). This season, Rondo figures to take a back seat to LeBron James, who is set to handle starting point guard duties. Rather than force Kyle Kuzma to come off the bench, the Lakers are likely to run James at point and round out the starting five with Danny Green, Kuzma, Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins. Rondo should still see some work with the second unit over Quinn Cook, as the team is in win-now mode, but a downturn in minutes and production seems like a reasonable expectation for Rondo in 2019-20.
HOU (F, PF, SF)
G
81
Min
32.8
FPTS
912.0
REB
454.0
AST
91.0
STL
125.0
BLK
37.0
TO
60.0
FGM
199.0
FGA
496.0
FTM
40.0
FTA
56.0
Tucker averaged 7.3 points and 5.8 rebounds for Houston last season, starting all 82 games for the first time in his career. He doesn't offer much in the way of scoring or field-goal percentage primarily because 72.8 percent of his shots over the last two seasons have been threes. The good news is that his three-point shooting has been respectable, with 1.8 triples made per contest at a 37.7 rate in 2018-19. A 3-and-D frontcourt player, Tucker led the league in corner threes last season while providing solid interior defense for Houston with a career-high 2.1 combined blocks/steals per game. Tucker's point totals are not consistent, but he can heat up when his three-ball is falling, and he finished the year hitting at least three triples in 29 games. He provides a safe floor in terms of minutes, having averaged 31.0 minutes in two seasons with the Rockets, including a career-high 34.2 minutes in 2018-19.
Tucker averaged 7.3 points and 5.8 rebounds for Houston last season, starting all 82 games for the first time in his career. He doesn't offer much in the way of scoring or field-goal percentage primarily because 72.8 percent of his shots over the last two seasons have been threes. The good news is that his three-point shooting has been respectable, with 1.8 triples made per contest at a 37.7 rate in 2018-19. A 3-and-D frontcourt player, Tucker led the league in corner threes last season while providing solid interior defense for Houston with a career-high 2.1 combined blocks/steals per game. Tucker's point totals are not consistent, but he can heat up when his three-ball is falling, and he finished the year hitting at least three triples in 29 games. He provides a safe floor in terms of minutes, having averaged 31.0 minutes in two seasons with the Rockets, including a career-high 34.2 minutes in 2018-19.
BRO (F, SF, PF)
G
70
Min
30.0
FPTS
910.0
REB
399.0
AST
84.0
STL
67.0
BLK
41.0
TO
125.0
FGM
332.0
FGA
750.0
FTM
120.0
FTA
149.0
Kurucs ended up enjoying a robust role for a second-round pick last season, as the now-21-year-old averaged 20.5 minutes over 63 games, with 46 of those starting assignments. The second-year pro from Latvia brought some Euroleague experience into the NBA, which may have helped lay the foundation for a solid start to his professional career stateside. Kurucs finished with 8.5 points (on 45.0 percent shooting) and 3.9 rebounds across 20.5 minutes last season, filling in at both forward spots. Kurucs finished off the postseason with a 14-point, seven-rebound effort over 15 minutes in Game 5 against the 76ers in the Eastern Conference quarterfinals and then followed it up with averages of 9.3 points, 5.3 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.7 steals across 24.5 minutes over six games in Las Vegas Summer League play. Looking ahead to the coming season, Kurucs should be in for at least a slight increase in playing time, although a solid veteran in Wilson Chandler does slot in behind him on the depth chart and should see his fair share of opportunity. Kurucs still figures to be no better than a fourth option in the offense when the starting five is at full health, however. D'Angelo Russell has been swapped out for an equally high-usage asset in Kyrie Irving, while DeAndre Jordan now joins Jarrett Allen down low and figures to gobble up plenty of the frontcourt's rebounding opportunities. Meanwhile, highly capable wings Joe Harris and Caris LeVert figure to command a robust allotment of shot attempts as well, leaving Kurucs with some, but not an abundance, of opportunity to upgrade his rookie-season numbers.
Kurucs ended up enjoying a robust role for a second-round pick last season, as the now-21-year-old averaged 20.5 minutes over 63 games, with 46 of those starting assignments. The second-year pro from Latvia brought some Euroleague experience into the NBA, which may have helped lay the foundation for a solid start to his professional career stateside. Kurucs finished with 8.5 points (on 45.0 percent shooting) and 3.9 rebounds across 20.5 minutes last season, filling in at both forward spots. Kurucs finished off the postseason with a 14-point, seven-rebound effort over 15 minutes in Game 5 against the 76ers in the Eastern Conference quarterfinals and then followed it up with averages of 9.3 points, 5.3 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.7 steals across 24.5 minutes over six games in Las Vegas Summer League play. Looking ahead to the coming season, Kurucs should be in for at least a slight increase in playing time, although a solid veteran in Wilson Chandler does slot in behind him on the depth chart and should see his fair share of opportunity. Kurucs still figures to be no better than a fourth option in the offense when the starting five is at full health, however. D'Angelo Russell has been swapped out for an equally high-usage asset in Kyrie Irving, while DeAndre Jordan now joins Jarrett Allen down low and figures to gobble up plenty of the frontcourt's rebounding opportunities. Meanwhile, highly capable wings Joe Harris and Caris LeVert figure to command a robust allotment of shot attempts as well, leaving Kurucs with some, but not an abundance, of opportunity to upgrade his rookie-season numbers.
ATL (G, SG, SF)
G
77
Min
28.8
FPTS
909.0
REB
275.0
AST
241.0
STL
70.0
BLK
27.0
TO
118.0
FGM
323.0
FGA
756.0
FTM
46.0
FTA
61.0
Huerter put together a solid rookie season with Atlanta last year, earning far more playing time than anticipated when he was selected 19th overall. Projected as a role player, he started 59 of 75 games played and logged significant minutes (27.3 per game). In his first year, the Maryland product finished with 9.7 points, 3.3 rebounds and 2.9 assists per game. He also drained 1.8 threes at a 38.5 percent clip, living up to his pre-draft expectations as a sharpshooter. He'll start the 2019-20 season as the likely starter at shooting guard, where he could push for increased minutes and take a step forward in his overall play. Huerter seems like a good bet for another year of consistent production in threes, but he can be an even more valuable fantasy contributor if he can improve on his rebounding, assist numbers and defense.
Huerter put together a solid rookie season with Atlanta last year, earning far more playing time than anticipated when he was selected 19th overall. Projected as a role player, he started 59 of 75 games played and logged significant minutes (27.3 per game). In his first year, the Maryland product finished with 9.7 points, 3.3 rebounds and 2.9 assists per game. He also drained 1.8 threes at a 38.5 percent clip, living up to his pre-draft expectations as a sharpshooter. He'll start the 2019-20 season as the likely starter at shooting guard, where he could push for increased minutes and take a step forward in his overall play. Huerter seems like a good bet for another year of consistent production in threes, but he can be an even more valuable fantasy contributor if he can improve on his rebounding, assist numbers and defense.
ORL (F, PF, SF)
G
72
Min
26.3
FPTS
909.0
REB
504.0
AST
86.0
STL
56.0
BLK
27.0
TO
59.0
FGM
203.0
FGA
490.0
FTM
119.0
FTA
143.0
Aminu landed with the Magic on a three-year, $29 million deal after spending the last four seasons with the Trail Blazers. The forward averaged 9.4 points, 7.5 rebounds and 1.2 threes across 28.3 minutes, making 81 starts. Aminu is a solid defender and rebounder who can hit a three when needed, though he's far from a knockdown shooter. He won't start at power forward, with that spot locked up by Aaron Gordon, though Aminu could push Jonathan Isaac for the starting small forward gig. Regardless of his status as a starter, minutes in the mid-to-high 20s seem like a reasonable expectation as he could be the first man off the bench. Aminu's projected minutes and quality rebounding and defense give him a steady fantasy floor, though his upside is limited on an offense led by Gordon, Nikola Vucevic, Evan Fournier and Terrence Ross.
Aminu landed with the Magic on a three-year, $29 million deal after spending the last four seasons with the Trail Blazers. The forward averaged 9.4 points, 7.5 rebounds and 1.2 threes across 28.3 minutes, making 81 starts. Aminu is a solid defender and rebounder who can hit a three when needed, though he's far from a knockdown shooter. He won't start at power forward, with that spot locked up by Aaron Gordon, though Aminu could push Jonathan Isaac for the starting small forward gig. Regardless of his status as a starter, minutes in the mid-to-high 20s seem like a reasonable expectation as he could be the first man off the bench. Aminu's projected minutes and quality rebounding and defense give him a steady fantasy floor, though his upside is limited on an offense led by Gordon, Nikola Vucevic, Evan Fournier and Terrence Ross.
POR (F, SG, SF)
G
72
Min
27.2
FPTS
907.0
REB
311.0
AST
181.0
STL
106.0
BLK
50.0
TO
144.0
FGM
332.0
FGA
814.0
FTM
155.0
FTA
209.0
Bazemore will play for his fourth team after being traded to Portland for Evan Turner. In his final season with the Hawks, Bazemore compiled his second-best scoring (11.6) and rebounding (3.9) averages of his career, despite shooting just 40.2 percent from the floor and 32.0 percent from three -- his worst marks since his rookie season. Encouragingly, Bazemore was still a quality defender with 1.9 combined blocks/steals, and he's collected at least 1.8 blocks/steals in four straight seasons. His role was largely scaled back last year, as Bazemore played just 24.5 minutes per game and started only 35 of 67 appearances. The playing time represented a four-year low for the eight-year veteran who will hope to see his role grow in Portland. He'll vie for playing time with Rodney Hood and new additions Anthony Tolliver and Mario Herzonja, but if he can earn a steady rotational role with the Blazers, Bazemore has proven to be a reliable source of threes and defense in his career.
Bazemore will play for his fourth team after being traded to Portland for Evan Turner. In his final season with the Hawks, Bazemore compiled his second-best scoring (11.6) and rebounding (3.9) averages of his career, despite shooting just 40.2 percent from the floor and 32.0 percent from three -- his worst marks since his rookie season. Encouragingly, Bazemore was still a quality defender with 1.9 combined blocks/steals, and he's collected at least 1.8 blocks/steals in four straight seasons. His role was largely scaled back last year, as Bazemore played just 24.5 minutes per game and started only 35 of 67 appearances. The playing time represented a four-year low for the eight-year veteran who will hope to see his role grow in Portland. He'll vie for playing time with Rodney Hood and new additions Anthony Tolliver and Mario Herzonja, but if he can earn a steady rotational role with the Blazers, Bazemore has proven to be a reliable source of threes and defense in his career.
FA (C, C)
G
58
Min
22.2
FPTS
903.0
REB
499.0
AST
23.0
STL
40.0
BLK
60.0
TO
92.0
FGM
239.0
FGA
380.0
FTM
146.0
FTA
256.0
Howard's 16th NBA season is going to be make-or-break, as the former All-Star has a lot to prove this year in terms of both health and production. After staying surprisingly healthy over the course of the three previous seasons, including playing in 81 games in 2017-18 with Charlotte, Howard's 2018-19 campaign was a complete disaster. Multiple lingering injuries caused Howard to appear in just nine games for the Wizards last season, and he failed to average double-digit rebounds (9.2 per game) in those nine appearances for the first time in his entire NBA career. Howard was then traded to Memphis this offseason and ultimately waived so he could sign with the Lakers shortly after DeMarcus Cousins suffered a torn ACL. It's worth noting that Howard is on a non-guaranteed contract, which doesn't make him a lock to make the final roster, especially if he isn't healthy. But assuming the big man is in shape and the team believes he can contribute, Howard should play a decent-sized role in Los Angeles. Given that Anthony Davis prefers to not play the center position, the Lakers will likely have to play a center next to him most of the time, which would result in Dwight Howard and JaVale McGee splitting time at the position. Howard's numbers over the years have come with him playing 30-plus minutes per game, and with the 33-year-old likely in store for closer to 20 minutes per game and playing next to some high-usage players like LeBron James and Davis, his production will likely be limited and sporadic this season.
Howard's 16th NBA season is going to be make-or-break, as the former All-Star has a lot to prove this year in terms of both health and production. After staying surprisingly healthy over the course of the three previous seasons, including playing in 81 games in 2017-18 with Charlotte, Howard's 2018-19 campaign was a complete disaster. Multiple lingering injuries caused Howard to appear in just nine games for the Wizards last season, and he failed to average double-digit rebounds (9.2 per game) in those nine appearances for the first time in his entire NBA career. Howard was then traded to Memphis this offseason and ultimately waived so he could sign with the Lakers shortly after DeMarcus Cousins suffered a torn ACL. It's worth noting that Howard is on a non-guaranteed contract, which doesn't make him a lock to make the final roster, especially if he isn't healthy. But assuming the big man is in shape and the team believes he can contribute, Howard should play a decent-sized role in Los Angeles. Given that Anthony Davis prefers to not play the center position, the Lakers will likely have to play a center next to him most of the time, which would result in Dwight Howard and JaVale McGee splitting time at the position. Howard's numbers over the years have come with him playing 30-plus minutes per game, and with the 33-year-old likely in store for closer to 20 minutes per game and playing next to some high-usage players like LeBron James and Davis, his production will likely be limited and sporadic this season.
MIL (G, SF, SG)
G
78
Min
23.1
FPTS
899.0
REB
369.0
AST
178.0
STL
47.0
BLK
36.0
TO
47.0
FGM
229.0
FGA
500.0
FTM
44.0
FTA
57.0
In his first season with the Bucks, Connaughton contributed career-high averages in points (6.9), rebounds (4.2), assists (2.0), threes (1.1), steals (0.5), blocks (0.4) and minutes (20.7). Perhaps most impressively, Connaughton had the same turnover average (0.5) in 2017-18, so he nearly doubled his assist average this past season, from 1.1 to 2.0, while limiting mistakes. The offseason departure of Malcolm Brogdon figures to open up more playing time for Connaughton, which is precisely what happened when Brogdon went down with a foot injury in mid-March. In fact, in 24 games after the All-Star break, Connaughton raised his averages to 8.6 points (50.0 FG%, 38.2 3P%, 77.8 FT%), 5.7 rebounds, 2.3 assists versus 0.6 turnovers, 1.4 threes, 0.7 steals and 0.4 blocks in 26.5 minutes per game. There's no guarantee he'll be able to maintain that level of efficiency or production over the course of 2019-20. Still, his ability to stretch the floor as a shooter and make sound decisions with the ball bodes well for his role going forward.
In his first season with the Bucks, Connaughton contributed career-high averages in points (6.9), rebounds (4.2), assists (2.0), threes (1.1), steals (0.5), blocks (0.4) and minutes (20.7). Perhaps most impressively, Connaughton had the same turnover average (0.5) in 2017-18, so he nearly doubled his assist average this past season, from 1.1 to 2.0, while limiting mistakes. The offseason departure of Malcolm Brogdon figures to open up more playing time for Connaughton, which is precisely what happened when Brogdon went down with a foot injury in mid-March. In fact, in 24 games after the All-Star break, Connaughton raised his averages to 8.6 points (50.0 FG%, 38.2 3P%, 77.8 FT%), 5.7 rebounds, 2.3 assists versus 0.6 turnovers, 1.4 threes, 0.7 steals and 0.4 blocks in 26.5 minutes per game. There's no guarantee he'll be able to maintain that level of efficiency or production over the course of 2019-20. Still, his ability to stretch the floor as a shooter and make sound decisions with the ball bodes well for his role going forward.
DEN (G, SG)
G
65
Min
31.0
FPTS
897.0
REB
197.0
AST
156.0
STL
84.0
BLK
23.0
TO
84.0
FGM
360.0
FGA
783.0
FTM
147.0
FTA
177.0
Persistent lower-body injuries allowed Harris to appear in just 57 games last year, and he clearly wasn't himself when on the court. He posted four-year lows in minutes (28.8), field-goal percentage (42.4), three-point percentage (33.9) and steals (1.0) per game. Losing time to injury is nothing new for Harris, who is averaging just 64.3 games per season once becoming a full-time starter in 2015-16. But he demonstrated his potential in 2017-18, averaging 17.5 points, 2.9 assists, 2.6 rebounds, 2.3 threes and 1.8 steals across 34.4 minutes. Entering his age 25 season, Harris will look to bounce back to those numbers and continue his development within one of the top young cores in the NBA. While the Michigan State product won't provide much in terms of assists and rebounds, his upside as a three-and-D player is enough to be worth a late-round selection in most fantasy drafts.
Persistent lower-body injuries allowed Harris to appear in just 57 games last year, and he clearly wasn't himself when on the court. He posted four-year lows in minutes (28.8), field-goal percentage (42.4), three-point percentage (33.9) and steals (1.0) per game. Losing time to injury is nothing new for Harris, who is averaging just 64.3 games per season once becoming a full-time starter in 2015-16. But he demonstrated his potential in 2017-18, averaging 17.5 points, 2.9 assists, 2.6 rebounds, 2.3 threes and 1.8 steals across 34.4 minutes. Entering his age 25 season, Harris will look to bounce back to those numbers and continue his development within one of the top young cores in the NBA. While the Michigan State product won't provide much in terms of assists and rebounds, his upside as a three-and-D player is enough to be worth a late-round selection in most fantasy drafts.
CLE (G, SG, PG)
G
80
Min
23.5
FPTS
894.0
REB
229.0
AST
166.0
STL
48.0
BLK
11.0
TO
115.0
FGM
443.0
FGA
1,002.0
FTM
132.0
FTA
163.0
Clarkson finished just behind Kevin Love (17.0 PPG) in scoring for Cleveland last season with a career-high 16.8 points per game. He added 3.3 rebounds and 2.4 assists in his first full season with the team and assumed the role of primary scoring option for most of the year, as Love appeared in just 22 games. He's not a knockdown shooter, but Clarkson did hit a career-high 1.8 triples per contest. He logged 27.3 minutes per contest in 2018-19, though that's likely to change this season. Cleveland drafted talented Vanderbilt guard Darius Garland with the fifth pick in this year's draft, and he'll likely be a starter immediately. With the backcourt occupied by Garland and second-year guard Collin Sexton, minutes will be harder to come by for Clarkson. If Kevin Love can stay healthy, he'll be a top option on offense and cut into Clarkson's playing time and production even further. Clarkson still a talented scorer, and is sure to retain value in points and threes, though fantasy owners should temper expectations this season.
Clarkson finished just behind Kevin Love (17.0 PPG) in scoring for Cleveland last season with a career-high 16.8 points per game. He added 3.3 rebounds and 2.4 assists in his first full season with the team and assumed the role of primary scoring option for most of the year, as Love appeared in just 22 games. He's not a knockdown shooter, but Clarkson did hit a career-high 1.8 triples per contest. He logged 27.3 minutes per contest in 2018-19, though that's likely to change this season. Cleveland drafted talented Vanderbilt guard Darius Garland with the fifth pick in this year's draft, and he'll likely be a starter immediately. With the backcourt occupied by Garland and second-year guard Collin Sexton, minutes will be harder to come by for Clarkson. If Kevin Love can stay healthy, he'll be a top option on offense and cut into Clarkson's playing time and production even further. Clarkson still a talented scorer, and is sure to retain value in points and threes, though fantasy owners should temper expectations this season.
MEM (F, PF, SF)
G
75
Min
26.6
FPTS
892.0
REB
354.0
AST
122.0
STL
65.0
BLK
29.0
TO
78.0
FGM
287.0
FGA
694.0
FTM
135.0
FTA
181.0
Crowder was traded to the Grizzlies this offseason as part of the deal that sent Mike Conley to the Jazz. His role figures to increase as a possible starter on a rebuilding franchise rather than a sixth-man on a fringe title contender. He averaged 11.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.7 assists for Utah just a season ago. Though he's not an adept shooter (39.9 field goal percentage, 33.1 three-point percentage last season), Crowder drained 2.2 threes per contest and has averaged 1.9 triples per game over the last four years. He can play either forward spot, but it may be tough to find consistent minutes at the four with rookie standout Jaren Jackson and first-round pick Brandon Clarke manning that position. Crowder's path to playing time will likely be at the three, where his main competition will be Kyle Anderson and former Suns first-rounder Josh Jackson. Crowder is the most reliable and established option at small forward, and it wouldn't be unreasonable to expect him to trend near 30 minutes per game.
Crowder was traded to the Grizzlies this offseason as part of the deal that sent Mike Conley to the Jazz. His role figures to increase as a possible starter on a rebuilding franchise rather than a sixth-man on a fringe title contender. He averaged 11.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.7 assists for Utah just a season ago. Though he's not an adept shooter (39.9 field goal percentage, 33.1 three-point percentage last season), Crowder drained 2.2 threes per contest and has averaged 1.9 triples per game over the last four years. He can play either forward spot, but it may be tough to find consistent minutes at the four with rookie standout Jaren Jackson and first-round pick Brandon Clarke manning that position. Crowder's path to playing time will likely be at the three, where his main competition will be Kyle Anderson and former Suns first-rounder Josh Jackson. Crowder is the most reliable and established option at small forward, and it wouldn't be unreasonable to expect him to trend near 30 minutes per game.
DET (G, PG, SG)
G
72
Min
26.5
FPTS
887.0
REB
180.0
AST
287.0
STL
46.0
BLK
8.0
TO
143.0
FGM
377.0
FGA
911.0
FTM
167.0
FTA
197.0
Jackson played all 82 games for the first time in his career during the 2018-19 campaign. It was a welcome improvement after the point guard had played a total of 97 games across the previous two years. While he improved in his three-point shooting compared to 2017-18, Jackson saw his usage rate dip to a five-year low (24.5%) as Blake Griffin took control of the Pistons' offense. Though Jackson's role is smaller than many other starting point guards, he still provided some nice individual performances last season, racking up 21 games with at least 20 points and 33 games with more than five assists. Still, Jackson's upside heading into his age 29 season is relatively low, and he'll likely drop to the final rounds of most fantasy drafts as a result. But if he can manage to play 82 games for a second consecutive year, he'll be able to provide some nice value.
Jackson played all 82 games for the first time in his career during the 2018-19 campaign. It was a welcome improvement after the point guard had played a total of 97 games across the previous two years. While he improved in his three-point shooting compared to 2017-18, Jackson saw his usage rate dip to a five-year low (24.5%) as Blake Griffin took control of the Pistons' offense. Though Jackson's role is smaller than many other starting point guards, he still provided some nice individual performances last season, racking up 21 games with at least 20 points and 33 games with more than five assists. Still, Jackson's upside heading into his age 29 season is relatively low, and he'll likely drop to the final rounds of most fantasy drafts as a result. But if he can manage to play 82 games for a second consecutive year, he'll be able to provide some nice value.
HOU (G, SG, SF)
G
72
Min
32.3
FPTS
860.0
REB
160.0
AST
158.0
STL
44.0
BLK
29.0
TO
106.0
FGM
409.0
FGA
989.0
FTM
133.0
FTA
164.0
Gordon put together another strong showing for Houston in his third season with the team. He averaged 16.2 points, 2.2 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 2018-19, adding 3.2 threes on 36.0 percent shooting from deep in 31.7 minutes per contest. He boasts a healthy 2.2 threes per game on 36.8 percent three-point shooting in his career, but his excellent three-point shooting has been especially lethal in recent years, draining at least 3.2 threes for the third straight season. Gordon's nightly three-point barrage is unlikely to slow down in Mike D'Antoni's run-and-gun offensive scheme. Gordon has been a model of consistency in his 11 NBA seasons, with career averages of 17.0 points, 3.0 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 1.0 steals. With little deviation from year-to-year, Gordon has a very safe fantasy floor. The addition of Russell Westbrook to Houston's roster signals that the Rockets are all-in on a title run this season, and Westbrook's ball dominance and scoring could cut into Gordon's points. Still, it's safe to project Gordon for 30 minutes a night and a healthy amount of threes.
Gordon put together another strong showing for Houston in his third season with the team. He averaged 16.2 points, 2.2 rebounds and 1.9 assists in 2018-19, adding 3.2 threes on 36.0 percent shooting from deep in 31.7 minutes per contest. He boasts a healthy 2.2 threes per game on 36.8 percent three-point shooting in his career, but his excellent three-point shooting has been especially lethal in recent years, draining at least 3.2 threes for the third straight season. Gordon's nightly three-point barrage is unlikely to slow down in Mike D'Antoni's run-and-gun offensive scheme. Gordon has been a model of consistency in his 11 NBA seasons, with career averages of 17.0 points, 3.0 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 1.0 steals. With little deviation from year-to-year, Gordon has a very safe fantasy floor. The addition of Russell Westbrook to Houston's roster signals that the Rockets are all-in on a title run this season, and Westbrook's ball dominance and scoring could cut into Gordon's points. Still, it's safe to project Gordon for 30 minutes a night and a healthy amount of threes.
BRO (F, SF)
G
71
Min
29.8
FPTS
859.0
REB
271.0
AST
157.0
STL
72.0
BLK
26.0
TO
136.0
FGM
328.0
FGA
763.0
FTM
130.0
FTA
158.0
After appearing in all 82 games for what could be considered a breakout sophomore season, the injury bug hit Prince last year, and the former Baylor standout appeared in just 55 games for the Hawks, making 47 starts on the wing. Still, despite the injuries, Prince still managed to average 13.5 points, 3.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists per game. Most impressive was his sustainable success from behind the arc, as Prince shot a career-best 39.0 percent from three on 5.7 attempts per game. While he was originally viewed as a key member of Atlanta's young core, he was shipped to Brooklyn this offseason as part of the Allen Crabbe salary dump. Now, his role is a lot less stable, as he will join a Nets club that boasts plenty of wing and frontcourt depth even in the absence of Kevin Durant this season. Prince will be competing with the likes of Caris LeVert, Garrett Temple, Wilson Chandler and Rodions Kurucs for time on the floor this season, but given how the 25-year-old has emerged as a three-point marksman over the last two seasons, it would be surprising if the Nets didn't often utilize him as a floor spacer in the frontcourt.
After appearing in all 82 games for what could be considered a breakout sophomore season, the injury bug hit Prince last year, and the former Baylor standout appeared in just 55 games for the Hawks, making 47 starts on the wing. Still, despite the injuries, Prince still managed to average 13.5 points, 3.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists per game. Most impressive was his sustainable success from behind the arc, as Prince shot a career-best 39.0 percent from three on 5.7 attempts per game. While he was originally viewed as a key member of Atlanta's young core, he was shipped to Brooklyn this offseason as part of the Allen Crabbe salary dump. Now, his role is a lot less stable, as he will join a Nets club that boasts plenty of wing and frontcourt depth even in the absence of Kevin Durant this season. Prince will be competing with the likes of Caris LeVert, Garrett Temple, Wilson Chandler and Rodions Kurucs for time on the floor this season, but given how the 25-year-old has emerged as a three-point marksman over the last two seasons, it would be surprising if the Nets didn't often utilize him as a floor spacer in the frontcourt.
NYK (G, PG)
G
64
Min
25.2
FPTS
853.0
REB
284.0
AST
377.0
STL
57.0
BLK
22.0
TO
145.0
FGM
235.0
FGA
532.0
FTM
68.0
FTA
95.0
After spending 31 of the first 36 games of the 2018-19 season on the sideline with a sprained ankle, Payton went on to produce solid all-around numbers in 42 appearances with the Pelicans. The 24-year-old point guard started every game he played in New Orleans, averaging 10.6 points, 5.2 rebounds and a career-high 7.6 assists across 29.8 minutes per game. He also had a stretch in February where he recorded five straight triple-doubles. Now, Payton enters a situation in New York with a backcourt filled with young talent, including the likes of Dennis Smith, Kadeem Allen, Frank Ntilikina, Allonzo Trier and rookie R.J. Barrett, all of whom could serve as the team's primary ball-handler. With that, it's unclear exactly where Payton will fit into the rotation, especially since the Knicks acquired Dennis Smith as their apparent point guard of the future in the Kristaps Prozingis trade last season. However, given their free agent signings this offseason, it's clear the Knicks are looking to put a more competitive product on the court this season, and with Payton's production last season and his existing chemistry with Julius Randle from their time in New Orleans, the point guard could have a leg-up on the competition in the early goings of the season. The biggest issue for Payton remains his ineffective shooting ability, as he shot just 31.4 percent from behind the arc and 43.4 percent from the field overall last season.
After spending 31 of the first 36 games of the 2018-19 season on the sideline with a sprained ankle, Payton went on to produce solid all-around numbers in 42 appearances with the Pelicans. The 24-year-old point guard started every game he played in New Orleans, averaging 10.6 points, 5.2 rebounds and a career-high 7.6 assists across 29.8 minutes per game. He also had a stretch in February where he recorded five straight triple-doubles. Now, Payton enters a situation in New York with a backcourt filled with young talent, including the likes of Dennis Smith, Kadeem Allen, Frank Ntilikina, Allonzo Trier and rookie R.J. Barrett, all of whom could serve as the team's primary ball-handler. With that, it's unclear exactly where Payton will fit into the rotation, especially since the Knicks acquired Dennis Smith as their apparent point guard of the future in the Kristaps Prozingis trade last season. However, given their free agent signings this offseason, it's clear the Knicks are looking to put a more competitive product on the court this season, and with Payton's production last season and his existing chemistry with Julius Randle from their time in New Orleans, the point guard could have a leg-up on the competition in the early goings of the season. The biggest issue for Payton remains his ineffective shooting ability, as he shot just 31.4 percent from behind the arc and 43.4 percent from the field overall last season.
MIA (G, SG)
G
77
Min
27.7
FPTS
844.0
REB
270.0
AST
146.0
STL
45.0
BLK
11.0
TO
100.0
FGM
305.0
FGA
719.0
FTM
154.0
FTA
162.0
Herro was selected No. 13 overall in the 2019 draft after an impressive freshman season with Kentucky. He snuck into the lottery behind a strong NCAA Tournament, and he could land the starting job at shooting guard as a rookie with Miami. Herro flashed at the Las Vegas Summer League with his all-around play, averaging 19.8 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.5 steals in four appearances. The lanky two-guard can be impactful on both ends of the court, with his solid defense and ability to get to the rim and shoot the three-ball at a respectable clip (35.5 percent last season) on offense. The pure scorer should have no problem securing a healthy allotment of minutes in a rotation that could use help scoring outside of Jimmy Butler. He won't face much competition for playing time from the current members of the Heat backcourt outside of Dion Waiters.
Herro was selected No. 13 overall in the 2019 draft after an impressive freshman season with Kentucky. He snuck into the lottery behind a strong NCAA Tournament, and he could land the starting job at shooting guard as a rookie with Miami. Herro flashed at the Las Vegas Summer League with his all-around play, averaging 19.8 points, 4.5 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.5 steals in four appearances. The lanky two-guard can be impactful on both ends of the court, with his solid defense and ability to get to the rim and shoot the three-ball at a respectable clip (35.5 percent last season) on offense. The pure scorer should have no problem securing a healthy allotment of minutes in a rotation that could use help scoring outside of Jimmy Butler. He won't face much competition for playing time from the current members of the Heat backcourt outside of Dion Waiters.
GSW (G, PG, SG)
G
68
Min
26.1
FPTS
837.0
REB
303.0
AST
165.0
STL
50.0
BLK
27.0
TO
84.0
FGM
266.0
FGA
635.0
FTM
153.0
FTA
182.0
Burks de-committed from the Thunder to join the Warriors this season after spending last season with the Jazz, Cavaliers and Kings. He averaged 8.8 points, 3.7 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 21.5 minutes across 64 games, achieving three-year highs in those categories. Burks is a serviceable shooter, but his minimal production across the board hasn't made him fantasy relevant in most formats at this point in his career. Still, we've seen under-the-radar players make an impact in Golden State before, and with thin depth in the backcourt and Klay Thompson out until at least the All-Star break, Burks shouldn't have a hard time carving out a rotational role for the Warriors this season. He'll play behind Steph Curry and D'Angelo Russell, but he could see minutes in the low-to-mid 20s, especially if rookie guard Jordan Poole isn't NBA-ready right out of the gate.
Burks de-committed from the Thunder to join the Warriors this season after spending last season with the Jazz, Cavaliers and Kings. He averaged 8.8 points, 3.7 rebounds and 2.2 assists in 21.5 minutes across 64 games, achieving three-year highs in those categories. Burks is a serviceable shooter, but his minimal production across the board hasn't made him fantasy relevant in most formats at this point in his career. Still, we've seen under-the-radar players make an impact in Golden State before, and with thin depth in the backcourt and Klay Thompson out until at least the All-Star break, Burks shouldn't have a hard time carving out a rotational role for the Warriors this season. He'll play behind Steph Curry and D'Angelo Russell, but he could see minutes in the low-to-mid 20s, especially if rookie guard Jordan Poole isn't NBA-ready right out of the gate.
LAL (G, SF, SG)
G
73
Min
28.6
FPTS
837.0
REB
299.0
AST
112.0
STL
69.0
BLK
50.0
TO
71.0
FGM
257.0
FGA
594.0
FTM
34.0
FTA
41.0
After a title run with Toronto last season, Green signed a two-year, $30 million deal with the Lakers in the offseason. He'll likely be the starter at shooting guard, playing his usual three-and-D role. After a decline in shooting during his final season with San Antonio in 2017-18, Green bounced back nicely in that department with Toronto, hitting a career-high 2.5 triples per game to go along with a career-best 45.5 percent mark from distance in 80 starts. He also contributed 4.0 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.6 combined blocks/steals to go with his 10.3 points per game. He's a reliable source of threes, shooting and defense, and though he's not a great shot-creator, it's a fair assumption that he'll find plenty of quality looks on catch-and-shoot opportunities playing with LeBron James and Anthony Davis.
After a title run with Toronto last season, Green signed a two-year, $30 million deal with the Lakers in the offseason. He'll likely be the starter at shooting guard, playing his usual three-and-D role. After a decline in shooting during his final season with San Antonio in 2017-18, Green bounced back nicely in that department with Toronto, hitting a career-high 2.5 triples per game to go along with a career-best 45.5 percent mark from distance in 80 starts. He also contributed 4.0 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 1.6 combined blocks/steals to go with his 10.3 points per game. He's a reliable source of threes, shooting and defense, and though he's not a great shot-creator, it's a fair assumption that he'll find plenty of quality looks on catch-and-shoot opportunities playing with LeBron James and Anthony Davis.
DET (G, PG, SG)
G
62
Min
24.9
FPTS
823.0
REB
155.0
AST
213.0
STL
34.0
BLK
13.0
TO
91.0
FGM
382.0
FGA
835.0
FTM
154.0
FTA
177.0
Rose signed a two-year, $15 million deal to join the Pistons over the summer and will play for his fourth team in as many years. Rose enjoyed a surprisingly productive season in his first year full year with the Timberwolves in 2018-19, averaging 18.0 points, 4.3 assists and 2.7 rebounds in 27.3 minutes per contest. The former MVP turned back the clock with some vintage play in 51 appearances. He shot 48.2 percent from the field and a career-best 37.0 percent from three despite significantly lower career averages in both shooting categories. Whether he can continue to shoot at such a high level is a question worth asking. Rose figures to fit in with Detroit as the backup to Reggie Jackson, but he could see some playing time at shooting guard as well. The Pistons' backcourt lacks playmakers, and Rose should have no problem seeing minutes in the mid-to-high 20s. Despite the resurgent efforts in 2018-19, Rose still played only 51 games and has missed an alarming 37.7 games per season since 2013 due to a litany of injuries. His health presents a clear problem, but he's proven to be a valuable fantasy contributor when healthy, primarily for his natural scoring abilities.
Rose signed a two-year, $15 million deal to join the Pistons over the summer and will play for his fourth team in as many years. Rose enjoyed a surprisingly productive season in his first year full year with the Timberwolves in 2018-19, averaging 18.0 points, 4.3 assists and 2.7 rebounds in 27.3 minutes per contest. The former MVP turned back the clock with some vintage play in 51 appearances. He shot 48.2 percent from the field and a career-best 37.0 percent from three despite significantly lower career averages in both shooting categories. Whether he can continue to shoot at such a high level is a question worth asking. Rose figures to fit in with Detroit as the backup to Reggie Jackson, but he could see some playing time at shooting guard as well. The Pistons' backcourt lacks playmakers, and Rose should have no problem seeing minutes in the mid-to-high 20s. Despite the resurgent efforts in 2018-19, Rose still played only 51 games and has missed an alarming 37.7 games per season since 2013 due to a litany of injuries. His health presents a clear problem, but he's proven to be a valuable fantasy contributor when healthy, primarily for his natural scoring abilities.
LAC (G, SG, SF)
G
81
Min
28.2
FPTS
822.0
REB
170.0
AST
171.0
STL
47.0
BLK
13.0
TO
57.0
FGM
305.0
FGA
733.0
FTM
96.0
FTA
118.0
Shamet was traded to the Clippers at the trade deadline as part of the deal that sent Tobias Harris to the 76ers. He had a promising rookie season in which he displayed his sharpshooting abilities, finishing with 2.1 threes made per game at a 42.2 percent clip. He also shot respectably from the floor (43.1 percent) and from the charity stripe (80.6 percent). Shamet spent 25 games in Los Angeles, where he improved his averages in points, rebounds, assists, three-pointers made and three-point percentage. He averaged just 22.8 minutes per contest, but his averages per 36 minutes work out to 14.4 points, 2.7 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 3.3 threes. Shamet has a great chance to start at shooting guard on a loaded Clippers team, and with defensive attention likely lasered in on Paul George and Kawhi Leonard, open looks should present themselves frequently. Shamet will look to carry his end-of-season momentum into 2019 where he should be a reliable source of threes.
Shamet was traded to the Clippers at the trade deadline as part of the deal that sent Tobias Harris to the 76ers. He had a promising rookie season in which he displayed his sharpshooting abilities, finishing with 2.1 threes made per game at a 42.2 percent clip. He also shot respectably from the floor (43.1 percent) and from the charity stripe (80.6 percent). Shamet spent 25 games in Los Angeles, where he improved his averages in points, rebounds, assists, three-pointers made and three-point percentage. He averaged just 22.8 minutes per contest, but his averages per 36 minutes work out to 14.4 points, 2.7 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 3.3 threes. Shamet has a great chance to start at shooting guard on a loaded Clippers team, and with defensive attention likely lasered in on Paul George and Kawhi Leonard, open looks should present themselves frequently. Shamet will look to carry his end-of-season momentum into 2019 where he should be a reliable source of threes.
TOR (F, SF, PF)
G
75
Min
27.1
FPTS
822.0
REB
316.0
AST
91.0
STL
73.0
BLK
33.0
TO
83.0
FGM
287.0
FGA
607.0
FTM
72.0
FTA
114.0
Anunoby averaged 7.0 points and 2.9 rebounds for Toronto last season, logging 20.2 minutes per night across 62 contests. He also managed 1.0 combined blocks/steals and 1.0 threes per night, draining that many threes for the second straight season. Though he reached new career highs in most counting stats, his field goal percentage (45.2) and three-point percentage (33.2) were significantly lower in 2018-19 than in 2017-18 as a rookie. His role remained virtually unchanged in his second year, losing playing time and production to Kawhi Leonard, Pascal Siakam and Serge Ibaka. But Anunoby could be in for a boost in minutes in 2019. With Leonard gone, Anunoby has a real chance to be the Raptors' starting small forward. Anunoby should be relied upon for his solid defense and potential as a three-point shooter, though his place in the rotation is yet unclear. He's worth a chance as a late-round pickup as a player likely to see starters' minutes on a new-look, rebuilding Toronto team.
Anunoby averaged 7.0 points and 2.9 rebounds for Toronto last season, logging 20.2 minutes per night across 62 contests. He also managed 1.0 combined blocks/steals and 1.0 threes per night, draining that many threes for the second straight season. Though he reached new career highs in most counting stats, his field goal percentage (45.2) and three-point percentage (33.2) were significantly lower in 2018-19 than in 2017-18 as a rookie. His role remained virtually unchanged in his second year, losing playing time and production to Kawhi Leonard, Pascal Siakam and Serge Ibaka. But Anunoby could be in for a boost in minutes in 2019. With Leonard gone, Anunoby has a real chance to be the Raptors' starting small forward. Anunoby should be relied upon for his solid defense and potential as a three-point shooter, though his place in the rotation is yet unclear. He's worth a chance as a late-round pickup as a player likely to see starters' minutes on a new-look, rebuilding Toronto team.
NYK (F, PF, C)
G
74
Min
18.7
FPTS
819.0
REB
376.0
AST
69.0
STL
44.0
BLK
32.0
TO
60.0
FGM
237.0
FGA
441.0
FTM
112.0
FTA
145.0
Gibson agreed to a two-year, $20 million deal to join the Knicks this summer after spending the last two seasons with the Timberwolves. He played primarily off the bench for Minnesota but saw solid minutes as a reliable contributor in the frontcourt. He averaged 10.8 points and 6.5 rebounds in 24.1 minutes last season, shooting a respectable 56.6 percent from the floor. Gibson proved that he could still be a valuable part of a team's rotation as a veteran with a high basketball IQ and quality rebounding skills. It's likely he got his deal from New York primarily for his intangible skills as a leader and a veteran presence in a young locker room rather than his on-the-court abilities. Otherwise, New York would not have made the signings that it did, like bringing in Julius Randle, Bobby Portis and Marcus Morris to play alongside second-year center Mitchell Robinson. Randle and Portis are younger and offer more upside than Gibson, so it's likely he sees a sharp drop-off in minutes in his 11th season. Expectations should be tempered for Gibson, who is playing in a crowded frontcourt.
Gibson agreed to a two-year, $20 million deal to join the Knicks this summer after spending the last two seasons with the Timberwolves. He played primarily off the bench for Minnesota but saw solid minutes as a reliable contributor in the frontcourt. He averaged 10.8 points and 6.5 rebounds in 24.1 minutes last season, shooting a respectable 56.6 percent from the floor. Gibson proved that he could still be a valuable part of a team's rotation as a veteran with a high basketball IQ and quality rebounding skills. It's likely he got his deal from New York primarily for his intangible skills as a leader and a veteran presence in a young locker room rather than his on-the-court abilities. Otherwise, New York would not have made the signings that it did, like bringing in Julius Randle, Bobby Portis and Marcus Morris to play alongside second-year center Mitchell Robinson. Randle and Portis are younger and offer more upside than Gibson, so it's likely he sees a sharp drop-off in minutes in his 11th season. Expectations should be tempered for Gibson, who is playing in a crowded frontcourt.
SAC (F, SF, PF)
G
68
Min
27.1
FPTS
810.0
REB
291.0
AST
198.0
STL
71.0
BLK
16.0
TO
83.0
FGM
233.0
FGA
577.0
FTM
102.0
FTA
129.0
Ariza joins the Kings after playing for the Suns and Wizards last season. Traded to Washington in December, he played a key role for the Wizards, averaging a five-year high in points (14.1) to go along with 5.3 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 43 appearances for Washington. He continued his sharpshooting by draining 2.1 threes at a 36.8 percent clip, similar to his most recent six-year average of 2.3 three-pointers at 36.1 percent from deep. Ariza can still make an impact on defense, evidenced by his 1.3 steals per game, and similar defensive numbers can be reasonably expected this season. Ariza will play for his eighth team in his 16th season and provide veteran leadership for an up-and-coming Kings squad . He figures to come off the bench behind Harrison Barnes, but Ariza could still be a valuable contributor to the second unit as a reliable source of threes and defense.
Ariza joins the Kings after playing for the Suns and Wizards last season. Traded to Washington in December, he played a key role for the Wizards, averaging a five-year high in points (14.1) to go along with 5.3 rebounds and 3.8 assists in 43 appearances for Washington. He continued his sharpshooting by draining 2.1 threes at a 36.8 percent clip, similar to his most recent six-year average of 2.3 three-pointers at 36.1 percent from deep. Ariza can still make an impact on defense, evidenced by his 1.3 steals per game, and similar defensive numbers can be reasonably expected this season. Ariza will play for his eighth team in his 16th season and provide veteran leadership for an up-and-coming Kings squad . He figures to come off the bench behind Harrison Barnes, but Ariza could still be a valuable contributor to the second unit as a reliable source of threes and defense.
NYK (G, PG)
G
70
Min
27.1
FPTS
808.0
REB
195.0
AST
317.0
STL
84.0
BLK
25.0
TO
194.0
FGM
356.0
FGA
818.0
FTM
122.0
FTA
196.0
Smith enters 2019 atop the Knicks' depth chart at point guard after being selected in the lottery by Dallas in 2017. Once considered a cornerstone piece of the rebuilding Mavericks, Smith was shipped to New York as part of the massive Kristaps Porzingis deal shortly before the February trade deadline. He played 32 games for Dallas and 21 for New York, missing a total of 29 games due to back issues and illness. After a strong rookie campaign in which he averaged 15.2 points, 5.2 assists, 3.8 rebounds, 1.5 threes and 1.0 steals per game, Smith took a step back in most categories as a sophomore, averaging 13.6 points, 4.8 assists, 2.9 rebounds, 1.3 steals and 1.3 threes. It wasn't all bad last season, however, as Smith made small strides in his efficiency. Though shooting still remains an area of improvement, Smith's shooting averages in 2018-19 while with Dallas (44 FG%, 34.4 3P%) were much improved. Smith had a tumultuous finish to the season, marred by illness and trade rumors in January and a recurring back issue after arriving in New York. While learning to fit in with his new team, he experienced an end-of-season slump that ultimately brought his season averages down in shooting and rebounding. With a full offseason to get healthy and practice with the overhauled Knicks roster, a big bounce-back performance could be in store. The Knicks have added some quality players in RJ Barrett and Julius Randle to play alongside Kevin Knox and Mitchell Robinson, and Smith will be orchestrating the entire offense.
Smith enters 2019 atop the Knicks' depth chart at point guard after being selected in the lottery by Dallas in 2017. Once considered a cornerstone piece of the rebuilding Mavericks, Smith was shipped to New York as part of the massive Kristaps Porzingis deal shortly before the February trade deadline. He played 32 games for Dallas and 21 for New York, missing a total of 29 games due to back issues and illness. After a strong rookie campaign in which he averaged 15.2 points, 5.2 assists, 3.8 rebounds, 1.5 threes and 1.0 steals per game, Smith took a step back in most categories as a sophomore, averaging 13.6 points, 4.8 assists, 2.9 rebounds, 1.3 steals and 1.3 threes. It wasn't all bad last season, however, as Smith made small strides in his efficiency. Though shooting still remains an area of improvement, Smith's shooting averages in 2018-19 while with Dallas (44 FG%, 34.4 3P%) were much improved. Smith had a tumultuous finish to the season, marred by illness and trade rumors in January and a recurring back issue after arriving in New York. While learning to fit in with his new team, he experienced an end-of-season slump that ultimately brought his season averages down in shooting and rebounding. With a full offseason to get healthy and practice with the overhauled Knicks roster, a big bounce-back performance could be in store. The Knicks have added some quality players in RJ Barrett and Julius Randle to play alongside Kevin Knox and Mitchell Robinson, and Smith will be orchestrating the entire offense.
TOR (F, SF, PF, C)
G
72
Min
21.6
FPTS
806.0
REB
391.0
AST
121.0
STL
55.0
BLK
34.0
TO
86.0
FGM
266.0
FGA
614.0
FTM
157.0
FTA
221.0
Hollis-Jefferson just wrapped up his rookie contract with the Nets, and the team ultimately did not extend a qualifying offer to him after a number of injuries led to the 24-year-old appearing in just 59 games for the team last season. As a result, Hollis-Jefferson was unable to match the production from his rock-solid 2017-18 campaign. After averaging 13.9 points and 6.8 rebounds across 28.2 minutes per game the year before, Hollis-Jefferson's numbers dropped last year to 8.9 points and 5.3 rebounds while playing just over 20 minutes per contest. Beyond the injuries, Hollis-Jefferson also has the emergence of rookie Rodions Kurucs to thank for his reduced role last year. Now, the versatile forward will get a fresh start in Toronto. Given the current state of the Raptors' frontcourt, Hollis-Jefferson should be able to carve out a solid role off the bench for the defending champs behind rising star Pascal Siakam. While Hollis-Jefferson's offensive game doesn't come relatively close to that of Siakam, as he is just a career 22.3 percent shooter from the outside, he does boast similar versatility on defense, which should be valuable to Toronto's second unit.
Hollis-Jefferson just wrapped up his rookie contract with the Nets, and the team ultimately did not extend a qualifying offer to him after a number of injuries led to the 24-year-old appearing in just 59 games for the team last season. As a result, Hollis-Jefferson was unable to match the production from his rock-solid 2017-18 campaign. After averaging 13.9 points and 6.8 rebounds across 28.2 minutes per game the year before, Hollis-Jefferson's numbers dropped last year to 8.9 points and 5.3 rebounds while playing just over 20 minutes per contest. Beyond the injuries, Hollis-Jefferson also has the emergence of rookie Rodions Kurucs to thank for his reduced role last year. Now, the versatile forward will get a fresh start in Toronto. Given the current state of the Raptors' frontcourt, Hollis-Jefferson should be able to carve out a solid role off the bench for the defending champs behind rising star Pascal Siakam. While Hollis-Jefferson's offensive game doesn't come relatively close to that of Siakam, as he is just a career 22.3 percent shooter from the outside, he does boast similar versatility on defense, which should be valuable to Toronto's second unit.
TOR (G, SG, SF)
G
74
Min
25.5
FPTS
801.0
REB
233.0
AST
153.0
STL
65.0
BLK
22.0
TO
109.0
FGM
308.0
FGA
670.0
FTM
101.0
FTA
126.0
Powell finished his fourth NBA season notching career highs in points (8.6), rebounds (2.3), assists (1.5), threes (1.1) and field goal percentage (48.6). He also played a career-high 18.8 minutes per contest, appearing in 60 games. Powell was good from the foul line (82.7 percent) and from deep (40.0 percent), though the increased efficiency doesn't move the needle much on his overall fantasy value. He's the preseason favorite to be the starter at shooting guard in 2019-20, but that role is far from secure as he'll compete with Fred VanVleet for it. VanVleet had a career year in 2018-19, capped off by a strong showing in the Finals. He averaged 24.6 minutes in the playoffs compared to 15.9 minutes for Powell, and VanVleet's 27.5 minutes per game in the regular season were significantly more than Powell's 18.8. Powell has yet to show consistency on either end of the floor and has not played 20 minutes a game in his career. The absence of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green should free up opportunities for him, but Powell will be a player to avoid outside of deep leagues this season.
Powell finished his fourth NBA season notching career highs in points (8.6), rebounds (2.3), assists (1.5), threes (1.1) and field goal percentage (48.6). He also played a career-high 18.8 minutes per contest, appearing in 60 games. Powell was good from the foul line (82.7 percent) and from deep (40.0 percent), though the increased efficiency doesn't move the needle much on his overall fantasy value. He's the preseason favorite to be the starter at shooting guard in 2019-20, but that role is far from secure as he'll compete with Fred VanVleet for it. VanVleet had a career year in 2018-19, capped off by a strong showing in the Finals. He averaged 24.6 minutes in the playoffs compared to 15.9 minutes for Powell, and VanVleet's 27.5 minutes per game in the regular season were significantly more than Powell's 18.8. Powell has yet to show consistency on either end of the floor and has not played 20 minutes a game in his career. The absence of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green should free up opportunities for him, but Powell will be a player to avoid outside of deep leagues this season.
DAL (F, SF, PF)
G
80
Min
25.1
FPTS
800.0
REB
394.0
AST
96.0
STL
70.0
BLK
36.0
TO
75.0
FGM
227.0
FGA
534.0
FTM
77.0
FTA
104.0
Finney-Smith will return to the Mavericks on a three-year, $12 million deal. The third-year forward averaged a career-high 7.5 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.2 assists with Dallas last season, logging 24.5 minutes per night in 81 appearances. After playing just 21 games the year prior due to tendonitis, it was encouraging to see Finney-Smith play the entire season -- the second time in three years he played at least 81 games. He's an above-average defender but a poor shooter, limiting his upside to rebounding and defensive stats. Though his minutes have increased in each of the past two seasons, he's likely to see those minutes go in the opposite direction, playing a backup forward role. Kristaps Porzingis should be healthy, and Tim Hardaway and Justin Jackson will be back to take playing time from Finney-Smith. He's not worth drafting in standard formats.
Finney-Smith will return to the Mavericks on a three-year, $12 million deal. The third-year forward averaged a career-high 7.5 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.2 assists with Dallas last season, logging 24.5 minutes per night in 81 appearances. After playing just 21 games the year prior due to tendonitis, it was encouraging to see Finney-Smith play the entire season -- the second time in three years he played at least 81 games. He's an above-average defender but a poor shooter, limiting his upside to rebounding and defensive stats. Though his minutes have increased in each of the past two seasons, he's likely to see those minutes go in the opposite direction, playing a backup forward role. Kristaps Porzingis should be healthy, and Tim Hardaway and Justin Jackson will be back to take playing time from Finney-Smith. He's not worth drafting in standard formats.
HOU (F, SF, PF)
G
76
Min
27.5
FPTS
797.0
REB
299.0
AST
85.0
STL
45.0
BLK
23.0
TO
75.0
FGM
239.0
FGA
538.0
FTM
123.0
FTA
152.0
House put together a quality campaign in 2018-19, solidifying himself as a valuable contributor off the bench for Houston in his first year with the team. The Rockets clearly liked what they saw and signed House to a three-year, $11.1 million deal this offseason. The Texas A&M product averaged 9.4 points, 3.6 rebounds and 1.9 triples per game, shooting a stellar 41.6 percent from deep. He logged 25.1 minutes across 39 games, starting 13 of them. House upped his play as a starter, generating 11.2 points, 4.2 boards and 2.2 threes. He has a good chance to replicate last season's workload either in the starting lineup or in a high-usage reserve role. Still, he'll only be valuable in deeper leagues this season for his shooting and threes.
House put together a quality campaign in 2018-19, solidifying himself as a valuable contributor off the bench for Houston in his first year with the team. The Rockets clearly liked what they saw and signed House to a three-year, $11.1 million deal this offseason. The Texas A&M product averaged 9.4 points, 3.6 rebounds and 1.9 triples per game, shooting a stellar 41.6 percent from deep. He logged 25.1 minutes across 39 games, starting 13 of them. House upped his play as a starter, generating 11.2 points, 4.2 boards and 2.2 threes. He has a good chance to replicate last season's workload either in the starting lineup or in a high-usage reserve role. Still, he'll only be valuable in deeper leagues this season for his shooting and threes.
DAL (F, PF, C)
G
73
Min
22.2
FPTS
784.0
REB
355.0
AST
76.0
STL
39.0
BLK
84.0
TO
58.0
FGM
199.0
FGA
442.0
FTM
61.0
FTA
80.0
Kleber recorded career highs in points (6.8), rebounds (4.6), combined blocks/steals (1.6) and threes (1.1) across 21.2 minutes in his second season with Dallas. The big man defends well, can stretch the floor with his three-point shooting and can play forward or center. Those abilities landed him a four-year, $35 million extension this offseason to stay with the Mavericks. Though Kleber played the most minutes of his career last season, his role may shrink in year three given the acquisition of Kristaps Porzingis. Kleber will battle Dwight Powell for the starting center job, but Powell seems to have the inside track. Kleber could see more run if Porzingis isn't fully healthy, but for now, the former seems to be the odd man out in the frontcourt. As a result, he can likely go undrafted in standard leagues.
Kleber recorded career highs in points (6.8), rebounds (4.6), combined blocks/steals (1.6) and threes (1.1) across 21.2 minutes in his second season with Dallas. The big man defends well, can stretch the floor with his three-point shooting and can play forward or center. Those abilities landed him a four-year, $35 million extension this offseason to stay with the Mavericks. Though Kleber played the most minutes of his career last season, his role may shrink in year three given the acquisition of Kristaps Porzingis. Kleber will battle Dwight Powell for the starting center job, but Powell seems to have the inside track. Kleber could see more run if Porzingis isn't fully healthy, but for now, the former seems to be the odd man out in the frontcourt. As a result, he can likely go undrafted in standard leagues.
NOR (F, PF, C)
G
71
Min
17.5
FPTS
780.0
REB
299.0
AST
39.0
STL
30.0
BLK
87.0
TO
34.0
FGM
203.0
FGA
319.0
FTM
92.0
FTA
121.0
Hayes' freshman season was cut short by what looked like a serious knee injury, but an MRI ultimately revealed no structural damage, and he was able to participate in summer league. Hayes, who averaged 10.0 points, 5.0 rebounds and 2.2 blocks per game at Texas, is a terrific frontcourt athlete and shot-blocker, but there are still plenty of questions surrounding his abilities on offense. That said, he was surprisingly effective on offense in summer league, averaging 16.3 points on 10.8 shots. He also added 7.3 rebounds and 1.3 blocks across 24.3 minutes in four contests. While the Pelicans showed plenty of confidence in Hayes by drafting him eighth overall, the 19-year-old has competition for playing time. Derrick Favors, Jahlil Okafor and Zion Williamson are all candidates to see action at center, which could cut into Hayes' workload. It might be tough for the rookie to carve out a standard-league fantasy role right out of the gate, but it's possible he'll make for a streaming option for blocks and field-goal percentage.
Hayes' freshman season was cut short by what looked like a serious knee injury, but an MRI ultimately revealed no structural damage, and he was able to participate in summer league. Hayes, who averaged 10.0 points, 5.0 rebounds and 2.2 blocks per game at Texas, is a terrific frontcourt athlete and shot-blocker, but there are still plenty of questions surrounding his abilities on offense. That said, he was surprisingly effective on offense in summer league, averaging 16.3 points on 10.8 shots. He also added 7.3 rebounds and 1.3 blocks across 24.3 minutes in four contests. While the Pelicans showed plenty of confidence in Hayes by drafting him eighth overall, the 19-year-old has competition for playing time. Derrick Favors, Jahlil Okafor and Zion Williamson are all candidates to see action at center, which could cut into Hayes' workload. It might be tough for the rookie to carve out a standard-league fantasy role right out of the gate, but it's possible he'll make for a streaming option for blocks and field-goal percentage.
OKC (C, C)
G
76
Min
14.8
FPTS
765.0
REB
347.0
AST
48.0
STL
75.0
BLK
103.0
TO
51.0
FGM
167.0
FGA
294.0
FTM
60.0
FTA
84.0
Noel will return to the Thunder as a backup center for his second season with the team. Noel appeared in 77 games but logged the fewest minutes (13.7 per game) of his career. He provided minimal contributions offensively, with 4.9 points and 4.2 rebounds, but he was one of the best per-minute defenders in the NBA. Noel averaged 2.1 combined blocks/steals in limited action and provided a defensive spark for the second unit. His per-36 numbers were huge, with averages of 12.9 points, 11.1 rebounds and a ridiculous 5.6 combined blocks/steals. Steven Adams is firmly entrenched as the starting center, but the rebuilding Thunder may opt to give Noel some additional run, especially after his strong showing defensively. For now, Noel is a deep-league add only given the uncertainty of his playing time, but if Adams were to miss time for any reason, he could return fantasy value immediately in all formats.
Noel will return to the Thunder as a backup center for his second season with the team. Noel appeared in 77 games but logged the fewest minutes (13.7 per game) of his career. He provided minimal contributions offensively, with 4.9 points and 4.2 rebounds, but he was one of the best per-minute defenders in the NBA. Noel averaged 2.1 combined blocks/steals in limited action and provided a defensive spark for the second unit. His per-36 numbers were huge, with averages of 12.9 points, 11.1 rebounds and a ridiculous 5.6 combined blocks/steals. Steven Adams is firmly entrenched as the starting center, but the rebuilding Thunder may opt to give Noel some additional run, especially after his strong showing defensively. For now, Noel is a deep-league add only given the uncertainty of his playing time, but if Adams were to miss time for any reason, he could return fantasy value immediately in all formats.
MIL (G, SG, PG)
G
68
Min
26.3
FPTS
765.0
REB
203.0
AST
203.0
STL
71.0
BLK
11.0
TO
70.0
FGM
238.0
FGA
516.0
FTM
94.0
FTA
117.0
Hill was traded to the Bucks in early December as the Bucks looked to dump salary and gain veteran talent in the backcourt. Appearing in 47 games with Milwaukee, Hill saw 20.4 minutes per game and averaged 6.8 points on 5.7 shots, 2.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists. While that was a relatively small role, it's possible Hill will see his workload expand this season considering the departure of Malcolm Brogdon. The Bucks loaded up on shooting guard options like Wesley Matthews and Kyle Korver, but now Eric Bledsoe and Hill are Milwaukee's only two backcourt playmakers. It would be surprising if Hill found himself with standard fantasy league relevance, but owners in deep leagues could consider the veteran with the final pick in a draft.
Hill was traded to the Bucks in early December as the Bucks looked to dump salary and gain veteran talent in the backcourt. Appearing in 47 games with Milwaukee, Hill saw 20.4 minutes per game and averaged 6.8 points on 5.7 shots, 2.6 rebounds and 2.1 assists. While that was a relatively small role, it's possible Hill will see his workload expand this season considering the departure of Malcolm Brogdon. The Bucks loaded up on shooting guard options like Wesley Matthews and Kyle Korver, but now Eric Bledsoe and Hill are Milwaukee's only two backcourt playmakers. It would be surprising if Hill found himself with standard fantasy league relevance, but owners in deep leagues could consider the veteran with the final pick in a draft.
OKC (C, PF, C)
G
71
Min
24.7
FPTS
759.0
REB
328.0
AST
102.0
STL
30.0
BLK
51.0
TO
64.0
FGM
199.0
FGA
485.0
FTM
96.0
FTA
114.0
Muscala appeared in 64 games last season between the 76ers and the Lakers. He saw 20.4 minutes and averaged a career-high 1.4 threes en route to 7.0 points per game. He also chipped in 3.8 rebounds and 1.2 assists. While Muscala has shown upside as a floor-spacing big, his rebounding and defense leave something to be desired, which will likely make it difficult for him to see an expanded role at some point in the future. In joining the Thunder, Muscala figures to be the primary backup at power forward to Danilo Gallinari. It's possible Muscala sees time at center as well, but Nerlens Noel will likely have the reserve center spot locked down. All things considered, Muscala is worth avoiding in all but the deepest of fantasy leagues.
Muscala appeared in 64 games last season between the 76ers and the Lakers. He saw 20.4 minutes and averaged a career-high 1.4 threes en route to 7.0 points per game. He also chipped in 3.8 rebounds and 1.2 assists. While Muscala has shown upside as a floor-spacing big, his rebounding and defense leave something to be desired, which will likely make it difficult for him to see an expanded role at some point in the future. In joining the Thunder, Muscala figures to be the primary backup at power forward to Danilo Gallinari. It's possible Muscala sees time at center as well, but Nerlens Noel will likely have the reserve center spot locked down. All things considered, Muscala is worth avoiding in all but the deepest of fantasy leagues.
SAC (G, PG, SG)
G
82
Min
21.8
FPTS
754.0
REB
242.0
AST
278.0
STL
81.0
BLK
19.0
TO
69.0
FGM
203.0
FGA
475.0
FTM
27.0
FTA
37.0
After two seasons with the Pacers, Joseph landed with the Kings this offseason, signing a three-year, $37 million deal. Joseph continued to play a bench role last season, but he has averaged 25.7 minutes per contest over the last four years. He's a durable player, having appeared in at least 79 games in each of the last five seasons, playing all 82 over the last two years. He averaged 6.5 points last season to go along with career highs in assists (3.9), rebounds (3.4) and steals (1.1). His stats weren't particularly remarkable, and he will come off the bench once again, backing up De'Aaron Fox. Sacramento has one of the most talented backcourts in the NBA with Fox and Buddy Hield, but it wouldn't be a surprise to see Joseph on the court for at least 20 minutes per game this season due to his defense and ability to play off-ball. His usual production can be expected, and Joseph is best reserved as a deep-league fantasy selection.
After two seasons with the Pacers, Joseph landed with the Kings this offseason, signing a three-year, $37 million deal. Joseph continued to play a bench role last season, but he has averaged 25.7 minutes per contest over the last four years. He's a durable player, having appeared in at least 79 games in each of the last five seasons, playing all 82 over the last two years. He averaged 6.5 points last season to go along with career highs in assists (3.9), rebounds (3.4) and steals (1.1). His stats weren't particularly remarkable, and he will come off the bench once again, backing up De'Aaron Fox. Sacramento has one of the most talented backcourts in the NBA with Fox and Buddy Hield, but it wouldn't be a surprise to see Joseph on the court for at least 20 minutes per game this season due to his defense and ability to play off-ball. His usual production can be expected, and Joseph is best reserved as a deep-league fantasy selection.
MIA (F, PF, SF)
G
72
Min
23.8
FPTS
752.0
REB
259.0
AST
199.0
STL
52.0
BLK
40.0
TO
109.0
FGM
253.0
FGA
558.0
FTM
71.0
FTA
103.0
After finishing with a double-digit scoring average in his first two years with the Heat, Johnson's production dipped considerably across 55 games this past season. Those first two years in Miami are the only campaigns in Johnson's 10-year career that he has averaged more than 9.1 points per game. Moreover, after averaging 27.4 and 26.6 minutes in 2016-17 and 2017-18, respectively, Johnson earned just 21.2 minutes per night in 2018-19. The 32-year-old forward was slowed by abdomen and shoulder injuries, which resulted in his fewest appearances since 2013-14. Despite the down year, Johnson remains a well-rounded and versatile statistical contributor. Still, he's firmly behind Jimmy Butler, Justise Winslow and Goran Dragic in the pecking order offensively. Meanwhile, Dion Waiters is yet to meet a shot he didn't like, and Miami's roster is a deep one. All in all, if Johnson is going to enjoy a bounce-back year in 2019-20, he'll need to stay healthy first and foremost, but he'll also need to hold off the younger and spryer Derrick Jones Jr.
After finishing with a double-digit scoring average in his first two years with the Heat, Johnson's production dipped considerably across 55 games this past season. Those first two years in Miami are the only campaigns in Johnson's 10-year career that he has averaged more than 9.1 points per game. Moreover, after averaging 27.4 and 26.6 minutes in 2016-17 and 2017-18, respectively, Johnson earned just 21.2 minutes per night in 2018-19. The 32-year-old forward was slowed by abdomen and shoulder injuries, which resulted in his fewest appearances since 2013-14. Despite the down year, Johnson remains a well-rounded and versatile statistical contributor. Still, he's firmly behind Jimmy Butler, Justise Winslow and Goran Dragic in the pecking order offensively. Meanwhile, Dion Waiters is yet to meet a shot he didn't like, and Miami's roster is a deep one. All in all, if Johnson is going to enjoy a bounce-back year in 2019-20, he'll need to stay healthy first and foremost, but he'll also need to hold off the younger and spryer Derrick Jones Jr.
SAN (F, PF, SF)
G
71
Min
23.9
FPTS
748.0
REB
348.0
AST
85.0
STL
31.0
BLK
10.0
TO
73.0
FGM
232.0
FGA
573.0
FTM
178.0
FTA
241.0
Carroll inked a three-year, $21 million deal over the summer with San Antonio after spending the last two seasons in Brooklyn. He played a significant role for the Nets in 2017-18, but his role was scaled back last year, logging 25.4 minutes per night in only eight starts. Carroll averaged 11.1 points, 5.2 rebounds and 1.3 assists in his final season with Brooklyn, draining 1.6 threes per contest. He's not a particularly skilled shooter, and his points and made threes were in large part due to volume, with 4.6 of his 8.6 field goal attempts coming from beyond the arc. Carroll is a solid rebounder and useful for threes, but he's likely to get lost in the shuffle in San Antonio, playing behind DeMar DeRozan and LaMarcus Aldridge. He'll scrap for backup minutes with Rudy Gay, Trey Lyles and Lonnie Walker. Overall, and Carroll figures to see a significantly reduced role this season.
Carroll inked a three-year, $21 million deal over the summer with San Antonio after spending the last two seasons in Brooklyn. He played a significant role for the Nets in 2017-18, but his role was scaled back last year, logging 25.4 minutes per night in only eight starts. Carroll averaged 11.1 points, 5.2 rebounds and 1.3 assists in his final season with Brooklyn, draining 1.6 threes per contest. He's not a particularly skilled shooter, and his points and made threes were in large part due to volume, with 4.6 of his 8.6 field goal attempts coming from beyond the arc. Carroll is a solid rebounder and useful for threes, but he's likely to get lost in the shuffle in San Antonio, playing behind DeMar DeRozan and LaMarcus Aldridge. He'll scrap for backup minutes with Rudy Gay, Trey Lyles and Lonnie Walker. Overall, and Carroll figures to see a significantly reduced role this season.
CHA (F, SG, SF)
G
74
Min
26.2
FPTS
748.0
REB
227.0
AST
120.0
STL
52.0
BLK
13.0
TO
46.0
FGM
296.0
FGA
656.0
FTM
91.0
FTA
118.0
Bacon appeared in just 43 games for Charlotte last season, averaging 17.7 minutes per tilt while he split time with the Hornets' G League affiliate, the Greensboro Swarm. The Florida State product provided excellent shooting in limited action, producing career highs in field goal percentage (47.5) and three-point percentage (43.7). He closed the season on a high note with solid play as a starter over the final 12 games. In those games, he averaged 12.6 points, 2.9 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.8 threes on 46.8 percent shooting from the field and 42.9 percent shooting from three. With Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb gone, Bacon could be in line for production and minutes similar to his end-of-season averages, which would make him a fantasy-relevant pickup in 2019-20 in deeper formats. He will compete for playing time with Malik Monk, Terry Rozier, Nicolas Batum and Devonte' Graham, but the rotation on this rebuilding Hornets team does not yet have clarity.
Bacon appeared in just 43 games for Charlotte last season, averaging 17.7 minutes per tilt while he split time with the Hornets' G League affiliate, the Greensboro Swarm. The Florida State product provided excellent shooting in limited action, producing career highs in field goal percentage (47.5) and three-point percentage (43.7). He closed the season on a high note with solid play as a starter over the final 12 games. In those games, he averaged 12.6 points, 2.9 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.8 threes on 46.8 percent shooting from the field and 42.9 percent shooting from three. With Kemba Walker and Jeremy Lamb gone, Bacon could be in line for production and minutes similar to his end-of-season averages, which would make him a fantasy-relevant pickup in 2019-20 in deeper formats. He will compete for playing time with Malik Monk, Terry Rozier, Nicolas Batum and Devonte' Graham, but the rotation on this rebuilding Hornets team does not yet have clarity.
ORL (C, C)
G
68
Min
17.9
FPTS
743.0
REB
370.0
AST
62.0
STL
21.0
BLK
102.0
TO
68.0
FGM
193.0
FGA
386.0
FTM
63.0
FTA
100.0
Bamba's rookie season was cut short by a foot injury and, ultimately, a tibia stress fracture that required surgery. The pair of injuries caused the big man to play in just 47 games over the course of his first regular season. Now, Bamba enters year two completely healthy, but he is likely to take on a similar role as last season. In 47 games, most of which were spent backing up All-Star center Nikola Vucevic, Bamba averaged 6.2 points, 5.0 rebounds and 1.4 blocks across 16.3 minutes per game. Even if it was a small sample size, Bamba showed promise on both ends with his ability to rack up rebounds and blocked shots in short spurts along with making 30 percent of his three-point attempts, which is a good baseline for the seven-footer. But with Vucevic wasting no time signing a four-year, $100 million contract with the Magic this offseason, it looks like Bamba's workload will remain relatively unchanged. However, while Vucevic did play 80 games for the first time in his NBA career last season, he is no stranger to injuries, which would be Bamba's only clear avenue to seeing extended minutes in his sophomore season.
Bamba's rookie season was cut short by a foot injury and, ultimately, a tibia stress fracture that required surgery. The pair of injuries caused the big man to play in just 47 games over the course of his first regular season. Now, Bamba enters year two completely healthy, but he is likely to take on a similar role as last season. In 47 games, most of which were spent backing up All-Star center Nikola Vucevic, Bamba averaged 6.2 points, 5.0 rebounds and 1.4 blocks across 16.3 minutes per game. Even if it was a small sample size, Bamba showed promise on both ends with his ability to rack up rebounds and blocked shots in short spurts along with making 30 percent of his three-point attempts, which is a good baseline for the seven-footer. But with Vucevic wasting no time signing a four-year, $100 million contract with the Magic this offseason, it looks like Bamba's workload will remain relatively unchanged. However, while Vucevic did play 80 games for the first time in his NBA career last season, he is no stranger to injuries, which would be Bamba's only clear avenue to seeing extended minutes in his sophomore season.
LAC (F, SF, PF)
G
71
Min
18.6
FPTS
743.0
REB
394.0
AST
48.0
STL
43.0
BLK
33.0
TO
84.0
FGM
215.0
FGA
459.0
FTM
78.0
FTA
97.0
Green registered career highs in made threes (1.4 per game), three-point shooting percentage (40.3) and steals (0.7) this past season. He also matched his career-best blocks average (0.5), all of this despite seeing a fairly significant reduction in minutes. Green had earned 27.3 and 28.0 minutes per night in 2016-17 and 2017-18, respectively, before being limited to 21.1 per matchup in 2018-19. That said, he did receive a boost in playing time during the playoffs, as Ivica Zubac struggled to keep pace with the Warriors. Across six playoff games, Green recorded averages of 11.0 points (53.5 FG%, 52.2 3P%, 80.0 FT%), 5.3 rebounds, 2.0 threes, 0.8 assists and 0.7 steals in 23.5 minutes. As long as Green spends some time at power forward and thus isn't forced to merely split time at center with Zubac and Montrezl Harrell, he could be a decent source of points, boards and threes. Even so, unless Green logs fairly heavy minutes at the four, he's likely to remain a modest contributor.
Green registered career highs in made threes (1.4 per game), three-point shooting percentage (40.3) and steals (0.7) this past season. He also matched his career-best blocks average (0.5), all of this despite seeing a fairly significant reduction in minutes. Green had earned 27.3 and 28.0 minutes per night in 2016-17 and 2017-18, respectively, before being limited to 21.1 per matchup in 2018-19. That said, he did receive a boost in playing time during the playoffs, as Ivica Zubac struggled to keep pace with the Warriors. Across six playoff games, Green recorded averages of 11.0 points (53.5 FG%, 52.2 3P%, 80.0 FT%), 5.3 rebounds, 2.0 threes, 0.8 assists and 0.7 steals in 23.5 minutes. As long as Green spends some time at power forward and thus isn't forced to merely split time at center with Zubac and Montrezl Harrell, he could be a decent source of points, boards and threes. Even so, unless Green logs fairly heavy minutes at the four, he's likely to remain a modest contributor.
UTA (F, SF, PF)
G
75
Min
24.8
FPTS
741.0
REB
274.0
AST
122.0
STL
38.0
BLK
35.0
TO
90.0
FGM
236.0
FGA
554.0
FTM
158.0
FTA
183.0
Green joined the Wizards last season after a one-year stint with the Cavaliers, and the 12-year veteran started 44 games in 2018-19 -- his most starts since the 2013-14 season. Green shot a respectable 47.5 percent from the field and drilled 1.4 threes per contest on 34.7 percent shooting from deep. Green has shot well for the last two seasons, and it seems his down year in Orlando in 2016-17 was an outlier. His 12.3 points were his most since the 2014-15 season, and he added 4.0 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 27.2 minutes. Those minutes will likely decrease this season, playing for a title contender in Utah rather than a floundering lottery team in Washington. Green could contend for 20 minutes a night, but he's primarily a quality depth addition on a loaded roster who is unlikely to make huge contributions. The Jazz boast a lot of talent at the forward position in Joe Ingles, Bojan Bogdanovic and Royce O'Neale, and Green will almost certainly be more valuable in real-life basketball as a smart veteran than in fantasy basketball as a reserve.
Green joined the Wizards last season after a one-year stint with the Cavaliers, and the 12-year veteran started 44 games in 2018-19 -- his most starts since the 2013-14 season. Green shot a respectable 47.5 percent from the field and drilled 1.4 threes per contest on 34.7 percent shooting from deep. Green has shot well for the last two seasons, and it seems his down year in Orlando in 2016-17 was an outlier. His 12.3 points were his most since the 2014-15 season, and he added 4.0 rebounds and 1.8 assists in 27.2 minutes. Those minutes will likely decrease this season, playing for a title contender in Utah rather than a floundering lottery team in Washington. Green could contend for 20 minutes a night, but he's primarily a quality depth addition on a loaded roster who is unlikely to make huge contributions. The Jazz boast a lot of talent at the forward position in Joe Ingles, Bojan Bogdanovic and Royce O'Neale, and Green will almost certainly be more valuable in real-life basketball as a smart veteran than in fantasy basketball as a reserve.
PHO (C, PF, C)
G
72
Min
18.5
FPTS
740.0
REB
288.0
AST
111.0
STL
21.0
BLK
21.0
TO
72.0
FGM
235.0
FGA
526.0
FTM
145.0
FTA
189.0
Kaminsky just wrapped up a four-year stint in Charlotte, and after the Hornets elected to not retain the former Wisconsin standout, he signed a two-year, $10 million contract with the Suns this offseason. Kaminsky had a tough final year in Charlotte, as he was completely out of the rotation to start the season despite having back-to-back years where he averaged over 11 points per game. As a result, the big man ended up appearing in just 47 games for the Hornets in 2018-19, averaging 8.6 points and 3.5 rebounds across 16.1 minutes per game. However, his numbers following the All-Star break, when he was once again consistently in the team's rotation, were very solid, as he averaged 12.8 points and 4.8 rebounds across nearly 23 minutes per game. Additionally, Kaminsky did uphold his reputation as a legitimate threat from behind the arc, shooting 36 percent from deep on three attempts per game. In Phoenix, he'll be playing behind likely starting power forward Dario Saric, who boasts a similar offensive skillset to that of Kaminsky's, which could make the 26-year-old a seamless fit off the bench. He will, however, have to compete for minutes with fellow big man Aron Baynes, who the Suns acquired via a trade with the Celtics on draft night.
Kaminsky just wrapped up a four-year stint in Charlotte, and after the Hornets elected to not retain the former Wisconsin standout, he signed a two-year, $10 million contract with the Suns this offseason. Kaminsky had a tough final year in Charlotte, as he was completely out of the rotation to start the season despite having back-to-back years where he averaged over 11 points per game. As a result, the big man ended up appearing in just 47 games for the Hornets in 2018-19, averaging 8.6 points and 3.5 rebounds across 16.1 minutes per game. However, his numbers following the All-Star break, when he was once again consistently in the team's rotation, were very solid, as he averaged 12.8 points and 4.8 rebounds across nearly 23 minutes per game. Additionally, Kaminsky did uphold his reputation as a legitimate threat from behind the arc, shooting 36 percent from deep on three attempts per game. In Phoenix, he'll be playing behind likely starting power forward Dario Saric, who boasts a similar offensive skillset to that of Kaminsky's, which could make the 26-year-old a seamless fit off the bench. He will, however, have to compete for minutes with fellow big man Aron Baynes, who the Suns acquired via a trade with the Celtics on draft night.
ATL (F, SF, PF)
G
77
Min
25.8
FPTS
739.0
REB
265.0
AST
101.0
STL
109.0
BLK
13.0
TO
66.0
FGM
253.0
FGA
550.0
FTM
85.0
FTA
109.0
Hunter, selected by the Hawks with the fourth overall pick in the 2019 Draft, is arguably the most versatile defensive player in the rookie class, and he helped lead Virginia to a National Championship as a sophomore last season. He projects as a three-and-D forward who can be relied upon as a spot-up shooter and defend multiple positions, notably shooting 46-for-105 (43.8 percent) from three and averaging a combined 1.2 steals/blocks in 2018-19. Hunter figures to slot in as Atlanta's starting small forward, completing a young presumed lineup of Trae Young, Kevin Hurter, John Collins and Alex Len. Hunter doesn't have huge upside as a fantasy asset considering he was a low-usage player in college (10.4 FGA and 2.0 APG), but he has the potential to provide value in the three-pointers, rebounding and defensive categories.
Hunter, selected by the Hawks with the fourth overall pick in the 2019 Draft, is arguably the most versatile defensive player in the rookie class, and he helped lead Virginia to a National Championship as a sophomore last season. He projects as a three-and-D forward who can be relied upon as a spot-up shooter and defend multiple positions, notably shooting 46-for-105 (43.8 percent) from three and averaging a combined 1.2 steals/blocks in 2018-19. Hunter figures to slot in as Atlanta's starting small forward, completing a young presumed lineup of Trae Young, Kevin Hurter, John Collins and Alex Len. Hunter doesn't have huge upside as a fantasy asset considering he was a low-usage player in college (10.4 FGA and 2.0 APG), but he has the potential to provide value in the three-pointers, rebounding and defensive categories.
MIN (F, SF, PF)
G
79
Min
22.1
FPTS
735.0
REB
286.0
AST
70.0
STL
41.0
BLK
39.0
TO
61.0
FGM
264.0
FGA
558.0
FTM
69.0
FTA
93.0
Layman joined the Timberwolves in a three-year, $11.5 million sign-and-trade deal after spending his first three seasons with the Trail Blazers. He averaged career highs in points (7.6) and rebounds (3.1) in 2018, playing 18.7 minutes off the bench on a loaded Portland team. He played more games in his third season (71) than he did in his first two years combined (70), notching 33 starts. Despite the expanded role, Layman was often a low-usage, inconsistent player and actually saw his production fall when in the starting lineup. However, he did have a few big games, and Layman averaged 19.3 points, 5.8 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.0 steal in the four games in which he saw at least 30 minutes. He could see more playing time with the Wolves in 2019-20, with a sixth-man ceiling if he can make a leap. Still, he's likely only worth drafting in deeper fantasy formats.
Layman joined the Timberwolves in a three-year, $11.5 million sign-and-trade deal after spending his first three seasons with the Trail Blazers. He averaged career highs in points (7.6) and rebounds (3.1) in 2018, playing 18.7 minutes off the bench on a loaded Portland team. He played more games in his third season (71) than he did in his first two years combined (70), notching 33 starts. Despite the expanded role, Layman was often a low-usage, inconsistent player and actually saw his production fall when in the starting lineup. However, he did have a few big games, and Layman averaged 19.3 points, 5.8 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.0 steal in the four games in which he saw at least 30 minutes. He could see more playing time with the Wolves in 2019-20, with a sixth-man ceiling if he can make a leap. Still, he's likely only worth drafting in deeper fantasy formats.
MIN (G, SG, SF)
G
73
Min
24.8
FPTS
730.0
REB
241.0
AST
141.0
STL
45.0
BLK
18.0
TO
85.0
FGM
302.0
FGA
673.0
FTM
122.0
FTA
168.0
The Texas Tech product and No. 6 overall pick in the 2019 Draft led the Red Raiders to the National Championship game as a sophomore last season, averaging 18.5 points, 6.4 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 1.5 steals in 38 contests. His numbers were good enough to secure an All-American Second Team selection, not to mention winning Big 12 Player of the Year. He has clear upside as a scorer, but he wasn't especially efficient last season, hitting 46.1 percent of his 14.5 field goals per game, 30.4 percent of his 4.2 threes and 70.7 percent of his 5.5 free throws. His initial pathway to significant minutes in the NBA may be his defensive presence. At 6-foot-5 and 195 pounds, Culver may be able to guard both backcourt positions and small forward. There's a decent chance he'll start the 2019-20 season as the Wolves' starting small forward, though he'll be competing with the likes of Josh Okogie and Jake Layman. Robert Covington and Andrew Wiggins are both options on the wing as well if coach Ryan Saunders wants to go big.
The Texas Tech product and No. 6 overall pick in the 2019 Draft led the Red Raiders to the National Championship game as a sophomore last season, averaging 18.5 points, 6.4 rebounds, 3.7 assists and 1.5 steals in 38 contests. His numbers were good enough to secure an All-American Second Team selection, not to mention winning Big 12 Player of the Year. He has clear upside as a scorer, but he wasn't especially efficient last season, hitting 46.1 percent of his 14.5 field goals per game, 30.4 percent of his 4.2 threes and 70.7 percent of his 5.5 free throws. His initial pathway to significant minutes in the NBA may be his defensive presence. At 6-foot-5 and 195 pounds, Culver may be able to guard both backcourt positions and small forward. There's a decent chance he'll start the 2019-20 season as the Wolves' starting small forward, though he'll be competing with the likes of Josh Okogie and Jake Layman. Robert Covington and Andrew Wiggins are both options on the wing as well if coach Ryan Saunders wants to go big.
SAC (F, PF)
G
68
Min
18.9
FPTS
730.0
REB
319.0
AST
106.0
STL
39.0
BLK
40.0
TO
59.0
FGM
199.0
FGA
426.0
FTM
52.0
FTA
66.0
Bjelica finished with career highs across nearly every category last season, including points (9.6), rebounds (5.8), assists (1.9), threes (1.3), blocks (0.7) and minutes (23.2) per game. Bjelica also matched his career high in steals per game (0.7), turned in a career-best field goal percentage (47.9), appeared in a career-high 77 games, and drew over three times as many starts (70) as he did through his first three seasons combined (22). Bjelica's ability to stretch the floor from beyond the arc (40.1 percent) helped him hold down the fort as the starting power forward on the Kings for the vast majority of the campaign. Still, Marvin Bagley was slowly but surely eating away at Bjelica's minutes as the year went on, and it's reasonable to assume that will continue going forward, not to mention the addition of Trevor Ariza. All things considered, it could prove difficult for Bjelica to maintain last season's per-game averages, and he should only be considered in the late rounds of most fantasy leagues.
Bjelica finished with career highs across nearly every category last season, including points (9.6), rebounds (5.8), assists (1.9), threes (1.3), blocks (0.7) and minutes (23.2) per game. Bjelica also matched his career high in steals per game (0.7), turned in a career-best field goal percentage (47.9), appeared in a career-high 77 games, and drew over three times as many starts (70) as he did through his first three seasons combined (22). Bjelica's ability to stretch the floor from beyond the arc (40.1 percent) helped him hold down the fort as the starting power forward on the Kings for the vast majority of the campaign. Still, Marvin Bagley was slowly but surely eating away at Bjelica's minutes as the year went on, and it's reasonable to assume that will continue going forward, not to mention the addition of Trevor Ariza. All things considered, it could prove difficult for Bjelica to maintain last season's per-game averages, and he should only be considered in the late rounds of most fantasy leagues.
ATL (F, SF, PF)
G
59
Min
21.1
FPTS
728.0
REB
304.0
AST
110.0
STL
33.0
BLK
22.0
TO
109.0
FGM
258.0
FGA
511.0
FTM
90.0
FTA
123.0
Parker has joined the Hawks on a one-year, $13 million deal after spending last season in Chicago and Washington. He played a key role for the Wizards, where he averaged 15.0 points and 7.2 rebounds in 25 games, and he finished the season with career highs in rebounds (6.6) and assists (2.4). The former No. 2 overall pick has failed to live up to lofty expectations, largely due to recurring knee injuries, though he could be a valuable contributor off the bench for the Hawks as a sixth man at both forward spots. There's little question regarding Parker's offensive talents (18.3 points per 36 minutes and 49.1 FG% for his career), but he has a tough time seeing heavy minutes due to defensive deficiencies. While drafting Parker in fantasy is risky, being on a one-year deal should motivate him, and the Hawks, as a rebuilding team, should be willing to give Parker plenty of opportunities.
Parker has joined the Hawks on a one-year, $13 million deal after spending last season in Chicago and Washington. He played a key role for the Wizards, where he averaged 15.0 points and 7.2 rebounds in 25 games, and he finished the season with career highs in rebounds (6.6) and assists (2.4). The former No. 2 overall pick has failed to live up to lofty expectations, largely due to recurring knee injuries, though he could be a valuable contributor off the bench for the Hawks as a sixth man at both forward spots. There's little question regarding Parker's offensive talents (18.3 points per 36 minutes and 49.1 FG% for his career), but he has a tough time seeing heavy minutes due to defensive deficiencies. While drafting Parker in fantasy is risky, being on a one-year deal should motivate him, and the Hawks, as a rebuilding team, should be willing to give Parker plenty of opportunities.
NYK (F, SF, PF)
G
78
Min
27.1
FPTS
728.0
REB
328.0
AST
80.0
STL
42.0
BLK
24.0
TO
112.0
FGM
346.0
FGA
895.0
FTM
162.0
FTA
221.0
Knox joined the Knicks with relatively high expectations as the ninth overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. His upside as a scorer is obvious, given his athletic 6-foot-9 frame and nice shooting touch, but Knox struggled with efficiency as a rookie. He shot just 37.0 percent from the field on 12.2 attempts per game, 34.3 percent from deep on 4.9 attempts and 71.7 percent from the charity stripe on 3.0 attempts. While he racked up 11 games with at least 20 points, he also tallied 27 games in the single-digits. But it's important to consider how much of the offensive gameplan fell on him as a 19-year-old, as he led the Knicks in total minutes played (2,158) and total points (963). Heading into this season, Knox will have more help surrounding him, not to mention some presumed development over the summer. He figures to be the Knicks' starting small forward, so he should have no issues finding shots. Whether or not he can be efficient will be the ultimate determiner in his fantasy value.
Knox joined the Knicks with relatively high expectations as the ninth overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. His upside as a scorer is obvious, given his athletic 6-foot-9 frame and nice shooting touch, but Knox struggled with efficiency as a rookie. He shot just 37.0 percent from the field on 12.2 attempts per game, 34.3 percent from deep on 4.9 attempts and 71.7 percent from the charity stripe on 3.0 attempts. While he racked up 11 games with at least 20 points, he also tallied 27 games in the single-digits. But it's important to consider how much of the offensive gameplan fell on him as a 19-year-old, as he led the Knicks in total minutes played (2,158) and total points (963). Heading into this season, Knox will have more help surrounding him, not to mention some presumed development over the summer. He figures to be the Knicks' starting small forward, so he should have no issues finding shots. Whether or not he can be efficient will be the ultimate determiner in his fantasy value.
POR (G, SG, SF)
G
68
Min
27.9
FPTS
727.0
REB
157.0
AST
126.0
STL
59.0
BLK
12.0
TO
55.0
FGM
301.0
FGA
672.0
FTM
133.0
FTA
155.0
Hood will remain in Portland on a two-year, $16 million deal. He logged 24.4 minutes per game with the Blazers after being traded from the Cavaliers, and he provided an offensive spark off the bench at times. He averaged 9.6 points, 1.7 rebounds and 1.3 assists on serviceable shooting from the floor and from the charity stripe. Hood also made 1.2 threes per game, but he's far from a knockdown shooter. His contributions off the bench were valuable for Portland in the postseason, where he provided scoring in some opportune moments. Hood won't receive nearly the same scoring opportunities that he did while in Cleveland, as he's now surrounded by much more talented teammates in Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum, who will handle the majority of work on offense. He'll also have new addition Kent Bazemore to deal with when looking for minutes. Hood has flashed scoring upside, but he goes cold too often. His lack of consistency in that department detracts from his fantasy value, which is negligible aside from points.
Hood will remain in Portland on a two-year, $16 million deal. He logged 24.4 minutes per game with the Blazers after being traded from the Cavaliers, and he provided an offensive spark off the bench at times. He averaged 9.6 points, 1.7 rebounds and 1.3 assists on serviceable shooting from the floor and from the charity stripe. Hood also made 1.2 threes per game, but he's far from a knockdown shooter. His contributions off the bench were valuable for Portland in the postseason, where he provided scoring in some opportune moments. Hood won't receive nearly the same scoring opportunities that he did while in Cleveland, as he's now surrounded by much more talented teammates in Damian Lillard and CJ McCollum, who will handle the majority of work on offense. He'll also have new addition Kent Bazemore to deal with when looking for minutes. Hood has flashed scoring upside, but he goes cold too often. His lack of consistency in that department detracts from his fantasy value, which is negligible aside from points.
CHA (C, C)
G
60
Min
16.4
FPTS
721.0
REB
377.0
AST
73.0
STL
19.0
BLK
24.0
TO
70.0
FGM
191.0
FGA
367.0
FTM
123.0
FTA
175.0
Despite being healthy for almost all of the 2018-19 season, Hernangomez appeared in just 58 games for the Hornets, as head coach James Borrego began utilizing fellow big man Frank Kaminsky more often in the rotation, which cut into Hernangomez's playing time. Despite ultimately seeing just 14.0 minutes per game, Hernangomez still posted solid numbers on the season, averaging 7.3 points and 5.4 rebounds. That made for career-best per-36 averages of 18.7 points and 13.8 rebounds. Now, with Kaminsky gone to Phoenix, there are frontcourt minutes up for grabs this season behind assumed starter Cody Zeller, and with Zeller having only played 82 total games over the last two seasons, there will likely be starter's minutes up for grabs should Zeller miss time once again. Hernangomez will surely be competing with veteran center Bismack Biyombo for those minutes, and his workload and resulting value during the 2019-20 season relies entirely on whether or not he can beat out the big man from the Congo.
Despite being healthy for almost all of the 2018-19 season, Hernangomez appeared in just 58 games for the Hornets, as head coach James Borrego began utilizing fellow big man Frank Kaminsky more often in the rotation, which cut into Hernangomez's playing time. Despite ultimately seeing just 14.0 minutes per game, Hernangomez still posted solid numbers on the season, averaging 7.3 points and 5.4 rebounds. That made for career-best per-36 averages of 18.7 points and 13.8 rebounds. Now, with Kaminsky gone to Phoenix, there are frontcourt minutes up for grabs this season behind assumed starter Cody Zeller, and with Zeller having only played 82 total games over the last two seasons, there will likely be starter's minutes up for grabs should Zeller miss time once again. Hernangomez will surely be competing with veteran center Bismack Biyombo for those minutes, and his workload and resulting value during the 2019-20 season relies entirely on whether or not he can beat out the big man from the Congo.
MIN (G, SF, SG)
G
76
Min
25.8
FPTS
721.0
REB
243.0
AST
102.0
STL
98.0
BLK
37.0
TO
70.0
FGM
238.0
FGA
567.0
FTM
136.0
FTA
181.0
Okogie had a much larger role in his rookie season than anticipated. The Georgia Tech product played in 74 games, starting 52 of them thanks in large part to a litany of injuries that plagued the Timberwolves. Okogie contributed minimally on the offensive end of the floor, putting up 7.7 points, 2.9 points and 1.2 assists in 23.7 minutes per game. Okogie struggled mightily with his shot, shooting just 38.6 percent from the field and 27.9 percent from three, though he is just 20 years old with a lot of room to grow in his second season. He made an impact on defense with 1.2 steals and 0.4 blocks per contest, and his effort on that end of the floor makes him an interesting fantasy prospect heading into 2019-20 if he can improve his shot and maintain a level of consistency on offense. Okogie is a candidate to open the season as the starting small forward, and an uptick in minutes is a strong possibility.
Okogie had a much larger role in his rookie season than anticipated. The Georgia Tech product played in 74 games, starting 52 of them thanks in large part to a litany of injuries that plagued the Timberwolves. Okogie contributed minimally on the offensive end of the floor, putting up 7.7 points, 2.9 points and 1.2 assists in 23.7 minutes per game. Okogie struggled mightily with his shot, shooting just 38.6 percent from the field and 27.9 percent from three, though he is just 20 years old with a lot of room to grow in his second season. He made an impact on defense with 1.2 steals and 0.4 blocks per contest, and his effort on that end of the floor makes him an interesting fantasy prospect heading into 2019-20 if he can improve his shot and maintain a level of consistency on offense. Okogie is a candidate to open the season as the starting small forward, and an uptick in minutes is a strong possibility.
CHA (G, PG, SG)
G
76
Min
23.1
FPTS
710.0
REB
191.0
AST
175.0
STL
52.0
BLK
27.0
TO
120.0
FGM
315.0
FGA
818.0
FTM
121.0
FTA
142.0
Monk, the No. 11 overall pick in 2017, averaged career highs in points (8.9), rebounds (1.9) and assists (1.6) in his second season, coming off the bench for 17.2 minutes per game. He also canned 1.5 triples at a 33.0 percent clip. Aside from the three-ball, Monk's shooting has been pedestrian in his first two seasons, shooting 37.8 from the field. The Hornets are facing a total rebuild this season with leading scorers Jeremy Lamb and franchise superstar Kemba Walker gone in free agency. That gives Charlotte incentive to give more playing time to its young players, possibly affording Monk a bump in usage. He averaged 18.7 points, 3.9 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 3.1 threes per 36 minutes last season, and more minutes could put him on the fantasy radar for the first time in his career. The former lottery pick out of Kentucky has failed to live up to his high draft selection in two seasons, but the Hornets are bereft of talent, opening the door for Monk to prove himself in the league if he can earn significant minutes. He's an interesting late-round flyer who offers scoring upside, but how Charlotte's rotation shakes out this season is anyone's guess at this point.
Monk, the No. 11 overall pick in 2017, averaged career highs in points (8.9), rebounds (1.9) and assists (1.6) in his second season, coming off the bench for 17.2 minutes per game. He also canned 1.5 triples at a 33.0 percent clip. Aside from the three-ball, Monk's shooting has been pedestrian in his first two seasons, shooting 37.8 from the field. The Hornets are facing a total rebuild this season with leading scorers Jeremy Lamb and franchise superstar Kemba Walker gone in free agency. That gives Charlotte incentive to give more playing time to its young players, possibly affording Monk a bump in usage. He averaged 18.7 points, 3.9 rebounds, 3.3 assists and 3.1 threes per 36 minutes last season, and more minutes could put him on the fantasy radar for the first time in his career. The former lottery pick out of Kentucky has failed to live up to his high draft selection in two seasons, but the Hornets are bereft of talent, opening the door for Monk to prove himself in the league if he can earn significant minutes. He's an interesting late-round flyer who offers scoring upside, but how Charlotte's rotation shakes out this season is anyone's guess at this point.
ATL (F, PG, SG, SF)
G
77
Min
18.8
FPTS
701.0
REB
296.0
AST
255.0
STL
30.0
BLK
16.0
TO
103.0
FGM
181.0
FGA
400.0
FTM
74.0
FTA
96.0
Turner was traded to the Hawks for Kent Bazemore in the offseason after a down year with the Trail Blazers. The Ohio State product appeared in 73 games and averaged 6.8 points (career-low), 4.5 rebounds and 3.9 assists across 22.0 minutes per tilt, mainly off the bench. He was a low-usage option for Portland throughout his tenure with the team, and he's likely to see a similar role with Atlanta. The Hawks are one of the youngest teams in the league and the core is comprised of first and second-year talent, with much of it on the wing. The Hawks added a smattering of veterans for balance and leadership, but it's clear the focus of this team is development. Turner will have a tough time finding minutes on the wing, competing with Cam Reddish, Kevin Huerter and De'Andre Hunter among others in what will be a crowded group. His ball-handling abilities may afford him playing time at point guard behind Trae Young, but even if he secures a regular role, Turner's overall value is minimal, making him a player you can safely leave undrafted in most formats.
Turner was traded to the Hawks for Kent Bazemore in the offseason after a down year with the Trail Blazers. The Ohio State product appeared in 73 games and averaged 6.8 points (career-low), 4.5 rebounds and 3.9 assists across 22.0 minutes per tilt, mainly off the bench. He was a low-usage option for Portland throughout his tenure with the team, and he's likely to see a similar role with Atlanta. The Hawks are one of the youngest teams in the league and the core is comprised of first and second-year talent, with much of it on the wing. The Hawks added a smattering of veterans for balance and leadership, but it's clear the focus of this team is development. Turner will have a tough time finding minutes on the wing, competing with Cam Reddish, Kevin Huerter and De'Andre Hunter among others in what will be a crowded group. His ball-handling abilities may afford him playing time at point guard behind Trae Young, but even if he secures a regular role, Turner's overall value is minimal, making him a player you can safely leave undrafted in most formats.
CHI (C, C)
G
75
Min
17.7
FPTS
699.0
REB
321.0
AST
17.0
STL
21.0
BLK
66.0
TO
62.0
FGM
229.0
FGA
389.0
FTM
114.0
FTA
190.0
A sophomore out of Arkansas, Gafford landed on the Bulls with the 38th overall pick in the 2019 Draft. Last season, the 6-foot-11, 233-pound center was voted onto the First Team All-SEC (Coaches) and SEC All-Defensive Team. He started all 32 of his appearances, averaging 16.9 points on 66.0 percent shooting, 8.7 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. In five summer league appearances, Gafford kept up those numbers, averaging 13.8 points on 68.3 percent shooting, 7.8 rebounds and 2.8 blocks across 24.9 minutes. After Wendell Carter Jr., the Bulls' No. 2 center spot seems to be up for grabs, with Gafford competing against Luke Kornet and Cristiano Felicio. There's a strong chance Gafford will be able to secure the reserve center role, and he could have fantasy relevance in deep leagues as a result. That said, it's unlikely he contributes outside of field-goal percentage, rebounding and shot-blocking.
A sophomore out of Arkansas, Gafford landed on the Bulls with the 38th overall pick in the 2019 Draft. Last season, the 6-foot-11, 233-pound center was voted onto the First Team All-SEC (Coaches) and SEC All-Defensive Team. He started all 32 of his appearances, averaging 16.9 points on 66.0 percent shooting, 8.7 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. In five summer league appearances, Gafford kept up those numbers, averaging 13.8 points on 68.3 percent shooting, 7.8 rebounds and 2.8 blocks across 24.9 minutes. After Wendell Carter Jr., the Bulls' No. 2 center spot seems to be up for grabs, with Gafford competing against Luke Kornet and Cristiano Felicio. There's a strong chance Gafford will be able to secure the reserve center role, and he could have fantasy relevance in deep leagues as a result. That said, it's unlikely he contributes outside of field-goal percentage, rebounding and shot-blocking.