Enter Your League Settings
Select which categories your league uses.
League Type
H2H Points
Scoring
MIL (F, SF, PF)
G
79
Min
36.9
FPTS
2,811.0
REB
1,034.0
AST
431.0
STL
101.0
BLK
127.0
TO
251.0
FGM
817.0
FGA
1,522.0
FTM
549.0
FTA
708.0
Antetokounmpo, who finished sixth in MVP voting last season, is also coming off his second consecutive All-NBA nod. The 23-year-old went top-five in most Fantasy drafts last season, rewarding owners with 26.9 points, 10.0 rebounds, 4.8 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.4 blocks per game. Another year of development, and a new coach, should only help Antetokounmpo’s Fantasy stock. Plus, he’s missed only 17 games in his NBA career -- a selling point for drafting him over other stars like Anthony Davis, who has struggled to stay healthy throughout his career. In addition to his impressive 52.9 percent shooting from the field, Antetokounmpo flashed an improved three-point shot toward the back-half of 2017-18. From January 1 on, Antetokounmpo took two threes per game, completing them at a 33.3 percent clip. If the Greek Freak can starting hitting at least one three per game on a consistent basis, that would round him out completely as a player, and as a Fantasy asset. He should not slip past the top-three in nearly any Fantasy drafts this season.
Antetokounmpo, who finished sixth in MVP voting last season, is also coming off his second consecutive All-NBA nod. The 23-year-old went top-five in most Fantasy drafts last season, rewarding owners with 26.9 points, 10.0 rebounds, 4.8 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.4 blocks per game. Another year of development, and a new coach, should only help Antetokounmpo’s Fantasy stock. Plus, he’s missed only 17 games in his NBA career -- a selling point for drafting him over other stars like Anthony Davis, who has struggled to stay healthy throughout his career. In addition to his impressive 52.9 percent shooting from the field, Antetokounmpo flashed an improved three-point shot toward the back-half of 2017-18. From January 1 on, Antetokounmpo took two threes per game, completing them at a 33.3 percent clip. If the Greek Freak can starting hitting at least one three per game on a consistent basis, that would round him out completely as a player, and as a Fantasy asset. He should not slip past the top-three in nearly any Fantasy drafts this season.
MIN (C, C)
G
82
Min
36.3
FPTS
2,481.0
REB
1,032.0
AST
206.0
STL
65.0
BLK
117.0
TO
162.0
FGM
668.0
FGA
1,218.0
FTM
366.0
FTA
425.0
Towns was rightfully in the discussion to be the number one pick in many Fantasy leagues last season, and while he was not able to reach those lofty heights, it would be unfair to suggest he was a disappointment. While it took some time for Towns to gel with new teammate Jimmy Butler, he played in all 82 games for the third straight season and finished with averages of 21.3 points, 12.3 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 1.4 blocks and 0.8 steals per game. Towns' scoring numbers took a slight hit with the arrival of Butler, but unlike Andrew Wiggins, Towns was able to maintain his efficiency from both the field (54.5% FG) and the free-throw line (85.8% FT). Amazingly, Towns also finished the season as the Timberwolves' leading three-point shooter, hitting a very respectable 42.1 percent of his 3.5 attempts per game. As he did in his sophomore season, Towns seemed to get better as the season progressed. As he enters his fourth season, the hope is that Towns can continue to improve, particularly on the defensive end. Once again, Towns projects to be among the elites at his position when it comes to Fantasy production, though owners may be able to get him at a (very slight) bargain on the heels of an offseason laced with some uncertainty and internal dissension.
Towns was rightfully in the discussion to be the number one pick in many Fantasy leagues last season, and while he was not able to reach those lofty heights, it would be unfair to suggest he was a disappointment. While it took some time for Towns to gel with new teammate Jimmy Butler, he played in all 82 games for the third straight season and finished with averages of 21.3 points, 12.3 rebounds, 2.4 assists, 1.4 blocks and 0.8 steals per game. Towns' scoring numbers took a slight hit with the arrival of Butler, but unlike Andrew Wiggins, Towns was able to maintain his efficiency from both the field (54.5% FG) and the free-throw line (85.8% FT). Amazingly, Towns also finished the season as the Timberwolves' leading three-point shooter, hitting a very respectable 42.1 percent of his 3.5 attempts per game. As he did in his sophomore season, Towns seemed to get better as the season progressed. As he enters his fourth season, the hope is that Towns can continue to improve, particularly on the defensive end. Once again, Towns projects to be among the elites at his position when it comes to Fantasy production, though owners may be able to get him at a (very slight) bargain on the heels of an offseason laced with some uncertainty and internal dissension.
NOR (F, C, PF)
G
73
Min
36.9
FPTS
2,477.0
REB
822.0
AST
172.0
STL
114.0
BLK
191.0
TO
160.0
FGM
780.0
FGA
1,476.0
FTM
513.0
FTA
618.0
Davis had one of the more memorable Fantasy seasons in recent memory, finishing as the number one overall player in many formats. Coming into the season, he was certainly in the discussion as the No. 1 draft pick, but his injury history led to some justifiable trepidation. Despite heading to the locker room on a number of occasions, Davis managed to play in 75 games, which was more than enough to buoy his status as a top-five Fantasy commodity in nearly any format. His numbers were phenomenal, with averages of 28.1 points, 11.1 rebounds, 1.5 steals and 2.6 blocks per game, to go with 53.4 percent shooting from the field and 82.8 percent from the charity stripe. His efforts on the offensive end were obvious, but his defensive abilities were other-worldly. Davis demonstrated the ability to lock down an entire section of the court single-handedly, especially during the four-game sweep of the Portland Trail Blazers in the first round of the Western Conference playoffs. Davis finished the season as the runner-up for the Defensive Player of the Year award, and he placed third in MVP voting behind James Harden and LeBron James. Looking ahead to this season, owners should expect another dominant campaign, provided Davis can again stay even relatively healthy. He'll no longer have DeMarcus Cousins by his side, but the Pelicans added a promising young big man in Julius Randle in free agency. Randle could take a couple of rebounds away from Davis here and there, but, like Cousins, he offers little on the defensive end of the floor. On the whole, Davis' scoring and rebounding could take a slight hit, but there's no reason to believe he shouldn't be able to maintain his elite defensive numbers and magnificent efficiency. The injury concerns will always be there, but after two consecutive seasons of 75 games, Davis is once again firmly in the discussion as the No. 1 overall Fantasy commodity.
Davis had one of the more memorable Fantasy seasons in recent memory, finishing as the number one overall player in many formats. Coming into the season, he was certainly in the discussion as the No. 1 draft pick, but his injury history led to some justifiable trepidation. Despite heading to the locker room on a number of occasions, Davis managed to play in 75 games, which was more than enough to buoy his status as a top-five Fantasy commodity in nearly any format. His numbers were phenomenal, with averages of 28.1 points, 11.1 rebounds, 1.5 steals and 2.6 blocks per game, to go with 53.4 percent shooting from the field and 82.8 percent from the charity stripe. His efforts on the offensive end were obvious, but his defensive abilities were other-worldly. Davis demonstrated the ability to lock down an entire section of the court single-handedly, especially during the four-game sweep of the Portland Trail Blazers in the first round of the Western Conference playoffs. Davis finished the season as the runner-up for the Defensive Player of the Year award, and he placed third in MVP voting behind James Harden and LeBron James. Looking ahead to this season, owners should expect another dominant campaign, provided Davis can again stay even relatively healthy. He'll no longer have DeMarcus Cousins by his side, but the Pelicans added a promising young big man in Julius Randle in free agency. Randle could take a couple of rebounds away from Davis here and there, but, like Cousins, he offers little on the defensive end of the floor. On the whole, Davis' scoring and rebounding could take a slight hit, but there's no reason to believe he shouldn't be able to maintain his elite defensive numbers and magnificent efficiency. The injury concerns will always be there, but after two consecutive seasons of 75 games, Davis is once again firmly in the discussion as the No. 1 overall Fantasy commodity.
OKC (G, PG)
G
80
Min
35.6
FPTS
2,385.0
REB
784.0
AST
782.0
STL
136.0
BLK
20.0
TO
376.0
FGM
769.0
FGA
1,701.0
FTM
460.0
FTA
601.0
Coming off a 2016-17 MVP season where he averaged a 30-point triple-double, Westbrook was joined by Paul George and Carmelo Anthony last year. Though he still managed to average a triple-double and lead the league in assists, Westbrook saw his scoring average drop by 6.2 points, largely a product of taking just under three fewer shots per game. He also regressed as a three-point and free-throw shooter, losing 4.5 percent on his threes and 10.8 percent on his freebies. On a couple positive notes, he committed 57 fewer turnovers and swiped 15 more steals on the season despite playing one fewer game than in 2016-17. Over the summer, general manager Sam Presti traded Anthony and his 15.0 shots per game for Dennis Schroder. Schroder averaged 17.1 shots last season, but was the No. 1 option for the tanking Hawks, and will likely transition into a sixth-man role with lower usage in OKC. This is all to ask the question: Will Westbrook trend closer to his MVP production with Melo elsewhere? It’s an answer we won't get until we're in the season. But, considering he’s missed just five games in three years and is a walking triple-double, Westbrook is a no-brainer first-round Fantasy pick. The optimists who believe Melo’s departure will open things up can justify taking Westbrook in the top five.
Coming off a 2016-17 MVP season where he averaged a 30-point triple-double, Westbrook was joined by Paul George and Carmelo Anthony last year. Though he still managed to average a triple-double and lead the league in assists, Westbrook saw his scoring average drop by 6.2 points, largely a product of taking just under three fewer shots per game. He also regressed as a three-point and free-throw shooter, losing 4.5 percent on his threes and 10.8 percent on his freebies. On a couple positive notes, he committed 57 fewer turnovers and swiped 15 more steals on the season despite playing one fewer game than in 2016-17. Over the summer, general manager Sam Presti traded Anthony and his 15.0 shots per game for Dennis Schroder. Schroder averaged 17.1 shots last season, but was the No. 1 option for the tanking Hawks, and will likely transition into a sixth-man role with lower usage in OKC. This is all to ask the question: Will Westbrook trend closer to his MVP production with Melo elsewhere? It’s an answer we won't get until we're in the season. But, considering he’s missed just five games in three years and is a walking triple-double, Westbrook is a no-brainer first-round Fantasy pick. The optimists who believe Melo’s departure will open things up can justify taking Westbrook in the top five.
HOU (G, PG, SG)
G
79
Min
35.1
FPTS
2,330.0
REB
423.0
AST
685.0
STL
137.0
BLK
54.0
TO
342.0
FGM
699.0
FGA
1,575.0
FTM
680.0
FTA
790.0
In an effort to craft a super team to matchup with the Golden State Warriors, the Rockets made a splash and traded for Chris Paul prior to the 2017-18 campaign. There were concerns that Paul's presence could hinder Harden's overall Fantasy value by forcing him to play off the ball, but Harden still wound up putting up monster numbers and was one of the top Fantasy options all year. As expected, his assists per game fell from 11.2 in 2016-17 to just 8.8, which was a direct result of Paul playing the facilitator. His rebounding also took a hit, but was still 5.4 boards per game, which is more than solid production for a guard. On the other hand, Harden took yet another step forward as a scorer, averaging a league-high 30.4 points per game, while also increasing his efficiency across the board to 44.9 percent from the field and 36.7 percent from beyond the arc, which also may have been a result of Paul's ability to take on defenders and create more open looks for Harden. In addition to his league-leading per game scoring, Harden finished fourth in assists and second behind only Steph Curry in three-pointers made (3.7). The only real downfall was that Harden did miss a handful of weeks due to a hamstring injury, which limited him to 72 total games and was the first time in three years that he missed more than just one contest. All of that production allowed Harden to pick up league MVP honors for the first time in his career, while he nabbed his sixth straight All-Star game appearance and was named All-NBA First Team for the fourth time. The Rockets' roster did change a bit this offseason. Most notably, Corey Brewer and Luc Richard Mbah a Moute departed. On the other hand, the Rockets brought in Carmelo Anthony, who adds yet another scorer to a team that loves to play at a quick pace and fire up shots. There's a belief that Anthony ends up coming off the bench, so he shouldn't really impact Harden's usage at all. As a result, look for Harden and Paul to run the show. The 28-year-old will be in contention for a top-5 pick once again and he'll be an elite source of points, assists, steals and three-pointers. He also gets to the line at will -- Harden averaged a whopping 10.1 free-throw attempts in 2017-18 -- so that will give him a fairly high floor on a night-to-night basis for scoring. The fact that he's averaged more than 4.0 turnovers in each of the last four seasons is something to keep in mind for leagues that are negatively impacted by that category, but his elite production elsewhere across the box score more than makes up for it and should put him into consideration for MVP honors once again.
In an effort to craft a super team to matchup with the Golden State Warriors, the Rockets made a splash and traded for Chris Paul prior to the 2017-18 campaign. There were concerns that Paul's presence could hinder Harden's overall Fantasy value by forcing him to play off the ball, but Harden still wound up putting up monster numbers and was one of the top Fantasy options all year. As expected, his assists per game fell from 11.2 in 2016-17 to just 8.8, which was a direct result of Paul playing the facilitator. His rebounding also took a hit, but was still 5.4 boards per game, which is more than solid production for a guard. On the other hand, Harden took yet another step forward as a scorer, averaging a league-high 30.4 points per game, while also increasing his efficiency across the board to 44.9 percent from the field and 36.7 percent from beyond the arc, which also may have been a result of Paul's ability to take on defenders and create more open looks for Harden. In addition to his league-leading per game scoring, Harden finished fourth in assists and second behind only Steph Curry in three-pointers made (3.7). The only real downfall was that Harden did miss a handful of weeks due to a hamstring injury, which limited him to 72 total games and was the first time in three years that he missed more than just one contest. All of that production allowed Harden to pick up league MVP honors for the first time in his career, while he nabbed his sixth straight All-Star game appearance and was named All-NBA First Team for the fourth time. The Rockets' roster did change a bit this offseason. Most notably, Corey Brewer and Luc Richard Mbah a Moute departed. On the other hand, the Rockets brought in Carmelo Anthony, who adds yet another scorer to a team that loves to play at a quick pace and fire up shots. There's a belief that Anthony ends up coming off the bench, so he shouldn't really impact Harden's usage at all. As a result, look for Harden and Paul to run the show. The 28-year-old will be in contention for a top-5 pick once again and he'll be an elite source of points, assists, steals and three-pointers. He also gets to the line at will -- Harden averaged a whopping 10.1 free-throw attempts in 2017-18 -- so that will give him a fairly high floor on a night-to-night basis for scoring. The fact that he's averaged more than 4.0 turnovers in each of the last four seasons is something to keep in mind for leagues that are negatively impacted by that category, but his elite production elsewhere across the box score more than makes up for it and should put him into consideration for MVP honors once again.
LAL (F, SF, PF)
G
77
Min
35.7
FPTS
2,277.0
REB
617.0
AST
607.0
STL
105.0
BLK
56.0
TO
315.0
FGM
768.0
FGA
1,435.0
FTM
344.0
FTA
482.0
Last year, to cap off his second stint with Cleveland, LeBron led the league in minutes (3,026) and points (2,251) while playing all 82 games at 33 years old. He also set a career high in assists per game (9.1), which ranked second in the NBA, and matched his career-high 8.6 rebounds per game. The King also remained as efficient as ever, setting the third-highest true shooting percentage (62.1) of his career. Speculation about his potential departure from the Cavaliers for a second time began as a result of the team’s poor play, largely resulting from moves made to accomodate Kyrie Irving’s trade request. The Cavs finished fourth in the Eastern Conference and, despite getting swept in the Finals by Golden State, LeBron played his most playoff games in a single season since 2012-13. Opting for a change of scenery, LeBron agreed to a four-year, $153.31 million contract with the Lakers on July 1. While it shouldn't be banked on that he'll lead the league in minutes again, it’s hard to imagine a scenario where LeBron isn't worth a top-10, if not top-5, pick in the vast majority of Fantasy leagues this season.
Last year, to cap off his second stint with Cleveland, LeBron led the league in minutes (3,026) and points (2,251) while playing all 82 games at 33 years old. He also set a career high in assists per game (9.1), which ranked second in the NBA, and matched his career-high 8.6 rebounds per game. The King also remained as efficient as ever, setting the third-highest true shooting percentage (62.1) of his career. Speculation about his potential departure from the Cavaliers for a second time began as a result of the team’s poor play, largely resulting from moves made to accomodate Kyrie Irving’s trade request. The Cavs finished fourth in the Eastern Conference and, despite getting swept in the Finals by Golden State, LeBron played his most playoff games in a single season since 2012-13. Opting for a change of scenery, LeBron agreed to a four-year, $153.31 million contract with the Lakers on July 1. While it shouldn't be banked on that he'll lead the league in minutes again, it’s hard to imagine a scenario where LeBron isn't worth a top-10, if not top-5, pick in the vast majority of Fantasy leagues this season.
DEN (C, C)
G
76
Min
33.5
FPTS
2,216.0
REB
836.0
AST
477.0
STL
94.0
BLK
64.0
TO
219.0
FGM
553.0
FGA
1,070.0
FTM
303.0
FTA
351.0
Jokic, who broke out during the second half of the 2016-17 campaign, kept things rolling last season. The dynamic center averaged 18.5 points, 10.7 rebounds, 6.1 assists and a combined 2.0 steals/blocks. He also shot 49.9 percent from the field, converted 85.0 percent of his free-throws, and drilled 1.5 threes per game at 39.6 percent. To gain an idea of how rare Jokic’s skill set is, only three other players since the three-point era (1979-80) have averaged at least 18 points, 10 rebounds and six assists: Russell Westbrook, Kevin Garnett and Larry Bird. Jokic has also stayed relatively healthy -- often a concern for centers -- during his three-year career, missing just 18 games. Heading into 2018-18, Jokic may look to better balance his three-point shooting and work in the paint, as he lost 5.1 percent on his effective field-goal percentage from 2016-17 to last season. Regardless, even if he plateaus as a player this year, he still projects to be a top-15 Fantasy option and likely worthy of a first-round selection.
Jokic, who broke out during the second half of the 2016-17 campaign, kept things rolling last season. The dynamic center averaged 18.5 points, 10.7 rebounds, 6.1 assists and a combined 2.0 steals/blocks. He also shot 49.9 percent from the field, converted 85.0 percent of his free-throws, and drilled 1.5 threes per game at 39.6 percent. To gain an idea of how rare Jokic’s skill set is, only three other players since the three-point era (1979-80) have averaged at least 18 points, 10 rebounds and six assists: Russell Westbrook, Kevin Garnett and Larry Bird. Jokic has also stayed relatively healthy -- often a concern for centers -- during his three-year career, missing just 18 games. Heading into 2018-18, Jokic may look to better balance his three-point shooting and work in the paint, as he lost 5.1 percent on his effective field-goal percentage from 2016-17 to last season. Regardless, even if he plateaus as a player this year, he still projects to be a top-15 Fantasy option and likely worthy of a first-round selection.
DET (C, C)
G
81
Min
33.9
FPTS
2,170.0
REB
1,277.0
AST
251.0
STL
119.0
BLK
122.0
TO
209.0
FGM
487.0
FGA
930.0
FTM
242.0
FTA
413.0
After a brutal 2016-17 campaign, Drummond's resurgence this past season was a huge boost for Fantasy owners that took a risk on him. The 24-year-old upped his averages across the board with 15.0 points, 16.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.6 blocks over 33.7 minutes. That placed him as the No. 1 overall rebounder in the league by nearly one board per game (DeAndre Jordan, 15.2 RPG), as well as the sixth overall finisher in blocks per game. It also earned Drummond his second career All-Star bid, with his only previous selection coming in 2016. While all of that was key in an impressive bounce-back year, it was Drummond's improvement as a free-throw shooter that may have been the biggest surprise. After shooting less than 42 percent from the charity stripe in each of his first five seasons, Drummond catapulted up to 60.5 percent in 2017-18. That's still not great overall, but if the improvements continue, Fantasy owners in some roto leagues may not have to punt on the free-throw percentage category entirely by keeping Drummond in lineups. The Pistons added another superstar in Blake Griffin at the trade deadline, but Griffin's presence only had minor impacts. Most notably, Drummond's assists fell from 3.6 per game prior to the trade deadline to just 1.7 following Griffin's addition. With that said, there should be high expectations for Drummond going into the upcoming campaign. He's going to be one of the best rebounders and rim protectors in the league, and he can put up a 20-20 double-double on any given night. Fantasy owners will always need to be wary of his free-throw shooting percentages, but his all-around production elsewhere should cement Drummond as a top-5 center and an option to consider in the first few rounds of drafts.
After a brutal 2016-17 campaign, Drummond's resurgence this past season was a huge boost for Fantasy owners that took a risk on him. The 24-year-old upped his averages across the board with 15.0 points, 16.0 rebounds, 3.0 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.6 blocks over 33.7 minutes. That placed him as the No. 1 overall rebounder in the league by nearly one board per game (DeAndre Jordan, 15.2 RPG), as well as the sixth overall finisher in blocks per game. It also earned Drummond his second career All-Star bid, with his only previous selection coming in 2016. While all of that was key in an impressive bounce-back year, it was Drummond's improvement as a free-throw shooter that may have been the biggest surprise. After shooting less than 42 percent from the charity stripe in each of his first five seasons, Drummond catapulted up to 60.5 percent in 2017-18. That's still not great overall, but if the improvements continue, Fantasy owners in some roto leagues may not have to punt on the free-throw percentage category entirely by keeping Drummond in lineups. The Pistons added another superstar in Blake Griffin at the trade deadline, but Griffin's presence only had minor impacts. Most notably, Drummond's assists fell from 3.6 per game prior to the trade deadline to just 1.7 following Griffin's addition. With that said, there should be high expectations for Drummond going into the upcoming campaign. He's going to be one of the best rebounders and rim protectors in the league, and he can put up a 20-20 double-double on any given night. Fantasy owners will always need to be wary of his free-throw shooting percentages, but his all-around production elsewhere should cement Drummond as a top-5 center and an option to consider in the first few rounds of drafts.
GS (F, SF, PF)
G
70
Min
34.8
FPTS
2,078.0
REB
503.0
AST
364.0
STL
62.0
BLK
122.0
TO
217.0
FGM
671.0
FGA
1,280.0
FTM
381.0
FTA
428.0
Durant, during his second year with Golden State, continued his all-around dominance and is one of the best Fantasy assets on a per-game basis. He filled nearly every category of the stat sheet, averaging 26.4 points, 6.8 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 1.8 blocks. Durant also continued to be one of the most efficient volume shooters in the NBA, hitting 51.6 percent of his looks from the field and drilling 2.5 threes per tilt at 41.9 percent. He also got to the free-throw line 5.9 times per night, drilling his freebies at 88.9 percent. However, his Fantasy value has been deflated over the past two seasons by injuries, averaging 65 games played. Still, there’s not much, if anything, to suggest Durant’s production will trend up or down significantly during the upcoming season. The addition of DeMarcus Cousins shakes things up a bit, but it’s not clear exactly when he'll be back, how much he'll play, and how effective he'll be. All things considered, it’s hard to draft Durant too early considering he’s one of the best players in the league and has only had one long-term injury in his entire career.
Durant, during his second year with Golden State, continued his all-around dominance and is one of the best Fantasy assets on a per-game basis. He filled nearly every category of the stat sheet, averaging 26.4 points, 6.8 rebounds, 5.4 assists and 1.8 blocks. Durant also continued to be one of the most efficient volume shooters in the NBA, hitting 51.6 percent of his looks from the field and drilling 2.5 threes per tilt at 41.9 percent. He also got to the free-throw line 5.9 times per night, drilling his freebies at 88.9 percent. However, his Fantasy value has been deflated over the past two seasons by injuries, averaging 65 games played. Still, there’s not much, if anything, to suggest Durant’s production will trend up or down significantly during the upcoming season. The addition of DeMarcus Cousins shakes things up a bit, but it’s not clear exactly when he'll be back, how much he'll play, and how effective he'll be. All things considered, it’s hard to draft Durant too early considering he’s one of the best players in the league and has only had one long-term injury in his entire career.
GS (G, SG, PG)
G
77
Min
32.9
FPTS
2,076.0
REB
372.0
AST
484.0
STL
124.0
BLK
12.0
TO
238.0
FGM
638.0
FGA
1,304.0
FTM
426.0
FTA
467.0
Nursing an ankle injury, Curry appeared in just 51 games last season -- his fewest since 2011-12. However, when he played, he was the most efficient player in league, leading all players in true shooting percentage (67.5). He achieved the feat through shooting 49.5 percent from the field, hitting 4.2 threes per tilt at 42.3 percent, and leading the NBA in free-throw percentage (92.1). That resulted in 26.4 points per game, plus averages of 6.1 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.6 steals. He also continued to be a big-game threat, as he posted 17 games with at least 30 points -- three of which were 40-point efforts. This year marks Curry’s age 30 seasons, but there are no signs of him slowing down, save for his ankle injury. However, prior to that, he had appeared in at least 78 games each season since 2012-13. Overall, even with the addition of DeMarcus Cousins, Curry’s usage and efficiency should remain high enough for him to be one of the best Fantasy players in the NBA.
Nursing an ankle injury, Curry appeared in just 51 games last season -- his fewest since 2011-12. However, when he played, he was the most efficient player in league, leading all players in true shooting percentage (67.5). He achieved the feat through shooting 49.5 percent from the field, hitting 4.2 threes per tilt at 42.3 percent, and leading the NBA in free-throw percentage (92.1). That resulted in 26.4 points per game, plus averages of 6.1 assists, 5.1 rebounds and 1.6 steals. He also continued to be a big-game threat, as he posted 17 games with at least 30 points -- three of which were 40-point efforts. This year marks Curry’s age 30 seasons, but there are no signs of him slowing down, save for his ankle injury. However, prior to that, he had appeared in at least 78 games each season since 2012-13. Overall, even with the addition of DeMarcus Cousins, Curry’s usage and efficiency should remain high enough for him to be one of the best Fantasy players in the NBA.
PHI (G, PG, PF)
G
80
Min
34.2
FPTS
2,025.0
REB
665.0
AST
687.0
STL
140.0
BLK
70.0
TO
254.0
FGM
586.0
FGA
1,102.0
FTM
229.0
FTA
399.0
After missing the entire 2016-17 campaign after being selected with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2016 NBA Draft, Simmons took the court for his highly-anticipated debut season. The 22-year-old missed just one game the entire year and helped take a very young roster to the Eastern Conference semifinals. Simmons' stuffing of the stat sheet made him an immediate hit in Fantasy leagues and he wound up averaging 15.8 points, 8.1 rebounds, 8.2 assists and 1.7 steals across 33.7 minutes. That placed him 6th in the league in assists and 10th in steals, while he also notched 12 triple-doubles. Simmons does have some work to do with his shot, as defenses were able to pack the lane at times knowing the young star doesn't have a developed three-point shot. He took just 11 total three-pointers for the entire year and failed to get a single one to fall, so that is certainly a spot where his game can grow. Simmons also finished with a brutal 56 percent clip from the free-throw line, another thing to consider for those negatively impacted in rotisserie Fantasy leagues. Despite the few drawbacks, Simmons' solid first season immediately puts him into consideration for a top-20 pick in most leagues ahead of Year 2. As previously mentioned, there's a few places where Simmons needs to improve, but his overall ability to fill up the box score and potential to put up a triple-double on any given night, should bring him off the board early in drafts. The Rookie of the Year award winner could also take another step forward offensively with an offseason to work on his game and it's also worth it to note that the Sixers didn't bring in anyone this summer that threatens any of Simmons' workload or usage.
After missing the entire 2016-17 campaign after being selected with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2016 NBA Draft, Simmons took the court for his highly-anticipated debut season. The 22-year-old missed just one game the entire year and helped take a very young roster to the Eastern Conference semifinals. Simmons' stuffing of the stat sheet made him an immediate hit in Fantasy leagues and he wound up averaging 15.8 points, 8.1 rebounds, 8.2 assists and 1.7 steals across 33.7 minutes. That placed him 6th in the league in assists and 10th in steals, while he also notched 12 triple-doubles. Simmons does have some work to do with his shot, as defenses were able to pack the lane at times knowing the young star doesn't have a developed three-point shot. He took just 11 total three-pointers for the entire year and failed to get a single one to fall, so that is certainly a spot where his game can grow. Simmons also finished with a brutal 56 percent clip from the free-throw line, another thing to consider for those negatively impacted in rotisserie Fantasy leagues. Despite the few drawbacks, Simmons' solid first season immediately puts him into consideration for a top-20 pick in most leagues ahead of Year 2. As previously mentioned, there's a few places where Simmons needs to improve, but his overall ability to fill up the box score and potential to put up a triple-double on any given night, should bring him off the board early in drafts. The Rookie of the Year award winner could also take another step forward offensively with an offseason to work on his game and it's also worth it to note that the Sixers didn't bring in anyone this summer that threatens any of Simmons' workload or usage.
DAL (C, C)
G
80
Min
32.1
FPTS
1,994.0
REB
1,215.0
AST
124.0
STL
46.0
BLK
75.0
TO
145.0
FGM
407.0
FGA
613.0
FTM
228.0
FTA
385.0
Playing without crafty point guard Chris Paul for the first time in six years, Jordan dealt with some struggles on the offensive side of the ball. His scoring took a slight dip, falling from 12.7 points per game in 2016-17 to 12.0 in 2017-18. Even more notable was Jordan's drop in efficiency, as he shot just 64.5 percent from the field after finishing above 70 percent in each of his prior three seasons. A lot of that can be attributed to missing Paul's ability to get in the lane and feed Jordan lobs, though either way, it was a disappointment overall. However, the big man continued to be an absolute force on the boards with an average of 15.2 rebounds per game, which included 13 games where he tallied more than 20. That placed Jordan second in the league behind only Andre Drummond's 16.0 rebounds per contest and marked the fifth straight year where Jordan averaged a double-double. In the offseason, the star center opted to decline his player option with the Clippers and now joins Dallas, where he nearly landed the last time he was apart of the free agent pool. He'll immediately slot into the top spot at center and should be looking at a similar workload. There are almost always some growing pains in joining a new team, so Jordan could struggle with his chemistry a bit early on, especially in pick and roll situations with guys like Dennis Smith and first-round pick Luka Doncic. Still, Jordan is once again going to be a great option in most Fantasy leagues for his rebound, field-goal percentage and block (1.7 blocks per game for career) categories. The only other thing to keep in mind is Jordan's free-throw shooting, as he shot just 58 percent from the charity stripe last year and that drastically hurts his value in leagues that include that category.
Playing without crafty point guard Chris Paul for the first time in six years, Jordan dealt with some struggles on the offensive side of the ball. His scoring took a slight dip, falling from 12.7 points per game in 2016-17 to 12.0 in 2017-18. Even more notable was Jordan's drop in efficiency, as he shot just 64.5 percent from the field after finishing above 70 percent in each of his prior three seasons. A lot of that can be attributed to missing Paul's ability to get in the lane and feed Jordan lobs, though either way, it was a disappointment overall. However, the big man continued to be an absolute force on the boards with an average of 15.2 rebounds per game, which included 13 games where he tallied more than 20. That placed Jordan second in the league behind only Andre Drummond's 16.0 rebounds per contest and marked the fifth straight year where Jordan averaged a double-double. In the offseason, the star center opted to decline his player option with the Clippers and now joins Dallas, where he nearly landed the last time he was apart of the free agent pool. He'll immediately slot into the top spot at center and should be looking at a similar workload. There are almost always some growing pains in joining a new team, so Jordan could struggle with his chemistry a bit early on, especially in pick and roll situations with guys like Dennis Smith and first-round pick Luka Doncic. Still, Jordan is once again going to be a great option in most Fantasy leagues for his rebound, field-goal percentage and block (1.7 blocks per game for career) categories. The only other thing to keep in mind is Jordan's free-throw shooting, as he shot just 58 percent from the charity stripe last year and that drastically hurts his value in leagues that include that category.
PHI (C, C)
G
69
Min
31.2
FPTS
1,874.0
REB
777.0
AST
235.0
STL
49.0
BLK
139.0
TO
263.0
FGM
589.0
FGA
1,200.0
FTM
407.0
FTA
526.0
After playing in just 31 outings as a rookie, Embiid was able to more than double his amount of games played in 2017-18, taking the court for 63 contests. The 76ers also felt more and more comfortable getting their big man extended run and after being brought along slowly early on in the season, Embiid ended the year averaging 30.3 minutes. He turned that into his first full season of averaging a double-double, finishing with 22.9 points, 11.0 rebounds, 3.2 assists and 1.8 blocks. Those numbers placed him 15th in the league in scoring, ninth in rebounds and sixth in blocks, while it also earned him his first selection as an NBA All-Star. In addition, Embiid was a capable floor stretcher, knocking down 1.0 three-pointer at a 30.8 percent clip. That wasn't the most efficient number, but still forced defenses to extend to the perimeter and not sag in the lane. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, Embiid should be in line for a similar role and could actually see another slight uptick in his workload now that he's further away from the foot injuries that plagued him previously. Obviously, one of Embiid's biggest downfalls is his health, so the risk of him missing double-digit games is always on the table. However, his elite production in multiple categories, as well as the fact that Embiid finished second in the league in usage percentage behind James Harden last year, should bring him into consideration to be a top-5 center off the board. He would benefit with increased efficiency from the three-point line, as well as the charity stripe, but with another offseason to hone in on his shot, Embiid will be an elite Fantasy asset.
After playing in just 31 outings as a rookie, Embiid was able to more than double his amount of games played in 2017-18, taking the court for 63 contests. The 76ers also felt more and more comfortable getting their big man extended run and after being brought along slowly early on in the season, Embiid ended the year averaging 30.3 minutes. He turned that into his first full season of averaging a double-double, finishing with 22.9 points, 11.0 rebounds, 3.2 assists and 1.8 blocks. Those numbers placed him 15th in the league in scoring, ninth in rebounds and sixth in blocks, while it also earned him his first selection as an NBA All-Star. In addition, Embiid was a capable floor stretcher, knocking down 1.0 three-pointer at a 30.8 percent clip. That wasn't the most efficient number, but still forced defenses to extend to the perimeter and not sag in the lane. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, Embiid should be in line for a similar role and could actually see another slight uptick in his workload now that he's further away from the foot injuries that plagued him previously. Obviously, one of Embiid's biggest downfalls is his health, so the risk of him missing double-digit games is always on the table. However, his elite production in multiple categories, as well as the fact that Embiid finished second in the league in usage percentage behind James Harden last year, should bring him into consideration to be a top-5 center off the board. He would benefit with increased efficiency from the three-point line, as well as the charity stripe, but with another offseason to hone in on his shot, Embiid will be an elite Fantasy asset.
POR (G, PG)
G
74
Min
36.1
FPTS
1,814.0
REB
325.0
AST
468.0
STL
77.0
BLK
27.0
TO
206.0
FGM
624.0
FGA
1,416.0
FTM
486.0
FTA
538.0
Spectacular as his first four pro campaigns were, Lillard found a way to take it to another level last season, generating career-best numbers in multiple categories. The All-Star point guard posted new high-water marks in points (27.0), rebounds (4.9), shooting percentage (44.4) and free-throw percentage (89.4), while also putting up solid assist numbers (5.9). Despite the Trail Blazers’ season ending in a disappointing and unexpected four-game sweep at the hands of the Pelicans in the conference quarterfinals, expectations will be high in Portland once again for the 2018-19 season, with Lillard naturally remaining the franchise’s centerpiece. Seth Curry was added during the offseason and has a chance to serve as his primary backup at the point, but given Lillard’s iron-man reputation, he’s still likely to average minutes in the mid-30s as he has throughout his career thus far. With the same starting five expected to return, Lillard’s level of offensive responsibility – which led to 19.4 shot attempts per game last season – should also sustain.
Spectacular as his first four pro campaigns were, Lillard found a way to take it to another level last season, generating career-best numbers in multiple categories. The All-Star point guard posted new high-water marks in points (27.0), rebounds (4.9), shooting percentage (44.4) and free-throw percentage (89.4), while also putting up solid assist numbers (5.9). Despite the Trail Blazers’ season ending in a disappointing and unexpected four-game sweep at the hands of the Pelicans in the conference quarterfinals, expectations will be high in Portland once again for the 2018-19 season, with Lillard naturally remaining the franchise’s centerpiece. Seth Curry was added during the offseason and has a chance to serve as his primary backup at the point, but given Lillard’s iron-man reputation, he’s still likely to average minutes in the mid-30s as he has throughout his career thus far. With the same starting five expected to return, Lillard’s level of offensive responsibility – which led to 19.4 shot attempts per game last season – should also sustain.
UTA (C, C)
G
73
Min
33.5
FPTS
1,792.0
REB
902.0
AST
107.0
STL
59.0
BLK
184.0
TO
143.0
FGM
381.0
FGA
598.0
FTM
270.0
FTA
402.0
Battling knee injuries, Gobert was limited to 56 games last season -- his fifth year in the league. He regressed slightly across the board, though was presumably playing at less than 100 percent for much of the year, and still averaged 13.5 points, 10.7 rebounds and 2.3 blocks while shooting 62.2 percent from the field. On a positive note, he was able to set a career high in free-throw percentage (68.2) and match his career-high 0.8 steals per game. While it’s no secret at this point, Fantasy owners who draft Gobert get a walking double-double (31 last season) with high upside for blocks (22 games with at least three blocks). But, it might be fair to begin questioning his durability. He’s averaging just 66 games played over the past three seasons, with all his missed time being due to knee issues. That being the case, Fantasy owners who draft Gobert may want to bolster their center depth to create a safety net.
Battling knee injuries, Gobert was limited to 56 games last season -- his fifth year in the league. He regressed slightly across the board, though was presumably playing at less than 100 percent for much of the year, and still averaged 13.5 points, 10.7 rebounds and 2.3 blocks while shooting 62.2 percent from the field. On a positive note, he was able to set a career high in free-throw percentage (68.2) and match his career-high 0.8 steals per game. While it’s no secret at this point, Fantasy owners who draft Gobert get a walking double-double (31 last season) with high upside for blocks (22 games with at least three blocks). But, it might be fair to begin questioning his durability. He’s averaging just 66 games played over the past three seasons, with all his missed time being due to knee issues. That being the case, Fantasy owners who draft Gobert may want to bolster their center depth to create a safety net.
HOU (C, C)
G
76
Min
28.3
FPTS
1,767.0
REB
848.0
AST
83.0
STL
61.0
BLK
138.0
TO
109.0
FGM
472.0
FGA
714.0
FTM
158.0
FTA
272.0
After being in a positional timeshare for a few years in a row, Capela finally became the Rockets' full-time center in 2017-18, averaging 27.5 minutes per game. That uptick in workload allowed the 6-foot-10 big man to post career highs of 13.9 points, 10.8 rebounds and 1.8 blocks. He also finished with an outstanding 65.2 percent clip from the field, which along with his blocks per game (4th overall), landed him among the league leaders. Playing alongside elite ball-handlers and creators like James Harden and Chris Paul allowed Capela to thrive in the pick-and-rolls and gave him open look after open look. With those three really thriving and nearly taking down the defending champion Golden State Warriors, the Rockets opted to re-sign Capela this offseason as a restricted free agent, giving him a five-year, $90 million extension. That locks him in as the center of the future and guarantees he'll be seeing big minutes for the foreseeable future. Other than the addition of Carmelo Anthony, who's expected to come off the bench, there were no other additions that should impact the speed and flow of the offense, so Capela is going to continue to get plenty of easy buckets alongside Harden and Paul. While he doesn't have any semblance of a three-point shot and it's worth it to note that he shot just 56 percent from the free-throw line last season, Capela's combination of points, rebounds and blocks should bring him into consideration as a top-10 center and a top-50 selection overall in the majority of formats.
After being in a positional timeshare for a few years in a row, Capela finally became the Rockets' full-time center in 2017-18, averaging 27.5 minutes per game. That uptick in workload allowed the 6-foot-10 big man to post career highs of 13.9 points, 10.8 rebounds and 1.8 blocks. He also finished with an outstanding 65.2 percent clip from the field, which along with his blocks per game (4th overall), landed him among the league leaders. Playing alongside elite ball-handlers and creators like James Harden and Chris Paul allowed Capela to thrive in the pick-and-rolls and gave him open look after open look. With those three really thriving and nearly taking down the defending champion Golden State Warriors, the Rockets opted to re-sign Capela this offseason as a restricted free agent, giving him a five-year, $90 million extension. That locks him in as the center of the future and guarantees he'll be seeing big minutes for the foreseeable future. Other than the addition of Carmelo Anthony, who's expected to come off the bench, there were no other additions that should impact the speed and flow of the offense, so Capela is going to continue to get plenty of easy buckets alongside Harden and Paul. While he doesn't have any semblance of a three-point shot and it's worth it to note that he shot just 56 percent from the free-throw line last season, Capela's combination of points, rebounds and blocks should bring him into consideration as a top-10 center and a top-50 selection overall in the majority of formats.
TOR (F, SF, PF)
G
75
Min
33.8
FPTS
1,750.0
REB
501.0
AST
232.0
STL
131.0
BLK
58.0
TO
152.0
FGM
584.0
FGA
1,239.0
FTM
388.0
FTA
459.0
Leonard's 2017-18 campaign was one of the more bizarre situations in recent memory. The 27-year-old was reported to be dealing with right quad tendinopathy and was shut down for the preseason. However, that ultimately lingered into the start of the regular season and Leonard would go on to miss the team's first 27 games. In mid-December, Leonard was finally cleared for a return and he alternated playing in games and getting nights off for rest for roughly a month. However, after playing just nine contests, Leonard was shut down indefinitely and wound up missing the last 43 games of the season. The peculiarity of the situation came when the Spurs' medical staff seemed to clear Leonard to play, while Leonard's personal medical team continued to advise him to sit out. That created tensions between himself, his teammates, his coaching staff and the fans, which eventually resulted in a relationship that was so far damaged that it was beyond repair. As a result, Leonard was traded to the Raptors this offseason, as well as Danny Green, in exchange for DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl. It's a strong landing spot for Leonard considering he's joining a team that finished with the best overall record in the Eastern Conference last season and is set up for another playoff run. He's got another All-Star in Kyle Lowry to be a facilitator and to help take the pressure off his back, as well as a couple of other established pieces in the frontcourt like Serge Ibaka and Jonas Valanciunas. That should give Leonard every opportunity to excel and if he comes anywhere near his numbers from 2016-17, he'll be a sure-fire first-round pick in the majority of Fantasy leagues. In his last full season (74 games), Leonard averaged 25.5 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.5 assists, 1.8 steals and 2.0 three-pointers, operating as one of the best two-way players in the league and finishing as an MVP finalist. The real mystery comes regarding his current health. Leonard's camp remains mum on any sort of update, though he did pass the physical that was necessary to complete the trade, so that in itself is encouraging. At this point, Leonard's draft position will simply be determined by whether or not Fantasy owners think he'll be healthy for the start of the season. If believed to be healthy, go ahead and select Leonard in the first or second round. If not, avoid him and someone else in the league will likely take the risk.
Leonard's 2017-18 campaign was one of the more bizarre situations in recent memory. The 27-year-old was reported to be dealing with right quad tendinopathy and was shut down for the preseason. However, that ultimately lingered into the start of the regular season and Leonard would go on to miss the team's first 27 games. In mid-December, Leonard was finally cleared for a return and he alternated playing in games and getting nights off for rest for roughly a month. However, after playing just nine contests, Leonard was shut down indefinitely and wound up missing the last 43 games of the season. The peculiarity of the situation came when the Spurs' medical staff seemed to clear Leonard to play, while Leonard's personal medical team continued to advise him to sit out. That created tensions between himself, his teammates, his coaching staff and the fans, which eventually resulted in a relationship that was so far damaged that it was beyond repair. As a result, Leonard was traded to the Raptors this offseason, as well as Danny Green, in exchange for DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl. It's a strong landing spot for Leonard considering he's joining a team that finished with the best overall record in the Eastern Conference last season and is set up for another playoff run. He's got another All-Star in Kyle Lowry to be a facilitator and to help take the pressure off his back, as well as a couple of other established pieces in the frontcourt like Serge Ibaka and Jonas Valanciunas. That should give Leonard every opportunity to excel and if he comes anywhere near his numbers from 2016-17, he'll be a sure-fire first-round pick in the majority of Fantasy leagues. In his last full season (74 games), Leonard averaged 25.5 points, 5.8 rebounds, 3.5 assists, 1.8 steals and 2.0 three-pointers, operating as one of the best two-way players in the league and finishing as an MVP finalist. The real mystery comes regarding his current health. Leonard's camp remains mum on any sort of update, though he did pass the physical that was necessary to complete the trade, so that in itself is encouraging. At this point, Leonard's draft position will simply be determined by whether or not Fantasy owners think he'll be healthy for the start of the season. If believed to be healthy, go ahead and select Leonard in the first or second round. If not, avoid him and someone else in the league will likely take the risk.
CLE (F, C, PF)
G
68
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,723.0
REB
762.0
AST
203.0
STL
53.0
BLK
34.0
TO
129.0
FGM
460.0
FGA
1,055.0
FTM
365.0
FTA
418.0
Love's 2017-18 season was hampered by a fractured left hand, which costed him a stretch of 20 straight contests and resulted in him playing in 60 or less games for the second straight campaign. Even when he was on the court, Love appeared to take a step back from a year prior, seeing his point (17.6), rebound (9.3) and assist (1.7) averages fall. He was still an asset as a three-point shooter, though, and hit 2.3 deep balls at a 41.5 percent clip, while adding an efficient 45.8 percent from the field and 88.0 percent from the charity stripe. Love's point, rebound and three-point totals, as well as his strong percentages, all kept him in the running as a top tier option that could be slotted in at both power forward or center. An already strong Fantasy asset, Love has the chance to up his production across the board during the upcoming season. Most notably comes the departure of superstar LeBron James, who led the Cavaliers in scoring, assisting and minutes last season, while falling behind just Love in the rebound department. With such a high usage player leaving, Love's numbers are likely going to be significantly impacted across the board. Look for his scoring and rebounding numbers to make the most notable jump, as Love's usage and shot attempts are going to trend upwards. The added usage could hurt his efficiency, though, so don't be overly surprised if Love's percentages dip a bit. Still, with Love officially being the new building block of the future and earning a four-year, $120 million extension, look for the offense to run through him and there's a chance we see some flashes of the player that originally broke out during his Minnesota days.
Love's 2017-18 season was hampered by a fractured left hand, which costed him a stretch of 20 straight contests and resulted in him playing in 60 or less games for the second straight campaign. Even when he was on the court, Love appeared to take a step back from a year prior, seeing his point (17.6), rebound (9.3) and assist (1.7) averages fall. He was still an asset as a three-point shooter, though, and hit 2.3 deep balls at a 41.5 percent clip, while adding an efficient 45.8 percent from the field and 88.0 percent from the charity stripe. Love's point, rebound and three-point totals, as well as his strong percentages, all kept him in the running as a top tier option that could be slotted in at both power forward or center. An already strong Fantasy asset, Love has the chance to up his production across the board during the upcoming season. Most notably comes the departure of superstar LeBron James, who led the Cavaliers in scoring, assisting and minutes last season, while falling behind just Love in the rebound department. With such a high usage player leaving, Love's numbers are likely going to be significantly impacted across the board. Look for his scoring and rebounding numbers to make the most notable jump, as Love's usage and shot attempts are going to trend upwards. The added usage could hurt his efficiency, though, so don't be overly surprised if Love's percentages dip a bit. Still, with Love officially being the new building block of the future and earning a four-year, $120 million extension, look for the offense to run through him and there's a chance we see some flashes of the player that originally broke out during his Minnesota days.
NOR (F, C, PF)
G
80
Min
31.6
FPTS
1,709.0
REB
754.0
AST
260.0
STL
50.0
BLK
52.0
TO
246.0
FGM
548.0
FGA
1,036.0
FTM
352.0
FTA
491.0
After a slow start to the 2017-18 season, Randle came on strong to finish the year, boosting his Fantasy stock across the board. He played in all 82 games and ended the season as the Lakers' leader in scoring and rebounding, while shooting an impressive 56 percent from the field. Despite the way he finished the season, Randle was still not assured of his role moving forward and opted to test the free agency waters. The Pelicans clearly liked what they saw from Randle, and he'll step in as Anthony Davis' new frontcourt partner following the departure of DeMarcus Cousins. Teaming with Davis, a fellow Kentucky product, could entail an adjustment process, but the Pelicans aren't overly deep up front, so Randle should see plenty of opportunity. While he'll battle Nikola Mirotic for minutes at the four, Randle is the more natural fit next to Davis, and Mirotic is more than capable of sliding down to the wing in certain lineups. Production-wise, a replication of last season's numbers seems fairly realistic, but it remains to be seen whether Randle will be able to maintain his scoring efficiency. Putting up points and rebounds are what Randle does best, and though he's flashed some improvement on the defensive end, he's not likely to be much of a contributor in blocks (0.5 per game in 2017-18) or steals (0.5 per game).
After a slow start to the 2017-18 season, Randle came on strong to finish the year, boosting his Fantasy stock across the board. He played in all 82 games and ended the season as the Lakers' leader in scoring and rebounding, while shooting an impressive 56 percent from the field. Despite the way he finished the season, Randle was still not assured of his role moving forward and opted to test the free agency waters. The Pelicans clearly liked what they saw from Randle, and he'll step in as Anthony Davis' new frontcourt partner following the departure of DeMarcus Cousins. Teaming with Davis, a fellow Kentucky product, could entail an adjustment process, but the Pelicans aren't overly deep up front, so Randle should see plenty of opportunity. While he'll battle Nikola Mirotic for minutes at the four, Randle is the more natural fit next to Davis, and Mirotic is more than capable of sliding down to the wing in certain lineups. Production-wise, a replication of last season's numbers seems fairly realistic, but it remains to be seen whether Randle will be able to maintain his scoring efficiency. Putting up points and rebounds are what Randle does best, and though he's flashed some improvement on the defensive end, he's not likely to be much of a contributor in blocks (0.5 per game in 2017-18) or steals (0.5 per game).
OKC (F, SG, SF, PF)
G
78
Min
36.2
FPTS
1,682.0
REB
464.0
AST
257.0
STL
143.0
BLK
32.0
TO
207.0
FGM
606.0
FGA
1,372.0
FTM
354.0
FTA
413.0
A change of scenery didn't phase George, who remained an All-Star during his first year in OKC following a trade from Indiana. While his scoring decreased by almost two points per game, he managed to set a career high in made threes (244) -- good for second in the league behind James Harden (265). George also managed to swipe the second-most steals (161) in the league, ironically behind Victor Oladipo (177), the main piece sent to Indiana in the trade. There’s not much reason to expect much more from George, who signed a long-term deal with the Thunder over the summer, but it’s possible we'll get it this season. Reports surfaced after the season that George was dealing with knee and elbow issues for most of the campaign, resulting in surgery on both after the playoffs. Combined with Carmelo Anthony being traded, George appears to be in a good position to see more usage and/or play at a higher level in 2018-19.
A change of scenery didn't phase George, who remained an All-Star during his first year in OKC following a trade from Indiana. While his scoring decreased by almost two points per game, he managed to set a career high in made threes (244) -- good for second in the league behind James Harden (265). George also managed to swipe the second-most steals (161) in the league, ironically behind Victor Oladipo (177), the main piece sent to Indiana in the trade. There’s not much reason to expect much more from George, who signed a long-term deal with the Thunder over the summer, but it’s possible we'll get it this season. Reports surfaced after the season that George was dealing with knee and elbow issues for most of the campaign, resulting in surgery on both after the playoffs. Combined with Carmelo Anthony being traded, George appears to be in a good position to see more usage and/or play at a higher level in 2018-19.
SAN (G, SF, SG)
G
79
Min
33.5
FPTS
1,654.0
REB
334.0
AST
351.0
STL
83.0
BLK
19.0
TO
171.0
FGM
643.0
FGA
1,392.0
FTM
508.0
FTA
601.0
Fresh off his most impressive Fantasy season to date, DeRozan was hoping to build on the career-best 27.3 points per game he averaged in 2016-17. That number ended up falling to 23.0, however, as DeRozan hoisted three less shot attempts (17.7) per game than he had a year prior (20.9), and also became more of a facilitator with a career-high 5.2 assists. He still kept his efficiency up and shot 45.6 percent from the field, and also hit 82.5 percent of his free-throw attempts, while getting to the line 7.0 times per game. Long known as a mid-range shooter that could score at the rim and get to the line, those numbers all fit DeRozan's typical style. As a result, it was DeRozan's concerted effort to extend his range that was somewhat surprising, considering the 28-year-old made 1.1 three-pointers per game, another career high. DeRozan ended up shooting 31.0 percent from deep and while that certainly isn't outstanding when considering others at his position, it was a step up from the brutal 26.6 percent clip he put up in 2016-17. With the Raptors being swept in the first round of the playoffs, management opted to explore the trade market this offseason, eventually coming to terms on a monster deal with San Antonio. Fellow superstar Kawhi Leonard was shipped to Toronto, while DeRozan was the significant piece that was brought over to San Antonio to make the deal work. The move certainly doesn't improve DeRozan's chances of going further in the playoffs, but it should keep his Fantasy value close to where it was in Toronto. LaMarcus Aldridge is really the only established offensive piece, so DeRozan's usage should at least sustain with the move. It may take time to get used to coach Gregg Popovich's system and the Spurs do tend to rest veterans at various points in the season, all of which are things to consider when drafting DeRozan. That said, the four-time NBA All-Star is still a top-tier shooting guard and his elite scoring ability, as well as his solid contributions in the peripheral categories, should keep him in the discussion for a selection in the first few rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
Fresh off his most impressive Fantasy season to date, DeRozan was hoping to build on the career-best 27.3 points per game he averaged in 2016-17. That number ended up falling to 23.0, however, as DeRozan hoisted three less shot attempts (17.7) per game than he had a year prior (20.9), and also became more of a facilitator with a career-high 5.2 assists. He still kept his efficiency up and shot 45.6 percent from the field, and also hit 82.5 percent of his free-throw attempts, while getting to the line 7.0 times per game. Long known as a mid-range shooter that could score at the rim and get to the line, those numbers all fit DeRozan's typical style. As a result, it was DeRozan's concerted effort to extend his range that was somewhat surprising, considering the 28-year-old made 1.1 three-pointers per game, another career high. DeRozan ended up shooting 31.0 percent from deep and while that certainly isn't outstanding when considering others at his position, it was a step up from the brutal 26.6 percent clip he put up in 2016-17. With the Raptors being swept in the first round of the playoffs, management opted to explore the trade market this offseason, eventually coming to terms on a monster deal with San Antonio. Fellow superstar Kawhi Leonard was shipped to Toronto, while DeRozan was the significant piece that was brought over to San Antonio to make the deal work. The move certainly doesn't improve DeRozan's chances of going further in the playoffs, but it should keep his Fantasy value close to where it was in Toronto. LaMarcus Aldridge is really the only established offensive piece, so DeRozan's usage should at least sustain with the move. It may take time to get used to coach Gregg Popovich's system and the Spurs do tend to rest veterans at various points in the season, all of which are things to consider when drafting DeRozan. That said, the four-time NBA All-Star is still a top-tier shooting guard and his elite scoring ability, as well as his solid contributions in the peripheral categories, should keep him in the discussion for a selection in the first few rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
PHO (C, C)
G
77
Min
28.8
FPTS
1,650.0
REB
758.0
AST
72.0
STL
32.0
BLK
131.0
TO
145.0
FGM
494.0
FGA
862.0
FTM
247.0
FTA
340.0
In his lone season at Arizona, Ayton was clearly one of the most dominant big men in the country, averaging a double-double of 20.1 points and 11.6 rebounds. The 7-foot-1, 250-pounder added 1.9 blocks, consistently scaring off opposing players from attempting to get to the rim when he was in the game. Despite his size, Ayton has the athleticism and ability to run the floor in transition successfully, which should translate over well to a Suns team that played at the third-quickest pace in the NBA last season. He also has a solid jumper and showed he can knock down a three-pointer when necessary after posting a 34.3 percent clip from deep. All of those skills earned Ayton the No. 1 overall selection in the 2018 NBA Draft and he joins a Suns team that should give him every opportunity to excel right away. Concerns about his effort and motor do exist, but if Ayton does end up getting featured alongside superstar Devin Booker offensively, there's a chance he becomes a legitimate option for Fantasy owners to select in the middle rounds of most drafts. Ayton does occasionally rely on having strong facilitators that can set him up, so guys like Booker and potentially Brandon Knight could have a key part in making sure Ayton hits his upside, especially in pick-and-roll situations. While Ayton could struggle early on as a rookie transitioning to the NBA, he does have 20/10 potential on any given night if the Suns do feature him as expected. It's worth it to note that Ayton dominated summer league, averaging 14.5 points, 10.5 rebounds, 1.0 steal and 1.0 block.
In his lone season at Arizona, Ayton was clearly one of the most dominant big men in the country, averaging a double-double of 20.1 points and 11.6 rebounds. The 7-foot-1, 250-pounder added 1.9 blocks, consistently scaring off opposing players from attempting to get to the rim when he was in the game. Despite his size, Ayton has the athleticism and ability to run the floor in transition successfully, which should translate over well to a Suns team that played at the third-quickest pace in the NBA last season. He also has a solid jumper and showed he can knock down a three-pointer when necessary after posting a 34.3 percent clip from deep. All of those skills earned Ayton the No. 1 overall selection in the 2018 NBA Draft and he joins a Suns team that should give him every opportunity to excel right away. Concerns about his effort and motor do exist, but if Ayton does end up getting featured alongside superstar Devin Booker offensively, there's a chance he becomes a legitimate option for Fantasy owners to select in the middle rounds of most drafts. Ayton does occasionally rely on having strong facilitators that can set him up, so guys like Booker and potentially Brandon Knight could have a key part in making sure Ayton hits his upside, especially in pick-and-roll situations. While Ayton could struggle early on as a rookie transitioning to the NBA, he does have 20/10 potential on any given night if the Suns do feature him as expected. It's worth it to note that Ayton dominated summer league, averaging 14.5 points, 10.5 rebounds, 1.0 steal and 1.0 block.
IND (G, PG, SG)
G
74
Min
34.5
FPTS
1,642.0
REB
380.0
AST
326.0
STL
166.0
BLK
57.0
TO
219.0
FGM
630.0
FGA
1,354.0
FTM
303.0
FTA
376.0
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, the 2017-18 campaign marked a make-or-break year for Oladipo, who had struggled to live up to his No. 2 overall selection in the 2013 NBA Draft. However, the move to Indiana clearly paid dividends, as Oladipo finally put everything together and secured the breakout performance that many expected to see earlier in his career. The 26-year-old was the go-to option for the Pacers offensively, upping his scoring to 23.1 points per game compared to 15.9 a year prior. Oladipo also tallied career-highs elsewhere across the board and provided the highly valued multi-category production Fantasy owners covet with 5.2 rebounds, 4.3 assists, 2.4 steals and 2.1 three-pointers across 34.0 minutes. Despite putting up 17.9 field goal attempts per game -- he averaged just 13.9 attempts in 2016-17 -- Oladipo still increased his efficiency overall, shooting 47.7 percent from the field and 37.1 percent from the three-point line, both of which were also tops in his five years in the NBA. As a result of the production, Oladipo was showered with awards, picking up the NBA's Most Improved Player award, as well as earning his first All-Star invite and becoming an All-Defensive First Team selection following his top overall finish in the league for steals per game. Now considered one of the more impressive two-way players in the league following last year's explosion, expectations for Oladipo for the upcoming campaign should be high. The Pacers only added a few significant pieces in free agency, most notably being the signing of Tyreke Evans. However, Evans shouldn't pose much of a threat to Oladipo's usage, so look for him to run the show once again. Considering his contributions to a plethora of categories, specifically his top-tier scoring and steal totals, Oladipo has now put himself into consideration as a top-15 or top-20 pick overall in the majority of Fantasy formats. Those looking to pick up the superstar guard will have to invest an early-round selection.
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, the 2017-18 campaign marked a make-or-break year for Oladipo, who had struggled to live up to his No. 2 overall selection in the 2013 NBA Draft. However, the move to Indiana clearly paid dividends, as Oladipo finally put everything together and secured the breakout performance that many expected to see earlier in his career. The 26-year-old was the go-to option for the Pacers offensively, upping his scoring to 23.1 points per game compared to 15.9 a year prior. Oladipo also tallied career-highs elsewhere across the board and provided the highly valued multi-category production Fantasy owners covet with 5.2 rebounds, 4.3 assists, 2.4 steals and 2.1 three-pointers across 34.0 minutes. Despite putting up 17.9 field goal attempts per game -- he averaged just 13.9 attempts in 2016-17 -- Oladipo still increased his efficiency overall, shooting 47.7 percent from the field and 37.1 percent from the three-point line, both of which were also tops in his five years in the NBA. As a result of the production, Oladipo was showered with awards, picking up the NBA's Most Improved Player award, as well as earning his first All-Star invite and becoming an All-Defensive First Team selection following his top overall finish in the league for steals per game. Now considered one of the more impressive two-way players in the league following last year's explosion, expectations for Oladipo for the upcoming campaign should be high. The Pacers only added a few significant pieces in free agency, most notably being the signing of Tyreke Evans. However, Evans shouldn't pose much of a threat to Oladipo's usage, so look for him to run the show once again. Considering his contributions to a plethora of categories, specifically his top-tier scoring and steal totals, Oladipo has now put himself into consideration as a top-15 or top-20 pick overall in the majority of Fantasy formats. Those looking to pick up the superstar guard will have to invest an early-round selection.
CHR (G, PG)
G
81
Min
35.2
FPTS
1,635.0
REB
263.0
AST
463.0
STL
98.0
BLK
25.0
TO
187.0
FGM
619.0
FGA
1,420.0
FTM
353.0
FTA
414.0
Walker has made the All-Star team each of the past two seasons, averaging 22.6 points, 5.5 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.1 steals. His name was all over the NBA leaderboards last season, ranking top-15 in minutes played (2,736), points (1,770), made three-pointers (231), made free-throws (361) and assists (444). This season, he may have an opportunity to climb those leaderboards even higher. Dwight Howard’s presence last season knocked Walker’s usage rate from 29.2 percent to 27.4 percent. The experiment was ultimately deemed a failure, however, with the Hornets opting to send Dwight Howard to Brooklyn, where he was waived and then signed with Washington. However, a high-usage and/or dynamic player was not added in his stead, leaving Walker with essentially the same crew he had in 2016-17, when he set a career high in usage. And, considering Walker is still relatively young (28 years old) and in a contract year with the Eastern Conference now weaker, it’s not a stretch to think he could be in store for a career year.
Walker has made the All-Star team each of the past two seasons, averaging 22.6 points, 5.5 assists, 3.5 rebounds and 1.1 steals. His name was all over the NBA leaderboards last season, ranking top-15 in minutes played (2,736), points (1,770), made three-pointers (231), made free-throws (361) and assists (444). This season, he may have an opportunity to climb those leaderboards even higher. Dwight Howard’s presence last season knocked Walker’s usage rate from 29.2 percent to 27.4 percent. The experiment was ultimately deemed a failure, however, with the Hornets opting to send Dwight Howard to Brooklyn, where he was waived and then signed with Washington. However, a high-usage and/or dynamic player was not added in his stead, leaving Walker with essentially the same crew he had in 2016-17, when he set a career high in usage. And, considering Walker is still relatively young (28 years old) and in a contract year with the Eastern Conference now weaker, it’s not a stretch to think he could be in store for a career year.
WAS (G, PG)
G
74
Min
35.8
FPTS
1,632.0
REB
289.0
AST
738.0
STL
107.0
BLK
58.0
TO
297.0
FGM
540.0
FGA
1,253.0
FTM
353.0
FTA
453.0
After four straight seasons of playing 77 or more games, Wall's luck took a bit of a turn during the 2017-18 campaign, as the 27-year-old point guard missed 41 contests with a recurring knee injury. He had a cleanup procedure performed at the end of January and was given a 6-to-8-week timetable for his return, which ultimately allowed him to rejoin the team for a playoff run. Wall made it back for the final six games of the regular season, but the Wizards weren't able to make much noise once the postseason began, as they were bounced by the Raptors in the first round. It was yet another early exit for Washington, and a disappointing season for Fantasy owners that selected Wall in the top of drafts. Over his abbreviated schedule, Wall finished with averages of 19.4 points, 9.6 assists, 3.7 rebounds, 1.4 steals and 1.1 blocks across 34.4 minutes, all of which (except blocks) were down from his previous season averages. However, the injuries certainly played a factor there and the five-time NBA All-Star should be a prime bounce-back candidate heading into the upcoming campaign. Wall is already back to full strength and the Wizards return nearly the entire roster from a season ago, so there shouldn't be any drastic threats to Wall's usage offensively. Fellow backcourt star Bradley Beal did earn his first All-Star bid himself, and for the second straight season averaged over 22.0 points per game, but again, the two have proven they can play alongside each other without sacrificing a ton of value. Wall's a career 78.6 percent free-throw shooter and has knocked down only 32.7 percent of his deep balls since joining the NBA, so there are certainly a few categories where he's not perfect. That said, his scoring numbers are almost always there and Wall seems likely to jump back up into double-digit assist averages, giving him plenty of potential to be selected in the top-15 of drafts once again.
After four straight seasons of playing 77 or more games, Wall's luck took a bit of a turn during the 2017-18 campaign, as the 27-year-old point guard missed 41 contests with a recurring knee injury. He had a cleanup procedure performed at the end of January and was given a 6-to-8-week timetable for his return, which ultimately allowed him to rejoin the team for a playoff run. Wall made it back for the final six games of the regular season, but the Wizards weren't able to make much noise once the postseason began, as they were bounced by the Raptors in the first round. It was yet another early exit for Washington, and a disappointing season for Fantasy owners that selected Wall in the top of drafts. Over his abbreviated schedule, Wall finished with averages of 19.4 points, 9.6 assists, 3.7 rebounds, 1.4 steals and 1.1 blocks across 34.4 minutes, all of which (except blocks) were down from his previous season averages. However, the injuries certainly played a factor there and the five-time NBA All-Star should be a prime bounce-back candidate heading into the upcoming campaign. Wall is already back to full strength and the Wizards return nearly the entire roster from a season ago, so there shouldn't be any drastic threats to Wall's usage offensively. Fellow backcourt star Bradley Beal did earn his first All-Star bid himself, and for the second straight season averaged over 22.0 points per game, but again, the two have proven they can play alongside each other without sacrificing a ton of value. Wall's a career 78.6 percent free-throw shooter and has knocked down only 32.7 percent of his deep balls since joining the NBA, so there are certainly a few categories where he's not perfect. That said, his scoring numbers are almost always there and Wall seems likely to jump back up into double-digit assist averages, giving him plenty of potential to be selected in the top-15 of drafts once again.
ATL (F, PF, C)
G
80
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,630.0
REB
760.0
AST
141.0
STL
54.0
BLK
115.0
TO
152.0
FGM
456.0
FGA
855.0
FTM
236.0
FTA
323.0
Due to the Hawks' roster construction and expected path back to the lottery, Collins was one of the more intriguing rookie prospects after being selected in the first round of last year's draft. While he opened the season in a bench role behind Ersan Ilyasova, the Hawks ultimately bought out the veteran in February and elevated Collins into the top unit once their playoff hopes were out of reach. The 6-foot-10 big man would go on to start 26 games, a stretch where he averaged 11.2 points 7.9 rebounds and 2.0 assists across 28.4 minutes. Those numbers were all slightly up from the 10.5 points, 7.3 rebounds and 1.3 assists across 24.1 minutes that Collins averaged for the entire year (74 games). In addition, Collins was a capable rim protector with 1.1 blocks per contest and shot 57.6 percent from the field. He only knocked down 16 total three-pointers and was a 71.5 percent free-throw shooter, though, so there are a few aspects of his game that are still a work in progress. However, Collins has high expectations going into his second year in the league. Ilyasova won't be in his way for the first half of the season and Mike Muscala was traded to the Sixers over the summer, meaning Collins has as clear a path to playing time as possible. A role surpassing 30.0 minutes a night seems likely, so the 20-year-old's numbers will certainly be on the rise. Averaging a double-double isn't out of the question, which means Collins is going to head into the year as one of the more intriguing breakout candidates. Look for him to be a very strong mid-to-late-round option if he falls that far and it wouldn't be surprising if Fantasy owners elected to pay up a bit considering his potential upside.
Due to the Hawks' roster construction and expected path back to the lottery, Collins was one of the more intriguing rookie prospects after being selected in the first round of last year's draft. While he opened the season in a bench role behind Ersan Ilyasova, the Hawks ultimately bought out the veteran in February and elevated Collins into the top unit once their playoff hopes were out of reach. The 6-foot-10 big man would go on to start 26 games, a stretch where he averaged 11.2 points 7.9 rebounds and 2.0 assists across 28.4 minutes. Those numbers were all slightly up from the 10.5 points, 7.3 rebounds and 1.3 assists across 24.1 minutes that Collins averaged for the entire year (74 games). In addition, Collins was a capable rim protector with 1.1 blocks per contest and shot 57.6 percent from the field. He only knocked down 16 total three-pointers and was a 71.5 percent free-throw shooter, though, so there are a few aspects of his game that are still a work in progress. However, Collins has high expectations going into his second year in the league. Ilyasova won't be in his way for the first half of the season and Mike Muscala was traded to the Sixers over the summer, meaning Collins has as clear a path to playing time as possible. A role surpassing 30.0 minutes a night seems likely, so the 20-year-old's numbers will certainly be on the rise. Averaging a double-double isn't out of the question, which means Collins is going to head into the year as one of the more intriguing breakout candidates. Look for him to be a very strong mid-to-late-round option if he falls that far and it wouldn't be surprising if Fantasy owners elected to pay up a bit considering his potential upside.
PHO (G, PG, SG)
G
77
Min
35.7
FPTS
1,623.0
REB
363.0
AST
368.0
STL
69.0
BLK
21.0
TO
281.0
FGM
687.0
FGA
1,555.0
FTM
421.0
FTA
485.0
Injuries dampened what was otherwise another outstanding season for Booker, as he took the floor for just 54 games due to hand and groin injuries in 2017-18. When he was healthy and on the court, Booker was once again an elite scorer, posting a career-high 24.9 points per game, which was up from 22.1 a year prior and also placed him 10th in the entire league. That slight uptick in scoring was likely due to increased efficiency. Booker shot 43.2 percent from the field, 38.3 percent from three-point range and 87.8 percent from the free-throw line, all of which were the best numbers of his career. He added 4.5 rebounds and 4.7 assists, while finishing 12th in the league with 2.7 three-pointers made. That production made him one of the elite shooting guards in the league and that isn't expected to change heading into the upcoming season. The Suns selected center Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft and while that's another mouth to feed offensively, he'll actually likely help draw defenses away from Booker and should allow him to keep his efficiency up with another year of solid percentages. Booker also just signed a max five-year, $158 million contract extension, so the Suns have committed to him long term and the are going to continue to rely on him as the team's go-to option offensively. With all that said, Booker will be a top-tier shooting guard option on draft day and will likely come off the board in the first three or four rounds or so of most Fantasy formats.
Injuries dampened what was otherwise another outstanding season for Booker, as he took the floor for just 54 games due to hand and groin injuries in 2017-18. When he was healthy and on the court, Booker was once again an elite scorer, posting a career-high 24.9 points per game, which was up from 22.1 a year prior and also placed him 10th in the entire league. That slight uptick in scoring was likely due to increased efficiency. Booker shot 43.2 percent from the field, 38.3 percent from three-point range and 87.8 percent from the free-throw line, all of which were the best numbers of his career. He added 4.5 rebounds and 4.7 assists, while finishing 12th in the league with 2.7 three-pointers made. That production made him one of the elite shooting guards in the league and that isn't expected to change heading into the upcoming season. The Suns selected center Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft and while that's another mouth to feed offensively, he'll actually likely help draw defenses away from Booker and should allow him to keep his efficiency up with another year of solid percentages. Booker also just signed a max five-year, $158 million contract extension, so the Suns have committed to him long term and the are going to continue to rely on him as the team's go-to option offensively. With all that said, Booker will be a top-tier shooting guard option on draft day and will likely come off the board in the first three or four rounds or so of most Fantasy formats.
NY (C, C)
G
74
Min
26.3
FPTS
1,599.0
REB
824.0
AST
110.0
STL
38.0
BLK
39.0
TO
130.0
FGM
441.0
FGA
758.0
FTM
194.0
FTA
235.0
After two years in Oklahoma City, Kanter was traded to the Knicks last offseason in a deal that also sent Carmelo Anthony back to the Thunder. It was a fruitful landing spot for the big man, as he wound up starting all 71 games he played in after being stuck behind Steven Adams previously. His 25.8 minutes per game was a three-year high and he ultimately averaged a double-double for the first time in his career, posting 14.1 points and 11.0 rebounds. However, that's where the production stopped, as Kanter's offense-first mindset kept him well off the radar in the other categories. While it took him a while to a make a final decision, Kanter eventually opted into his $18.6 million player option for the upcoming campaign, which isn't surprising considering he was unlikely to land anywhere near that sort of money elsewhere. He'll slot back into the starting center role right away and should see just as big of a workload to start the year, if not a few extra minutes, considering Kristaps Porzingis will miss at least the first two or three months of the season while recovering from a torn ACL. Look for Kanter to operate as the team's second scoring option behind Tim Hardaway for the duration of Porzingis' absence and he should also continue to be a solid source of boards, though it may be tough for him to match the 11.0 he averaged a season ago. Kanter doesn't have any semblance of a three-point shot, but he does have valuable percentages after finishing with a 59.2 percent clip from the field and an 84.8 percent clip from the free-throw line. Kanter won't provide much defense, but his work elsewhere should bring him into consideration as an intriguing mid-round pick.
After two years in Oklahoma City, Kanter was traded to the Knicks last offseason in a deal that also sent Carmelo Anthony back to the Thunder. It was a fruitful landing spot for the big man, as he wound up starting all 71 games he played in after being stuck behind Steven Adams previously. His 25.8 minutes per game was a three-year high and he ultimately averaged a double-double for the first time in his career, posting 14.1 points and 11.0 rebounds. However, that's where the production stopped, as Kanter's offense-first mindset kept him well off the radar in the other categories. While it took him a while to a make a final decision, Kanter eventually opted into his $18.6 million player option for the upcoming campaign, which isn't surprising considering he was unlikely to land anywhere near that sort of money elsewhere. He'll slot back into the starting center role right away and should see just as big of a workload to start the year, if not a few extra minutes, considering Kristaps Porzingis will miss at least the first two or three months of the season while recovering from a torn ACL. Look for Kanter to operate as the team's second scoring option behind Tim Hardaway for the duration of Porzingis' absence and he should also continue to be a solid source of boards, though it may be tough for him to match the 11.0 he averaged a season ago. Kanter doesn't have any semblance of a three-point shot, but he does have valuable percentages after finishing with a 59.2 percent clip from the field and an 84.8 percent clip from the free-throw line. Kanter won't provide much defense, but his work elsewhere should bring him into consideration as an intriguing mid-round pick.
MIN (G, SF, SG)
G
67
Min
36.4
FPTS
1,598.0
REB
359.0
AST
337.0
STL
131.0
BLK
34.0
TO
122.0
FGM
501.0
FGA
1,070.0
FTM
414.0
FTA
486.0
Butler was traded to the Timberwolves last summer and arrived in Minnesota as one of the league's biggest offseason additions. After a slow start to the season, Butler soon found his groove and started putting up the numbers Fantasy owners had become accustomed to in recent years. He finished his season as the team's leader in both scoring and steals, averaging 22.2 points and 2.0 steals per game, to go along with 5.3 rebounds and 4.9 assists. Despite the high-level production, Butler's season will likely be remembered for his knee injury, which came a ta key point in the season. The loss of Butler was felt immediately, and the team fell from the fourth seed to the eighth seed in the West within a matter of weeks. Although the Timberwolves were ultimately able to sneak into the playoffs as the eighth seed, they were quickly dispatched by Houston in Round 1. Looking ahead, Butler will again be locked in as the primary -- or perhaps co-primary -- option on offense, as well as the defensive anchor. Owners in most formats will have to part with a top-30 pick in order to secure Butler's services, and while he doesn't have the upside of the truly elite Fantasy commodities, Butler is about as safe as they come, though it's fair question whether he'll be able to stay healthy. The 29-year-old played in only 59 games last season -- his fewest since the lockout-shortened 2011-12 campaign-- and he's missed at least 15 contests in four of the last five seasons.
Butler was traded to the Timberwolves last summer and arrived in Minnesota as one of the league's biggest offseason additions. After a slow start to the season, Butler soon found his groove and started putting up the numbers Fantasy owners had become accustomed to in recent years. He finished his season as the team's leader in both scoring and steals, averaging 22.2 points and 2.0 steals per game, to go along with 5.3 rebounds and 4.9 assists. Despite the high-level production, Butler's season will likely be remembered for his knee injury, which came a ta key point in the season. The loss of Butler was felt immediately, and the team fell from the fourth seed to the eighth seed in the West within a matter of weeks. Although the Timberwolves were ultimately able to sneak into the playoffs as the eighth seed, they were quickly dispatched by Houston in Round 1. Looking ahead, Butler will again be locked in as the primary -- or perhaps co-primary -- option on offense, as well as the defensive anchor. Owners in most formats will have to part with a top-30 pick in order to secure Butler's services, and while he doesn't have the upside of the truly elite Fantasy commodities, Butler is about as safe as they come, though it's fair question whether he'll be able to stay healthy. The 29-year-old played in only 59 games last season -- his fewest since the lockout-shortened 2011-12 campaign-- and he's missed at least 15 contests in four of the last five seasons.
SAN (F, C, PF)
G
75
Min
33.2
FPTS
1,594.0
REB
614.0
AST
149.0
STL
43.0
BLK
89.0
TO
110.0
FGM
530.0
FGA
1,047.0
FTM
284.0
FTA
335.0
After two disappointing seasons to start his Spurs tenure, Aldridge finally got back on track and showed the type of production that earned him All-Star bids from 2012-16. Most notably was his scoring, as Aldridge upped his average to 23.1 points per game on 18.0 shot attempts, which was a significant boost from the 2016-17 campaign when he finished with just 17.3 points on 14.6 attempts. Much of that increase in usage can be attributed to Kawhi Leonard's surprising absence, as the superstar ended up sitting out all but nine games with a quad injury and subsequent complications. With Aldridge as the clear next-best option, the offensive burden was placed squarely on his shoulders and he didn't falter. In addition to his scoring, Aldridge also upped his rebound (8.5 RPG) and assist (2.0 APG) numbers, while staying consistent with 1.2 blocks per game, as well. Also worth noting is that Aldridge played in 75 games, so he wasn't impacted much by the Spurs' reputation for resting veteran players throughout the season. With Leonard's absence causing a massive rift between his camp and the organization, the Spurs locked in a deal with the Raptors, who sent DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl to San Antonio in change for the former Finals MVP. DeRozan's addition, in particular, could impact Aldridge's value, given his high usage rate and propensity for isolating possessions. DeRozan's 29.6 percent usage rate placed him 18th in the NBA last season, one spot ahead of Aldridge, who checked in at 29.1 percent -- the second-highest mark of his career. With the Spurs essentially adding DeRozan to last year's roster, Aldridge is likely to lose some touches and could find it tough to match his scoring volume. Still, his numbers across the board shouldn't be drastically affected by DeRozan's arrival, and Aldridge does have more-than-respectable field goal and free-throw percentages, which should keep him as a very intriguing Fantasy option who will likely have dual-eligibility at power forward and center. Realistically, Aldridge may be at risk of a slow start while the Spurs work to integrate DeRozan, though he's still worthy of a selection in the early rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
After two disappointing seasons to start his Spurs tenure, Aldridge finally got back on track and showed the type of production that earned him All-Star bids from 2012-16. Most notably was his scoring, as Aldridge upped his average to 23.1 points per game on 18.0 shot attempts, which was a significant boost from the 2016-17 campaign when he finished with just 17.3 points on 14.6 attempts. Much of that increase in usage can be attributed to Kawhi Leonard's surprising absence, as the superstar ended up sitting out all but nine games with a quad injury and subsequent complications. With Aldridge as the clear next-best option, the offensive burden was placed squarely on his shoulders and he didn't falter. In addition to his scoring, Aldridge also upped his rebound (8.5 RPG) and assist (2.0 APG) numbers, while staying consistent with 1.2 blocks per game, as well. Also worth noting is that Aldridge played in 75 games, so he wasn't impacted much by the Spurs' reputation for resting veteran players throughout the season. With Leonard's absence causing a massive rift between his camp and the organization, the Spurs locked in a deal with the Raptors, who sent DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl to San Antonio in change for the former Finals MVP. DeRozan's addition, in particular, could impact Aldridge's value, given his high usage rate and propensity for isolating possessions. DeRozan's 29.6 percent usage rate placed him 18th in the NBA last season, one spot ahead of Aldridge, who checked in at 29.1 percent -- the second-highest mark of his career. With the Spurs essentially adding DeRozan to last year's roster, Aldridge is likely to lose some touches and could find it tough to match his scoring volume. Still, his numbers across the board shouldn't be drastically affected by DeRozan's arrival, and Aldridge does have more-than-respectable field goal and free-throw percentages, which should keep him as a very intriguing Fantasy option who will likely have dual-eligibility at power forward and center. Realistically, Aldridge may be at risk of a slow start while the Spurs work to integrate DeRozan, though he's still worthy of a selection in the early rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
NOR (G, PG, SG)
G
76
Min
36.3
FPTS
1,593.0
REB
353.0
AST
511.0
STL
116.0
BLK
33.0
TO
201.0
FGM
571.0
FGA
1,185.0
FTM
179.0
FTA
227.0
If it's at all possible to have a breakout season at the age of 28, then that's exactly what Jrue Holiday did. The acquisition of Rajon Rondo last offseason meant Holiday was shuffled up to the shooting guard spot, which, in turn, meant the ball would be out of his hands a bit more.This resulted in Holiday dropping in some drafts given the level of uncertainty. Those owners lucky enough to secure his services had their selection more than justified, as Holiday turned in an extremely productive Fantasy season. He finished as a top-30 player in a number of formats, joining Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins to form one of the better three-headed Fantasy monsters in the NBA. Holiday put up averages of 19.0 points, 4.5 rebounds, 6.0 assists and 1.5 steals per game on almost 50 percent shooting from the field. He also managed to play in 81 of the 82 regular season games, putting to rest any lingering concerns about his leg issues from two seasons prior. Fast forward a few months and Rondo is now out of equation and has been replaced by Elfrid Payton. The addition of Payton, somewhat of a similar player to Rondo, shouldn't have a massive impact on Holiday's role or playing time, and owners are highly unlikely to get him at any sort of discount this time around, especially after Holiday raised his game to an even higher level during the Pelicans' playoff run, which included a surprising first-round sweep of the three-seed Trail Blazers.
If it's at all possible to have a breakout season at the age of 28, then that's exactly what Jrue Holiday did. The acquisition of Rajon Rondo last offseason meant Holiday was shuffled up to the shooting guard spot, which, in turn, meant the ball would be out of his hands a bit more.This resulted in Holiday dropping in some drafts given the level of uncertainty. Those owners lucky enough to secure his services had their selection more than justified, as Holiday turned in an extremely productive Fantasy season. He finished as a top-30 player in a number of formats, joining Anthony Davis and DeMarcus Cousins to form one of the better three-headed Fantasy monsters in the NBA. Holiday put up averages of 19.0 points, 4.5 rebounds, 6.0 assists and 1.5 steals per game on almost 50 percent shooting from the field. He also managed to play in 81 of the 82 regular season games, putting to rest any lingering concerns about his leg issues from two seasons prior. Fast forward a few months and Rondo is now out of equation and has been replaced by Elfrid Payton. The addition of Payton, somewhat of a similar player to Rondo, shouldn't have a massive impact on Holiday's role or playing time, and owners are highly unlikely to get him at any sort of discount this time around, especially after Holiday raised his game to an even higher level during the Pelicans' playoff run, which included a surprising first-round sweep of the three-seed Trail Blazers.
HOU (G, PG)
G
65
Min
31.3
FPTS
1,589.0
REB
345.0
AST
527.0
STL
106.0
BLK
15.0
TO
142.0
FGM
421.0
FGA
892.0
FTM
230.0
FTA
255.0
Paul's first season in Houston was for the most part a success. He fit in seamlessly alongside MVP James Harden and helped the Rockets nearly take down the Warriors in the Western Conference Finals. Houston actually held a 3-2 advantage in that series before Paul went down with a Grade 2 hamstring strain and missed the final two contests. In fact, if there was a negative to pull from the season, it was Paul's checkered injury history catching back up to him. The superstar point guard ended up playing in just 58 games, which was his second straight campaign missing over 20 contests. Still, when on the floor, Paul's numbers didn't suffer much, if at all, while playing alongside a high usage player like Harden. His assists fell as expected, going from 9.2 per game in 2016-17 to 7.9 this past year. However, he actually boosted his scoring (18.6 ppg) and rebounding (5.4 rpg) numbers, while remaining an elite defender with 1.7 steals per contest. Rounding out his impressive stat line was 2.5 three-pointers made at a 38.0 percent clip, which helped cement his spot as one of the top guards in the NBA. The Rockets made a handful of moves this offseason, with a couple of strong defenders in Corey Brewer and Luc Richard Mbah a Moute leaving, and an offensive driven Carmelo Anthony joining the team as a free agent. Anthony is expected to come off the bench and at this point, doesn't pose a real threat to any of Paul's numbers. As a result, look for Paul to continue to provide the elite numbers both offensively and defensively that we've seen the last few seasons and that should make him a potential top-5 point guard once again.
Paul's first season in Houston was for the most part a success. He fit in seamlessly alongside MVP James Harden and helped the Rockets nearly take down the Warriors in the Western Conference Finals. Houston actually held a 3-2 advantage in that series before Paul went down with a Grade 2 hamstring strain and missed the final two contests. In fact, if there was a negative to pull from the season, it was Paul's checkered injury history catching back up to him. The superstar point guard ended up playing in just 58 games, which was his second straight campaign missing over 20 contests. Still, when on the floor, Paul's numbers didn't suffer much, if at all, while playing alongside a high usage player like Harden. His assists fell as expected, going from 9.2 per game in 2016-17 to 7.9 this past year. However, he actually boosted his scoring (18.6 ppg) and rebounding (5.4 rpg) numbers, while remaining an elite defender with 1.7 steals per contest. Rounding out his impressive stat line was 2.5 three-pointers made at a 38.0 percent clip, which helped cement his spot as one of the top guards in the NBA. The Rockets made a handful of moves this offseason, with a couple of strong defenders in Corey Brewer and Luc Richard Mbah a Moute leaving, and an offensive driven Carmelo Anthony joining the team as a free agent. Anthony is expected to come off the bench and at this point, doesn't pose a real threat to any of Paul's numbers. As a result, look for Paul to continue to provide the elite numbers both offensively and defensively that we've seen the last few seasons and that should make him a potential top-5 point guard once again.
BOS (G, PG)
G
71
Min
31.7
FPTS
1,585.0
REB
265.0
AST
373.0
STL
76.0
BLK
20.0
TO
163.0
FGM
617.0
FGA
1,269.0
FTM
274.0
FTA
305.0
Last season, Irving was cruising through an MVP-caliber campaign before being struck down in March with a left knee issue that led to an early end to his season. While Terry Rozier performed admirably during Irving’s absence, it was clear the Celtics needed Irving’s superstar talent and ability to create his own shot during crunch time. Now, the bigger question is this: Can Irving stay healthy? Irving has averaged 63 games per season over his seven year career. Knowing that Rozier deserves more minutes, Boston might be wise to periodically rest its star point guard in preparation for what will likely be another deep playoff run. On a more positive note, Irving shot a career high 49% percent from the field last season, and it seems relatively safe to assume Irving’s hot shooting will continue, given the amount of talent around him. The Celtics' depth across the board is borderline-historic, and while that could mean less of a workload for Irving, there's no question that Boston is at its best when the five-time All-Star is on the floor. The return of Gordon Hayward could result in Irving ceding some playmaking responsibilities, but the 26-year-old still managed the second-highest scoring average of his career last season, despite adjusting to a new system and playing nearly three fewer minutes per game, compared to his final year in Cleveland.
Last season, Irving was cruising through an MVP-caliber campaign before being struck down in March with a left knee issue that led to an early end to his season. While Terry Rozier performed admirably during Irving’s absence, it was clear the Celtics needed Irving’s superstar talent and ability to create his own shot during crunch time. Now, the bigger question is this: Can Irving stay healthy? Irving has averaged 63 games per season over his seven year career. Knowing that Rozier deserves more minutes, Boston might be wise to periodically rest its star point guard in preparation for what will likely be another deep playoff run. On a more positive note, Irving shot a career high 49% percent from the field last season, and it seems relatively safe to assume Irving’s hot shooting will continue, given the amount of talent around him. The Celtics' depth across the board is borderline-historic, and while that could mean less of a workload for Irving, there's no question that Boston is at its best when the five-time All-Star is on the floor. The return of Gordon Hayward could result in Irving ceding some playmaking responsibilities, but the 26-year-old still managed the second-highest scoring average of his career last season, despite adjusting to a new system and playing nearly three fewer minutes per game, compared to his final year in Cleveland.
WAS (G, PG, SG)
G
80
Min
36.1
FPTS
1,575.0
REB
319.0
AST
319.0
STL
93.0
BLK
35.0
TO
208.0
FGM
688.0
FGA
1,474.0
FTM
287.0
FTA
357.0
Beal put together the first complete season of his career in 2017-18, playing in all 82 games after seeing action in less than 65 contests in three of five prior campaigns. His scoring (22.6 PPG) remained relatively the same to his 2016-17 offensive breakout and he shot slightly worse numbers from both the field (46 percent) and from deep (37.5 percent), though he did hoist up an additional shot attempt per game (18.1 FGA). His biggest improvements came as a playmaker and on the boards, where he posted career-highs of 4.4 rebounds and 4.5 assists, up from 3.1 and 3.5, respectively, a year prior. That was likely a result of Beal's backcourt mate, John Wall, missing 41 games due to injury. Beal was forced to take on more ball-handling responsibility, which likely contributed to his career-high 2.6 turnovers per game as well. Still, Beal proved he could run the show when needed and ultimately garnered his first career All-Star selection. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, the Wizards essentially return the same contributors and supporting cast from a season ago other than the switch at center from Marcin Gortat to Dwight Howard. Wall should be back to full strength from the get go, which could result in lessened assist totals. That said, with another All-Star in the lineup to absorb defenders, Beal should get more open looks and could up his efficiency as a shooter after a slight down year. Don't expect Beal's scoring totals to take a hit, though, and his ability to do a little bit of everything should make him a top-tier shooting guard option on draft day.
Beal put together the first complete season of his career in 2017-18, playing in all 82 games after seeing action in less than 65 contests in three of five prior campaigns. His scoring (22.6 PPG) remained relatively the same to his 2016-17 offensive breakout and he shot slightly worse numbers from both the field (46 percent) and from deep (37.5 percent), though he did hoist up an additional shot attempt per game (18.1 FGA). His biggest improvements came as a playmaker and on the boards, where he posted career-highs of 4.4 rebounds and 4.5 assists, up from 3.1 and 3.5, respectively, a year prior. That was likely a result of Beal's backcourt mate, John Wall, missing 41 games due to injury. Beal was forced to take on more ball-handling responsibility, which likely contributed to his career-high 2.6 turnovers per game as well. Still, Beal proved he could run the show when needed and ultimately garnered his first career All-Star selection. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, the Wizards essentially return the same contributors and supporting cast from a season ago other than the switch at center from Marcin Gortat to Dwight Howard. Wall should be back to full strength from the get go, which could result in lessened assist totals. That said, with another All-Star in the lineup to absorb defenders, Beal should get more open looks and could up his efficiency as a shooter after a slight down year. Don't expect Beal's scoring totals to take a hit, though, and his ability to do a little bit of everything should make him a top-tier shooting guard option on draft day.
WAS (C, C)
G
70
Min
32.4
FPTS
1,568.0
REB
862.0
AST
91.0
STL
48.0
BLK
102.0
TO
158.0
FGM
429.0
FGA
719.0
FTM
257.0
FTA
460.0
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, Howard joined Charlotte in 2017-18 after stints with the Hawks and Rockets. As he's done for his entire 14-year career, Howard averaged a double-double, upping his scoring to 16.6 points per game, while posting 12.5 rebounds, which was on par with his career number of 12.7 boards. The 6-foot-11 big man also started 81 games, proving himself to be reliable health wise with his third straight season playing more than 70 contests. Howard finished seventh in the NBA in blocks with 1.6 per game, but saw his field goal percentage dip somewhat drastically, going from 63.3 percent in 2016-17 to just 55.5 percent last year. However, Charlotte wasn't willing to retain him and Howard is now headed to yet another new organization. After joining Washington this offseason, Howard once again appears primed to start at center, as the Wizards dealt their previous starter, Marcin Gortat, to the Clippers. That makes Ian Mahinmi, who averaged just 14.9 minutes last season, Howard's only real competition for minutes. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising to see Howard eclipse the 30-minute threshold once again, which should give him every opportunity to keep his double-double streak alive. While Howard may not score as much playing alongside offensive threats like John Wall and Bradley Beal, he's still going to rack up boards and blocks for as long as he gets consistent run, so Fantasy owners can still target him with confidence when looking for those categories. Of course, Howard is a career 56.6 percent free-throw shooter and can't knock down a three-pointer, which hurts his value considerably in some formats.
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, Howard joined Charlotte in 2017-18 after stints with the Hawks and Rockets. As he's done for his entire 14-year career, Howard averaged a double-double, upping his scoring to 16.6 points per game, while posting 12.5 rebounds, which was on par with his career number of 12.7 boards. The 6-foot-11 big man also started 81 games, proving himself to be reliable health wise with his third straight season playing more than 70 contests. Howard finished seventh in the NBA in blocks with 1.6 per game, but saw his field goal percentage dip somewhat drastically, going from 63.3 percent in 2016-17 to just 55.5 percent last year. However, Charlotte wasn't willing to retain him and Howard is now headed to yet another new organization. After joining Washington this offseason, Howard once again appears primed to start at center, as the Wizards dealt their previous starter, Marcin Gortat, to the Clippers. That makes Ian Mahinmi, who averaged just 14.9 minutes last season, Howard's only real competition for minutes. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising to see Howard eclipse the 30-minute threshold once again, which should give him every opportunity to keep his double-double streak alive. While Howard may not score as much playing alongside offensive threats like John Wall and Bradley Beal, he's still going to rack up boards and blocks for as long as he gets consistent run, so Fantasy owners can still target him with confidence when looking for those categories. Of course, Howard is a career 56.6 percent free-throw shooter and can't knock down a three-pointer, which hurts his value considerably in some formats.
ORL (F, SF, PF)
G
76
Min
34.2
FPTS
1,543.0
REB
622.0
AST
190.0
STL
80.0
BLK
61.0
TO
151.0
FGM
546.0
FGA
1,194.0
FTM
218.0
FTA
306.0
Gordon, who will turn 23 early this season, re-upped with the Magic this summer on a four-year, $84 million contract. The former fourth overall pick out of Arizona is coming off his best year as a pro, helped by a career-high 32.9 minutes per game, though he only played 58 games due to injury (including two concussions). Gordon averaged 17.6 points, 7.9 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.8 combined steals/blocks. He also drilled 2.0 threes per tilt at 33.6 percent after not cracking 30 percent in any of his previous three seasons. Though the increased attempts beyond the arc hurt his field-goal percentage, he managed keep his overall efficiency stable, posting an identical true shooting percentage (53.0) to 2016-17. Gordon’s consistency issues persist, but so does his upside. Last season, he recorded two forty-point games, two games with at least 15 rebounds, and 10 games with at least four assists. Assuming another year of improvement, Gordon probably won't make it past the sixth round in most Fantasy drafts.
Gordon, who will turn 23 early this season, re-upped with the Magic this summer on a four-year, $84 million contract. The former fourth overall pick out of Arizona is coming off his best year as a pro, helped by a career-high 32.9 minutes per game, though he only played 58 games due to injury (including two concussions). Gordon averaged 17.6 points, 7.9 rebounds, 2.3 assists and 1.8 combined steals/blocks. He also drilled 2.0 threes per tilt at 33.6 percent after not cracking 30 percent in any of his previous three seasons. Though the increased attempts beyond the arc hurt his field-goal percentage, he managed keep his overall efficiency stable, posting an identical true shooting percentage (53.0) to 2016-17. Gordon’s consistency issues persist, but so does his upside. Last season, he recorded two forty-point games, two games with at least 15 rebounds, and 10 games with at least four assists. Assuming another year of improvement, Gordon probably won't make it past the sixth round in most Fantasy drafts.
UTA (G, PG, SG)
G
79
Min
36.4
FPTS
1,533.0
REB
323.0
AST
317.0
STL
129.0
BLK
29.0
TO
237.0
FGM
673.0
FGA
1,493.0
FTM
293.0
FTA
352.0
Drafted with the 13th overall pick in the 2017 Draft, Mitchell was expected to hold a relatively small rotational role on the Jazz during his rookie year. However, the Louisville product came out of the gates hot, scoring 22 points on 9-of-16 shooting during his sixth NBA game, being inserted into the starting five just six games later. He never looked back from there, filling the void created by Gordon Hayward’s departure. A favorite among some to win Rookie of the Year, Mitchell was able to lead Utah to the playoffs on the back of an especially strong post-All-Star break stint. During his final 24 appearances, Mitchell averaged 22.5 points, 4.3 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.6 steals. Throughout the year, Mitchell was also able to put together five 30-point games, two 40-point games, 25 games with at least five assists and 13 performances with three or more steals. Considering Mitchell posted a 29.1 percent usage rate during his rookie campaign, it may be difficult for him to improve on his overall volume heading into 2018-19. However, there remains room for him to improve as a shooter, as he shot a fair, but not great, 43.7 percent from the field and 34.0 percent from beyond the arc. And, considering how much he handles the ball for the Jazz, he may be looking to improve as a passer. Regardless, Mitchell already has the makings of an up-and-coming star in the NBA.
Drafted with the 13th overall pick in the 2017 Draft, Mitchell was expected to hold a relatively small rotational role on the Jazz during his rookie year. However, the Louisville product came out of the gates hot, scoring 22 points on 9-of-16 shooting during his sixth NBA game, being inserted into the starting five just six games later. He never looked back from there, filling the void created by Gordon Hayward’s departure. A favorite among some to win Rookie of the Year, Mitchell was able to lead Utah to the playoffs on the back of an especially strong post-All-Star break stint. During his final 24 appearances, Mitchell averaged 22.5 points, 4.3 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.6 steals. Throughout the year, Mitchell was also able to put together five 30-point games, two 40-point games, 25 games with at least five assists and 13 performances with three or more steals. Considering Mitchell posted a 29.1 percent usage rate during his rookie campaign, it may be difficult for him to improve on his overall volume heading into 2018-19. However, there remains room for him to improve as a shooter, as he shot a fair, but not great, 43.7 percent from the field and 34.0 percent from beyond the arc. And, considering how much he handles the ball for the Jazz, he may be looking to improve as a passer. Regardless, Mitchell already has the makings of an up-and-coming star in the NBA.
OKC (C, C)
G
80
Min
32.1
FPTS
1,528.0
REB
728.0
AST
91.0
STL
95.0
BLK
81.0
TO
132.0
FGM
452.0
FGA
736.0
FTM
171.0
FTA
297.0
Adams, who has been Oklahoma City’s starting center over the past four campaigns, cracked 30 minutes per game for the first time as a pro last season. He set career highs nearly across the board, averaging 13.9 points, 9.0 rebounds and a combined 2.2 steals/blocks. Notably, he ranked second in the league in total offensive rebounds (384), fourth in field-goal percentage (62.9) and collected 28 double-doubles across 76 appearances. In addition to his quality play, Adams’ Fantasy value gets a boost due to his nearly spotless health, averaging 77.4 games played through his first five seasons. General Manager Sam Presti opted to improve the Thunder’s extremely thin bench over the offseason, bringing in free agent Nerlens Noel. However, the move isn't expected to affect Adams’ playing time, as Noel hasn't quite lived up to his potential and signed a deal just worth under $2 million per year. Overall, Adams’ Fantasy stock should remain similar to last season, though improvement is still feasible considering he just turned 25 years old.
Adams, who has been Oklahoma City’s starting center over the past four campaigns, cracked 30 minutes per game for the first time as a pro last season. He set career highs nearly across the board, averaging 13.9 points, 9.0 rebounds and a combined 2.2 steals/blocks. Notably, he ranked second in the league in total offensive rebounds (384), fourth in field-goal percentage (62.9) and collected 28 double-doubles across 76 appearances. In addition to his quality play, Adams’ Fantasy value gets a boost due to his nearly spotless health, averaging 77.4 games played through his first five seasons. General Manager Sam Presti opted to improve the Thunder’s extremely thin bench over the offseason, bringing in free agent Nerlens Noel. However, the move isn't expected to affect Adams’ playing time, as Noel hasn't quite lived up to his potential and signed a deal just worth under $2 million per year. Overall, Adams’ Fantasy stock should remain similar to last season, though improvement is still feasible considering he just turned 25 years old.
MIL (G, SG, SF)
G
79
Min
36.4
FPTS
1,521.0
REB
382.0
AST
313.0
STL
123.0
BLK
20.0
TO
184.0
FGM
545.0
FGA
1,188.0
FTM
307.0
FTA
346.0
Despite having his worst three-point shooting campaign since joining Milwaukee (35.9 percent), Middleton posted a career-high 20.1 points per game while still shooting a solid 46.6 percent from the field overall. Middleton is also one of the best free-throw shooters in the league, not falling below 88.0 percent over the past three seasons. He’s much more than a scorer, however, averaging 5.2 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 1.5 steals across 36.4 minutes. Middleton’s health has rarely been a concern, either. He’s played at least 79 games since joining the Bucks in all but one season, when he tore his hamstring in 2016-17, limiting him to 29 outings. There’s nothing to suggest Middleton will see his usage dip, and if the 27-year-old can get back on track from three-point range, it’s possible he has a career year. All things considered, Middleton shouldn't get past the third round in Fantasy drafts.
Despite having his worst three-point shooting campaign since joining Milwaukee (35.9 percent), Middleton posted a career-high 20.1 points per game while still shooting a solid 46.6 percent from the field overall. Middleton is also one of the best free-throw shooters in the league, not falling below 88.0 percent over the past three seasons. He’s much more than a scorer, however, averaging 5.2 rebounds, 4.0 assists and 1.5 steals across 36.4 minutes. Middleton’s health has rarely been a concern, either. He’s played at least 79 games since joining the Bucks in all but one season, when he tore his hamstring in 2016-17, limiting him to 29 outings. There’s nothing to suggest Middleton will see his usage dip, and if the 27-year-old can get back on track from three-point range, it’s possible he has a career year. All things considered, Middleton shouldn't get past the third round in Fantasy drafts.
TOR (G, PG)
G
74
Min
33.7
FPTS
1,521.0
REB
399.0
AST
502.0
STL
84.0
BLK
18.0
TO
182.0
FGM
408.0
FGA
938.0
FTM
239.0
FTA
287.0
After playing just 60 games during the 2016-17 campaign, Lowry put together a relatively healthy season in 2017-18, seeing action in 78 of a possible 82 regular-season contests. However, the 32-year-old was monitored closely throughout the year and head coach Dwane Casey opted to lessen Lowry's workload to make sure he could keep his veteran point guard at full strength. Lowry averaged just 32.2 minutes per game -- down from 37.4 minutes a year prior -- signifying his lowest mark since the 2012-13 campaign. That decrease in playing time unsurprisingly meant his numbers were going to fall across the board, though most notably was Lowry's scoring, which fell to 16.2 points per game after averaging a career-high 22.4 a year prior. He still shot a solid 42.7 percent from the field and 39.9 percent from deep, but took only 12.1 field goal attempts, a distant second to DeMar DeRozan's 17.7. Lowry did become a more active rebounder with a career-high 5.6 rebounds, in addition to 6.9 assists, 1.1 steals and 3.1 three-pointers, all of which boosted his multi-category production and earned him his fourth straight All-Star appearance. Of course, the season was still a disappointment, as the Raptors were swept by the Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference semifinals. That prompted the organization to make a splash on the trade market this summer, dealing DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl to the Spurs in exchange for superstar Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. In Leonard's last full season (he played just nine games last year), he put up 17.7 shot attempts per game, which was identical to DeRozan's numbers from 2017-18. As a result, it's safe to assume Lowry's touches and attempts shouldn't be drastically impacted. In addition, Leonard is a more efficient player that has better range than DeRozan, so he'll draw even more of the defensive attention, which allows Lowry more open looks and better pathways to the rim. With all that said, Lowry appears to be one of the biggest beneficiaries of Leonard's addition when looking at the roster, so it wouldn't be surprising if he saw a slight uptick in his production across the board, especially on the offensive side of the ball. That should keep Lowry as a borderline top-10 point guard in Fantasy leagues, as his well-rounded game and solid percentages should help chip away at deficits throughout the season.
After playing just 60 games during the 2016-17 campaign, Lowry put together a relatively healthy season in 2017-18, seeing action in 78 of a possible 82 regular-season contests. However, the 32-year-old was monitored closely throughout the year and head coach Dwane Casey opted to lessen Lowry's workload to make sure he could keep his veteran point guard at full strength. Lowry averaged just 32.2 minutes per game -- down from 37.4 minutes a year prior -- signifying his lowest mark since the 2012-13 campaign. That decrease in playing time unsurprisingly meant his numbers were going to fall across the board, though most notably was Lowry's scoring, which fell to 16.2 points per game after averaging a career-high 22.4 a year prior. He still shot a solid 42.7 percent from the field and 39.9 percent from deep, but took only 12.1 field goal attempts, a distant second to DeMar DeRozan's 17.7. Lowry did become a more active rebounder with a career-high 5.6 rebounds, in addition to 6.9 assists, 1.1 steals and 3.1 three-pointers, all of which boosted his multi-category production and earned him his fourth straight All-Star appearance. Of course, the season was still a disappointment, as the Raptors were swept by the Cavaliers in the Eastern Conference semifinals. That prompted the organization to make a splash on the trade market this summer, dealing DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl to the Spurs in exchange for superstar Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. In Leonard's last full season (he played just nine games last year), he put up 17.7 shot attempts per game, which was identical to DeRozan's numbers from 2017-18. As a result, it's safe to assume Lowry's touches and attempts shouldn't be drastically impacted. In addition, Leonard is a more efficient player that has better range than DeRozan, so he'll draw even more of the defensive attention, which allows Lowry more open looks and better pathways to the rim. With all that said, Lowry appears to be one of the biggest beneficiaries of Leonard's addition when looking at the roster, so it wouldn't be surprising if he saw a slight uptick in his production across the board, especially on the offensive side of the ball. That should keep Lowry as a borderline top-10 point guard in Fantasy leagues, as his well-rounded game and solid percentages should help chip away at deficits throughout the season.
LAC (F, PF, SF)
G
80
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,510.0
REB
493.0
AST
206.0
STL
78.0
BLK
38.0
TO
135.0
FGM
575.0
FGA
1,210.0
FTM
174.0
FTA
209.0
Harris split the 2017-18 campaign between the Pistons and Clippers, but finished the year in Los Angeles after being dealt there in the blockbuster Blake Griffin trade. He actually upped his production after switching teams and in 32 games, Harris averaged 19.3 points, 6.0 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.2 steals across 34.5 minutes. He was extremely efficient from beyond the arc, shooting a blistering hot 41.4 percent and knocking down 2.2 per game. Adding on to that, Harris' other percentages were valuable as well, going 47.3 percent from the field and 80.0 percent from the free-throw. All in all, Harris produced the multi-category production that Fantasy owners covet and he likely out-performed his draft positioning in many leagues. Owners will have to pay up ahead of the upcoming campaign though, as Harris is once again expected to be a top option offensively for a team that no longer has Griffin or DeAndre Jordan. It seems likely that Harris should be able to mimic the numbers he tallied after getting traded, and he could even up his rebound numbers with Jordan's 15.2 boards per game no longer around, which should make him a top-50 pick in most leagues. He's also missed just five games or less in each of the last six seasons, so the reliability is there as well.
Harris split the 2017-18 campaign between the Pistons and Clippers, but finished the year in Los Angeles after being dealt there in the blockbuster Blake Griffin trade. He actually upped his production after switching teams and in 32 games, Harris averaged 19.3 points, 6.0 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.2 steals across 34.5 minutes. He was extremely efficient from beyond the arc, shooting a blistering hot 41.4 percent and knocking down 2.2 per game. Adding on to that, Harris' other percentages were valuable as well, going 47.3 percent from the field and 80.0 percent from the free-throw. All in all, Harris produced the multi-category production that Fantasy owners covet and he likely out-performed his draft positioning in many leagues. Owners will have to pay up ahead of the upcoming campaign though, as Harris is once again expected to be a top option offensively for a team that no longer has Griffin or DeAndre Jordan. It seems likely that Harris should be able to mimic the numbers he tallied after getting traded, and he could even up his rebound numbers with Jordan's 15.2 boards per game no longer around, which should make him a top-50 pick in most leagues. He's also missed just five games or less in each of the last six seasons, so the reliability is there as well.
TOR (C, C)
G
79
Min
24.4
FPTS
1,507.0
REB
738.0
AST
91.0
STL
32.0
BLK
77.0
TO
129.0
FGM
429.0
FGA
769.0
FTM
191.0
FTA
236.0
Valanciunas once again put up strong per-minute numbers in his sixth season despite his workload being the smallest of his career. He finished the year averaging just 22.4 minutes, which was likely an attempt by the Raptors to go with some smaller, more athletic lineups to matchup better with opponents across the league. Despite more than a three-minute drop in his playing time from the year prior, Valanciunas upped his scoring to 12.7 points, and also kept similar averages elsewhere with 8.6 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 0.9 blocks. His value could see a resurgence heading into the upcoming campaign as well. Recently promoted head coach Nick Nurse appears to be a big fan of the seven-footer and thinks he can be effective playing alongside Kyle Lowry and newly acquired Kawhi Leonard, who was brought over in a trade that sent DeMar DeRozan to San Antonio. Valanciunas already previewed a solid three-point stroke last year, knocking down 30-of-74 attempts (40.5 percent) and has apparently continued to work on it this offseason. That improvement could help expand his game and keep him on the floor for longer durations. The Raptors haven't confirmed who will start in the frontcourt, but Valanciunas should reclaim his top spot at center, with the likes of Serge Ibaka and OG Anunoby alternating as the starting power forward. With promising youngster Jakob Poeltl also being sent to the Spurs, Valanciunas has the potential to see a slight uptick in his workload, which opens the door for him to out-perform his likely draft positioning in the mid-to-late rounds of drafts.
Valanciunas once again put up strong per-minute numbers in his sixth season despite his workload being the smallest of his career. He finished the year averaging just 22.4 minutes, which was likely an attempt by the Raptors to go with some smaller, more athletic lineups to matchup better with opponents across the league. Despite more than a three-minute drop in his playing time from the year prior, Valanciunas upped his scoring to 12.7 points, and also kept similar averages elsewhere with 8.6 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 0.9 blocks. His value could see a resurgence heading into the upcoming campaign as well. Recently promoted head coach Nick Nurse appears to be a big fan of the seven-footer and thinks he can be effective playing alongside Kyle Lowry and newly acquired Kawhi Leonard, who was brought over in a trade that sent DeMar DeRozan to San Antonio. Valanciunas already previewed a solid three-point stroke last year, knocking down 30-of-74 attempts (40.5 percent) and has apparently continued to work on it this offseason. That improvement could help expand his game and keep him on the floor for longer durations. The Raptors haven't confirmed who will start in the frontcourt, but Valanciunas should reclaim his top spot at center, with the likes of Serge Ibaka and OG Anunoby alternating as the starting power forward. With promising youngster Jakob Poeltl also being sent to the Spurs, Valanciunas has the potential to see a slight uptick in his workload, which opens the door for him to out-perform his likely draft positioning in the mid-to-late rounds of drafts.
GS (F, C, PF)
G
77
Min
31.5
FPTS
1,502.0
REB
569.0
AST
538.0
STL
111.0
BLK
96.0
TO
214.0
FGM
294.0
FGA
658.0
FTM
138.0
FTA
183.0
While Green remained an All-Star last season, he didn't perform as well as we're used to seeing from him in a few aspects of his game, though some of that may have been due to a shoulder injury that limited him to 70 games. While his scoring (11.0) and passing (7.3) hovered around their usual marks, Green posted his fewest rebounds (7.6) and steals (1.4) per game since the 2013-14 campaign. He also shot threes at the worst percentage of his career (30.1) other than his rookie year. Still, his across-the-board production and the fact that he remains a nightly double-double, and even triple-double, threat keeps his Fantasy value high. He posted 38 games with double-digit points, 22 games with double-digit rebounds and 11 games with double-digit assists. Green even accumulated nine games with at least three steals and 10 games with at least three blocks. It’s not exactly clear how the addition of DeMarcus Cousins to the Warriors will affect Green’s usage, though it seems unlikely his presence will put Green’s All-Star status in jeopardy.
While Green remained an All-Star last season, he didn't perform as well as we're used to seeing from him in a few aspects of his game, though some of that may have been due to a shoulder injury that limited him to 70 games. While his scoring (11.0) and passing (7.3) hovered around their usual marks, Green posted his fewest rebounds (7.6) and steals (1.4) per game since the 2013-14 campaign. He also shot threes at the worst percentage of his career (30.1) other than his rookie year. Still, his across-the-board production and the fact that he remains a nightly double-double, and even triple-double, threat keeps his Fantasy value high. He posted 38 games with double-digit points, 22 games with double-digit rebounds and 11 games with double-digit assists. Green even accumulated nine games with at least three steals and 10 games with at least three blocks. It’s not exactly clear how the addition of DeMarcus Cousins to the Warriors will affect Green’s usage, though it seems unlikely his presence will put Green’s All-Star status in jeopardy.
WAS (F, PF, SF)
G
79
Min
32.3
FPTS
1,493.0
REB
517.0
AST
165.0
STL
122.0
BLK
43.0
TO
79.0
FGM
474.0
FGA
932.0
FTM
112.0
FTA
134.0
After signing a four-year, $106 million contract extension last offseason, Porter took to the floor for his fifth campaign, essentially duplicating his numbers from the year before. He finished with 14.7 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.0 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.8 three-pointers across 31.6 minutes. Most notably, he proved that his breakout shooting during the 2016-17 season wasn't a fluke, as Porter shot 50.3 percent from the floor and a career-high 44.1 percent from deep. That placed him third in the NBA for three-point percentage, behind only Darren Collison and Reggie Bullock. Despite the solid output, Porter's numbers were actually fairly disappointing considering he had a big opportunity to step up with John Wall missing 41 games due to a knee injury. Instead, he simply stuck to his usual role and let Bradley Beal do the bulk of the playmaking. With Wall healthy heading into the 2018-19 campaign, the Wizards should be back to full strength, and they also return the majority of their regular contributors. Porter should once again slot in as the third option behind both Wall and Beal offensively, while chipping in across the box score with some solid multi-category production. When you add in his stellar shooting percentages and lack of turnovers (just 1.0 per game in 2017-18), Porter should slot into that second tier of small forwards behind the superstars like LeBron James, Kawhi Leonard, Kevin Durant and Paul George.
After signing a four-year, $106 million contract extension last offseason, Porter took to the floor for his fifth campaign, essentially duplicating his numbers from the year before. He finished with 14.7 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.0 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.8 three-pointers across 31.6 minutes. Most notably, he proved that his breakout shooting during the 2016-17 season wasn't a fluke, as Porter shot 50.3 percent from the floor and a career-high 44.1 percent from deep. That placed him third in the NBA for three-point percentage, behind only Darren Collison and Reggie Bullock. Despite the solid output, Porter's numbers were actually fairly disappointing considering he had a big opportunity to step up with John Wall missing 41 games due to a knee injury. Instead, he simply stuck to his usual role and let Bradley Beal do the bulk of the playmaking. With Wall healthy heading into the 2018-19 campaign, the Wizards should be back to full strength, and they also return the majority of their regular contributors. Porter should once again slot in as the third option behind both Wall and Beal offensively, while chipping in across the box score with some solid multi-category production. When you add in his stellar shooting percentages and lack of turnovers (just 1.0 per game in 2017-18), Porter should slot into that second tier of small forwards behind the superstars like LeBron James, Kawhi Leonard, Kevin Durant and Paul George.
MEM (C, C)
G
73
Min
34.3
FPTS
1,469.0
REB
538.0
AST
291.0
STL
51.0
BLK
100.0
TO
184.0
FGM
445.0
FGA
985.0
FTM
259.0
FTA
311.0
Gasol was the proverbial last man standing after Mike Conley's heel injury early last season, putting in a valiant effort over 73 games. The 33-year-old averaged 17.2 points, 8.1 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.4 blocks, although he did shoot a career-low 42.0 percent, with the fact he was often double-teamed and outmanned on a thin Grizzlies squad likely playing a significant part in his struggles. Another factor was certainly Gasol's uptick in long-distance shooting, as he averaged a career-high 4.4 three-point attempts per contest. The veteran's assist and free-throw metrics also continued trending in the right direction, as Gasol turned in the second-highest success rate of his career from the charity stripe (83.4 percent) and second-most dimes (4.2). While fourth overall pick Jaren Jackson is certainly capable of spelling Gasol at center, the rookie is projected to have his biggest impact at power forward. Therefore, barring injury, Gasol should once again average the 33-34 minutes he's tallied over the last five seasons.
Gasol was the proverbial last man standing after Mike Conley's heel injury early last season, putting in a valiant effort over 73 games. The 33-year-old averaged 17.2 points, 8.1 rebounds, 4.2 assists and 1.4 blocks, although he did shoot a career-low 42.0 percent, with the fact he was often double-teamed and outmanned on a thin Grizzlies squad likely playing a significant part in his struggles. Another factor was certainly Gasol's uptick in long-distance shooting, as he averaged a career-high 4.4 three-point attempts per contest. The veteran's assist and free-throw metrics also continued trending in the right direction, as Gasol turned in the second-highest success rate of his career from the charity stripe (83.4 percent) and second-most dimes (4.2). While fourth overall pick Jaren Jackson is certainly capable of spelling Gasol at center, the rookie is projected to have his biggest impact at power forward. Therefore, barring injury, Gasol should once again average the 33-34 minutes he's tallied over the last five seasons.
POR (G, PG, SG)
G
80
Min
36.3
FPTS
1,450.0
REB
298.0
AST
276.0
STL
76.0
BLK
35.0
TO
150.0
FGM
678.0
FGA
1,497.0
FTM
220.0
FTA
254.0
McCollum’s offensive metrics actually saw a slight downturn last season, although his numbers still rendered him a top-10 option at shooting guard in Fantasy circles. The 2013 first-round pick averaged 21.4 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.0 steal across 36.1 minutes over 81 games, shooting 44.3 percent from the field, including 39.7 percent from distance. He also encouragingly took a career-high 18.6 shot attempts per contest, helping lead to a robust 26.5 percent usage rate. With the Blazers projected to likely return the same starting five, there’s little doubt that the Portland offense should largely run through the backcourt once again this season. That should leave McCollum poised for another large workload, one that’s helped him generate near-elite numbers out of the two-guard spot over the last three campaigns. Moreover, at least a slight improvement on a free-throw rate that dropped from 2016-17’s 91.2 percent to 83.6 percent last season would bump McCollum’s value up another notch.
McCollum’s offensive metrics actually saw a slight downturn last season, although his numbers still rendered him a top-10 option at shooting guard in Fantasy circles. The 2013 first-round pick averaged 21.4 points, 4.0 rebounds, 3.4 assists and 1.0 steal across 36.1 minutes over 81 games, shooting 44.3 percent from the field, including 39.7 percent from distance. He also encouragingly took a career-high 18.6 shot attempts per contest, helping lead to a robust 26.5 percent usage rate. With the Blazers projected to likely return the same starting five, there’s little doubt that the Portland offense should largely run through the backcourt once again this season. That should leave McCollum poised for another large workload, one that’s helped him generate near-elite numbers out of the two-guard spot over the last three campaigns. Moreover, at least a slight improvement on a free-throw rate that dropped from 2016-17’s 91.2 percent to 83.6 percent last season would bump McCollum’s value up another notch.
POR (C, C)
G
75
Min
27.8
FPTS
1,437.0
REB
708.0
AST
143.0
STL
64.0
BLK
111.0
TO
183.0
FGM
482.0
FGA
951.0
FTM
177.0
FTA
273.0
Fresh off signing a four-year, $48 million contract in early July, Nurkic enters the 2018-19 season with designs on a career-best campaign. The 2014 first-round pick enjoyed a solid 2017-18 campaign and encouragingly suited up for a career-high 79 games, but his numbers actually took a hit as compared to the 20 first games of his Portland tenure the year prior following a trade from the Nuggets. Nurkic still generated 14.3 points, 9.0 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.4 blocks last season over 79 games, putting up a career-high 12.0 shot attempts and logging the second-highest usage rate of his career (26.2). The big man’s work on the defensive glass was at elite levels as well, putting up the highest defensive rebounding percentage of his career (26.5) on his way to 27 double-doubles. Given his well-rounded talents, Nurkic slots in at a level just below elite at the center position for Fantasy purposes if he can steer clear of the injury bug.
Fresh off signing a four-year, $48 million contract in early July, Nurkic enters the 2018-19 season with designs on a career-best campaign. The 2014 first-round pick enjoyed a solid 2017-18 campaign and encouragingly suited up for a career-high 79 games, but his numbers actually took a hit as compared to the 20 first games of his Portland tenure the year prior following a trade from the Nuggets. Nurkic still generated 14.3 points, 9.0 rebounds, 1.8 assists and 1.4 blocks last season over 79 games, putting up a career-high 12.0 shot attempts and logging the second-highest usage rate of his career (26.2). The big man’s work on the defensive glass was at elite levels as well, putting up the highest defensive rebounding percentage of his career (26.5) on his way to 27 double-doubles. Given his well-rounded talents, Nurkic slots in at a level just below elite at the center position for Fantasy purposes if he can steer clear of the injury bug.
DET (F, PF, C)
G
62
Min
33.8
FPTS
1,416.0
REB
421.0
AST
376.0
STL
42.0
BLK
25.0
TO
175.0
FGM
484.0
FGA
1,044.0
FTM
267.0
FTA
336.0
Griffin signed a five-year, $171.2 million max extension with the Clippers in July of 2017, which was expected to lock the big man in as one of the team's key foundation pieces for the future. However, with Chris Paul getting dealt to the Rockets, and the Clippers struggling to earn a playoff bid, the organization opted to search for trade partners to unload Griffin and his lengthy contract less than a year after the extension. A deal was ultimately put in place with the Pistons at the trade deadline, sending Griffin to pair with Andre Drummond as the top two guys in Detroit. Through 25 games with the Pistons, Griffin understandably saw his rebound numbers (6.6 RPG) take a hit playing alongside a guy like Drummond, but he still co-existed without much trouble and added averages of 19.8 points and an improved 6.2 assists. His usage was similar between the two teams as well and Griffin was still given every opportunity to be the go-to guy on the offensive side of the ball. While Griffin's health will always be of concern -- he's played 67 games or less in four straight seasons -- the 29-year-old now has a full offseason to get comfortable with his new team and could see a slight uptick in his production in 2018-19 as a result. His shooting percentages are nothing to be excited about (43.8% FG, 34.5% 3Pt, 78.5% FT), but his assist totals as a big man are valuable, and he's always going to provide strong scoring and rebounding numbers. It's also worth it to note the Pistons clearly gave him the green light to fire up shots from three-point land, as Griffin's 5.4 attempts from deep were more than double that of any average he's held in a previous season. All of that combined should keep Griffin as a top-30 pick in standard leagues.
Griffin signed a five-year, $171.2 million max extension with the Clippers in July of 2017, which was expected to lock the big man in as one of the team's key foundation pieces for the future. However, with Chris Paul getting dealt to the Rockets, and the Clippers struggling to earn a playoff bid, the organization opted to search for trade partners to unload Griffin and his lengthy contract less than a year after the extension. A deal was ultimately put in place with the Pistons at the trade deadline, sending Griffin to pair with Andre Drummond as the top two guys in Detroit. Through 25 games with the Pistons, Griffin understandably saw his rebound numbers (6.6 RPG) take a hit playing alongside a guy like Drummond, but he still co-existed without much trouble and added averages of 19.8 points and an improved 6.2 assists. His usage was similar between the two teams as well and Griffin was still given every opportunity to be the go-to guy on the offensive side of the ball. While Griffin's health will always be of concern -- he's played 67 games or less in four straight seasons -- the 29-year-old now has a full offseason to get comfortable with his new team and could see a slight uptick in his production in 2018-19 as a result. His shooting percentages are nothing to be excited about (43.8% FG, 34.5% 3Pt, 78.5% FT), but his assist totals as a big man are valuable, and he's always going to provide strong scoring and rebounding numbers. It's also worth it to note the Pistons clearly gave him the green light to fire up shots from three-point land, as Griffin's 5.4 attempts from deep were more than double that of any average he's held in a previous season. All of that combined should keep Griffin as a top-30 pick in standard leagues.
BOS (C, C, PF)
G
74
Min
31.9
FPTS
1,407.0
REB
519.0
AST
352.0
STL
45.0
BLK
81.0
TO
137.0
FGM
387.0
FGA
781.0
FTM
99.0
FTA
125.0
For much of last season, Horford led the Celtics in assists per game. How many other centers have that kind of passing ability? The answer: not many. While Kyrie Irving, Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown fill up the highlight reel, Horford keeps the Celtics ship steady with quick defensive rotations, smart passing and tough rebounding. The 32-year-old is entering his 12th NBA season, yet he's showing few signs of slowing down. Though Horford's scoring took a slight dip last season, he increased his efficiency compared to 2016-17, and hit nearly 43 percent of his 3.1 three-point attempts per game, offering relatively rare production in that category from the center position. Horford also chipped in 7.4 rebounds and 4.7 assists per game, while blocking at least one shot per game (1.1 BPG) for the 10th straight season. If there's a knock on Horford it's that he's missed a combined 24 games over the last two seasons, but he did play 82 games in 2015-16 and hasn't shown any ill-effects from the severe shoulder issues that hampered him earlier in his career.
For much of last season, Horford led the Celtics in assists per game. How many other centers have that kind of passing ability? The answer: not many. While Kyrie Irving, Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown fill up the highlight reel, Horford keeps the Celtics ship steady with quick defensive rotations, smart passing and tough rebounding. The 32-year-old is entering his 12th NBA season, yet he's showing few signs of slowing down. Though Horford's scoring took a slight dip last season, he increased his efficiency compared to 2016-17, and hit nearly 43 percent of his 3.1 three-point attempts per game, offering relatively rare production in that category from the center position. Horford also chipped in 7.4 rebounds and 4.7 assists per game, while blocking at least one shot per game (1.1 BPG) for the 10th straight season. If there's a knock on Horford it's that he's missed a combined 24 games over the last two seasons, but he did play 82 games in 2015-16 and hasn't shown any ill-effects from the severe shoulder issues that hampered him earlier in his career.
BRO (C, C)
G
78
Min
27.8
FPTS
1,400.0
REB
584.0
AST
76.0
STL
42.0
BLK
132.0
TO
123.0
FGM
408.0
FGA
688.0
FTM
191.0
FTA
241.0
Despite being a late-first-round selection, Allen enjoyed a strong rookie season. It got off to a somewhat slow start, as the big man averaged just 18.2 minutes across his first 50 games of the year. However, as he was slowly integrated into the rotation and gained some added comfort, Allen wound up averaging 9.4 points, 6.1 rebounds and 2.1 blocks across 24.0 minutes in his final 22 games after the All-Star break. That provided an early glimpse into what Fantasy owners can expect heading into 2018-19. Allen is set to open the year with the top unit and considering his age, upside, and the Nets' lack of premier big men, he should have every opportunity to log minutes in the upper-20's most nights. After finishing 22nd in the league in blocks per game last year while playing just 20.0 minutes per night, look for Allen to solidify his place as one of the league's best young rim-protectors. The offseason addition of Ed Davis means Allen will have some competition for playing time, but developing Allen should be the Nets' priority, and it's unlikely that Davis will be a major drag on Allen's overall role.
Despite being a late-first-round selection, Allen enjoyed a strong rookie season. It got off to a somewhat slow start, as the big man averaged just 18.2 minutes across his first 50 games of the year. However, as he was slowly integrated into the rotation and gained some added comfort, Allen wound up averaging 9.4 points, 6.1 rebounds and 2.1 blocks across 24.0 minutes in his final 22 games after the All-Star break. That provided an early glimpse into what Fantasy owners can expect heading into 2018-19. Allen is set to open the year with the top unit and considering his age, upside, and the Nets' lack of premier big men, he should have every opportunity to log minutes in the upper-20's most nights. After finishing 22nd in the league in blocks per game last year while playing just 20.0 minutes per night, look for Allen to solidify his place as one of the league's best young rim-protectors. The offseason addition of Ed Davis means Allen will have some competition for playing time, but developing Allen should be the Nets' priority, and it's unlikely that Davis will be a major drag on Allen's overall role.
DAL (G, PG, SG, SF)
G
75
Min
29.4
FPTS
1,378.0
REB
475.0
AST
429.0
STL
94.0
BLK
25.0
TO
182.0
FGM
371.0
FGA
821.0
FTM
213.0
FTA
273.0
Doncic entered the 2018 NBA Draft as one of the more hyped international players in recent memory. He picked up EuroLeague MVP honors in his fourth season with Real Madrid and finished the year with averages of 16.0 points, 4.9 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.1 steals across 33 games. He also hit 1.7 three-pointers per contest at a 32.9 percent clip. Doncic's production earned him a selection with the third overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft and he now heads to Dallas as another building block for the future. It seems likely that Doncic is thrust into big minutes right away and even though there may be some growing pains in terms of his fit alongside promising second-year guard Dennis Smith, his extended range at 6-foot-8 and versatility to make in impact at three different positions are all positives for his future Fantasy outlook. Doncic's numbers likely won't be overly gaudy in Year 1, but he'll enter the season as the best all-around Fantasy rookie, and he projects as a much more efficient scorer than the other guards in his draft class. Look for the rookie to be a coveted selection in dynasty leagues and he'll also be an intriguing late-round selection in standard drafts for those hoping Doncic makes a seamless transition to the NBA.
Doncic entered the 2018 NBA Draft as one of the more hyped international players in recent memory. He picked up EuroLeague MVP honors in his fourth season with Real Madrid and finished the year with averages of 16.0 points, 4.9 rebounds, 4.3 assists and 1.1 steals across 33 games. He also hit 1.7 three-pointers per contest at a 32.9 percent clip. Doncic's production earned him a selection with the third overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft and he now heads to Dallas as another building block for the future. It seems likely that Doncic is thrust into big minutes right away and even though there may be some growing pains in terms of his fit alongside promising second-year guard Dennis Smith, his extended range at 6-foot-8 and versatility to make in impact at three different positions are all positives for his future Fantasy outlook. Doncic's numbers likely won't be overly gaudy in Year 1, but he'll enter the season as the best all-around Fantasy rookie, and he projects as a much more efficient scorer than the other guards in his draft class. Look for the rookie to be a coveted selection in dynasty leagues and he'll also be an intriguing late-round selection in standard drafts for those hoping Doncic makes a seamless transition to the NBA.
ORL (C, C)
G
72
Min
27.9
FPTS
1,369.0
REB
591.0
AST
188.0
STL
54.0
BLK
69.0
TO
126.0
FGM
477.0
FGA
990.0
FTM
91.0
FTA
115.0
The big man struggled to stay healthy last season, appearing in only 57 games. That’s often been the case with Vucevic, as he’s averaging 67.5 games played over the past six campaigns. But, per usual, he remained productive in his time. Seeing 29.5 minutes per game in 2017-18, Vucevic recorded 29 double-doubles and averaged 16.5 points, 9.2 rebounds, 3.4 assists and a combined 2.1 blocks/steals. He’s also in the process of adding range, hitting a career-high 1.1 threes at 31.4 percent. However, for the first time since his rookie year, Vucevic’s role will be threatened. With the fifth overall pick in this summer’s draft, the Magic selected high-upside center Mo Bamba out of Texas. Bamba isn't a lock to start, but it’s expected there will be a battle for playing time between the two bigs. As a result, Vucevic’s Fantasy stock is taking a hit, and his Average Draft Position will likely drop relative to last season.
The big man struggled to stay healthy last season, appearing in only 57 games. That’s often been the case with Vucevic, as he’s averaging 67.5 games played over the past six campaigns. But, per usual, he remained productive in his time. Seeing 29.5 minutes per game in 2017-18, Vucevic recorded 29 double-doubles and averaged 16.5 points, 9.2 rebounds, 3.4 assists and a combined 2.1 blocks/steals. He’s also in the process of adding range, hitting a career-high 1.1 threes at 31.4 percent. However, for the first time since his rookie year, Vucevic’s role will be threatened. With the fifth overall pick in this summer’s draft, the Magic selected high-upside center Mo Bamba out of Texas. Bamba isn't a lock to start, but it’s expected there will be a battle for playing time between the two bigs. As a result, Vucevic’s Fantasy stock is taking a hit, and his Average Draft Position will likely drop relative to last season.
DEN (G, PG, SG)
G
81
Min
32.9
FPTS
1,354.0
REB
308.0
AST
292.0
STL
82.0
BLK
29.0
TO
179.0
FGM
511.0
FGA
1,112.0
FTM
242.0
FTA
266.0
After spending most of his rookie year behind Jameer Nelson and Emmanuel Mudiay, Murray started 80 of his 81 games for the Nuggets last season. Seeing just over 10 more minutes per game, the Kentucky product set career highs across the board. While he shouldn't be relied upon for assists (3.4) considering Nikola Jokic’s role in the offense, Murray is progressing into a legitimate scoring threat, recording 27 outings of at least 20 points last season, which includes seven 30-plus efforts. Those performances happen in part due to his knock-down three-point (2.0 per game at 37.8 percent) and free-throw (2.8 per game at 90.5 percent) shooting. Moving forward, consistency will be a step Murray needs to take to improve his Fantasy value, as he scored fewer than 10 points in 18 contests, and averaged 24.4 minutes in those tilts. One thing he has been consistent at, however, is staying on the court. Across his first two campaigns, Murray has missed just one contest. Assuming he stays healthy and improves as expected, the point guard seems primed to turn in a top-50 Fantasy campaign.
After spending most of his rookie year behind Jameer Nelson and Emmanuel Mudiay, Murray started 80 of his 81 games for the Nuggets last season. Seeing just over 10 more minutes per game, the Kentucky product set career highs across the board. While he shouldn't be relied upon for assists (3.4) considering Nikola Jokic’s role in the offense, Murray is progressing into a legitimate scoring threat, recording 27 outings of at least 20 points last season, which includes seven 30-plus efforts. Those performances happen in part due to his knock-down three-point (2.0 per game at 37.8 percent) and free-throw (2.8 per game at 90.5 percent) shooting. Moving forward, consistency will be a step Murray needs to take to improve his Fantasy value, as he scored fewer than 10 points in 18 contests, and averaged 24.4 minutes in those tilts. One thing he has been consistent at, however, is staying on the court. Across his first two campaigns, Murray has missed just one contest. Assuming he stays healthy and improves as expected, the point guard seems primed to turn in a top-50 Fantasy campaign.
IND (C, C)
G
76
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,328.0
REB
547.0
AST
107.0
STL
47.0
BLK
145.0
TO
117.0
FGM
394.0
FGA
810.0
FTM
208.0
FTA
259.0
After a strong sophomore campaign, Turner was expected to take another step forward in 2017-18 and appeared to be a prime candidate to up his production following the departures of big-time contributors Paul George and Jeff Teague. However, it was offseason addition, Victor Oladipo, that really shined and turned himself into the go-to option, while Turner remained more of a complementary piece. To begin with, the 6-foot-11 big man struggled a bit with his health and despite starting every game he played in, was limited to just 65 contests due to a concussion and an elbow injury. Even when Turner did take the court, though, he appeared to regress as a whole and finished the season with averages of 12.7 points, 6.4 rebounds and 1.8 blocks, all of which were down from 14.5, 7.3 and 2.1, respectively. Adding on to that, his 47.9 percent clip from the field was well below others at his position. Still, Turner's athleticism, rim-protecting skills and ability to stretch the floor (35.7% from deep in 2017-18) are key attributes to have as a center in today's NBA, so his workload shouldn't take any drastic hits despite the down year. Look for Turner to operate as the third or fourth option offensively, but his rebound and block totals should still earn him a selection in the middle rounds of most Fantasy leagues. A bounce-back season is certainly in play and Turner is still only 22 years old, so improvements with his overall game and production wouldn't be unexpected.
After a strong sophomore campaign, Turner was expected to take another step forward in 2017-18 and appeared to be a prime candidate to up his production following the departures of big-time contributors Paul George and Jeff Teague. However, it was offseason addition, Victor Oladipo, that really shined and turned himself into the go-to option, while Turner remained more of a complementary piece. To begin with, the 6-foot-11 big man struggled a bit with his health and despite starting every game he played in, was limited to just 65 contests due to a concussion and an elbow injury. Even when Turner did take the court, though, he appeared to regress as a whole and finished the season with averages of 12.7 points, 6.4 rebounds and 1.8 blocks, all of which were down from 14.5, 7.3 and 2.1, respectively. Adding on to that, his 47.9 percent clip from the field was well below others at his position. Still, Turner's athleticism, rim-protecting skills and ability to stretch the floor (35.7% from deep in 2017-18) are key attributes to have as a center in today's NBA, so his workload shouldn't take any drastic hits despite the down year. Look for Turner to operate as the third or fourth option offensively, but his rebound and block totals should still earn him a selection in the middle rounds of most Fantasy leagues. A bounce-back season is certainly in play and Turner is still only 22 years old, so improvements with his overall game and production wouldn't be unexpected.
MIL (G, PG)
G
72
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,328.0
REB
295.0
AST
383.0
STL
135.0
BLK
35.0
TO
216.0
FGM
455.0
FGA
987.0
FTM
255.0
FTA
317.0
Bledsoe spent just three games in Phoenix last season after being shipped to Milwaukee, where he started in all 71 of his appearances. He continued his work as a solid defender and scorer, averaging a combined 2.6 steals/blocks and 17.8 points on 47.6 percent shooting. While he’s not a top-tier three-point shooter (34.9 percent) he hit a career-high 1.7 threes per tilt last season. However, the 28-year-old still isn't much of a distributor, averaging 5.1 assists with the Bucks last year -- his lowest mark since 2012-13. Unless coach Mike Budenholzer drastically changes things, Bledsoe probably won't make strides as a passer this season considering the ball handling responsibilities of Giannis Antetokounmpo (and, to some extent, Khris Middleton and Jabari Parker). When on the court, Bledsoe is a top-30 player, though health concerns remain. By his standards, Bledsoe was healthy for the 2017-18 campaign, but is averaging just 59 games played since he became a full-time starter in 2013-14.
Bledsoe spent just three games in Phoenix last season after being shipped to Milwaukee, where he started in all 71 of his appearances. He continued his work as a solid defender and scorer, averaging a combined 2.6 steals/blocks and 17.8 points on 47.6 percent shooting. While he’s not a top-tier three-point shooter (34.9 percent) he hit a career-high 1.7 threes per tilt last season. However, the 28-year-old still isn't much of a distributor, averaging 5.1 assists with the Bucks last year -- his lowest mark since 2012-13. Unless coach Mike Budenholzer drastically changes things, Bledsoe probably won't make strides as a passer this season considering the ball handling responsibilities of Giannis Antetokounmpo (and, to some extent, Khris Middleton and Jabari Parker). When on the court, Bledsoe is a top-30 player, though health concerns remain. By his standards, Bledsoe was healthy for the 2017-18 campaign, but is averaging just 59 games played since he became a full-time starter in 2013-14.
DEN (F, PF, C)
G
74
Min
32.0
FPTS
1,321.0
REB
508.0
AST
214.0
STL
86.0
BLK
91.0
TO
151.0
FGM
409.0
FGA
902.0
FTM
251.0
FTA
336.0
Wrist surgery limited Millsap to 38 games during his debut season as a member of the Nuggets. In the 15 games prior to the injury, the four-time All-Star averaged 16.0 points, 6.3 rebounds, 3.2 assists and a combined 2.4 blocks/steals. He also shot 44.7 percent from the field, made 69.2 percent of his free-throws, and converted 1.3 threes per tilt at 33.9 percent. While counting stats regressed for the big man, it was nothing unexpected, as he turned 33 years old and was joining a new team with more high-usage talent than in his final year with Atlanta. It may be hard for Millsap to increase his scoring this season, however, as the team remains stocked with offensive talent. Overall, it seems safest to bank on him having a similar statistical season. Though he’s on the back end of his prime, Millsap is still someone worth exploring in the middle rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
Wrist surgery limited Millsap to 38 games during his debut season as a member of the Nuggets. In the 15 games prior to the injury, the four-time All-Star averaged 16.0 points, 6.3 rebounds, 3.2 assists and a combined 2.4 blocks/steals. He also shot 44.7 percent from the field, made 69.2 percent of his free-throws, and converted 1.3 threes per tilt at 33.9 percent. While counting stats regressed for the big man, it was nothing unexpected, as he turned 33 years old and was joining a new team with more high-usage talent than in his final year with Atlanta. It may be hard for Millsap to increase his scoring this season, however, as the team remains stocked with offensive talent. Overall, it seems safest to bank on him having a similar statistical season. Though he’s on the back end of his prime, Millsap is still someone worth exploring in the middle rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
GS (G, SG)
G
77
Min
33.9
FPTS
1,316.0
REB
289.0
AST
178.0
STL
57.0
BLK
35.0
TO
133.0
FGM
603.0
FGA
1,251.0
FTM
110.0
FTA
128.0
Though Thompson posted his lowest scoring average (20.0) since 2013-14, he set a career high in three-point percentage (44.0) and field-goal percentage (48.8). While his supplementary stats are relatively mundane -- 3.8 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.3 steals/blocks per tilt -- they’re enough to give him a reasonable Fantasy floor. And, despite playing just 73 games, Thompson ranked fifth in made threes (229). Overall, Thompson has been one of the most reliable players over the past four years. Since 2014-15, his first All-Star appearance, he’s played 73-plus games and averaged at least 20.0 points, 3.2 rebounds, 3.1 threes, 2.1 assists while shooting at least 46.3 percent from the field and 83.7 percent from the charity stripe. While he has a relatively low ceiling, his role isn't expected to change this season, so drafting Thompson remains one of the safest bets in Fantasy.
Though Thompson posted his lowest scoring average (20.0) since 2013-14, he set a career high in three-point percentage (44.0) and field-goal percentage (48.8). While his supplementary stats are relatively mundane -- 3.8 rebounds, 2.5 assists and 1.3 steals/blocks per tilt -- they’re enough to give him a reasonable Fantasy floor. And, despite playing just 73 games, Thompson ranked fifth in made threes (229). Overall, Thompson has been one of the most reliable players over the past four years. Since 2014-15, his first All-Star appearance, he’s played 73-plus games and averaged at least 20.0 points, 3.2 rebounds, 3.1 threes, 2.1 assists while shooting at least 46.3 percent from the field and 83.7 percent from the charity stripe. While he has a relatively low ceiling, his role isn't expected to change this season, so drafting Thompson remains one of the safest bets in Fantasy.
MIA (C, C)
G
65
Min
24.2
FPTS
1,314.0
REB
713.0
AST
47.0
STL
43.0
BLK
109.0
TO
106.0
FGM
367.0
FGA
667.0
FTM
141.0
FTA
210.0
The 2015-16 block champion and 2016-17 rebounding champion, Whiteside saw his role reduced during 2017-18, garnering his fewest minutes per game (25.3) since his first year in Miami. Though he was still productive -- 14.0 points, 11.4 rebounds, 1.7 blocks on 54.0 percent shooting -- it became clear that he wasn't always going to be a staple for coach Erik Spoelstra at the end of games and against small-ball teams. Whiteside also played just 54 games while dealing with knee and hip injuries. Even with that being the case, his 11 games of 30-plus minutes represent a drastic change from 2016-17, when he played 59 such games. That trend, coupled with the swirling rumors that the Heat are looking to trade Whiteside, make him a relatively risky pick for Fantasy. On a positive note, the 29-year-old improved his free-throw stroke to 70.3 percent after three consecutive years at 65.0 or under.
The 2015-16 block champion and 2016-17 rebounding champion, Whiteside saw his role reduced during 2017-18, garnering his fewest minutes per game (25.3) since his first year in Miami. Though he was still productive -- 14.0 points, 11.4 rebounds, 1.7 blocks on 54.0 percent shooting -- it became clear that he wasn't always going to be a staple for coach Erik Spoelstra at the end of games and against small-ball teams. Whiteside also played just 54 games while dealing with knee and hip injuries. Even with that being the case, his 11 games of 30-plus minutes represent a drastic change from 2016-17, when he played 59 such games. That trend, coupled with the swirling rumors that the Heat are looking to trade Whiteside, make him a relatively risky pick for Fantasy. On a positive note, the 29-year-old improved his free-throw stroke to 70.3 percent after three consecutive years at 65.0 or under.
MIA (G, PG)
G
76
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,314.0
REB
299.0
AST
401.0
STL
65.0
BLK
12.0
TO
171.0
FGM
513.0
FGA
1,107.0
FTM
220.0
FTA
279.0
Though Dragic managed to snag his first All-Star appearance last season at age 32, he was an injury replacement and actually had a down year relative to 2016-17, seeing his points (17.3), assists (4.8) and field-goal percentage (45.0) drop. He’s also slipped on the defensive end lately, averaging 1.1 steals per 36 minutes over the past four campaigns compared to 1.5 steals per 36 during the first six years of his career. On a positive note, Dragic has improved as a free-throw shooter, making 79.5 percent of his attempts over the past two seasons compared 74.9 percent prior. He also posted a career high in rebounding last season (4.1), though it’s generally ill-advised to bank on consistent rebounding production from point guards. All things considered, despite being on the back end of his prime, Dragic is set to remain a high-usage player within the Heat’s offense and has played at least 72 games per season since 2012-13, making him one of the most reliable Fantasy options available during the back ends of drafts.
Though Dragic managed to snag his first All-Star appearance last season at age 32, he was an injury replacement and actually had a down year relative to 2016-17, seeing his points (17.3), assists (4.8) and field-goal percentage (45.0) drop. He’s also slipped on the defensive end lately, averaging 1.1 steals per 36 minutes over the past four campaigns compared to 1.5 steals per 36 during the first six years of his career. On a positive note, Dragic has improved as a free-throw shooter, making 79.5 percent of his attempts over the past two seasons compared 74.9 percent prior. He also posted a career high in rebounding last season (4.1), though it’s generally ill-advised to bank on consistent rebounding production from point guards. All things considered, despite being on the back end of his prime, Dragic is set to remain a high-usage player within the Heat’s offense and has played at least 72 games per season since 2012-13, making him one of the most reliable Fantasy options available during the back ends of drafts.
SAC (C, C)
G
75
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,313.0
REB
554.0
AST
189.0
STL
84.0
BLK
75.0
TO
118.0
FGM
423.0
FGA
826.0
FTM
174.0
FTA
268.0
During his third year in the league, Cauley-Stein saw the most run of his career. He started 58 of his 73 appearances, garnering 28.0 minutes per contest. As a result, he set career highs nearly across the board by averaging 12.8 points, 7.0 rebounds, 2.4 assists and 1.1 steals while shooting 50.2 percent from the field and 61.9 percent from the charity stripe. He flashed a diverse skillset, able to put up significant stats in every category. Cauley-Stein was able to rack up 11 20-point games, 13 games with double-digit rebounds, six games with at least five assists, seven games with at least three steals, and four games with at least three swats. He should be in line for a similar workload this year, though the added presence of Marvin Bagley, who could play some center, could limited Cauley-Stein’s upside. Still, as a starting center who is expected to see minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s, Cauley-Stein is worth a look in the later rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
During his third year in the league, Cauley-Stein saw the most run of his career. He started 58 of his 73 appearances, garnering 28.0 minutes per contest. As a result, he set career highs nearly across the board by averaging 12.8 points, 7.0 rebounds, 2.4 assists and 1.1 steals while shooting 50.2 percent from the field and 61.9 percent from the charity stripe. He flashed a diverse skillset, able to put up significant stats in every category. Cauley-Stein was able to rack up 11 20-point games, 13 games with double-digit rebounds, six games with at least five assists, seven games with at least three steals, and four games with at least three swats. He should be in line for a similar workload this year, though the added presence of Marvin Bagley, who could play some center, could limited Cauley-Stein’s upside. Still, as a starting center who is expected to see minutes in the mid-to-upper 20s, Cauley-Stein is worth a look in the later rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
DEN (G, SG, SF)
G
78
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,311.0
REB
406.0
AST
302.0
STL
79.0
BLK
38.0
TO
148.0
FGM
455.0
FGA
1,020.0
FTM
180.0
FTA
224.0
In a super-sixth-man role, Barton started 40 of his 80 appearances for the Nuggets last season, seeing 33.1 minutes per tilt -- a role that will only be expanded with the departure of Wilson Chandler to Philadelphia via trade. Barton’s Fantasy value comes from his all-around playstyle. In 2017-18, the 27-year-old averaged 15.7 points, 5.0 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.0 steal -- being one of only 15 players to do so. That list shortens to eight players when including Barton’s 1.9 threes per tilt. He’s also stayed relatively healthy over the past three seasons, missing just 23 games. Plus, due to his dynamic skillset, Barton is often the player who sees extra usage when a backcourt or wing player goes down due to injury. There were 14 occasions last season where Barton saw at least 40 minutes, averaging 20.1 points, 6.1 rebounds, 5.4 assists and a combined 2.4 steals/blocks in those contests. Overall, he should be ready to improve on an already ascending career in 2018-19.
In a super-sixth-man role, Barton started 40 of his 80 appearances for the Nuggets last season, seeing 33.1 minutes per tilt -- a role that will only be expanded with the departure of Wilson Chandler to Philadelphia via trade. Barton’s Fantasy value comes from his all-around playstyle. In 2017-18, the 27-year-old averaged 15.7 points, 5.0 rebounds, 4.1 assists and 1.0 steal -- being one of only 15 players to do so. That list shortens to eight players when including Barton’s 1.9 threes per tilt. He’s also stayed relatively healthy over the past three seasons, missing just 23 games. Plus, due to his dynamic skillset, Barton is often the player who sees extra usage when a backcourt or wing player goes down due to injury. There were 14 occasions last season where Barton saw at least 40 minutes, averaging 20.1 points, 6.1 rebounds, 5.4 assists and a combined 2.4 steals/blocks in those contests. Overall, he should be ready to improve on an already ascending career in 2018-19.
MEM (G, PG)
G
68
Min
32.6
FPTS
1,308.0
REB
192.0
AST
402.0
STL
82.0
BLK
18.0
TO
109.0
FGM
438.0
FGA
991.0
FTM
295.0
FTA
359.0
Bleak as the Grizzlies' 2017-18 campaign was likely to be, it became an outright nightmare once Conley went down for the season after just 12 games due to a heel injury. He ultimately underwent surgery, and he remained limited to non-contact work as recently as late July. The veteran point guard's unfortunate turn of events came in the wake of a career-best season in 2016-17, one that saw him post new high-water marks in points (20.5), rebounds (3.5) and shooting percentage (46.0), including three-point shooting percentage (40.8). Assuming full health in time for the coming season, Conley will be helping fellow veterans Marc Gasol and Kyle Anderson shepherd a young group headlined by fourth overall pick Jaren Jackson. The struggles that Conley experienced offensively before his injury last season (career-low 38.1 percent) aren't expected to endure if Conley's track record is any indication, given that he'd shot under 43.0 percent only once in eight of the prior nine seasons.
Bleak as the Grizzlies' 2017-18 campaign was likely to be, it became an outright nightmare once Conley went down for the season after just 12 games due to a heel injury. He ultimately underwent surgery, and he remained limited to non-contact work as recently as late July. The veteran point guard's unfortunate turn of events came in the wake of a career-best season in 2016-17, one that saw him post new high-water marks in points (20.5), rebounds (3.5) and shooting percentage (46.0), including three-point shooting percentage (40.8). Assuming full health in time for the coming season, Conley will be helping fellow veterans Marc Gasol and Kyle Anderson shepherd a young group headlined by fourth overall pick Jaren Jackson. The struggles that Conley experienced offensively before his injury last season (career-low 38.1 percent) aren't expected to endure if Conley's track record is any indication, given that he'd shot under 43.0 percent only once in eight of the prior nine seasons.
CHI (G, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
34.2
FPTS
1,290.0
REB
368.0
AST
233.0
STL
84.0
BLK
16.0
TO
168.0
FGM
501.0
FGA
1,154.0
FTM
323.0
FTA
392.0
Coming off an ACL tear, LaVine was limited to 24 games last season -- his first campaign with Chicago. While he managed to score 16.7 points per game, he struggled with efficiency, hitting just 38.3 percent of his looks. However, it’s important to note that he took 19.5 shots per 36 minutes, which could be an indication of what’s to come in 2018-19. And, he shot 45.5 percent from the field and 38.8 percent from three during his final 129 games in Minnesota. If he can come marginally close to those percentages again while maintaining last year’s volume, LaVine could be in for a massive scoring bump. Last season, he also managed to rack up a career-high 5.2 rebounds and 4.0 assists per 36 minutes. The assist rate was his best mark since his rookie year, where he posted 5.2 dimes per 36 while playing 94 percent of his minutes at point guard. Still just 23 years old and on a fast-paced team where he'll be a focal point, LaVine will have no shortage of opportunities to improve on his game, and should see his Fantasy stock buoy compared to 2017-18.
Coming off an ACL tear, LaVine was limited to 24 games last season -- his first campaign with Chicago. While he managed to score 16.7 points per game, he struggled with efficiency, hitting just 38.3 percent of his looks. However, it’s important to note that he took 19.5 shots per 36 minutes, which could be an indication of what’s to come in 2018-19. And, he shot 45.5 percent from the field and 38.8 percent from three during his final 129 games in Minnesota. If he can come marginally close to those percentages again while maintaining last year’s volume, LaVine could be in for a massive scoring bump. Last season, he also managed to rack up a career-high 5.2 rebounds and 4.0 assists per 36 minutes. The assist rate was his best mark since his rookie year, where he posted 5.2 dimes per 36 while playing 94 percent of his minutes at point guard. Still just 23 years old and on a fast-paced team where he'll be a focal point, LaVine will have no shortage of opportunities to improve on his game, and should see his Fantasy stock buoy compared to 2017-18.
ATL (C, PF, C)
G
78
Min
25.7
FPTS
1,280.0
REB
637.0
AST
117.0
STL
52.0
BLK
67.0
TO
111.0
FGM
340.0
FGA
635.0
FTM
87.0
FTA
112.0
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, Dedmon saw the most extensive action of his career after joining Atlanta following previous stints in Dallas and Orlando. Dedmon was the team's top center for much of the year, starting 46 of the 62 games he played in, while averaging 24.9 minutes. He translated that to a near double-double of 10.0 points and 7.9 rebounds, though his efficiency took quite a bit of a hit with the increase in usage, falling to 52.4 percent from the field compared to 62.2 percent a year prior. In addition, Dedmon knocked down 50 three-pointers at a 35.5 percent clip, which was especially surprising considering the big man had never hit a three-pointer since joining the NBA in 2013. The Hawks made a few moves this offseason, most notably sending Dennis Schroder to the Thunder and Mike Muscala to the 76ers. Schroder led the Hawks' scoring attack last year, so his departure could create a few more shot attempts elsewhere on the roster. That said, it seems more likely guys like Kent Bazemore, Taurean Prince and John Collins soak up those extra touches, rather than Dedmon. The Hawks did add a somewhat intriguing center in Alex Len, who has shown flashes at times when pushed into extended minutes and is just 25 years old. He could push Dedmon for playing time if he shows well during training camp, so that will be a situation to monitor. Still, Dedmon remains the favorite to open the year as a starter and that would likely come with a similar workload and overall production from the 2017-18 campaign. Look for him to be asset in deeper leagues as a rebound specialist that can hit double-digit points on a night-to-night basis, though again, it would still be wise to keep an eye on Len's progress behind him.
Playing for his third team in as many seasons, Dedmon saw the most extensive action of his career after joining Atlanta following previous stints in Dallas and Orlando. Dedmon was the team's top center for much of the year, starting 46 of the 62 games he played in, while averaging 24.9 minutes. He translated that to a near double-double of 10.0 points and 7.9 rebounds, though his efficiency took quite a bit of a hit with the increase in usage, falling to 52.4 percent from the field compared to 62.2 percent a year prior. In addition, Dedmon knocked down 50 three-pointers at a 35.5 percent clip, which was especially surprising considering the big man had never hit a three-pointer since joining the NBA in 2013. The Hawks made a few moves this offseason, most notably sending Dennis Schroder to the Thunder and Mike Muscala to the 76ers. Schroder led the Hawks' scoring attack last year, so his departure could create a few more shot attempts elsewhere on the roster. That said, it seems more likely guys like Kent Bazemore, Taurean Prince and John Collins soak up those extra touches, rather than Dedmon. The Hawks did add a somewhat intriguing center in Alex Len, who has shown flashes at times when pushed into extended minutes and is just 25 years old. He could push Dedmon for playing time if he shows well during training camp, so that will be a situation to monitor. Still, Dedmon remains the favorite to open the year as a starter and that would likely come with a similar workload and overall production from the 2017-18 campaign. Look for him to be asset in deeper leagues as a rebound specialist that can hit double-digit points on a night-to-night basis, though again, it would still be wise to keep an eye on Len's progress behind him.
NOR (F, PF, C)
G
70
Min
28.8
FPTS
1,279.0
REB
547.0
AST
108.0
STL
59.0
BLK
53.0
TO
84.0
FGM
409.0
FGA
923.0
FTM
152.0
FTA
185.0
After missing a chunk of time at the start of the season stemming from an altercation with then-Bulls teammate Bobby Portis, Mirotic was eventually dealt to New Orleans, where he flourished as the de facto replacement for DeMarcus Cousins, who was lost to a torn Achilles in January. Mirotic has shown plenty of Fantasy promise over the last few seasons, but whether due to mismanagement or inconsistent play, he was always somewhat of a letdown in Chicago. Cousins' injury meant the Pelicans were on the lookout for another big with the ability to stretch the floor. Mirotic slotted in nicely, and across his 30 games for the Pelicans, he put up averages of 14.6 points, 8.2 rebounds, 1.0 steal, 0.9 blocks and 2.2 three-pointers per game. The defensive numbers were especially impressive, and the hope is that production becomes the norm, rather than a half-season anomaly. The arrival of Julius Randle could hurt Mirotic's value a bit, and he'll likely be stuck in a bench role moving forward. However, he still projects to be a major factor in the rotation and will end up playing alongside Randle in certain alignments.
After missing a chunk of time at the start of the season stemming from an altercation with then-Bulls teammate Bobby Portis, Mirotic was eventually dealt to New Orleans, where he flourished as the de facto replacement for DeMarcus Cousins, who was lost to a torn Achilles in January. Mirotic has shown plenty of Fantasy promise over the last few seasons, but whether due to mismanagement or inconsistent play, he was always somewhat of a letdown in Chicago. Cousins' injury meant the Pelicans were on the lookout for another big with the ability to stretch the floor. Mirotic slotted in nicely, and across his 30 games for the Pelicans, he put up averages of 14.6 points, 8.2 rebounds, 1.0 steal, 0.9 blocks and 2.2 three-pointers per game. The defensive numbers were especially impressive, and the hope is that production becomes the norm, rather than a half-season anomaly. The arrival of Julius Randle could hurt Mirotic's value a bit, and he'll likely be stuck in a bench role moving forward. However, he still projects to be a major factor in the rotation and will end up playing alongside Randle in certain alignments.
BOS (F, SF)
G
80
Min
31.6
FPTS
1,269.0
REB
438.0
AST
133.0
STL
86.0
BLK
51.0
TO
118.0
FGM
407.0
FGA
848.0
FTM
231.0
FTA
274.0
Had it not been for historic debuts from Ben Simmons and Donovan Mitchell, Tatum would have been the Rookie of the Year frontrunner. The No. 3 overall pick got off to a red-hot start from beyond the arc and eventually settled into his role as one of the Celtics' premier scoring threats. Tatum was at his best in the postseason, averaging 18.5 points, 4.4 rebounds and 2.7 assists while shooting better than 47 percent from the field during the Celtics' run to the Eastern Conference Finals. Of course, Tatum's breakout may not have been possible had it not been for Gordon Hayward's season-ending injury five minutes into opening night, and the biggest hurdle facing the 20-year-old may be how he'll fit into the offensive hierarchy with Hayward back in the mix. In a normal situation, Tatum would be on the short list of players poised to make the leap toward legitimate stardom, but on one of the deepest teams in recent memory, Tatum may be forced to settle for a secondary role for the time being, provided Hayward, Kyrie Irving, Al Horford and Jaylen Brown all stay relatively healthy. With that in mind, expectations should be tempered for Tatum, though he should again be a hyper-efficient scorer for his age, who carries significantly more value in dynasty/multi-season leagues.
Had it not been for historic debuts from Ben Simmons and Donovan Mitchell, Tatum would have been the Rookie of the Year frontrunner. The No. 3 overall pick got off to a red-hot start from beyond the arc and eventually settled into his role as one of the Celtics' premier scoring threats. Tatum was at his best in the postseason, averaging 18.5 points, 4.4 rebounds and 2.7 assists while shooting better than 47 percent from the field during the Celtics' run to the Eastern Conference Finals. Of course, Tatum's breakout may not have been possible had it not been for Gordon Hayward's season-ending injury five minutes into opening night, and the biggest hurdle facing the 20-year-old may be how he'll fit into the offensive hierarchy with Hayward back in the mix. In a normal situation, Tatum would be on the short list of players poised to make the leap toward legitimate stardom, but on one of the deepest teams in recent memory, Tatum may be forced to settle for a secondary role for the time being, provided Hayward, Kyrie Irving, Al Horford and Jaylen Brown all stay relatively healthy. With that in mind, expectations should be tempered for Tatum, though he should again be a hyper-efficient scorer for his age, who carries significantly more value in dynasty/multi-season leagues.
BRO (F, SF, PF, C)
G
74
Min
29.4
FPTS
1,261.0
REB
521.0
AST
189.0
STL
74.0
BLK
54.0
TO
137.0
FGM
394.0
FGA
834.0
FTM
275.0
FTA
358.0
In what was expected to be his first full season as a starter, Hollis-Jefferson wound up dealing with some injury issues in 2017-18. Most notably, he missed a stretch of 11 games from the end of January through most of February, which resulted in him playing just 68 total games. Still, when healthy, Hollis-Jefferson took another step forward, averaging career highs across the board of 13.9 points, 6.8 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 28.3 minutes per game. He also kept up his steady work on the defensive side of the ball and tallied at least 1.0 steal per game for the third straight year. Just 23 years old, Hollis-Jefferson remains one of the younger pieces who the Nets will continue to develop and build around. The Arizona product is expected to start alongside Jarrett Allen in the frontcourt and should once again push for minutes in the upper 20's. He showed some slight improvements in terms of efficiency last season but still shot a meager 24.1 percent from distance and 78.8 percent from the free-throw line, the former of which must improve if he's to effectively space the floor. Even so, Hollis-Jefferson's contributions across stat sheet, including reliable outputs in the defensive categories, will give him plenty of utility in the bulk of Fantasy leagues, even if he fails to markedly improve as an outside shooter.
In what was expected to be his first full season as a starter, Hollis-Jefferson wound up dealing with some injury issues in 2017-18. Most notably, he missed a stretch of 11 games from the end of January through most of February, which resulted in him playing just 68 total games. Still, when healthy, Hollis-Jefferson took another step forward, averaging career highs across the board of 13.9 points, 6.8 rebounds and 2.5 assists in 28.3 minutes per game. He also kept up his steady work on the defensive side of the ball and tallied at least 1.0 steal per game for the third straight year. Just 23 years old, Hollis-Jefferson remains one of the younger pieces who the Nets will continue to develop and build around. The Arizona product is expected to start alongside Jarrett Allen in the frontcourt and should once again push for minutes in the upper 20's. He showed some slight improvements in terms of efficiency last season but still shot a meager 24.1 percent from distance and 78.8 percent from the free-throw line, the former of which must improve if he's to effectively space the floor. Even so, Hollis-Jefferson's contributions across stat sheet, including reliable outputs in the defensive categories, will give him plenty of utility in the bulk of Fantasy leagues, even if he fails to markedly improve as an outside shooter.
MIN (G, PG)
G
76
Min
32.4
FPTS
1,258.0
REB
240.0
AST
524.0
STL
109.0
BLK
23.0
TO
189.0
FGM
375.0
FGA
846.0
FTM
218.0
FTA
255.0
After one season with his hometown Pacers, Teague joined Jimmy Butler and Taj Gibson with the new-look Timberwolves last summer. The move resulted in a slight hit too his production across the board, though Teague was able to slightly increase his defensive production, providing 1.5 steals per game, up from 1.2 per game in 2016-17. When Butler missed a chunk of the season with a knee injury, Teague took on additional offensive responsibility, averaging at least 15 points per game in February, March and April. However, Teague had some health issues of his own, missing a total of 12 games throughout the season. Nevertheless, Teague maintained his reputation as one of the more consistent, mid-level point guards in the league, finishing the season with averages of 14.2 points, 7.0 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.2 made three-pointers per game. Those numbers were roughly on par with the production he's provided since becoming a full-time starter in 2011-12, and there's little reason to believe Teague won't put up similar averages in 2018-19. While Minnesota has a capable backup point guard in Tyus Jones, coach Tom Thibodeau has been hesitant to explore his depth and Teague's role as the big-minutes starter shouldn't be in much jeopardy.
After one season with his hometown Pacers, Teague joined Jimmy Butler and Taj Gibson with the new-look Timberwolves last summer. The move resulted in a slight hit too his production across the board, though Teague was able to slightly increase his defensive production, providing 1.5 steals per game, up from 1.2 per game in 2016-17. When Butler missed a chunk of the season with a knee injury, Teague took on additional offensive responsibility, averaging at least 15 points per game in February, March and April. However, Teague had some health issues of his own, missing a total of 12 games throughout the season. Nevertheless, Teague maintained his reputation as one of the more consistent, mid-level point guards in the league, finishing the season with averages of 14.2 points, 7.0 assists, 1.5 steals and 1.2 made three-pointers per game. Those numbers were roughly on par with the production he's provided since becoming a full-time starter in 2011-12, and there's little reason to believe Teague won't put up similar averages in 2018-19. While Minnesota has a capable backup point guard in Tyus Jones, coach Tom Thibodeau has been hesitant to explore his depth and Teague's role as the big-minutes starter shouldn't be in much jeopardy.
LAL (F, PG, SG, SF)
G
77
Min
34.4
FPTS
1,255.0
REB
421.0
AST
265.0
STL
63.0
BLK
58.0
TO
200.0
FGM
476.0
FGA
999.0
FTM
266.0
FTA
378.0
Injuries limited Ingram to 59 games last season, his second year in the league, though he started each one and averaged 33.5 minutes. Due to a boost in workload over his rookie campaign, Ingram set career highs nearly across the board, registering 16.1 points, 5.3 rebounds, 3.9 assists and a combined 1.5 steals/blocks per contest. He also dramatically improved his efficiency, bumping his true shooting percentage up from 47.4 to 53.6. This season, the former second overall pick will probably be asked to handle the ball less, as LeBron James joined the team over the summer. However, Ingram should still see see 30-plus minutes on a regular basis, and may benefit from LeBron’s presence by getting cleaner looks, especially from beyond the arc. Considering he tied with Kyle Kuzma and Julius Randle (no longer on the team) for the most points per game (16.1), it’s feasible Ingram could take over as the team’s second option in 2018-19. That possibility gives him significant upside in Fantasy.
Injuries limited Ingram to 59 games last season, his second year in the league, though he started each one and averaged 33.5 minutes. Due to a boost in workload over his rookie campaign, Ingram set career highs nearly across the board, registering 16.1 points, 5.3 rebounds, 3.9 assists and a combined 1.5 steals/blocks per contest. He also dramatically improved his efficiency, bumping his true shooting percentage up from 47.4 to 53.6. This season, the former second overall pick will probably be asked to handle the ball less, as LeBron James joined the team over the summer. However, Ingram should still see see 30-plus minutes on a regular basis, and may benefit from LeBron’s presence by getting cleaner looks, especially from beyond the arc. Considering he tied with Kyle Kuzma and Julius Randle (no longer on the team) for the most points per game (16.1), it’s feasible Ingram could take over as the team’s second option in 2018-19. That possibility gives him significant upside in Fantasy.
UTA (F, SG, SF)
G
82
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,253.0
REB
352.0
AST
401.0
STL
92.0
BLK
18.0
TO
163.0
FGM
345.0
FGA
751.0
FTM
68.0
FTA
85.0
Through his first three years in the league, Ingles had drawn 60 starts and seen 20.2 minutes per game. That changed in 2017-18, as Ingles started all but one of his 82 appearances and garnered 31.4 minutes per contest. He’s turned into one of the league’s top three-point marksmen, shooting 44.0 percent from deep over the past two seasons and ranking 10th in made threes last season. While he racked up just 11.5 points per game last year, Ingles’ all-around skillset and nearly spotless health (four missed games in his career) has turned him into a true Fantasy asset, as he also averaged 4.8 assists, 4.2 rebounds and 1.1 steals. He has occasional big-game potential as well, posting four double-doubles (points, assists) and seven games with at least three steals in 2017-18. The Jazz didn't make any threatening additions in the offseason, so it seems safe to assume Ingles will have the same role this season.
Through his first three years in the league, Ingles had drawn 60 starts and seen 20.2 minutes per game. That changed in 2017-18, as Ingles started all but one of his 82 appearances and garnered 31.4 minutes per contest. He’s turned into one of the league’s top three-point marksmen, shooting 44.0 percent from deep over the past two seasons and ranking 10th in made threes last season. While he racked up just 11.5 points per game last year, Ingles’ all-around skillset and nearly spotless health (four missed games in his career) has turned him into a true Fantasy asset, as he also averaged 4.8 assists, 4.2 rebounds and 1.1 steals. He has occasional big-game potential as well, posting four double-doubles (points, assists) and seven games with at least three steals in 2017-18. The Jazz didn't make any threatening additions in the offseason, so it seems safe to assume Ingles will have the same role this season.
DAL (F, PF, SF)
G
76
Min
34.1
FPTS
1,237.0
REB
441.0
AST
132.0
STL
45.0
BLK
12.0
TO
105.0
FGM
500.0
FGA
1,096.0
FTM
238.0
FTA
281.0
With only minor changes to the roster, Barnes unsurprisingly finished the 2017-18 campaign with numbers similar to a year prior. He remained the team's top scoring threat at 18.9 points per game, while adding 6.1 rebounds and 2.0 assists across 34.2 minutes. The six-year forward also saw a spike in his three-point production and tallied a career-high 1.5 deep balls at a 35.7 percent clip. However, the Mavericks made some fairly significant upgrades to the roster in the offseason. Most notably was the signing of DeAndre Jordan, who's set to enter the starting five at center immediately. Jordan was second in the league last year with 15.2 rebounds per game, which means Barnes' board totals are very likely to take a hit. In addition, Dennis Smith is coming off a very impressive rookie season and will likely be involved even more in the offense in Year 2, while Luka Doncic was taken with the third overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft and is expected to be an offensive contributor immediately as an NBA ready player coming out of Europe. That means there's more mouths to feed overall, so Barnes' 15.7 field goal attempts per game and scoring totals are also at risk of declining. Fantasy owners can continue to rely on him for his production on offense, but he's likely going to be a one-trick pony for the most part if Jordan's presence does significantly impact Barnes' rebound totals as expected.
With only minor changes to the roster, Barnes unsurprisingly finished the 2017-18 campaign with numbers similar to a year prior. He remained the team's top scoring threat at 18.9 points per game, while adding 6.1 rebounds and 2.0 assists across 34.2 minutes. The six-year forward also saw a spike in his three-point production and tallied a career-high 1.5 deep balls at a 35.7 percent clip. However, the Mavericks made some fairly significant upgrades to the roster in the offseason. Most notably was the signing of DeAndre Jordan, who's set to enter the starting five at center immediately. Jordan was second in the league last year with 15.2 rebounds per game, which means Barnes' board totals are very likely to take a hit. In addition, Dennis Smith is coming off a very impressive rookie season and will likely be involved even more in the offense in Year 2, while Luka Doncic was taken with the third overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft and is expected to be an offensive contributor immediately as an NBA ready player coming out of Europe. That means there's more mouths to feed overall, so Barnes' 15.7 field goal attempts per game and scoring totals are also at risk of declining. Fantasy owners can continue to rely on him for his production on offense, but he's likely going to be a one-trick pony for the most part if Jordan's presence does significantly impact Barnes' rebound totals as expected.
PHI (F, PF)
G
79
Min
28.1
FPTS
1,236.0
REB
515.0
AST
194.0
STL
49.0
BLK
19.0
TO
142.0
FGM
393.0
FGA
877.0
FTM
176.0
FTA
208.0
Following a standout rookie campaign, Saric found himself as a regular starter in Year 2 and ended up averaging just under 30.0 minutes per game. That allowed him to set career highs across the board, averaging 14.6 points, 6.7 rebounds and 2.6 assists, all of which were up from 12.8, 6.3 and 2.2, respectively, a year prior. It was Saric's three-point game that took the most noticeable step forward though, as he connected on 2.0 deep balls per game at an impressive 39.3 percent clip. He shot just 31.1 percent from beyond the arc as a rookie, so that was a significant tick upwards in efficiency. He also shot 45.3 percent from the field and 86 percent from the free-throw line, so he was definitely an asset in leagues that took into consideration percentages. It was Ben Simmons' placement at point guard that allowed Saric to continue to work as at his natural power forward spot and that should be the case once again heading into the upcoming season. Superstars Simmons and Joel Embiid should take another step forward, and the Sixers did bring in Wilson Chandler this offseason. However, that shouldn't impact Saric's numbers all too much and similar production can likely be expected. That puts the 24-year-old into consideration for a top-75 pick and his age suggests he can continue to improve his overall skill set. Look for the floor-stretching forward to come off the board in the middle rounds of most drafts as a very safe pick with a somewhat capped ceiling.
Following a standout rookie campaign, Saric found himself as a regular starter in Year 2 and ended up averaging just under 30.0 minutes per game. That allowed him to set career highs across the board, averaging 14.6 points, 6.7 rebounds and 2.6 assists, all of which were up from 12.8, 6.3 and 2.2, respectively, a year prior. It was Saric's three-point game that took the most noticeable step forward though, as he connected on 2.0 deep balls per game at an impressive 39.3 percent clip. He shot just 31.1 percent from beyond the arc as a rookie, so that was a significant tick upwards in efficiency. He also shot 45.3 percent from the field and 86 percent from the free-throw line, so he was definitely an asset in leagues that took into consideration percentages. It was Ben Simmons' placement at point guard that allowed Saric to continue to work as at his natural power forward spot and that should be the case once again heading into the upcoming season. Superstars Simmons and Joel Embiid should take another step forward, and the Sixers did bring in Wilson Chandler this offseason. However, that shouldn't impact Saric's numbers all too much and similar production can likely be expected. That puts the 24-year-old into consideration for a top-75 pick and his age suggests he can continue to improve his overall skill set. Look for the floor-stretching forward to come off the board in the middle rounds of most drafts as a very safe pick with a somewhat capped ceiling.
MIN (F, SG, SF)
G
82
Min
37.0
FPTS
1,233.0
REB
368.0
AST
163.0
STL
96.0
BLK
43.0
TO
141.0
FGM
594.0
FGA
1,325.0
FTM
239.0
FTA
350.0
The arrival of Jimmy Butler last summer meant that Wiggins' production was likely to take a hit, and that was ultimately the case in 2017-18. With Butler finding his fit in Minnesota, Wiggins attempted 3.2 fewer field-goals per game, resulting in his scoring dipping from 23.6 to 17.7 points per game. Unfortunately for Wiggins, the decrease in volume also coincided with a drop in efficiency. Wiggins hit just 43.8 percent of his field goals -- the lowest mark since his rookie season -- and his free-throw percentage inexplicably fell from 76 percent to an unsightly 64 percent. Wiggins' game revolves around his ability to put the ball in the basket and defensive flaws have always been a major hindrance, from both a Fantasy and real basketball standpoint. While he was able to make some slight improvements on the defensive end (1.7 combined steals/blocks), Wiggins is still a long way away from being an elite Fantasy contributor on that end of the floor, which belies his physical abilities. Looking on the bright side, Wiggins has been one of the NBA's iron men since entering the league in 2014. He managed to play and start all 82 games for the third time in four seasons. Looking ahead, his role will likely remain much the same heading into 2018-19, as the Wolves bring back virtually the same core and coaching staff. Barring an injury to either Karl-Anthony Towns or Jimmy Butler, Wiggins will be fighting for touches on the offensive end and based on his most recent production, he'll battle more closely with Jeff Teague for the role of the third scoring option. Fantasy owners willing to take the risk should be able to grab Wiggins with a late-middle-round pick, although his name and pedigree as a former No. 1 overall pick often warrants unfounded hype.
The arrival of Jimmy Butler last summer meant that Wiggins' production was likely to take a hit, and that was ultimately the case in 2017-18. With Butler finding his fit in Minnesota, Wiggins attempted 3.2 fewer field-goals per game, resulting in his scoring dipping from 23.6 to 17.7 points per game. Unfortunately for Wiggins, the decrease in volume also coincided with a drop in efficiency. Wiggins hit just 43.8 percent of his field goals -- the lowest mark since his rookie season -- and his free-throw percentage inexplicably fell from 76 percent to an unsightly 64 percent. Wiggins' game revolves around his ability to put the ball in the basket and defensive flaws have always been a major hindrance, from both a Fantasy and real basketball standpoint. While he was able to make some slight improvements on the defensive end (1.7 combined steals/blocks), Wiggins is still a long way away from being an elite Fantasy contributor on that end of the floor, which belies his physical abilities. Looking on the bright side, Wiggins has been one of the NBA's iron men since entering the league in 2014. He managed to play and start all 82 games for the third time in four seasons. Looking ahead, his role will likely remain much the same heading into 2018-19, as the Wolves bring back virtually the same core and coaching staff. Barring an injury to either Karl-Anthony Towns or Jimmy Butler, Wiggins will be fighting for touches on the offensive end and based on his most recent production, he'll battle more closely with Jeff Teague for the role of the third scoring option. Fantasy owners willing to take the risk should be able to grab Wiggins with a late-middle-round pick, although his name and pedigree as a former No. 1 overall pick often warrants unfounded hype.
UTA (G, PG)
G
77
Min
30.2
FPTS
1,232.0
REB
362.0
AST
469.0
STL
129.0
BLK
11.0
TO
213.0
FGM
345.0
FGA
852.0
FTM
229.0
FTA
262.0
In a strange turn of events, Rubio set a career high in scoring (13.1 PPG) and a dramatic career-low 5.3 assists per game (while actually seeing his turnover rate increase) after averaging 8.5 assists across his first six seasons. Though some of that was due to Utah’s slow pace, the emergence of Donovan Mitchell as an unexpectedly high-usage player during his rookie campaign lowered Rubio’s passing upside and turned him into more of an off-ball player. On a positive note, Rubio improved his range, setting career highs in both threes made per game (1.2) and three-point percentage (35.2). Still, in this situation, it doesn't appear Rubio is a nightly 10-plus assist, three-plus steal threat any longer. In 2016-17, Rubio posted 34 games with 10-plus dimes and, in 2015-16, posted 33 games with at least three steals. Last year, those tallies dropped to seven and 15, respectively. A confusing turn of events aside, Rubio still has top-50 upside considering his under-appreciated rebounding ability (4.6), proficiency from the charity stripe (86.6 percent) and overall solid health (at least 75 games played over the past three campaigns).
In a strange turn of events, Rubio set a career high in scoring (13.1 PPG) and a dramatic career-low 5.3 assists per game (while actually seeing his turnover rate increase) after averaging 8.5 assists across his first six seasons. Though some of that was due to Utah’s slow pace, the emergence of Donovan Mitchell as an unexpectedly high-usage player during his rookie campaign lowered Rubio’s passing upside and turned him into more of an off-ball player. On a positive note, Rubio improved his range, setting career highs in both threes made per game (1.2) and three-point percentage (35.2). Still, in this situation, it doesn't appear Rubio is a nightly 10-plus assist, three-plus steal threat any longer. In 2016-17, Rubio posted 34 games with 10-plus dimes and, in 2015-16, posted 33 games with at least three steals. Last year, those tallies dropped to seven and 15, respectively. A confusing turn of events aside, Rubio still has top-50 upside considering his under-appreciated rebounding ability (4.6), proficiency from the charity stripe (86.6 percent) and overall solid health (at least 75 games played over the past three campaigns).
LAC (C, C)
G
80
Min
26.4
FPTS
1,210.0
REB
634.0
AST
154.0
STL
41.0
BLK
62.0
TO
101.0
FGM
310.0
FGA
570.0
FTM
113.0
FTA
166.0
For the second straight season, Gortat started all 82 games for the Wizards. However, his numbers took a hit across the board and he posted averages of just 8.4 points, 7.6 rebounds and 1.8 assists across 25.3 minutes. That was a fairly noticeable drop from the 10.8 points and 10.4 rebounds he tallied a year prior, as the Wizards often went with smaller, more athletic lineups to matchup better with opposing defenses. With John Wall publicly indicating his desire for the Wizards to get more athletic as a whole, the organization opted to deal Gortat to the Clippers this offseason, where he'll have the chance to slot into a starting role once again following DeAndre Jordan's departure in free agency. That said, with both Montrezl Harrell and Boban Marjanovic also in the fold, Gortat likely won't see any sort of increase on the 25.3 minutes he averaged in 2017-18. Gortat is likely nothing more than a rebounds specialist in deeper leagues and he's notably poor as a free-throw shooter after finishing with just a 67.5 percent clip from the charity stripe. Gortat also has hit just three total three-pointers for his entire career and is not a threat to extend his range anytime soon, so his upside his severely limited.
For the second straight season, Gortat started all 82 games for the Wizards. However, his numbers took a hit across the board and he posted averages of just 8.4 points, 7.6 rebounds and 1.8 assists across 25.3 minutes. That was a fairly noticeable drop from the 10.8 points and 10.4 rebounds he tallied a year prior, as the Wizards often went with smaller, more athletic lineups to matchup better with opposing defenses. With John Wall publicly indicating his desire for the Wizards to get more athletic as a whole, the organization opted to deal Gortat to the Clippers this offseason, where he'll have the chance to slot into a starting role once again following DeAndre Jordan's departure in free agency. That said, with both Montrezl Harrell and Boban Marjanovic also in the fold, Gortat likely won't see any sort of increase on the 25.3 minutes he averaged in 2017-18. Gortat is likely nothing more than a rebounds specialist in deeper leagues and he's notably poor as a free-throw shooter after finishing with just a 67.5 percent clip from the charity stripe. Gortat also has hit just three total three-pointers for his entire career and is not a threat to extend his range anytime soon, so his upside his severely limited.
CLE (F, PF, C)
G
68
Min
25.5
FPTS
1,201.0
REB
552.0
AST
100.0
STL
107.0
BLK
65.0
TO
62.0
FGM
289.0
FGA
502.0
FTM
119.0
FTA
167.0
Nance opened the 2017-18 campaign in complementary role off the bench with the Lakers, providing the all-around production and energy that coaches love. However, a mid-season trade involving the Cavaliers' Isaiah Thomas and handful of other players ended up sending Nance to Cleveland as an upside piece. The 6-foot-9 big man's value didn't change much with his new organization, though, and in 66 games between the two teams, he posted averages of 8.7 points, 6.8 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.3 steals, while shooting 58.1 percent from the field. His situation with Cleveland became slightly more intriguing this offseason after LeBron James bolted for Los Angeles. The Cavaliers have already tabbed Nance as a building block for the future and are hoping to extend the 25-year-old, which would suggest the team is hoping to key in on his development moving forward. Kevin Love was given a four-year, $120 million extension and Tristan Thompson is back and set to make over $17 million, so there are a few players in the way of a 30-plus minute role. That said, if the organization does like Nance's upside as much as has been let on, look for him to see a decent uptick in his playing time from the 21.5 minutes he averaged in 2017-18. While Nance's lack of a three-point game and poor free-throw percentage are always of concern, his ability to provide across-the-board value would bring him into consideration for ownership in the the bulk of Fantasy leagues if he's able to garner a full starter's workload. Look for Nance to at least be the first big man off the bench right away, though he could work his way into the top unit eventually.
Nance opened the 2017-18 campaign in complementary role off the bench with the Lakers, providing the all-around production and energy that coaches love. However, a mid-season trade involving the Cavaliers' Isaiah Thomas and handful of other players ended up sending Nance to Cleveland as an upside piece. The 6-foot-9 big man's value didn't change much with his new organization, though, and in 66 games between the two teams, he posted averages of 8.7 points, 6.8 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.3 steals, while shooting 58.1 percent from the field. His situation with Cleveland became slightly more intriguing this offseason after LeBron James bolted for Los Angeles. The Cavaliers have already tabbed Nance as a building block for the future and are hoping to extend the 25-year-old, which would suggest the team is hoping to key in on his development moving forward. Kevin Love was given a four-year, $120 million extension and Tristan Thompson is back and set to make over $17 million, so there are a few players in the way of a 30-plus minute role. That said, if the organization does like Nance's upside as much as has been let on, look for him to see a decent uptick in his playing time from the 21.5 minutes he averaged in 2017-18. While Nance's lack of a three-point game and poor free-throw percentage are always of concern, his ability to provide across-the-board value would bring him into consideration for ownership in the the bulk of Fantasy leagues if he's able to garner a full starter's workload. Look for Nance to at least be the first big man off the bench right away, though he could work his way into the top unit eventually.
LAC (G, SG, PG)
G
80
Min
27.4
FPTS
1,200.0
REB
167.0
AST
331.0
STL
72.0
BLK
16.0
TO
154.0
FGM
469.0
FGA
1,098.0
FTM
359.0
FTA
415.0
Despite coming off the bench for much of the 2017-18 season, Williams was essentially a starter considering his 32.8 minutes per game. He actually averaged a career-high 22.6 points per game, which matched Blake Griffin's scoring output in the 33 games he spent with the Clippers before being dealt to the Pistons at the trade deadline. Along with his impressive point totals, Williams was also a threat from deep whenever he touched the ball, hitting 2.4 three-pointers at a 35.9 percent clip. He also chipped in with some valuable secondary statistics, adding 5.3 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 1.1 steals, which made him a very intriguing Fantasy option across a plethora of different formats. It also earned him Sixth Man of the Year honors over other deserving candidates like Eric Gordon and Fred VanVleet. With Griffin out of the picture for the entire season and DeAndre Jordan leaving during free agency, Williams will be the clear cut No. 1 option on offense whenever he touches the floor, with the likes of Tobias Harris and Danilo Gallinari coming in as a close second and third. Whether he comes off the bench or moves into a starting position, it likely won't matter much, as Williams is still going to get as many minutes as he can handle. Look for him to come off the board in the top 50 picks of most drafts, which should result in a selection in the early middle rounds of standard leagues.
Despite coming off the bench for much of the 2017-18 season, Williams was essentially a starter considering his 32.8 minutes per game. He actually averaged a career-high 22.6 points per game, which matched Blake Griffin's scoring output in the 33 games he spent with the Clippers before being dealt to the Pistons at the trade deadline. Along with his impressive point totals, Williams was also a threat from deep whenever he touched the ball, hitting 2.4 three-pointers at a 35.9 percent clip. He also chipped in with some valuable secondary statistics, adding 5.3 assists, 2.5 rebounds and 1.1 steals, which made him a very intriguing Fantasy option across a plethora of different formats. It also earned him Sixth Man of the Year honors over other deserving candidates like Eric Gordon and Fred VanVleet. With Griffin out of the picture for the entire season and DeAndre Jordan leaving during free agency, Williams will be the clear cut No. 1 option on offense whenever he touches the floor, with the likes of Tobias Harris and Danilo Gallinari coming in as a close second and third. Whether he comes off the bench or moves into a starting position, it likely won't matter much, as Williams is still going to get as many minutes as he can handle. Look for him to come off the board in the top 50 picks of most drafts, which should result in a selection in the early middle rounds of standard leagues.
BOS (F, SG, SF)
G
71
Min
31.8
FPTS
1,199.0
REB
343.0
AST
232.0
STL
52.0
BLK
20.0
TO
129.0
FGM
420.0
FGA
916.0
FTM
265.0
FTA
319.0
Yes, the Celtics did well last season without Hayward, but the reality is they were able to take advantage of a weak Eastern Conference. While the West is still king, let’s not forget Hayward averaged 20 points, five boards and almost four assists per game during his last healthy season. Hayward's outside shooting and ability to create his own shot are exactly what Boston’s offense needs, and his defensive flexibility is perfect for coach Brad Stevens’ rotating scheme. It's fair to question how Hayward will bounce back from such a devastating injury, but before breaking his ankle on national television, Hayward averaged 73 games played over his previous seven seasons. If you're of the belief that Hayward will return to his usual, durable self, he could end up being a major Fantasy steal, should he slip to the later-middle-rounds. Perhaps the bigger concern is how the presence of Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown -- two of the better young wings in the league -- will impact Hayward's role. The presumption is that Hayward will be the No. 1 option on the wing, but just how many minutes and possessions per game he'll inherently have to cede to Tatum and Brown is one of Fantasy's biggest question marks heading into the season.
Yes, the Celtics did well last season without Hayward, but the reality is they were able to take advantage of a weak Eastern Conference. While the West is still king, let’s not forget Hayward averaged 20 points, five boards and almost four assists per game during his last healthy season. Hayward's outside shooting and ability to create his own shot are exactly what Boston’s offense needs, and his defensive flexibility is perfect for coach Brad Stevens’ rotating scheme. It's fair to question how Hayward will bounce back from such a devastating injury, but before breaking his ankle on national television, Hayward averaged 73 games played over his previous seven seasons. If you're of the belief that Hayward will return to his usual, durable self, he could end up being a major Fantasy steal, should he slip to the later-middle-rounds. Perhaps the bigger concern is how the presence of Jayson Tatum and Jaylen Brown -- two of the better young wings in the league -- will impact Hayward's role. The presumption is that Hayward will be the No. 1 option on the wing, but just how many minutes and possessions per game he'll inherently have to cede to Tatum and Brown is one of Fantasy's biggest question marks heading into the season.
IND (F, PF, C)
G
77
Min
23.6
FPTS
1,187.0
REB
572.0
AST
163.0
STL
40.0
BLK
32.0
TO
138.0
FGM
355.0
FGA
685.0
FTM
171.0
FTA
225.0
Sabonis was dealt to Indiana in the Paul George trade and was forced to transition into a reserve role after spending much of his rookie year with the Thunder as a starter. However, his status as a bench player didn't matter much and he ended up averaging 24.5 minutes per game, up from 20.1 minutes a year prior. That translated to career highs across the board, finishing with 11.6 points, 7.7 rebounds and 2.0 assists. He also shot a very respectable 51.4 percent from the field and had the ability to knock down a three-pointer (35.1%) when left open. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, the Pacers let both Al Jefferson and Trevor Booker walk, but then picked up Kyle O'Quinn during free agency. After Sabonis spent most of last season playing center, O'Quinn's addition could prompt Indiana to use him more at power forward. Either way, Sabonis is still just 22 years old and has plenty of upside, so the Pacers should make every effort to give him plenty of run off the bench. His production from last season is likely a good baseline for Sabonis' projected value, but that likely limits his utility to those in deeper leagues looking for help in the points and rebound categories.
Sabonis was dealt to Indiana in the Paul George trade and was forced to transition into a reserve role after spending much of his rookie year with the Thunder as a starter. However, his status as a bench player didn't matter much and he ended up averaging 24.5 minutes per game, up from 20.1 minutes a year prior. That translated to career highs across the board, finishing with 11.6 points, 7.7 rebounds and 2.0 assists. He also shot a very respectable 51.4 percent from the field and had the ability to knock down a three-pointer (35.1%) when left open. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, the Pacers let both Al Jefferson and Trevor Booker walk, but then picked up Kyle O'Quinn during free agency. After Sabonis spent most of last season playing center, O'Quinn's addition could prompt Indiana to use him more at power forward. Either way, Sabonis is still just 22 years old and has plenty of upside, so the Pacers should make every effort to give him plenty of run off the bench. His production from last season is likely a good baseline for Sabonis' projected value, but that likely limits his utility to those in deeper leagues looking for help in the points and rebound categories.
LAL (F, SF, PF)
G
80
Min
29.2
FPTS
1,186.0
REB
470.0
AST
130.0
STL
48.0
BLK
31.0
TO
136.0
FGM
463.0
FGA
1,008.0
FTM
144.0
FTA
202.0
After a three-season college stint at Utah in which he was named to the All-Pac-12 First Team during his junior campaign, Kuzma was drafted by the Lakers with the 27th overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft. After averaging 21.9 points with a 63.9 true shooting percentage at summer league, hype about Kuzma’s immediate potential began forming. That potential was realized right out of the gate, and Kuzma went on to post 16.1 points per game on 45.0 percent shooting from the field and 36.6 percent from deep. His 6.3 rebounds and 1.8 assists per contest also helped him get voted to the All-Rookie First Team. However, given the new presence of LeBron James, plus the signing of Michael Beasley, it may be tough for Kuzma to reach the 31.2 minutes per game he saw last year. Still, it’s likely he'll be one of LA’s primary sources of offense with the second unit, which should keep his usage high.
After a three-season college stint at Utah in which he was named to the All-Pac-12 First Team during his junior campaign, Kuzma was drafted by the Lakers with the 27th overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft. After averaging 21.9 points with a 63.9 true shooting percentage at summer league, hype about Kuzma’s immediate potential began forming. That potential was realized right out of the gate, and Kuzma went on to post 16.1 points per game on 45.0 percent shooting from the field and 36.6 percent from deep. His 6.3 rebounds and 1.8 assists per contest also helped him get voted to the All-Rookie First Team. However, given the new presence of LeBron James, plus the signing of Michael Beasley, it may be tough for Kuzma to reach the 31.2 minutes per game he saw last year. Still, it’s likely he'll be one of LA’s primary sources of offense with the second unit, which should keep his usage high.
NOR (G, PG)
G
75
Min
29.4
FPTS
1,173.0
REB
345.0
AST
457.0
STL
101.0
BLK
27.0
TO
205.0
FGM
385.0
FGA
813.0
FTM
137.0
FTA
205.0
A disrupted 2017-18 season meant Payton found it difficult to find any rhythm. A hamstring injury cost him almost 20 games early in the season and after making his return in Orlando, he was shipped off to Phoenix for minimal return. He was excellent through his first few games before essentially falling out of the rotation for a team that had clearly shifted toward tanking. After losing Rajon Rondo to the Lakers, the Pelicans decided Payton was worth a look, and there's a good chance he'll claim the starting point guard spot. The Louisiana native has a unique skillset for a guard, offering decent out-of-position numbers on the glass, as well as strong assists and defensive stats. However, Payton does not possess a strong perimeter game and is a sub-30 percent three-point shooter for his career. Even so, Payton has managed to maintain an efficient mark from the field, overall (45.7% career FG). A fresh start and the potential to battle for a spot in the first unit could result in an uptick in production. That said, Payton begins his tenure in New Orleans with plenty to prove after failing to live up to his billing in Orlando as a top-10 pick in the 2014 NBA Draft.
A disrupted 2017-18 season meant Payton found it difficult to find any rhythm. A hamstring injury cost him almost 20 games early in the season and after making his return in Orlando, he was shipped off to Phoenix for minimal return. He was excellent through his first few games before essentially falling out of the rotation for a team that had clearly shifted toward tanking. After losing Rajon Rondo to the Lakers, the Pelicans decided Payton was worth a look, and there's a good chance he'll claim the starting point guard spot. The Louisiana native has a unique skillset for a guard, offering decent out-of-position numbers on the glass, as well as strong assists and defensive stats. However, Payton does not possess a strong perimeter game and is a sub-30 percent three-point shooter for his career. Even so, Payton has managed to maintain an efficient mark from the field, overall (45.7% career FG). A fresh start and the potential to battle for a spot in the first unit could result in an uptick in production. That said, Payton begins his tenure in New Orleans with plenty to prove after failing to live up to his billing in Orlando as a top-10 pick in the 2014 NBA Draft.
CHI (G, PG, SG)
G
71
Min
31.4
FPTS
1,172.0
REB
323.0
AST
454.0
STL
132.0
BLK
37.0
TO
219.0
FGM
428.0
FGA
988.0
FTM
127.0
FTA
175.0
The fifth overall pick in 2016, Dunn finally got a chance to showcase his talents last season -- his first year in Chicago -- though a toe injury and a concussion resulting from a scary fall limited him to 52 games. The Providence product started 43 games, averaging 13.6 points, 6.3 assists, 4.2 rebounds and 2.0 steals in that role. Dunn already appears to be a lock as a solid passer and high-level defender, but questions still remain about his shooting ability. He shot only 28.8 percent from deep and 61.0 percent from the line during his rookie year, though managed to get those percentages up to 32.1 and 73.0, respectively. Another year of improvement could mean a breakout year, while a plateau season could begin to raise long-term concerns. Dunn’s Fantasy stock is largely dependent on how one feels about his potential as a shooter, though it’s hard to ignore his significant role within the Bulls’ gameplan, especially in points formats.
The fifth overall pick in 2016, Dunn finally got a chance to showcase his talents last season -- his first year in Chicago -- though a toe injury and a concussion resulting from a scary fall limited him to 52 games. The Providence product started 43 games, averaging 13.6 points, 6.3 assists, 4.2 rebounds and 2.0 steals in that role. Dunn already appears to be a lock as a solid passer and high-level defender, but questions still remain about his shooting ability. He shot only 28.8 percent from deep and 61.0 percent from the line during his rookie year, though managed to get those percentages up to 32.1 and 73.0, respectively. Another year of improvement could mean a breakout year, while a plateau season could begin to raise long-term concerns. Dunn’s Fantasy stock is largely dependent on how one feels about his potential as a shooter, though it’s hard to ignore his significant role within the Bulls’ gameplan, especially in points formats.
ATL (F, SF)
G
80
Min
31.6
FPTS
1,171.0
REB
398.0
AST
224.0
STL
97.0
BLK
43.0
TO
196.0
FGM
436.0
FGA
999.0
FTM
153.0
FTA
184.0
After a lackluster rookie campaign, Prince made a noticeable leap in his second year, starting all 82 regular season games and hitting the coveted 30-minute threshold on a per game basis. The 24-year-old finished second on the team in scoring behind Dennis Schroder at 14.1 points, which included 2.1 three-pointers at an improved 38.5 percent clip from deep. He also added 4.7 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 1.0 steal. Clearly one of the Hawks' building blocks of the future, Prince's rapid development has him primed for another productive year in 2018-19. The Hawks dealt Dennis Schroder to the Thunder in the offseason, so Prince will be the top returning scorer from a season ago. Fellow frontcourt player John Collins, who also has shown a ton of upside, is headed into his first full year as a starter, but that shouldn't cut into Prince's numbers much, if at all. In addition, the selection of Trae Young with the fifth overall pick in the draft replaces Schroder with an unproven talent. As a result, Prince and Collins will likely be relied upon even more offensively, giving both the opportunity to build on their already solid numbers. Prince's strong sophomore season and likely uptick in usage ahead of the upcoming campaign should establish him as a coveted mid-round pick in Fantasy drafts.
After a lackluster rookie campaign, Prince made a noticeable leap in his second year, starting all 82 regular season games and hitting the coveted 30-minute threshold on a per game basis. The 24-year-old finished second on the team in scoring behind Dennis Schroder at 14.1 points, which included 2.1 three-pointers at an improved 38.5 percent clip from deep. He also added 4.7 rebounds, 2.6 assists and 1.0 steal. Clearly one of the Hawks' building blocks of the future, Prince's rapid development has him primed for another productive year in 2018-19. The Hawks dealt Dennis Schroder to the Thunder in the offseason, so Prince will be the top returning scorer from a season ago. Fellow frontcourt player John Collins, who also has shown a ton of upside, is headed into his first full year as a starter, but that shouldn't cut into Prince's numbers much, if at all. In addition, the selection of Trae Young with the fifth overall pick in the draft replaces Schroder with an unproven talent. As a result, Prince and Collins will likely be relied upon even more offensively, giving both the opportunity to build on their already solid numbers. Prince's strong sophomore season and likely uptick in usage ahead of the upcoming campaign should establish him as a coveted mid-round pick in Fantasy drafts.
IND (G, SF, SG, PG)
G
70
Min
26.4
FPTS
1,155.0
REB
305.0
AST
313.0
STL
68.0
BLK
20.0
TO
135.0
FGM
418.0
FGA
930.0
FTM
186.0
FTA
240.0
Evans' career appeared to be heading in the wrong direction after playing just 40 games combined between the Pelicans and Kings in 2016-17. He averaged just 10.3 points, 3.4 rebounds and 3.1 assists across 19.7 minutes that year, all of which were easily career lows. However, the Grizzlies were still willing to take a shot on him and ended up signing Evans last offseason for the veteran's minimum. The 28-year-old ended up being a key addition for Memphis and despite playing just 52 games because of injuries and tanking efforts, put together arguably his best season since his rookie year. Evans posted averages of 19.4 points, 5.1 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.1 steals across 30.9 minutes, providing some key all-around production for Fantasy owners that took a risk on him late in drafts or picked him up off the waiver. Even more impressive was Evans' continued improvement as a three-point shooter, as he knocked down a career-high 2.2 deep balls per game at a 39.9 percent clip. He's a career 31.8 percent three-point shooter, so his efficiency was certainly surprising. Looking forward to the upcoming season, Evans is set to join the Pacers on a one-year, $12 million deal. There's a chance he shifts to a bench role with Darren Collison, Victor Oladipo and Bojan Bogdanovic all back in the fold from last season's starting five. However, Evans' ability to play three positions should still keep him on the floor for big minutes most nights, so he'll likely have an inflated version of the super-sixth-man role that the departed Lance Stephenson had last year. It seems unlikely Evans is able to duplicate the numbers he put up in Memphis after joining a much more talented roster, but Fantasy owners' expectations should still remain fairly high after such an impressive bounce-back effort.
Evans' career appeared to be heading in the wrong direction after playing just 40 games combined between the Pelicans and Kings in 2016-17. He averaged just 10.3 points, 3.4 rebounds and 3.1 assists across 19.7 minutes that year, all of which were easily career lows. However, the Grizzlies were still willing to take a shot on him and ended up signing Evans last offseason for the veteran's minimum. The 28-year-old ended up being a key addition for Memphis and despite playing just 52 games because of injuries and tanking efforts, put together arguably his best season since his rookie year. Evans posted averages of 19.4 points, 5.1 rebounds, 5.2 assists and 1.1 steals across 30.9 minutes, providing some key all-around production for Fantasy owners that took a risk on him late in drafts or picked him up off the waiver. Even more impressive was Evans' continued improvement as a three-point shooter, as he knocked down a career-high 2.2 deep balls per game at a 39.9 percent clip. He's a career 31.8 percent three-point shooter, so his efficiency was certainly surprising. Looking forward to the upcoming season, Evans is set to join the Pacers on a one-year, $12 million deal. There's a chance he shifts to a bench role with Darren Collison, Victor Oladipo and Bojan Bogdanovic all back in the fold from last season's starting five. However, Evans' ability to play three positions should still keep him on the floor for big minutes most nights, so he'll likely have an inflated version of the super-sixth-man role that the departed Lance Stephenson had last year. It seems unlikely Evans is able to duplicate the numbers he put up in Memphis after joining a much more talented roster, but Fantasy owners' expectations should still remain fairly high after such an impressive bounce-back effort.
CHR (F, SG, SF)
G
72
Min
32.7
FPTS
1,150.0
REB
375.0
AST
414.0
STL
77.0
BLK
27.0
TO
155.0
FGM
322.0
FGA
771.0
FTM
130.0
FTA
154.0
An early-season elbow injury and late-season Achilles injury limited the veteran to 64 games during his 10th season. While he was still able to provide all-around production -- 11.6 points, 5.5 assists, 4.8 rebounds, 1.4 threes, 1.0 steals -- each of those categories, except for steals, represented his lowest marks since joining the Hornets in 2015-16. Optimistic Fantasy owners could chalk up the down year to injuries and the presence of Dwight Howard. Pessimists could point to the fact that Batum is turning 30 and hasn't shot better than 42.6 percent from the field since 2013-14 -- what are the odds he’s getting better? Regardless, Howard’s departure without significant replacement should vault Batum’s usage up to the levels we saw during previous campaigns with Charlotte, where he posted 15.0 points, 6.2 rebounds, 5.8 assists, 1.9 threes and 1.0 steals per tilt.
An early-season elbow injury and late-season Achilles injury limited the veteran to 64 games during his 10th season. While he was still able to provide all-around production -- 11.6 points, 5.5 assists, 4.8 rebounds, 1.4 threes, 1.0 steals -- each of those categories, except for steals, represented his lowest marks since joining the Hornets in 2015-16. Optimistic Fantasy owners could chalk up the down year to injuries and the presence of Dwight Howard. Pessimists could point to the fact that Batum is turning 30 and hasn't shot better than 42.6 percent from the field since 2013-14 -- what are the odds he’s getting better? Regardless, Howard’s departure without significant replacement should vault Batum’s usage up to the levels we saw during previous campaigns with Charlotte, where he posted 15.0 points, 6.2 rebounds, 5.8 assists, 1.9 threes and 1.0 steals per tilt.
LAC (C, PF, C)
G
79
Min
19.9
FPTS
1,149.0
REB
372.0
AST
90.0
STL
44.0
BLK
63.0
TO
83.0
FGM
411.0
FGA
641.0
FTM
170.0
FTA
270.0
Despite the change of scenery, Harrell's role with the Clippers didn't change much from his final season in Houston. He spent the bulk of the year backing up DeAndre Jordan at center, while also occasionally getting minutes as a reserve power forward. Harrell finished the season averaging career highs of 11.0 points and 4.0 rebounds, while shooting 63.4 percent from the field. The 6-foot-8 big man has a chance to up that workload once again looking forward to the upcoming campaign. Jordan opted to leave Los Angeles during free agency and takes with it his stellar averages of 12.0 points and 15.2 rebounds across 31.5 minutes. That's a lot of production to make up for and it seems unlikely that offseason addition Marcin Gortat will be the only one to do so. As a result, look for Harrell to absorb some of the minutes and he could even push Gortat for more time considering the veteran big man is coming off one of his worst seasons statistically in recent memory. Of course, Boban Marjanovic is also an option at center, but his size only allows him to stay on the court for short stretches. All that said, look for Harrell's role to grow in his fourth NBA season and he could become a deep league option for Fantasy purposes if Gortat struggles and the Clippers turn to Harrell for more time. It is worth it to note that he has no semblance of a three-point shot and he knocked down just 62.6 percent of his free throws.
Despite the change of scenery, Harrell's role with the Clippers didn't change much from his final season in Houston. He spent the bulk of the year backing up DeAndre Jordan at center, while also occasionally getting minutes as a reserve power forward. Harrell finished the season averaging career highs of 11.0 points and 4.0 rebounds, while shooting 63.4 percent from the field. The 6-foot-8 big man has a chance to up that workload once again looking forward to the upcoming campaign. Jordan opted to leave Los Angeles during free agency and takes with it his stellar averages of 12.0 points and 15.2 rebounds across 31.5 minutes. That's a lot of production to make up for and it seems unlikely that offseason addition Marcin Gortat will be the only one to do so. As a result, look for Harrell to absorb some of the minutes and he could even push Gortat for more time considering the veteran big man is coming off one of his worst seasons statistically in recent memory. Of course, Boban Marjanovic is also an option at center, but his size only allows him to stay on the court for short stretches. All that said, look for Harrell's role to grow in his fourth NBA season and he could become a deep league option for Fantasy purposes if Gortat struggles and the Clippers turn to Harrell for more time. It is worth it to note that he has no semblance of a three-point shot and he knocked down just 62.6 percent of his free throws.
MIN (F, PF, C)
G
79
Min
31.0
FPTS
1,144.0
REB
525.0
AST
89.0
STL
56.0
BLK
53.0
TO
80.0
FGM
358.0
FGA
662.0
FTM
124.0
FTA
166.0
Gibson was perhaps the most surprising Timberwolves player last season, in terms of Fantasy production. The veteran was largely undrafted across many leagues, yet managed to maintain value in essentially all formats. He finished the season with averages of 12.2 points and 7.1 rebounds per game, plus a combined 1.5 steals and blocks, to go with a career-best 57.7 percent mark from the field. The 33-year-old started all 82 games for the first time in his career, bouncing back from an up-and-down 2016-17 campaign split between Chicago and Oklahoma City. Gibson's numbers were far from extraordinary, but he was remarkably consistent and even flashed increased shooting range, attempting 35 three-pointers, which were by far a career-high. Heading into 2018-19, Gibson's role will likely remain much the same, though at some point his workload (33.2 MPG last season) may have to be monitored. Given who's in charge of the rotation, however, a substantial drop-off in minutes doesn't seem likely.
Gibson was perhaps the most surprising Timberwolves player last season, in terms of Fantasy production. The veteran was largely undrafted across many leagues, yet managed to maintain value in essentially all formats. He finished the season with averages of 12.2 points and 7.1 rebounds per game, plus a combined 1.5 steals and blocks, to go with a career-best 57.7 percent mark from the field. The 33-year-old started all 82 games for the first time in his career, bouncing back from an up-and-down 2016-17 campaign split between Chicago and Oklahoma City. Gibson's numbers were far from extraordinary, but he was remarkably consistent and even flashed increased shooting range, attempting 35 three-pointers, which were by far a career-high. Heading into 2018-19, Gibson's role will likely remain much the same, though at some point his workload (33.2 MPG last season) may have to be monitored. Given who's in charge of the rotation, however, a substantial drop-off in minutes doesn't seem likely.
DEN (G, SG)
G
69
Min
35.2
FPTS
1,126.0
REB
190.0
AST
204.0
STL
120.0
BLK
16.0
TO
125.0
FGM
468.0
FGA
959.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
171.0
Though injuries have limited Harris to 124 games over the past two years, he’s shown significant improvement across his first four campaigns. The soon-to-be 24-year-old out of Michigan State set career highs in points (17.5), steals (1.8), three-pointers per game (2.3) and free-throw percentage (82.7) last season. He doesn't provide much by way of supplementary stats (2.9 assists and 2.6 rebounds), but his efficient, high-volume shooting and defense paves the way to Fantasy relevance. Harris is still young enough to keep improving, and it’s possible he crosses the 20-point per game threshold if he can evolve as a ball handler and get more aggressive taking the ball to the rack -- not to mention continue hitting threes at a high volume. Considering that his stats don't jump off the page, Fantasy owners may be able to get Harris in drafts later than his value might indicate. Assuming he stays relatively healthy and improves even marginally, Harris is worthy of a fourth-round pick, if not a late third.
Though injuries have limited Harris to 124 games over the past two years, he’s shown significant improvement across his first four campaigns. The soon-to-be 24-year-old out of Michigan State set career highs in points (17.5), steals (1.8), three-pointers per game (2.3) and free-throw percentage (82.7) last season. He doesn't provide much by way of supplementary stats (2.9 assists and 2.6 rebounds), but his efficient, high-volume shooting and defense paves the way to Fantasy relevance. Harris is still young enough to keep improving, and it’s possible he crosses the 20-point per game threshold if he can evolve as a ball handler and get more aggressive taking the ball to the rack -- not to mention continue hitting threes at a high volume. Considering that his stats don't jump off the page, Fantasy owners may be able to get Harris in drafts later than his value might indicate. Assuming he stays relatively healthy and improves even marginally, Harris is worthy of a fourth-round pick, if not a late third.
DAL (G, PG)
G
75
Min
32.6
FPTS
1,124.0
REB
310.0
AST
427.0
STL
80.0
BLK
21.0
TO
233.0
FGM
504.0
FGA
1,218.0
FTM
162.0
FTA
230.0
After being selected with the ninth overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft, Smith put together a very impressive rookie campaign. He started all 69 games he played in and was an immediate playmaker, both as a scorer and as a distributor. Smith's 15.2 points per game were second only to Harrison Barnes (18.9 PPG) on the team and he also added a respectable 5.2 assists. Rounding out his stat line was averages of 3.8 rebounds, 1.0 steal and 1.5 three-pointers, so Smith also helped out with some peripheral categories that Fantasy owners may struggle to get from other guards. The biggest downfall in his game was his efficiency as a scorer. Smith shot just 39.5 percent from the field, 31.3 percent from the three-point line and just 69.4 percent from the charity stripe, all of which are well below where he needs to be to take his Fantasy value to a new level. With another offseason to work on his shot and overall game, there's a decent chance the 20-year-old is able to show at least minor improvements there. The Mavericks did add some intriguing pieces this offseason, most notably being DeAndre Jordan's signing in free agency and the selection of Luka Doncic with the third overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. Doncic adds another seasoned scorer after he locked up EuroLeague MVP honors with Real Madrid last year and should be able to contribute immediately, while Jordan provides an athletic center that should get plenty of lobs from Smith when he drives to the basket. As a result, Smith's assist totals could rise with more talent surrounding him. His per-game points production likely won't budge much, but considering his age and designation as a building block of the future, Smith should have the ball in his hands plenty and will get as much run as possible. If Fantasy owners can overlook the poor percentages, Smith should carry utility across a plethora of formats.
After being selected with the ninth overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft, Smith put together a very impressive rookie campaign. He started all 69 games he played in and was an immediate playmaker, both as a scorer and as a distributor. Smith's 15.2 points per game were second only to Harrison Barnes (18.9 PPG) on the team and he also added a respectable 5.2 assists. Rounding out his stat line was averages of 3.8 rebounds, 1.0 steal and 1.5 three-pointers, so Smith also helped out with some peripheral categories that Fantasy owners may struggle to get from other guards. The biggest downfall in his game was his efficiency as a scorer. Smith shot just 39.5 percent from the field, 31.3 percent from the three-point line and just 69.4 percent from the charity stripe, all of which are well below where he needs to be to take his Fantasy value to a new level. With another offseason to work on his shot and overall game, there's a decent chance the 20-year-old is able to show at least minor improvements there. The Mavericks did add some intriguing pieces this offseason, most notably being DeAndre Jordan's signing in free agency and the selection of Luka Doncic with the third overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. Doncic adds another seasoned scorer after he locked up EuroLeague MVP honors with Real Madrid last year and should be able to contribute immediately, while Jordan provides an athletic center that should get plenty of lobs from Smith when he drives to the basket. As a result, Smith's assist totals could rise with more talent surrounding him. His per-game points production likely won't budge much, but considering his age and designation as a building block of the future, Smith should have the ball in his hands plenty and will get as much run as possible. If Fantasy owners can overlook the poor percentages, Smith should carry utility across a plethora of formats.
SAC (F, PF, C)
G
77
Min
28.1
FPTS
1,122.0
REB
554.0
AST
100.0
STL
31.0
BLK
46.0
TO
123.0
FGM
431.0
FGA
884.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
216.0
Bagley spent last season at Duke as a freshman, where he won ACC Player of the year by averaging 21.0 points and 11.1 rebounds per game. He also shot 61.4 percent from the field and 39.7 percent from deep, though took only 1.8 threes per contest. That resume was strong enough for the Kings to draft Bagley No. 2 overall during the 2018 Draft. He appeared in four summer league tilts with the team, but was underwhelming, posting averages of 10.3 points on 33.3 percent shooting, 5.8 rebounds and 1.8 blocks across 26.1 minutes. Still, Bagley, who is 6-foot-11 and 234 pounds, is expected to start at power forward to begin the season and should see significant run in the frontcourt, and maybe even some at small forward. He should be a nightly double-double threat, though it’s not clear if he'll be a dynamic enough of a scorer during Year 1 to make big impact at the NBA level. All things considered, Bagley’s pedigree and projected usage alone is probably enough to be worth a late-round flyer at the very least in most standard formats.
Bagley spent last season at Duke as a freshman, where he won ACC Player of the year by averaging 21.0 points and 11.1 rebounds per game. He also shot 61.4 percent from the field and 39.7 percent from deep, though took only 1.8 threes per contest. That resume was strong enough for the Kings to draft Bagley No. 2 overall during the 2018 Draft. He appeared in four summer league tilts with the team, but was underwhelming, posting averages of 10.3 points on 33.3 percent shooting, 5.8 rebounds and 1.8 blocks across 26.1 minutes. Still, Bagley, who is 6-foot-11 and 234 pounds, is expected to start at power forward to begin the season and should see significant run in the frontcourt, and maybe even some at small forward. He should be a nightly double-double threat, though it’s not clear if he'll be a dynamic enough of a scorer during Year 1 to make big impact at the NBA level. All things considered, Bagley’s pedigree and projected usage alone is probably enough to be worth a late-round flyer at the very least in most standard formats.
IND (F, PF, SF)
G
79
Min
30.2
FPTS
1,122.0
REB
468.0
AST
139.0
STL
123.0
BLK
33.0
TO
96.0
FGM
390.0
FGA
790.0
FTM
52.0
FTA
84.0
Following the departures of Paul George and Jeff Teague, Young was expected to take on a more significant role in the Pacer offense in his second year with the team. However, offseason addition Victor Oladipo was much better than expected and became an All-Star, while both Darren Collison and Bojan Bogdanovic had solid years as well. That kept Young's production from increasing much, so the 30-year-old ended with nearly an identical line to his 2016-17 campaign. Playing 32.2 minutes per contest, Young averaged 11.8 points, 6.3 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 1.7 steals. He did, however, see a noticeable drop in his field goal percentage, connecting on just 48.7 percent of his shots compared to 52.7 percent a year prior. The Pacers only made a couple of frontcourt moves this offseason. Both Al Jefferson and Trevor Booker were allowed to leave in free agency, while Kyle O'Quinn was signed from the Knicks. As a result, there weren't any moves made that would lead to a substantial role change for Young. Look for the 6-foot-8 big man to stick in the starting five, with Domantas Sabonis working as his backup. Young isn't going to put up any gaudy numbers, but his contributions across the box score will be valuable in deeper leagues and his solid steal totals for a player at his position are always a bonus. That said, it's worth it to note that Young has shot below 60 percent from the free-throw line in back-to-back seasons.
Following the departures of Paul George and Jeff Teague, Young was expected to take on a more significant role in the Pacer offense in his second year with the team. However, offseason addition Victor Oladipo was much better than expected and became an All-Star, while both Darren Collison and Bojan Bogdanovic had solid years as well. That kept Young's production from increasing much, so the 30-year-old ended with nearly an identical line to his 2016-17 campaign. Playing 32.2 minutes per contest, Young averaged 11.8 points, 6.3 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 1.7 steals. He did, however, see a noticeable drop in his field goal percentage, connecting on just 48.7 percent of his shots compared to 52.7 percent a year prior. The Pacers only made a couple of frontcourt moves this offseason. Both Al Jefferson and Trevor Booker were allowed to leave in free agency, while Kyle O'Quinn was signed from the Knicks. As a result, there weren't any moves made that would lead to a substantial role change for Young. Look for the 6-foot-8 big man to stick in the starting five, with Domantas Sabonis working as his backup. Young isn't going to put up any gaudy numbers, but his contributions across the box score will be valuable in deeper leagues and his solid steal totals for a player at his position are always a bonus. That said, it's worth it to note that Young has shot below 60 percent from the free-throw line in back-to-back seasons.
MEM (F, SF, PF)
G
76
Min
28.7
FPTS
1,117.0
REB
437.0
AST
223.0
STL
127.0
BLK
66.0
TO
104.0
FGM
248.0
FGA
483.0
FTM
123.0
FTA
161.0
The Grizzlies thought highly enough of Anderson’s talents to tender him a four-year, $37 million offer sheet that the Spurs somewhat surprisingly chose not to match. The 24-year-old swingman continued to fill out the stat sheet last season, his fourth in San Antonio. Anderson totaled career highs across the board – 7.9 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.6 steals on a career-best 52.7 percent shooting – averaging 26.7 minutes while Kawhi Leonard missed all but nine games with his quadriceps issues. A jack-of-all-trades with an above-average defensive skill set, Anderson seemingly fits right into Memphis’ slow-paced, half-court philosophy, one that somewhat resembles that of the Spurs team he leaves behind when running on all cylinders. Despite the presumed starting job, Anderson could ultimately see only a slight bump in playing time over last season, considering the likes of second-year man Dillon Brooks and veterans Chandler Parsons and Omri Casspi are also available to help man the three.
The Grizzlies thought highly enough of Anderson’s talents to tender him a four-year, $37 million offer sheet that the Spurs somewhat surprisingly chose not to match. The 24-year-old swingman continued to fill out the stat sheet last season, his fourth in San Antonio. Anderson totaled career highs across the board – 7.9 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.6 steals on a career-best 52.7 percent shooting – averaging 26.7 minutes while Kawhi Leonard missed all but nine games with his quadriceps issues. A jack-of-all-trades with an above-average defensive skill set, Anderson seemingly fits right into Memphis’ slow-paced, half-court philosophy, one that somewhat resembles that of the Spurs team he leaves behind when running on all cylinders. Despite the presumed starting job, Anderson could ultimately see only a slight bump in playing time over last season, considering the likes of second-year man Dillon Brooks and veterans Chandler Parsons and Omri Casspi are also available to help man the three.
LAL (G, PG)
G
67
Min
31.2
FPTS
1,113.0
REB
449.0
AST
411.0
STL
105.0
BLK
40.0
TO
163.0
FGM
277.0
FGA
703.0
FTM
55.0
FTA
93.0
Ball’s first year in the league was ultimately underwhelming, but was filled with positives to build upon. The second overall pick in 2017, Ball was a notably good shooter at UCLA despite unconventional form, hitting 2.2 threes per game at 41.2 percent. However, that failed to translate during his rookie campaign, as he shot just 30.5 percent from distance (and 36.0 percent overall). Ball was also atrocious from the free-throw line, making just 32 of his 71 attempts. However, the other aspects of his game shined through and allowed him to remain Fantasy relevant. Despite playing just 52 games due to injury, the 6-foot-6 point guard was able to rack up 13 double-doubles and two triple-doubles, averaging 7.2 assists and 6.9 rebounds. Ball also played impressive defense, racking up a combined 2.5 steals/blocks per contest. The addition of LeBron James to the Lakers complicates things for Ball. he'll presumably asked to play off-ball more often -- a role that will be difficult for him to succeed in if he can't improve his shooting. Plus, Rajon Rondo was added to the mix, giving Ball more competition for playing time. How early Ball should be drafted is heavily contingent on Fantasy owners’ belief in his ability to become a better shooter.
Ball’s first year in the league was ultimately underwhelming, but was filled with positives to build upon. The second overall pick in 2017, Ball was a notably good shooter at UCLA despite unconventional form, hitting 2.2 threes per game at 41.2 percent. However, that failed to translate during his rookie campaign, as he shot just 30.5 percent from distance (and 36.0 percent overall). Ball was also atrocious from the free-throw line, making just 32 of his 71 attempts. However, the other aspects of his game shined through and allowed him to remain Fantasy relevant. Despite playing just 52 games due to injury, the 6-foot-6 point guard was able to rack up 13 double-doubles and two triple-doubles, averaging 7.2 assists and 6.9 rebounds. Ball also played impressive defense, racking up a combined 2.5 steals/blocks per contest. The addition of LeBron James to the Lakers complicates things for Ball. he'll presumably asked to play off-ball more often -- a role that will be difficult for him to succeed in if he can't improve his shooting. Plus, Rajon Rondo was added to the mix, giving Ball more competition for playing time. How early Ball should be drafted is heavily contingent on Fantasy owners’ belief in his ability to become a better shooter.
HOU (F, PF, SF)
G
75
Min
29.2
FPTS
1,110.0
REB
423.0
AST
156.0
STL
35.0
BLK
41.0
TO
106.0
FGM
403.0
FGA
935.0
FTM
170.0
FTA
213.0
After six straight years in a Knicks uniform, Anthony was traded to Oklahoma City ahead of the 2017-18 campaign, where he was expected to form a new "Big 3" alongside Russell Westbrook and Paul George. Of the three, Anthony was clearly the bottom feeder and his touches and usage took a significant hit after being the go-to guy in New York. Anthony's field goal attempts fell from 18.8 per game to just 15.0, which resulted in a career-low scoring finish of 16.2 points per game. His 1.3 assists were also the worst of his career, while his 5.8 rebounds were his lowest finish since his second year in the league in 2005-2006. Much of the time Anthony simply drifted out to the three-point line and waited for open looks from Westbrook and George. As a result, Anthony did knock down 2.2 three-pointers at a 35.7 percent clip. Still, after the Thunder were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs, Anthony was quickly given much of the blame for the failed experiment and ultimately wound up with the Rockets after a trade and a buyout pushed him into the free agent market. Unfortunately for his Fantasy value, Anthony will be joining another stacked roster, one that nearly ousted the defending champion Warriors in the Western Conference Finals. With James Harden and Chris Paul running the show offensively, as well as the presence of the newly extended Clint Capela, Anthony is going to have to settle for a complementary scoring role. There's a chance the 15-year veteran could even come off the bench, which is somewhat surprising considering Anthony has publicly stated in the past that he wouldn't do so. All of that leads to the conclusion that Anthony will have to make some sacrifices with his new club and his willingness to do so could help determine his value. Anthony is assuredly walking into his smallest workload to date and while that essentially guarantees his production takes a hit, he could still have some value as a scorer and a deep-ball marksman on an uptempo team that led the league in uncontested three-pointers a year ago.
After six straight years in a Knicks uniform, Anthony was traded to Oklahoma City ahead of the 2017-18 campaign, where he was expected to form a new "Big 3" alongside Russell Westbrook and Paul George. Of the three, Anthony was clearly the bottom feeder and his touches and usage took a significant hit after being the go-to guy in New York. Anthony's field goal attempts fell from 18.8 per game to just 15.0, which resulted in a career-low scoring finish of 16.2 points per game. His 1.3 assists were also the worst of his career, while his 5.8 rebounds were his lowest finish since his second year in the league in 2005-2006. Much of the time Anthony simply drifted out to the three-point line and waited for open looks from Westbrook and George. As a result, Anthony did knock down 2.2 three-pointers at a 35.7 percent clip. Still, after the Thunder were eliminated in the first round of the playoffs, Anthony was quickly given much of the blame for the failed experiment and ultimately wound up with the Rockets after a trade and a buyout pushed him into the free agent market. Unfortunately for his Fantasy value, Anthony will be joining another stacked roster, one that nearly ousted the defending champion Warriors in the Western Conference Finals. With James Harden and Chris Paul running the show offensively, as well as the presence of the newly extended Clint Capela, Anthony is going to have to settle for a complementary scoring role. There's a chance the 15-year veteran could even come off the bench, which is somewhat surprising considering Anthony has publicly stated in the past that he wouldn't do so. All of that leads to the conclusion that Anthony will have to make some sacrifices with his new club and his willingness to do so could help determine his value. Anthony is assuredly walking into his smallest workload to date and while that essentially guarantees his production takes a hit, he could still have some value as a scorer and a deep-ball marksman on an uptempo team that led the league in uncontested three-pointers a year ago.
UTA (F, C, PF)
G
72
Min
27.0
FPTS
1,110.0
REB
498.0
AST
92.0
STL
49.0
BLK
74.0
TO
79.0
FGM
344.0
FGA
633.0
FTM
128.0
FTA
194.0
Despite some questions about the big man's durability and fit next to Rudy Gobert, Favors re-upped with the Jazz this summer on a two-year, $36 million contract. Since he became a full-time starter in 2013-14, Favors is averaging 67.2 games played per season. That's caused him to slip down draft boards year after year despite quality production when he's on the court. Last season, the 27-year-old recorded 12.3 points, 7.2 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.1 blocks per game on 56.3 percent shooting. Favors was also able to record 15 double-doubles and nine games with at least three blocks. While he's still relatively young, it doesn't seem likely Favors will take another statistical leap -- especially considering the Jazz play at one of the slowest paces in the league and Donovan Mitchell sucks up nearly 30 percent of the team's usage. However, optimists can point to Favors' increased three-point attempts as a possible new wrinkle in his game. He took a career-high 63 threes last season, though he only made them at a 22.2 percent clip. That said, he managed to hit a career-high 39.1 percent of his looks from 16 feet to the three-point line, suggesting his overall range is improving. Whether or not he's able to efficiently integrate the deep ball into his game this season will probably remain unknown until the preseason at the earliest.
Despite some questions about the big man's durability and fit next to Rudy Gobert, Favors re-upped with the Jazz this summer on a two-year, $36 million contract. Since he became a full-time starter in 2013-14, Favors is averaging 67.2 games played per season. That's caused him to slip down draft boards year after year despite quality production when he's on the court. Last season, the 27-year-old recorded 12.3 points, 7.2 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.1 blocks per game on 56.3 percent shooting. Favors was also able to record 15 double-doubles and nine games with at least three blocks. While he's still relatively young, it doesn't seem likely Favors will take another statistical leap -- especially considering the Jazz play at one of the slowest paces in the league and Donovan Mitchell sucks up nearly 30 percent of the team's usage. However, optimists can point to Favors' increased three-point attempts as a possible new wrinkle in his game. He took a career-high 63 threes last season, though he only made them at a 22.2 percent clip. That said, he managed to hit a career-high 39.1 percent of his looks from 16 feet to the three-point line, suggesting his overall range is improving. Whether or not he's able to efficiently integrate the deep ball into his game this season will probably remain unknown until the preseason at the earliest.
ATL (G, PG)
G
72
Min
32.1
FPTS
1,106.0
REB
223.0
AST
449.0
STL
58.0
BLK
0.0
TO
242.0
FGM
391.0
FGA
978.0
FTM
278.0
FTA
331.0
Young burst onto the college basketball scene as a freshman at Oklahoma, with his electric scoring ability and three-point range instantly drawing comparisons to NBA champion Steph Curry. Young would ultimately finish the season as Division 1's leading scorer (27.4 points per game) and assist man (8.7 per game), while hitting 118 three-pointers. He chipped in with 3.9 rebounds and 1.7 steals as well, while knocking down 36 percent of his deep balls. There are a few concerns with Young's transition to the NBA. He's only 6-foot-2 and doesn't have much length, so he could struggle to gain separation offensively, as well as keep some of the league's taller guards in check on the defensive side of the ball. There were also times when he disappeared against some of the better teams in the NCAA and his specific skill-set as a deep-ball threat poses potential issues with his efficiency. That said, Young is heading into an extremely advantageous situation after being drafted by the Hawks with the fifth overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. Atlanta traded last year's starting point guard, Dennis Schroder, to the Thunder this offseason, which should give Young an opportunity to jump into the starting unit right away. Jeremy Lin was added to the roster and could start if Young struggles during training camp or the preseason, but it's still Young's job to lose. As a result, the 19-year-old is slated for big minutes from the get go and is easily one of the more intriguing rookies from this year's class when looking at Fantasy potential. Lin should help take the pressure off Young at times and fellow youngsters Taurean Prince and John Collins are also on the rise, so the first-round pick should have some solid pieces alongside him to boost his assist numbers. Expectations will be high going into the season, though as mentioned previously, Fantasy owners will have to keep in mind his status as a rookie, as well as the potential for inefficiency issues going up against NBA talent.
Young burst onto the college basketball scene as a freshman at Oklahoma, with his electric scoring ability and three-point range instantly drawing comparisons to NBA champion Steph Curry. Young would ultimately finish the season as Division 1's leading scorer (27.4 points per game) and assist man (8.7 per game), while hitting 118 three-pointers. He chipped in with 3.9 rebounds and 1.7 steals as well, while knocking down 36 percent of his deep balls. There are a few concerns with Young's transition to the NBA. He's only 6-foot-2 and doesn't have much length, so he could struggle to gain separation offensively, as well as keep some of the league's taller guards in check on the defensive side of the ball. There were also times when he disappeared against some of the better teams in the NCAA and his specific skill-set as a deep-ball threat poses potential issues with his efficiency. That said, Young is heading into an extremely advantageous situation after being drafted by the Hawks with the fifth overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. Atlanta traded last year's starting point guard, Dennis Schroder, to the Thunder this offseason, which should give Young an opportunity to jump into the starting unit right away. Jeremy Lin was added to the roster and could start if Young struggles during training camp or the preseason, but it's still Young's job to lose. As a result, the 19-year-old is slated for big minutes from the get go and is easily one of the more intriguing rookies from this year's class when looking at Fantasy potential. Lin should help take the pressure off Young at times and fellow youngsters Taurean Prince and John Collins are also on the rise, so the first-round pick should have some solid pieces alongside him to boost his assist numbers. Expectations will be high going into the season, though as mentioned previously, Fantasy owners will have to keep in mind his status as a rookie, as well as the potential for inefficiency issues going up against NBA talent.
MIA (C, C, PF)
G
74
Min
24.5
FPTS
1,103.0
REB
439.0
AST
211.0
STL
63.0
BLK
36.0
TO
150.0
FGM
318.0
FGA
648.0
FTM
135.0
FTA
177.0
After spending the first four years of his career in Boston, Olynyk debuted as a member of the Heat last season, starting in 22 of his 76 appearances. He continued his efficient shooting, hitting 49.7 percent of his looks from the field, 77.0 percent from the charity stripe, and drilling 1.4 threes per game at 37.9 percent. He also posted career highs in points (11.5), rebounds (5.7) and assists (2.7) per contest. Olynyk’s less-than-ideal workload (23.4 minutes) subdues his Fantasy relevance, but his all-around play is good enough to keep him in top-100 contention. It’s important to keep in mind that he steps up when given expanded opportunities, however. In 14 games last season that he saw between 30-36 minutes, the big man averaged 14.1 points, 6.9 rebounds, 4.6 assists and a combined 2.1 steals/blocks while shooting 49.3 percent from the field, 79.6 percent from the stripe and 41.1 percent from deep.
After spending the first four years of his career in Boston, Olynyk debuted as a member of the Heat last season, starting in 22 of his 76 appearances. He continued his efficient shooting, hitting 49.7 percent of his looks from the field, 77.0 percent from the charity stripe, and drilling 1.4 threes per game at 37.9 percent. He also posted career highs in points (11.5), rebounds (5.7) and assists (2.7) per contest. Olynyk’s less-than-ideal workload (23.4 minutes) subdues his Fantasy relevance, but his all-around play is good enough to keep him in top-100 contention. It’s important to keep in mind that he steps up when given expanded opportunities, however. In 14 games last season that he saw between 30-36 minutes, the big man averaged 14.1 points, 6.9 rebounds, 4.6 assists and a combined 2.1 steals/blocks while shooting 49.3 percent from the field, 79.6 percent from the stripe and 41.1 percent from deep.
CHI (F, SF, PF)
G
66
Min
29.9
FPTS
1,096.0
REB
403.0
AST
158.0
STL
66.0
BLK
27.0
TO
136.0
FGM
451.0
FGA
981.0
FTM
182.0
FTA
242.0
In an act of good faith, the Bucks rescinded Parker’s qualifying offer, allowing him to sign a two-year, $40 million contract in his hometown of Chicago. While the Bucks were scared off by Parker’s two ACL tears and poor defense, the Bulls felt his upside was worth the short-term risk. Parker has played 82 games over the past two seasons, shooting 48.8 percent from the field and 37.1 percent from deep while averaging 20.6 points, 6.8 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.1 steals per 36 minutes. Though he’s spent just 21 percent of his career minutes at small forward, it appears that will be the position Parker is slotted into this season, as Lauri Markkanen is a lock at power forward. The move could affect his rebounding numbers, but there will be no shortage of scoring opportunities in Parker moving from Milwaukee’s 20th-paced offense to Chicago’s 10th-fastest offense. Still, the Duke product remains a risky pickup in Fantasy due to his injury history, and could see his draft position vary drastically from league to league. If he stays healthy, however, he could have a chance to be one of Fantasy’s top forwards.
In an act of good faith, the Bucks rescinded Parker’s qualifying offer, allowing him to sign a two-year, $40 million contract in his hometown of Chicago. While the Bucks were scared off by Parker’s two ACL tears and poor defense, the Bulls felt his upside was worth the short-term risk. Parker has played 82 games over the past two seasons, shooting 48.8 percent from the field and 37.1 percent from deep while averaging 20.6 points, 6.8 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.1 steals per 36 minutes. Though he’s spent just 21 percent of his career minutes at small forward, it appears that will be the position Parker is slotted into this season, as Lauri Markkanen is a lock at power forward. The move could affect his rebounding numbers, but there will be no shortage of scoring opportunities in Parker moving from Milwaukee’s 20th-paced offense to Chicago’s 10th-fastest offense. Still, the Duke product remains a risky pickup in Fantasy due to his injury history, and could see his draft position vary drastically from league to league. If he stays healthy, however, he could have a chance to be one of Fantasy’s top forwards.
TOR (F, C, PF)
G
78
Min
26.6
FPTS
1,089.0
REB
473.0
AST
61.0
STL
29.0
BLK
98.0
TO
89.0
FGM
372.0
FGA
781.0
FTM
94.0
FTA
117.0
The 2017-18 campaign was Ibaka's first full season in Toronto, but it was more of the same for the 28-year-old big man. He operated as the Raptors' third option offensively behind Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, putting up 10.3 field goal attempts and averaging 12.6 points per game. That was down from 12.4 and 14.8, respectively, which was in large part due to a slight reduction in his playing time. Ibaka was on the court just 27.6 minutes, representing an effort by coach Dwane Casey to keep his starters fresh, as he also did the same with Lowry and DeRozan. Despite the decrease in his workload, Ibaka was his typical self as a rim protector with 1.3 blocks per game, while he continued to space the floor with a 36 percent clip from behind the arc. Coach Casey was fired this offseason, but assistant coach Nick Nurse was promoted to take over his spot and there's a chance he opts for a similar approach in regards to starter's minutes considering the Raptors did finish with the best record in the Eastern Conference with the strategy. That said, the organization opted to make a big move this offseason, dealing DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl to the Spurs in exchange for superstar Kawhi Leonard and sharpshooter Danny Green. Leonard is one of the best two-way players in the game and should take over DeRozan's spot as the lead dog offensively without much issue. Leonard is actually quite a bit more efficient than DeRozan and has better play-making skills and more shooting range, which should draw defenses towards him and allow guys like Lowry and Ibaka to get more open looks. While there's been some rumblings that Ibaka could come off the bench behind OG Anunoby, that still shouldn't have much of an impact on his workload, especially considering Poeltl's departure means even more minutes for Ibaka at center. With all that said, Ibaka appears set for a similar role overall despite the significant roster changes, so consider his final numbers from the 2017-18 season as a good baseline for his projected value during the upcoming campaign.
The 2017-18 campaign was Ibaka's first full season in Toronto, but it was more of the same for the 28-year-old big man. He operated as the Raptors' third option offensively behind Kyle Lowry and DeMar DeRozan, putting up 10.3 field goal attempts and averaging 12.6 points per game. That was down from 12.4 and 14.8, respectively, which was in large part due to a slight reduction in his playing time. Ibaka was on the court just 27.6 minutes, representing an effort by coach Dwane Casey to keep his starters fresh, as he also did the same with Lowry and DeRozan. Despite the decrease in his workload, Ibaka was his typical self as a rim protector with 1.3 blocks per game, while he continued to space the floor with a 36 percent clip from behind the arc. Coach Casey was fired this offseason, but assistant coach Nick Nurse was promoted to take over his spot and there's a chance he opts for a similar approach in regards to starter's minutes considering the Raptors did finish with the best record in the Eastern Conference with the strategy. That said, the organization opted to make a big move this offseason, dealing DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl to the Spurs in exchange for superstar Kawhi Leonard and sharpshooter Danny Green. Leonard is one of the best two-way players in the game and should take over DeRozan's spot as the lead dog offensively without much issue. Leonard is actually quite a bit more efficient than DeRozan and has better play-making skills and more shooting range, which should draw defenses towards him and allow guys like Lowry and Ibaka to get more open looks. While there's been some rumblings that Ibaka could come off the bench behind OG Anunoby, that still shouldn't have much of an impact on his workload, especially considering Poeltl's departure means even more minutes for Ibaka at center. With all that said, Ibaka appears set for a similar role overall despite the significant roster changes, so consider his final numbers from the 2017-18 season as a good baseline for his projected value during the upcoming campaign.
NY (G, SF, SG)
G
70
Min
33.6
FPTS
1,087.0
REB
289.0
AST
179.0
STL
82.0
BLK
12.0
TO
115.0
FGM
464.0
FGA
1,067.0
FTM
182.0
FTA
221.0
Following a breakout season in Atlanta, the Knicks opted to fork over a four-year, $71 million contract offer to Hardaway, which he quickly accepted without much thought considering he wasn't going to get anywhere near that number elsewhere in the league. While it was largely considered the biggest overpay of that year's free agency period, Hardaway still became one of the Knicks' top options offensively, especially after Kristaps Porzingis went down with a torn ACL and missed the second half of the year. However, Hardaway himself dealt with some injuries as well, missing a stretch of 20 straight games due to a leg injury. That said, when he was on the court, the 26-year-old set career highs across the board, averaging 17.5 points, 3.9 rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.1 steals across 33.1 minutes. In addition, he continued to be a respected deep ball threat, knocking down 2.3 three-pointers per game. Hardaway likely frustrated owners with his percentages, shooting 42.1 percent from the field and just 31.7 percent from beyond the arc, but his strong totals elsewhere did make up for it a bit. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, Hardaway once again has a big opportunity ahead of him. Porzingis is still in the middle of his recovery and is looking at a return in December at the earliest. That means Hardaway is going to have the ball in his hands quite often right away and could have the chance to potentially see a slight increase in his numbers across the board. Efficiency issues will continue to linger and there are some injury concerns, but with a high usage role expected, look for Hardaway to crack the top-100 once again for most Fantasy leagues.
Following a breakout season in Atlanta, the Knicks opted to fork over a four-year, $71 million contract offer to Hardaway, which he quickly accepted without much thought considering he wasn't going to get anywhere near that number elsewhere in the league. While it was largely considered the biggest overpay of that year's free agency period, Hardaway still became one of the Knicks' top options offensively, especially after Kristaps Porzingis went down with a torn ACL and missed the second half of the year. However, Hardaway himself dealt with some injuries as well, missing a stretch of 20 straight games due to a leg injury. That said, when he was on the court, the 26-year-old set career highs across the board, averaging 17.5 points, 3.9 rebounds, 2.7 assists and 1.1 steals across 33.1 minutes. In addition, he continued to be a respected deep ball threat, knocking down 2.3 three-pointers per game. Hardaway likely frustrated owners with his percentages, shooting 42.1 percent from the field and just 31.7 percent from beyond the arc, but his strong totals elsewhere did make up for it a bit. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, Hardaway once again has a big opportunity ahead of him. Porzingis is still in the middle of his recovery and is looking at a return in December at the earliest. That means Hardaway is going to have the ball in his hands quite often right away and could have the chance to potentially see a slight increase in his numbers across the board. Efficiency issues will continue to linger and there are some injury concerns, but with a high usage role expected, look for Hardaway to crack the top-100 once again for most Fantasy leagues.
MIA (F, PF, SF)
G
73
Min
27.5
FPTS
1,080.0
REB
370.0
AST
289.0
STL
72.0
BLK
77.0
TO
147.0
FGM
308.0
FGA
634.0
FTM
121.0
FTA
173.0
Johnson became a legitimate Fantasy asset two seasons ago -- his first campaign in Miami -- when he emerged as a versatile two-way forward. The 31-year-old’s production remained relatively stagnant last year, averaging 10.8 points, 4.9 rebounds, 3.8 assists and a combined 1.7 steals/blocks. He was able to increase his field-goal percentage from 47.9 to 50.3, though lost just over three percent on his long-range shooting. In addition to his balanced play, Johnson’s health remains solid, having missed just 15 games over the past two seasons. Overall, the forward’s role seems unlikely to change significantly this year. But, if anything, he might see decreased usage as a result of the return of Dion Waiters and the continued presence of Kelly Olynyk, Justise Winslow and Josh Richardson. Johnson is someone to target in the final rounds of most standard league drafts.
Johnson became a legitimate Fantasy asset two seasons ago -- his first campaign in Miami -- when he emerged as a versatile two-way forward. The 31-year-old’s production remained relatively stagnant last year, averaging 10.8 points, 4.9 rebounds, 3.8 assists and a combined 1.7 steals/blocks. He was able to increase his field-goal percentage from 47.9 to 50.3, though lost just over three percent on his long-range shooting. In addition to his balanced play, Johnson’s health remains solid, having missed just 15 games over the past two seasons. Overall, the forward’s role seems unlikely to change significantly this year. But, if anything, he might see decreased usage as a result of the return of Dion Waiters and the continued presence of Kelly Olynyk, Justise Winslow and Josh Richardson. Johnson is someone to target in the final rounds of most standard league drafts.
CHI (F, PF)
G
62
Min
32.2
FPTS
1,078.0
REB
482.0
AST
70.0
STL
38.0
BLK
40.0
TO
79.0
FGM
354.0
FGA
795.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
162.0
The seventh overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft, Markkanen wasted no time bursting onto the scene for the Bulls. He started all 68 games he appeared in, led Chicago in rebounds per game (7.5), had the third-highest scoring average on the team (15.2) of everyone who saw at least 24 games with the club, and became the fastest player in NBA history to 100 made three-pointers. The sky seems to be the limit for the 21-year-old, who also recorded 14 double-doubles and two 30-point games. The addition of Jabari Parker via free agency and Wendell Carter through the draft gives Markkanen some more frontcourt competition, though it’s hard to imagine Markkanen getting the short end of the stick. Though he missed a handful of games to due nagging back spasms towards the end of the season, it’s tough to judge the seriousness of the issue, as the Bulls were more than willing to sit key players in order to secure a higher draft pick. So, in evaluating his Fantasy stock for 2018-19, those absences can arguably be ignored.
The seventh overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft, Markkanen wasted no time bursting onto the scene for the Bulls. He started all 68 games he appeared in, led Chicago in rebounds per game (7.5), had the third-highest scoring average on the team (15.2) of everyone who saw at least 24 games with the club, and became the fastest player in NBA history to 100 made three-pointers. The sky seems to be the limit for the 21-year-old, who also recorded 14 double-doubles and two 30-point games. The addition of Jabari Parker via free agency and Wendell Carter through the draft gives Markkanen some more frontcourt competition, though it’s hard to imagine Markkanen getting the short end of the stick. Though he missed a handful of games to due nagging back spasms towards the end of the season, it’s tough to judge the seriousness of the issue, as the Bulls were more than willing to sit key players in order to secure a higher draft pick. So, in evaluating his Fantasy stock for 2018-19, those absences can arguably be ignored.
LAL (C, C)
G
77
Min
17.8
FPTS
1,076.0
REB
404.0
AST
74.0
STL
47.0
BLK
127.0
TO
60.0
FGM
312.0
FGA
488.0
FTM
76.0
FTA
116.0
Over the past two seasons with Golden State, McGee started 27 games, but averaged just 5.5 points and 2.9 rebounds across 9.5 minutes. However, in joining the Lakers this year, he'll have the opportunity to be a full-time starter. The other competition for the position is Ivica Zubac, who played more G-League minutes than NBA minutes, and Moritz Wagner, the 25th pick in this year’s draft. That said, even if McGee earns the starting job, he may not see enough run to vault into Fantasy relevance. The last time the center garnered at least 15 minutes per game was in 2013-14 as a member of the Nuggets. During his 121 games with the team, he averaged 8.6 points, 4.6 rebounds and 1.8 blocks across 17.5 minutes -- an indication of the type of production he could have in LA. All things considered, McGee could make for a late-round flyer in Fantasy, though recent history suggests his upside is relatively limited.
Over the past two seasons with Golden State, McGee started 27 games, but averaged just 5.5 points and 2.9 rebounds across 9.5 minutes. However, in joining the Lakers this year, he'll have the opportunity to be a full-time starter. The other competition for the position is Ivica Zubac, who played more G-League minutes than NBA minutes, and Moritz Wagner, the 25th pick in this year’s draft. That said, even if McGee earns the starting job, he may not see enough run to vault into Fantasy relevance. The last time the center garnered at least 15 minutes per game was in 2013-14 as a member of the Nuggets. During his 121 games with the team, he averaged 8.6 points, 4.6 rebounds and 1.8 blocks across 17.5 minutes -- an indication of the type of production he could have in LA. All things considered, McGee could make for a late-round flyer in Fantasy, though recent history suggests his upside is relatively limited.
BRO (G, SG, SF, PG)
G
73
Min
28.9
FPTS
1,071.0
REB
277.0
AST
313.0
STL
83.0
BLK
23.0
TO
163.0
FGM
369.0
FGA
798.0
FTM
171.0
FTA
209.0
After missing a chunk of his rookie season recovering from injury, the 2017-18 campaign marked LeVert's first year of playing a full schedule. While he missed a handful of contests here and there, LeVert still played in 71 games and became a prominent member of the regular rotation. The Nets brought in Allen Crabbe and DeMarre Carroll in trades prior to the season and despite the fact that those two ultimately held down the two starting spots on the wing ahead of LeVert, the second-year guard was still able to log 26.3 minutes per game after finishing with just 21.7 as a rookie. LeVert posted career highs across the board of 12.1 points, 4.2 assists, 3.7 rebounds and 1.2 steals. He still struggled a bit with his shot, however, and finished just 43.5 percent from the field and 34.7 percent from deep. He'll likely continue to work on honing in his shooting stroke, which could help improve his 1.2 three-pointers per contest. Looking ahead to the upcoming season, the Nets bring back a similar cast of players on the wing. Crabbe, Carroll and Joe Harris all return, though the Nets did part ways with Jeremy Lin. Considering LeVert's ability to play point guard, shooting guard and small forward, the plethora of bodies shouldn't impact his ability to see significant minutes once again and the Nets seem likely to focus on his development as one of the foundation pieces of the future. If LeVert stays healthy, he should be able to take yet another step forward in his development. However, with so many mouths to feed, he may struggle to make more than minor gains across the stat sheet, so Fantasy owners shouldn't expect a huge jump in production going into his third year.
After missing a chunk of his rookie season recovering from injury, the 2017-18 campaign marked LeVert's first year of playing a full schedule. While he missed a handful of contests here and there, LeVert still played in 71 games and became a prominent member of the regular rotation. The Nets brought in Allen Crabbe and DeMarre Carroll in trades prior to the season and despite the fact that those two ultimately held down the two starting spots on the wing ahead of LeVert, the second-year guard was still able to log 26.3 minutes per game after finishing with just 21.7 as a rookie. LeVert posted career highs across the board of 12.1 points, 4.2 assists, 3.7 rebounds and 1.2 steals. He still struggled a bit with his shot, however, and finished just 43.5 percent from the field and 34.7 percent from deep. He'll likely continue to work on honing in his shooting stroke, which could help improve his 1.2 three-pointers per contest. Looking ahead to the upcoming season, the Nets bring back a similar cast of players on the wing. Crabbe, Carroll and Joe Harris all return, though the Nets did part ways with Jeremy Lin. Considering LeVert's ability to play point guard, shooting guard and small forward, the plethora of bodies shouldn't impact his ability to see significant minutes once again and the Nets seem likely to focus on his development as one of the foundation pieces of the future. If LeVert stays healthy, he should be able to take yet another step forward in his development. However, with so many mouths to feed, he may struggle to make more than minor gains across the stat sheet, so Fantasy owners shouldn't expect a huge jump in production going into his third year.
CHI (F, PF, C)
G
78
Min
26.6
FPTS
1,069.0
REB
476.0
AST
104.0
STL
38.0
BLK
96.0
TO
117.0
FGM
340.0
FGA
680.0
FTM
146.0
FTA
203.0
Carter comes in at 6-foot-10 and 251 pounds with a nearly a 7-foot-5 wingspan, providing some size at center for the Bulls alongside Lauri Markkanen. Though Carter lacks elite athleticism, his versatility gives him plenty of upside. The rookie can finish in the pick-and-roll, catch-and-shoot threes, work in the post and make good passes. He was also an impressive rebounder at Duke, posting 13.5 boards per 40 minutes. Defensively, Carter's size should help him hold his own in the post, while his quick feet and long arms could help him make switches on the perimeter. He looked more than comfortable during five summer league tilts, averaging 14.6 points, 9.4 rebounds, 3.4 combined blocks/steals and 1.6 assists while shooting 55.1 percent from the field and going 3-of-7 from beyond the arc. Carter also contributed to the overall success of the team, ending up with a plus-31.8 net rating. It’s unclear if he'll be the team’s starting center from Day 1, but it would be surprising if he doesn't at least split time at the position with Robin Lopez.
Carter comes in at 6-foot-10 and 251 pounds with a nearly a 7-foot-5 wingspan, providing some size at center for the Bulls alongside Lauri Markkanen. Though Carter lacks elite athleticism, his versatility gives him plenty of upside. The rookie can finish in the pick-and-roll, catch-and-shoot threes, work in the post and make good passes. He was also an impressive rebounder at Duke, posting 13.5 boards per 40 minutes. Defensively, Carter's size should help him hold his own in the post, while his quick feet and long arms could help him make switches on the perimeter. He looked more than comfortable during five summer league tilts, averaging 14.6 points, 9.4 rebounds, 3.4 combined blocks/steals and 1.6 assists while shooting 55.1 percent from the field and going 3-of-7 from beyond the arc. Carter also contributed to the overall success of the team, ending up with a plus-31.8 net rating. It’s unclear if he'll be the team’s starting center from Day 1, but it would be surprising if he doesn't at least split time at the position with Robin Lopez.
MEM (C, PF, C)
G
79
Min
27.6
FPTS
1,055.0
REB
482.0
AST
47.0
STL
32.0
BLK
134.0
TO
119.0
FGM
347.0
FGA
774.0
FTM
183.0
FTA
229.0
Jackson was nabbed by the Grizzlies with the fourth overall pick after just one season at Michigan State. The 18-year-old averaged 10.9 points, 5.8 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 3.0 blocks while draining 39.6 percent of his 2.7 three-point attempts per contest. At 6-foot-11, Jackson certainly has the size to fill in at the five if necessary, although he's currently projected to compete with JaMychal Green for the starting power forward role. Given his impressive two-way skills and Memphis' overall lack of depth, Jackson could play a significant role right from the onset of his first pro campaign, especially if the returning Mike Conley is subject to any early-season limitations that create even more of a need for offensive contributions. Moreover, taking Marc Gasol's own impressive floor-spacing skills into account, Jackson stands to benefit from plenty of one-on-one matchups that his skill set should allow him to capitalize on.
Jackson was nabbed by the Grizzlies with the fourth overall pick after just one season at Michigan State. The 18-year-old averaged 10.9 points, 5.8 rebounds, 1.1 assists and 3.0 blocks while draining 39.6 percent of his 2.7 three-point attempts per contest. At 6-foot-11, Jackson certainly has the size to fill in at the five if necessary, although he's currently projected to compete with JaMychal Green for the starting power forward role. Given his impressive two-way skills and Memphis' overall lack of depth, Jackson could play a significant role right from the onset of his first pro campaign, especially if the returning Mike Conley is subject to any early-season limitations that create even more of a need for offensive contributions. Moreover, taking Marc Gasol's own impressive floor-spacing skills into account, Jackson stands to benefit from plenty of one-on-one matchups that his skill set should allow him to capitalize on.
OKC (F, PF)
G
82
Min
23.5
FPTS
1,048.0
REB
391.0
AST
82.0
STL
46.0
BLK
90.0
TO
63.0
FGM
303.0
FGA
559.0
FTM
193.0
FTA
281.0
Grant continued his role as a bench staple for the Thunder last season, seeing 20.3 minutes per contest and logging time at power forward, small forward and center. A high-level athlete, Grant’s most impactful skill is his all-around defense, averaging 2.8 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes for his career. He also plays within himself on offense, scoring 8.4 points per game with a 57.0 effective field-goal percentage. With starting power forward Carmelo Anthony being traded away in the offseason, Grant immediately becomes a candidate to enter the starting five for OKC, though coach Billy Donovan may opt to insert Patrick Patterson, who is a far superior three-point shooter, for floor-spacing. Regardless, Grant’s minutes should see an uptick into the mid-20s. With Russell Westbrook, Paul George and Dennis Schroder in the fold, Grant still may not be asked to take a high volume of shots for the team. Considering he'll be entering his age 24 season, however, Grant still has the potential to improve his scoring ability. Ultimately, from a Fantasy perspective, how much his defense and rebounding can trend upwards with increased run will determine his value.
Grant continued his role as a bench staple for the Thunder last season, seeing 20.3 minutes per contest and logging time at power forward, small forward and center. A high-level athlete, Grant’s most impactful skill is his all-around defense, averaging 2.8 combined blocks/steals per 36 minutes for his career. He also plays within himself on offense, scoring 8.4 points per game with a 57.0 effective field-goal percentage. With starting power forward Carmelo Anthony being traded away in the offseason, Grant immediately becomes a candidate to enter the starting five for OKC, though coach Billy Donovan may opt to insert Patrick Patterson, who is a far superior three-point shooter, for floor-spacing. Regardless, Grant’s minutes should see an uptick into the mid-20s. With Russell Westbrook, Paul George and Dennis Schroder in the fold, Grant still may not be asked to take a high volume of shots for the team. Considering he'll be entering his age 24 season, however, Grant still has the potential to improve his scoring ability. Ultimately, from a Fantasy perspective, how much his defense and rebounding can trend upwards with increased run will determine his value.
PHI (F, SF, SG, PF)
G
78
Min
29.6
FPTS
1,047.0
REB
395.0
AST
142.0
STL
125.0
BLK
61.0
TO
115.0
FGM
310.0
FGA
759.0
FTM
105.0
FTA
124.0
Following two straight seasons of missing at least 15 games, Covington was able to stay healthy for nearly the entire 2017-18 campaign, taking the court for all but two contests. He turned that into an extremely effective Fantasy showing, as the 27-year-old was a contributor in almost every stat category. Covington averaged 12.6 points while being a complimentary scoring option behind the likes of Ben Simmons, Joel Embiid, J.J. Redick and Dario Saric, and also added 5.4 rebounds and 2.0 assists. On the defensive side of the ball, Covington was just as impactful in what wound up being his first ever All-Defensive First Team selection, averaging a combined 2.6 steals/blocks across 31.6 minutes. It didn't stop there though, as Covington also hit 2.5 three-pointers per game and was an efficient shooter across the board at 41.3 percent from the field, 36.8 percent from beyond the arc and 85.3 percent from the three-point line. All in all, there were very few weaknesses in Covington's contributions. That should result in high expectations going into the upcoming season. The addition of Wilson Chandler is something to keep an eye on, but it seems unlikely he ultimately cuts in Covington's workload much, if at all. Covington can also play both forward positions successfully, so that should help keep him on the floor for a 30-plus minute workload. If he's able to finish anywhere near the numbers he contributed last year, Covington will be a top-50 selection and is someone that can be targeted in the early middle rounds of most Fantasy drafts. He doesn't have many holes in his game, so his multi-category production and solid efficiency should help Fantasy owners cut deficits all season long.
Following two straight seasons of missing at least 15 games, Covington was able to stay healthy for nearly the entire 2017-18 campaign, taking the court for all but two contests. He turned that into an extremely effective Fantasy showing, as the 27-year-old was a contributor in almost every stat category. Covington averaged 12.6 points while being a complimentary scoring option behind the likes of Ben Simmons, Joel Embiid, J.J. Redick and Dario Saric, and also added 5.4 rebounds and 2.0 assists. On the defensive side of the ball, Covington was just as impactful in what wound up being his first ever All-Defensive First Team selection, averaging a combined 2.6 steals/blocks across 31.6 minutes. It didn't stop there though, as Covington also hit 2.5 three-pointers per game and was an efficient shooter across the board at 41.3 percent from the field, 36.8 percent from beyond the arc and 85.3 percent from the three-point line. All in all, there were very few weaknesses in Covington's contributions. That should result in high expectations going into the upcoming season. The addition of Wilson Chandler is something to keep an eye on, but it seems unlikely he ultimately cuts in Covington's workload much, if at all. Covington can also play both forward positions successfully, so that should help keep him on the floor for a 30-plus minute workload. If he's able to finish anywhere near the numbers he contributed last year, Covington will be a top-50 selection and is someone that can be targeted in the early middle rounds of most Fantasy drafts. He doesn't have many holes in his game, so his multi-category production and solid efficiency should help Fantasy owners cut deficits all season long.
ORL (G, SF, SG)
G
70
Min
32.6
FPTS
1,046.0
REB
222.0
AST
205.0
STL
63.0
BLK
15.0
TO
118.0
FGM
450.0
FGA
997.0
FTM
182.0
FTA
217.0
The 25-year-old continues to be a consistent scoring presence for the Magic when he’s on the court, but health also continues to be a concern. Over the past four seasons, Fournier is averaging 65.5 games played. Last year marked his second straight campaign averaging at least 17 points (17.8), doing so while shooting 45.9 percent from the field and drilling 2.2 threes per tilt at 37.9 percent. His free-throw percentage (86.7) was a career high. Any supplementary stats Fournier accumulates are a bonus, as he averaged just 3.2 rebounds and 2.9 assists. Heading into this season, Fournier’s role of 30-plus minutes should be safe, as the Magic didn't add any significant wing depth over the summer. Though there’s not much to indicate Fournier is ready to take a significant step in his development, he’s still relatively young and is coming off the best season of his career.
The 25-year-old continues to be a consistent scoring presence for the Magic when he’s on the court, but health also continues to be a concern. Over the past four seasons, Fournier is averaging 65.5 games played. Last year marked his second straight campaign averaging at least 17 points (17.8), doing so while shooting 45.9 percent from the field and drilling 2.2 threes per tilt at 37.9 percent. His free-throw percentage (86.7) was a career high. Any supplementary stats Fournier accumulates are a bonus, as he averaged just 3.2 rebounds and 2.9 assists. Heading into this season, Fournier’s role of 30-plus minutes should be safe, as the Magic didn't add any significant wing depth over the summer. Though there’s not much to indicate Fournier is ready to take a significant step in his development, he’s still relatively young and is coming off the best season of his career.
MIL (G, PG, SG)
G
73
Min
30.9
FPTS
1,036.0
REB
245.0
AST
261.0
STL
64.0
BLK
20.0
TO
104.0
FGM
378.0
FGA
790.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
134.0
Due to a partially torn left quadriceps tendon, Brogdon was limited to 48 games last season. Prior to the injury, which occured Feb. 1, he averaged 13.5 points (48.6 percent), 3.4 rebounds, 3.3 assists, 1.3 threes and nearly a steal across 31.0 minutes. It’s unclear if he'll start at shooting guard in 2018-19, but Brogdon’s ability to function as a combo guard -- and even a small forward in small-ball lineups -- should enable him to garner over 25 minutes per game for a third consecutive season. If he averages closer to 30 minutes, he has top-100 upside, and that’s without factoring in natural progression. Brogdon's average athleticism limits him, somewhat, as a point guard, but he's already a top-shelf three-point shooter (39.5% career) and is both a good decision-maker (1.5 TPG career) and defender, though it doesn't always translate into elite steals numbers.
Due to a partially torn left quadriceps tendon, Brogdon was limited to 48 games last season. Prior to the injury, which occured Feb. 1, he averaged 13.5 points (48.6 percent), 3.4 rebounds, 3.3 assists, 1.3 threes and nearly a steal across 31.0 minutes. It’s unclear if he'll start at shooting guard in 2018-19, but Brogdon’s ability to function as a combo guard -- and even a small forward in small-ball lineups -- should enable him to garner over 25 minutes per game for a third consecutive season. If he averages closer to 30 minutes, he has top-100 upside, and that’s without factoring in natural progression. Brogdon's average athleticism limits him, somewhat, as a point guard, but he's already a top-shelf three-point shooter (39.5% career) and is both a good decision-maker (1.5 TPG career) and defender, though it doesn't always translate into elite steals numbers.
MIA (G, SF, SG)
G
78
Min
32.6
FPTS
1,033.0
REB
270.0
AST
219.0
STL
115.0
BLK
66.0
TO
133.0
FGM
375.0
FGA
838.0
FTM
111.0
FTA
134.0
After injuries limited him to 53 games in 2016-17, Richardson was able to stay healthy last year and start all 81 of his appearances. He was one of the biggest surprises in Fantasy, turning in a top-40 season in many formats. Seeing 33.2 minutes per tilt, the Tennessee product averaged 12.9 points, 3.5 rebounds, 2.9 assists and a combined 2.4 steals/blocks. He also shot a solid 45.1 percent from the field, an impressive 84.5 percent from the charity stripe, and knocked down 1.6 threes per game at 37.8 percent. The 24-year-old will presumably occupy a starting role again this season, and the possibility remains of him improving across the board once more. Optimists could justify selecting Richardson in the third round of a Fantasy draft, though the integration of Dion Waiters back into the rotation following ankle surgery could drive Richardson’s usage down.
After injuries limited him to 53 games in 2016-17, Richardson was able to stay healthy last year and start all 81 of his appearances. He was one of the biggest surprises in Fantasy, turning in a top-40 season in many formats. Seeing 33.2 minutes per tilt, the Tennessee product averaged 12.9 points, 3.5 rebounds, 2.9 assists and a combined 2.4 steals/blocks. He also shot a solid 45.1 percent from the field, an impressive 84.5 percent from the charity stripe, and knocked down 1.6 threes per game at 37.8 percent. The 24-year-old will presumably occupy a starting role again this season, and the possibility remains of him improving across the board once more. Optimists could justify selecting Richardson in the third round of a Fantasy draft, though the integration of Dion Waiters back into the rotation following ankle surgery could drive Richardson’s usage down.
PHI (G, SF, SG)
G
74
Min
31.1
FPTS
1,028.0
REB
189.0
AST
205.0
STL
38.0
BLK
7.0
TO
112.0
FGM
407.0
FGA
904.0
FTM
208.0
FTA
232.0
Redick, who had previously played four consecutive seasons with the Clippers, joined the 76ers last offseason on a lucrative one-year, $23 million contract. The expectation was that he'd be a valuable mentor to some of the younger players on the roster, while also providing instant offense when the Sixers found themselves in a slump. Redick certainly filled that role admirably and actually out-performed many expectations. He averaged a career-high 17.1 points, which slotted him second on the team behind Joel Embiid and just above Ben Simmons. In addition, Redick remained just as effective with his trademarked three-point shooting, hitting 2.8 deep balls per game at a scorching hot 42.0 percent clip from deep. He's now posted four straight seasons shooting over 40 percent from deep and he also remained extremely efficient from the free-throw line (90.4 percent). After considering bolting to a new team this offseason, Redick opted to re-sign with the Sixers and should continue to provide an offensive weapon that can hit shots from all over the floor. With Embiid and Simmons potentially taking another step forward, as well as the potential to get former No. 1 overall pick Markelle Fultz, who missed all but 14 games last season, into the regular backcourt rotation, there's a decent chance Redick isn't able to provide as high of a scoring total as he did last year. He also doesn't provide much when it comes to the ancillary stats, so that hurts his utility in some leagues. That said, he boasts extremely high percentages and he finished 11th in the league in three-pointers made last year, so he'll still be draftable in the later rounds of most formats.
Redick, who had previously played four consecutive seasons with the Clippers, joined the 76ers last offseason on a lucrative one-year, $23 million contract. The expectation was that he'd be a valuable mentor to some of the younger players on the roster, while also providing instant offense when the Sixers found themselves in a slump. Redick certainly filled that role admirably and actually out-performed many expectations. He averaged a career-high 17.1 points, which slotted him second on the team behind Joel Embiid and just above Ben Simmons. In addition, Redick remained just as effective with his trademarked three-point shooting, hitting 2.8 deep balls per game at a scorching hot 42.0 percent clip from deep. He's now posted four straight seasons shooting over 40 percent from deep and he also remained extremely efficient from the free-throw line (90.4 percent). After considering bolting to a new team this offseason, Redick opted to re-sign with the Sixers and should continue to provide an offensive weapon that can hit shots from all over the floor. With Embiid and Simmons potentially taking another step forward, as well as the potential to get former No. 1 overall pick Markelle Fultz, who missed all but 14 games last season, into the regular backcourt rotation, there's a decent chance Redick isn't able to provide as high of a scoring total as he did last year. He also doesn't provide much when it comes to the ancillary stats, so that hurts his utility in some leagues. That said, he boasts extremely high percentages and he finished 11th in the league in three-pointers made last year, so he'll still be draftable in the later rounds of most formats.
TOR (C, C)
G
72
Min
19.5
FPTS
1,025.0
REB
465.0
AST
168.0
STL
73.0
BLK
38.0
TO
127.0
FGM
282.0
FGA
521.0
FTM
122.0
FTA
161.0
Monroe played for three different teams during the 2017-18 campaign, including Boston (26 games), Phoenix (20 games) and Milwaukee (5 games). In 51 contests combined, the veteran big man averaged 10.3 points, 6.9 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 0.5 blocks per game. Despite being a late summer addition, Monroe now joins a Toronto team that finished with the best overall record in the Eastern Conference last season and should at least have a minor role in the regular rotation. The Raptors recently traded for Kawhi Leonard in a package that sent young center Jakob Poeltl, along with DeMar DeRozan, in the corresponding move. Along with Poeltl, Toronto let Lucas Nogueira walk in free agency, which means Monroe will have plenty of opportunities to get on the floor. Still, with Jonas Valanciunas locked in as a starter, as well as the Raptors' propensity to give Serge Ibaka time at the position, Monroe could struggle to garner enough minutes to be more than a middle-of-the-road Fantasy commodity. That said, it is worth it to note that Monroe is just two years removed from averaging 15.3 points and 8.8 rebounds.
Monroe played for three different teams during the 2017-18 campaign, including Boston (26 games), Phoenix (20 games) and Milwaukee (5 games). In 51 contests combined, the veteran big man averaged 10.3 points, 6.9 rebounds, 2.2 assists and 0.5 blocks per game. Despite being a late summer addition, Monroe now joins a Toronto team that finished with the best overall record in the Eastern Conference last season and should at least have a minor role in the regular rotation. The Raptors recently traded for Kawhi Leonard in a package that sent young center Jakob Poeltl, along with DeMar DeRozan, in the corresponding move. Along with Poeltl, Toronto let Lucas Nogueira walk in free agency, which means Monroe will have plenty of opportunities to get on the floor. Still, with Jonas Valanciunas locked in as a starter, as well as the Raptors' propensity to give Serge Ibaka time at the position, Monroe could struggle to garner enough minutes to be more than a middle-of-the-road Fantasy commodity. That said, it is worth it to note that Monroe is just two years removed from averaging 15.3 points and 8.8 rebounds.
MIL (C, C)
G
75
Min
24.2
FPTS
1,022.0
REB
308.0
AST
137.0
STL
31.0
BLK
103.0
TO
103.0
FGM
384.0
FGA
811.0
FTM
129.0
FTA
165.0
Health was once a serious concern for Lopez, but he’s played at least 72 games over the past four campaigns. Last season in Los Angeles, the 30-year-old averaged 13.0 points, 4.0 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.3 blocks across 23.4 minutes per game. He shot only 46.5 percent from the field, but was taking 4.4 threes per game and converting them at a 34.5 percent clip. Lopez’s workload was also the lowest of his career, though he was playing for a young Lakers team with next-to-zero playoff aspirations. In joining Milwaukee, Lopez could have an opportunity to see some more run and may be asked to do more within the offense. He hovered around the top-100 in most Fantasy formats last year and will probably do the same once again, though he could be worth drafting sooner if there’s any indication from coach Mike Budenholzer that Lopez will see a true starter’s workload. Optimists can point to his averages in the 20 games last season in which he saw between 25 and 32 minutes: 17.6 points, 5.2 rebounds, 2.2 assists, with a combined 2.0 blocks/steals.
Health was once a serious concern for Lopez, but he’s played at least 72 games over the past four campaigns. Last season in Los Angeles, the 30-year-old averaged 13.0 points, 4.0 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.3 blocks across 23.4 minutes per game. He shot only 46.5 percent from the field, but was taking 4.4 threes per game and converting them at a 34.5 percent clip. Lopez’s workload was also the lowest of his career, though he was playing for a young Lakers team with next-to-zero playoff aspirations. In joining Milwaukee, Lopez could have an opportunity to see some more run and may be asked to do more within the offense. He hovered around the top-100 in most Fantasy formats last year and will probably do the same once again, though he could be worth drafting sooner if there’s any indication from coach Mike Budenholzer that Lopez will see a true starter’s workload. Optimists can point to his averages in the 20 games last season in which he saw between 25 and 32 minutes: 17.6 points, 5.2 rebounds, 2.2 assists, with a combined 2.0 blocks/steals.
IND (C, PF, C)
G
77
Min
18.0
FPTS
1,022.0
REB
470.0
AST
158.0
STL
36.0
BLK
98.0
TO
100.0
FGM
224.0
FGA
385.0
FTM
98.0
FTA
127.0
In his third year with the Knicks, O'Quinn continued to show some improvements with his overall game. He ended up posting career highs across the board with per game averages of 7.1 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.3 blocks across 18.0 minutes. He finished the season with eight double-doubles and was an especially important bench piece over the final few months after All-Star big man Kristaps Porzingis went down with a torn ACL. His fluctuating role kept him out of the season-long Fantasy league discussion for much of the year, but he was still a valuable DFS option when receiving an extended workload, as evidenced by his aforementioned double-double totals. As a result of his strong play, O'Quinn opted out of his $4.2 million player option with New York in an attempt to garner a pay raise. However, he ended up seeing just a very minor bump and now heads to Indiana on a one-year, $4.5 million deal. O'Quinn is expected to slot in as the team's third center behind Myles Turner and Domantas Sabonis, helping refill the frontcourt depth Indiana lost following the departures of Al Jefferson and Trevor Booker. Considering his placement on the depth chart, O'Quinn will struggle to provide consistent value for Fantasy owners, but he'll always be a streaming option if he's set for an increased workload on any given day/week.
In his third year with the Knicks, O'Quinn continued to show some improvements with his overall game. He ended up posting career highs across the board with per game averages of 7.1 points, 6.1 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.3 blocks across 18.0 minutes. He finished the season with eight double-doubles and was an especially important bench piece over the final few months after All-Star big man Kristaps Porzingis went down with a torn ACL. His fluctuating role kept him out of the season-long Fantasy league discussion for much of the year, but he was still a valuable DFS option when receiving an extended workload, as evidenced by his aforementioned double-double totals. As a result of his strong play, O'Quinn opted out of his $4.2 million player option with New York in an attempt to garner a pay raise. However, he ended up seeing just a very minor bump and now heads to Indiana on a one-year, $4.5 million deal. O'Quinn is expected to slot in as the team's third center behind Myles Turner and Domantas Sabonis, helping refill the frontcourt depth Indiana lost following the departures of Al Jefferson and Trevor Booker. Considering his placement on the depth chart, O'Quinn will struggle to provide consistent value for Fantasy owners, but he'll always be a streaming option if he's set for an increased workload on any given day/week.
CHR (F, PF, SF)
G
79
Min
27.1
FPTS
1,017.0
REB
481.0
AST
102.0
STL
60.0
BLK
41.0
TO
70.0
FGM
263.0
FGA
601.0
FTM
110.0
FTA
131.0
Last season, Williams saw his minutes per game (25.7) dip the farthest they have since he was with the Jazz in 2013-14. As a result, his production declined across the board, keeping him out of Fantasy relevance in most formats. He averaged just 9.5 points, 4.7 rebounds, 1.6 threes and 1.2 assists, though saw his field-goal percentage (45.8) reach its highest clip since 2010-11. While the Hornets didn't make any massive roster changes to his position(s) this offseason, the continued presence of Frank Kaminsky and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist combined with the draft choice of Miles Bridges may keep Williams’ run similar to last season. And, considering 2018-19 marks Williams’ 13th year in the league, he’s not due for any improvement. As a result, he can be safely ignored in most Fantasy formats, though may be able to provide a steady presence in deep leagues.
Last season, Williams saw his minutes per game (25.7) dip the farthest they have since he was with the Jazz in 2013-14. As a result, his production declined across the board, keeping him out of Fantasy relevance in most formats. He averaged just 9.5 points, 4.7 rebounds, 1.6 threes and 1.2 assists, though saw his field-goal percentage (45.8) reach its highest clip since 2010-11. While the Hornets didn't make any massive roster changes to his position(s) this offseason, the continued presence of Frank Kaminsky and Michael Kidd-Gilchrist combined with the draft choice of Miles Bridges may keep Williams’ run similar to last season. And, considering 2018-19 marks Williams’ 13th year in the league, he’s not due for any improvement. As a result, he can be safely ignored in most Fantasy formats, though may be able to provide a steady presence in deep leagues.
MIA (F, PF, C)
G
77
Min
23.2
FPTS
1,015.0
REB
498.0
AST
132.0
STL
42.0
BLK
54.0
TO
86.0
FGM
236.0
FGA
444.0
FTM
172.0
FTA
234.0
Adebayo, the 14th overall pick out of Kentucky in 2017, was able to make an impact as a rookie. He saw 19.8 minutes per game, averaging 6.9 points, 5.5 rebounds, 1.5 assists and a combined 1.1 blocks/steals. He even drew 19 starts while Hassan Whiteside missed games due to injury. In those tilts, Adebayo averaged 7.4 points, 7.1 rebounds, 1.2 assists and a combined 1.1 steals/blocks across 24.9 minutes -- enough to make him relevant for a stretch in DFS. The 21-year-old doesn't project to see much of an increase in role this season, assuming Hassan Whiteside’s minutes plateau, rather than decrease again. As a result, he can likely be avoided once again during Fantasy drafts, but might be a nice waiver wire target in the case of some frontcourt injuries for the Heat.
Adebayo, the 14th overall pick out of Kentucky in 2017, was able to make an impact as a rookie. He saw 19.8 minutes per game, averaging 6.9 points, 5.5 rebounds, 1.5 assists and a combined 1.1 blocks/steals. He even drew 19 starts while Hassan Whiteside missed games due to injury. In those tilts, Adebayo averaged 7.4 points, 7.1 rebounds, 1.2 assists and a combined 1.1 steals/blocks across 24.9 minutes -- enough to make him relevant for a stretch in DFS. The 21-year-old doesn't project to see much of an increase in role this season, assuming Hassan Whiteside’s minutes plateau, rather than decrease again. As a result, he can likely be avoided once again during Fantasy drafts, but might be a nice waiver wire target in the case of some frontcourt injuries for the Heat.
BRO (G, SG, SF)
G
77
Min
28.5
FPTS
1,010.0
REB
324.0
AST
117.0
STL
47.0
BLK
35.0
TO
78.0
FGM
361.0
FGA
826.0
FTM
116.0
FTA
135.0
After playing his first four NBA seasons with Portland, Crabbe was dealt to the Nets prior to the 2017-18 season in what was essentially a salary dump. However, Crabbe ended up being a solid player for the Nets and started 68 of the 75 games he played in. As we've come accustomed to, Crabbe's main impact was as a sharpshooter, helping to open the floor for his teammates and creating instant offense when needed. Crabbe finished the year averaging a career-high 2.7 three-pointers per game, while shooting a respectable 37.8 percent from deep. That percentage was down from 44.4 percent a year prior, but that wasn't overly surprising considering Crabbe's three-point attempts sky-rocketed from 3.8 to 7.1. Overall, Crabbe saw his role on offense grow quite a bit on a team that didn't have nearly the talent that he had previously played with. The wing added 13.2 points, 4.3 rebounds and 1.6 assists across 29.3 minutes, all of which were career highs. With D'Angelo Russell entering the season healthy after missing 34 games last season, he's expected to lead the team offensively. That has the potential to take away a shot attempt or two from Crabbe, though his production shouldn't suffer that much. The wing rotation is expected to be very similar with the likes of Crabbe, DeMarre Carroll, Joe Harris and Caris LeVert all mixing in. As a result, look for Crabbe's numbers to remain relatively similar during the upcoming campaign, with his trademark once again being his three-point shooting.
After playing his first four NBA seasons with Portland, Crabbe was dealt to the Nets prior to the 2017-18 season in what was essentially a salary dump. However, Crabbe ended up being a solid player for the Nets and started 68 of the 75 games he played in. As we've come accustomed to, Crabbe's main impact was as a sharpshooter, helping to open the floor for his teammates and creating instant offense when needed. Crabbe finished the year averaging a career-high 2.7 three-pointers per game, while shooting a respectable 37.8 percent from deep. That percentage was down from 44.4 percent a year prior, but that wasn't overly surprising considering Crabbe's three-point attempts sky-rocketed from 3.8 to 7.1. Overall, Crabbe saw his role on offense grow quite a bit on a team that didn't have nearly the talent that he had previously played with. The wing added 13.2 points, 4.3 rebounds and 1.6 assists across 29.3 minutes, all of which were career highs. With D'Angelo Russell entering the season healthy after missing 34 games last season, he's expected to lead the team offensively. That has the potential to take away a shot attempt or two from Crabbe, though his production shouldn't suffer that much. The wing rotation is expected to be very similar with the likes of Crabbe, DeMarre Carroll, Joe Harris and Caris LeVert all mixing in. As a result, look for Crabbe's numbers to remain relatively similar during the upcoming campaign, with his trademark once again being his three-point shooting.
SAC (G, SG, SF)
G
81
Min
26.3
FPTS
997.0
REB
291.0
AST
155.0
STL
86.0
BLK
22.0
TO
124.0
FGM
418.0
FGA
923.0
FTM
71.0
FTA
81.0
2017-18 marked Hield’s second year in the league after being drafted sixth overall in 2016. He garnered sixth-man run in his 80 appearances (12 starts) with the Kings last season, seeing 25.3 minutes per tilt. He was one of the league’s best three-point shooters, hitting 2.2 per game at 43.1 percent en route to 13.5 points. Hield also filled out some supplementary stats, averaging 3.8 boards, 1.9 dimes and 1.1 steals. He put together some bigger games as well, posting 13 games with at least 20 points, five with at least five assists, and 10 with at least three steals. While he’s shown legitimate upside, it won't be easy for Hield to garner a bigger role this season. Bogdan Bogdanovic and Justin Jackson are still options for Sacramento on the wing, and are each likely to see similar run to 2017-18. That said, even if Hield’s numbers don't see much improvement this season, he’s still worth consideration in the mid-to-late rounds of Fantasy drafts.
2017-18 marked Hield’s second year in the league after being drafted sixth overall in 2016. He garnered sixth-man run in his 80 appearances (12 starts) with the Kings last season, seeing 25.3 minutes per tilt. He was one of the league’s best three-point shooters, hitting 2.2 per game at 43.1 percent en route to 13.5 points. Hield also filled out some supplementary stats, averaging 3.8 boards, 1.9 dimes and 1.1 steals. He put together some bigger games as well, posting 13 games with at least 20 points, five with at least five assists, and 10 with at least three steals. While he’s shown legitimate upside, it won't be easy for Hield to garner a bigger role this season. Bogdan Bogdanovic and Justin Jackson are still options for Sacramento on the wing, and are each likely to see similar run to 2017-18. That said, even if Hield’s numbers don't see much improvement this season, he’s still worth consideration in the mid-to-late rounds of Fantasy drafts.
BOS (F, SF, SG, PF)
G
77
Min
29.1
FPTS
996.0
REB
360.0
AST
119.0
STL
73.0
BLK
25.0
TO
129.0
FGM
391.0
FGA
836.0
FTM
166.0
FTA
243.0
Brown’s demeanor makes it easy to forget that the number three overall pick in the 2016 draft will only be 22 years old heading into the 2018-19 season. Brown made the leap from inconsistent rookie to much-improved sophomore last season, significantly upping his production in every aspect of his game, except free throw shooting. Heading into his third season, Brown is entrenched as one of Boston's keystones, but his immediate value is difficult to gauge, given the return of Gordon Hayward from injury. Possessions will be harder to come by this season with Hayward and Kyrie Irving, who also missed a chunk of time last season, back in action, but if Brown can continue to defend at an elite level and hit close to 40 percent of his three-pointers, as he did last year, Boston will find a way to get him shots. Even so, how he'll fit within the best collection of talent in the East is a major question mark, particularly after the emergence of Jayson Tatum, who may be the most untouchable player on the league's deepest roster. At the very least, Brown should be able to closely replicate last season's production, perhaps with a slight downturn in scoring if Hayward returns at 100 percent. Whether Brown can maintain his three-point efficiency, as well as improve at the charity stripe, will also be something for Fantasy owners to keep an eye on.
Brown’s demeanor makes it easy to forget that the number three overall pick in the 2016 draft will only be 22 years old heading into the 2018-19 season. Brown made the leap from inconsistent rookie to much-improved sophomore last season, significantly upping his production in every aspect of his game, except free throw shooting. Heading into his third season, Brown is entrenched as one of Boston's keystones, but his immediate value is difficult to gauge, given the return of Gordon Hayward from injury. Possessions will be harder to come by this season with Hayward and Kyrie Irving, who also missed a chunk of time last season, back in action, but if Brown can continue to defend at an elite level and hit close to 40 percent of his three-pointers, as he did last year, Boston will find a way to get him shots. Even so, how he'll fit within the best collection of talent in the East is a major question mark, particularly after the emergence of Jayson Tatum, who may be the most untouchable player on the league's deepest roster. At the very least, Brown should be able to closely replicate last season's production, perhaps with a slight downturn in scoring if Hayward returns at 100 percent. Whether Brown can maintain his three-point efficiency, as well as improve at the charity stripe, will also be something for Fantasy owners to keep an eye on.
IND (G, PG, SG)
G
71
Min
28.2
FPTS
992.0
REB
177.0
AST
315.0
STL
91.0
BLK
15.0
TO
85.0
FGM
307.0
FGA
634.0
FTM
125.0
FTA
143.0
Despite joining a new team, Collison kept up with his consistently solid, but not spectacular production across the board during the 2017-18 campaign. He finished the year averaging 12.4 points, 5.3 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.3 steals across 29.3 minutes, all of which were very similar to his final season in Sacramento. However, Collison did notably knock down a scorching hot 46.8 percent (96-of-205) of his three-point attempts, which placed him No. 1 overall in the league for those that qualified. That also marked the third straight year that Collison finished over 40 percent from beyond the arc. Now 30 years old, Collison appears set to reclaim his spot in the starting lineup once again, but could have some competition for play-making duties. The Pacers signed Tyreke Evans this offseason, who had a resurgence last year in Memphis and averaged 19.4 points, 5.2 assists and 5.1 rebounds. Evans can play three different positions and won't solely be cutting into Collison's workload at point guard, but it still wouldn't be surprising if his overall numbers took a hit. That being said, Collison's stellar percentages and ability to contribute across the stat sheet should keep him as a mid-round option in most drafts.
Despite joining a new team, Collison kept up with his consistently solid, but not spectacular production across the board during the 2017-18 campaign. He finished the year averaging 12.4 points, 5.3 assists, 2.6 rebounds and 1.3 steals across 29.3 minutes, all of which were very similar to his final season in Sacramento. However, Collison did notably knock down a scorching hot 46.8 percent (96-of-205) of his three-point attempts, which placed him No. 1 overall in the league for those that qualified. That also marked the third straight year that Collison finished over 40 percent from beyond the arc. Now 30 years old, Collison appears set to reclaim his spot in the starting lineup once again, but could have some competition for play-making duties. The Pacers signed Tyreke Evans this offseason, who had a resurgence last year in Memphis and averaged 19.4 points, 5.2 assists and 5.1 rebounds. Evans can play three different positions and won't solely be cutting into Collison's workload at point guard, but it still wouldn't be surprising if his overall numbers took a hit. That being said, Collison's stellar percentages and ability to contribute across the stat sheet should keep him as a mid-round option in most drafts.
TOR (G, PG, SG)
G
80
Min
23.9
FPTS
989.0
REB
231.0
AST
306.0
STL
86.0
BLK
24.0
TO
93.0
FGM
296.0
FGA
686.0
FTM
123.0
FTA
146.0
After barely playing as an undrafted rookie out of Wichita State in 2016-17, VanVleet became a significant contributor for the Raptors in his second year, helping lead one of the better benches in the entire NBA. Operating as Kyle Lowry's backup at point guard, VanVleet posted averages of 8.6 points, 3.2 assists and 2.4 rebounds across 20.0 minutes. He also upped his efficiency as a shooter and finished 42.6 percent from the field, 41.4 percent from the three-point line and 83.2 percent from the charity stripe. Whenever Lowry or DeMar DeRozan were off the floor, VanVleet provided a reliable option as both a facilitator and a scorer, which landed him in the discussion for the NBA's Sixth Man of the Year award. VanVleet wound up placing third behind Lou Williams and Eric Gordon, but it was a still a testament to how valuable he was to a team that finished with the best record in the Eastern Conference. After earning a two-year, $18.1 million extension this offseason, VanVleet returns in what should be a similar role in the backcourt. The Raptors traded away DeRozan and brought in the likes of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, but it shouldn't impact VanVleet's role much. Look for him to operate as the No. 2 option at point guard behind Lowry, as well as the first guy off the bench most nights. That should limit his utility to a late-round option in deeper leagues.
After barely playing as an undrafted rookie out of Wichita State in 2016-17, VanVleet became a significant contributor for the Raptors in his second year, helping lead one of the better benches in the entire NBA. Operating as Kyle Lowry's backup at point guard, VanVleet posted averages of 8.6 points, 3.2 assists and 2.4 rebounds across 20.0 minutes. He also upped his efficiency as a shooter and finished 42.6 percent from the field, 41.4 percent from the three-point line and 83.2 percent from the charity stripe. Whenever Lowry or DeMar DeRozan were off the floor, VanVleet provided a reliable option as both a facilitator and a scorer, which landed him in the discussion for the NBA's Sixth Man of the Year award. VanVleet wound up placing third behind Lou Williams and Eric Gordon, but it was a still a testament to how valuable he was to a team that finished with the best record in the Eastern Conference. After earning a two-year, $18.1 million extension this offseason, VanVleet returns in what should be a similar role in the backcourt. The Raptors traded away DeRozan and brought in the likes of Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green, but it shouldn't impact VanVleet's role much. Look for him to operate as the No. 2 option at point guard behind Lowry, as well as the first guy off the bench most nights. That should limit his utility to a late-round option in deeper leagues.
LAL (G, SG, SF)
G
76
Min
30.9
FPTS
986.0
REB
345.0
AST
122.0
STL
96.0
BLK
14.0
TO
92.0
FGM
338.0
FGA
789.0
FTM
140.0
FTA
174.0
Last season marked Caldwell-Pope’s first with the Lakers, signing a one-year, $17.7 million contract with the team after four years with the Pistons. He set his lowest scoring average (13.4) since 2014-15 with, but set a career high in three-pointers made per game (2.1) and three-point percentage (38.3). He also remained a solid defender, matching his career high in steals per contest (1.4). Caldwell-Pope also garnered enough rebounds (5.2) and assists (2.2) to keep himself Fantasy relevant in most standard leagues. Signing another one-year deal, worth $12 million, Caldwell-Pope opted to stay in LA for 2018-19. He projects to be the Lakers’ starting shooting guard again, and should continue to get quality three-point looks due to the addition of LeBron James. It’s unlikely Caldwell-Pope will make any massive strides in his game, but will probably be productive enough to crack the top-100 Fantasy players.
Last season marked Caldwell-Pope’s first with the Lakers, signing a one-year, $17.7 million contract with the team after four years with the Pistons. He set his lowest scoring average (13.4) since 2014-15 with, but set a career high in three-pointers made per game (2.1) and three-point percentage (38.3). He also remained a solid defender, matching his career high in steals per contest (1.4). Caldwell-Pope also garnered enough rebounds (5.2) and assists (2.2) to keep himself Fantasy relevant in most standard leagues. Signing another one-year deal, worth $12 million, Caldwell-Pope opted to stay in LA for 2018-19. He projects to be the Lakers’ starting shooting guard again, and should continue to get quality three-point looks due to the addition of LeBron James. It’s unlikely Caldwell-Pope will make any massive strides in his game, but will probably be productive enough to crack the top-100 Fantasy players.
DET (G, PG, SG)
G
70
Min
28.1
FPTS
985.0
REB
205.0
AST
369.0
STL
44.0
BLK
7.0
TO
162.0
FGM
406.0
FGA
945.0
FTM
187.0
FTA
219.0
For the second straight season, Jackson succumbed to a long-term injury that essentially nulled his overall impact in Fantasy leagues for the much of the year. Jackson was limited to just 45 games as a result of a Grade 3 right ankle sprain that kept him off the floor for nearly three months. His final line -- 14.6 points, 5.3 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.2 three-pointers across 26.7 minutes -- was nearly identical to the year prior when he played just 52 games due to tendinitis in his left knee. He also connected on just 30.8 percent of his three-point attempts, which was nearly five percentage points worse than his two prior seasons. Despite the injuries, Jackson was back to a full workload over the final 12 games of the regular season and should be good to go moving forward. He's currently slotted in as the team's starting point guard and could be a bounce-back candidate if he can stay healthy. The Pistons added Blake Griffin at the trade deadline last year, so he can help take some of the play-making pressure off Jackson's shoulders. Still, Jackson's injury history with tendinitis will once again make him a risky draft pick and he's unlikely to average 30-plus minutes in order to limit his workload and the overall strain on his knee. Jackson's main contribution will continue to be his assist totals, as well as some solid scoring when he's locked in.
For the second straight season, Jackson succumbed to a long-term injury that essentially nulled his overall impact in Fantasy leagues for the much of the year. Jackson was limited to just 45 games as a result of a Grade 3 right ankle sprain that kept him off the floor for nearly three months. His final line -- 14.6 points, 5.3 assists, 2.8 rebounds and 1.2 three-pointers across 26.7 minutes -- was nearly identical to the year prior when he played just 52 games due to tendinitis in his left knee. He also connected on just 30.8 percent of his three-point attempts, which was nearly five percentage points worse than his two prior seasons. Despite the injuries, Jackson was back to a full workload over the final 12 games of the regular season and should be good to go moving forward. He's currently slotted in as the team's starting point guard and could be a bounce-back candidate if he can stay healthy. The Pistons added Blake Griffin at the trade deadline last year, so he can help take some of the play-making pressure off Jackson's shoulders. Still, Jackson's injury history with tendinitis will once again make him a risky draft pick and he's unlikely to average 30-plus minutes in order to limit his workload and the overall strain on his knee. Jackson's main contribution will continue to be his assist totals, as well as some solid scoring when he's locked in.
GS (C, PF, C)
G
77
Min
19.3
FPTS
985.0
REB
380.0
AST
173.0
STL
64.0
BLK
107.0
TO
94.0
FGM
216.0
FGA
343.0
FTM
68.0
FTA
89.0
Bell was one of the biggest surprises of last season, garnering 14.2 minutes per game for Warriors despite being the 38th pick in the 2017 Draft. He was most impressive during his 13 starts, averaging 7.2 points on 60.6 percent shooting, 5.4 rebounds, 3.2 assists and a combined 2.7 blocks/steals across 21.9 minutes. Bell also posted one 20-point game, three games with at least 10 boards, four games with at least five assists, and six games with at least three blocks. Bell should be able to garner more run this season, though the arrival of DeMarcus Cousins -- expected to replace the minutes of the departed JaVale McGee and Zaza Pachulia -- doesn't make the path to a Fantasy-relevant workload simple. Plenty of questions surround Cousins’ situation, including when he'll debut the team and how effective he'll be, so it’s possible Bell ultimately gets put in a situation where he can be worth a late-round Fantasy selection in most standard formats.
Bell was one of the biggest surprises of last season, garnering 14.2 minutes per game for Warriors despite being the 38th pick in the 2017 Draft. He was most impressive during his 13 starts, averaging 7.2 points on 60.6 percent shooting, 5.4 rebounds, 3.2 assists and a combined 2.7 blocks/steals across 21.9 minutes. Bell also posted one 20-point game, three games with at least 10 boards, four games with at least five assists, and six games with at least three blocks. Bell should be able to garner more run this season, though the arrival of DeMarcus Cousins -- expected to replace the minutes of the departed JaVale McGee and Zaza Pachulia -- doesn't make the path to a Fantasy-relevant workload simple. Plenty of questions surround Cousins’ situation, including when he'll debut the team and how effective he'll be, so it’s possible Bell ultimately gets put in a situation where he can be worth a late-round Fantasy selection in most standard formats.
ORL (C, C)
G
71
Min
23.9
FPTS
985.0
REB
525.0
AST
21.0
STL
36.0
BLK
128.0
TO
78.0
FGM
289.0
FGA
589.0
FTM
77.0
FTA
107.0
Bamba, selected out of Texas with the sixth overall pick in this summer’s draft, checks in at seven feet tall with a 7-foot-9 wingspan. Due to his physical tools, the Big 12 All-Defensive Team honoree projects to be a high-level shot-blocker from Day 1, as he averaged 3.7 blocks across 30.2 minutes last season. His quality rebounding (10.5) and scoring (12.9) also helped him be selected to the All-Big 12 Second Team. While Bamba already seems to be a lock as an imposing defensive presence, his upside as a three-point shooter has intrigued scouts. He only shot 14-of-51 (27.5 percent) from three at Texas, but has since showed off improved form in workouts. That said, he was conservative with the shot during summer league, going just 2-for-4 in 59 minutes. So, Fantasy owners hoping Bamba will come out shooting multiple threes every night could be let down. Starter’s minutes aren't a guarantee, either, as 27-year-old Nikola Vucevic remains on the roster. He saw 29.5 minutes per game last season and was 0.8 boards away from averaging a double-double. Regardless, given that Orlando is deep into a rebuild, it would be surprising if Bamba doesn't see significant run during his rookie campaign.
Bamba, selected out of Texas with the sixth overall pick in this summer’s draft, checks in at seven feet tall with a 7-foot-9 wingspan. Due to his physical tools, the Big 12 All-Defensive Team honoree projects to be a high-level shot-blocker from Day 1, as he averaged 3.7 blocks across 30.2 minutes last season. His quality rebounding (10.5) and scoring (12.9) also helped him be selected to the All-Big 12 Second Team. While Bamba already seems to be a lock as an imposing defensive presence, his upside as a three-point shooter has intrigued scouts. He only shot 14-of-51 (27.5 percent) from three at Texas, but has since showed off improved form in workouts. That said, he was conservative with the shot during summer league, going just 2-for-4 in 59 minutes. So, Fantasy owners hoping Bamba will come out shooting multiple threes every night could be let down. Starter’s minutes aren't a guarantee, either, as 27-year-old Nikola Vucevic remains on the roster. He saw 29.5 minutes per game last season and was 0.8 boards away from averaging a double-double. Regardless, given that Orlando is deep into a rebuild, it would be surprising if Bamba doesn't see significant run during his rookie campaign.
WAS (F, SF, PF, C)
G
76
Min
26.2
FPTS
984.0
REB
409.0
AST
143.0
STL
57.0
BLK
38.0
TO
128.0
FGM
328.0
FGA
694.0
FTM
124.0
FTA
149.0
Morris had another steady season in Washington this past year, starting all 73 games he played in. His overall numbers dipped a bit, though, averaging 11.5 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 0.8 steals across 27.0 minutes. That was down from 14.0 points, 6.5 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.1 steals in 31.2 minutes during the 2016-17 campaign. However, his three-point shooting (1.0 3PM) remained a strong suit and he was able to convert on over 36 percent of his deep balls for a second straight season. He also finished with a 48 percent clip from the field and knocked down 82 percent of his free throws, giving Morris strong overall percentages. Heading into 2018-19, Morris likely remains the fourth option offensively, as John Wall, Bradley Beal and Otto Porter all return once again. The Wizards did replace last year's starting center, Marcin Gortat, with Dwight Howard, who has averaged 12.7 rebounds throughout his 14-year career. As a result, Morris' rebound numbers could take a hit once again and he likely won't be utilized as much as a small-ball center. With less boards available and yet another big man absorbing touches, Morris' value should take a slight hit. That said, his reliable percentages and ability to hit three-pointers still puts him in consideration for the later rounds of Fantasy drafts.
Morris had another steady season in Washington this past year, starting all 73 games he played in. His overall numbers dipped a bit, though, averaging 11.5 points, 5.6 rebounds, 1.9 assists and 0.8 steals across 27.0 minutes. That was down from 14.0 points, 6.5 rebounds, 1.7 assists and 1.1 steals in 31.2 minutes during the 2016-17 campaign. However, his three-point shooting (1.0 3PM) remained a strong suit and he was able to convert on over 36 percent of his deep balls for a second straight season. He also finished with a 48 percent clip from the field and knocked down 82 percent of his free throws, giving Morris strong overall percentages. Heading into 2018-19, Morris likely remains the fourth option offensively, as John Wall, Bradley Beal and Otto Porter all return once again. The Wizards did replace last year's starting center, Marcin Gortat, with Dwight Howard, who has averaged 12.7 rebounds throughout his 14-year career. As a result, Morris' rebound numbers could take a hit once again and he likely won't be utilized as much as a small-ball center. With less boards available and yet another big man absorbing touches, Morris' value should take a slight hit. That said, his reliable percentages and ability to hit three-pointers still puts him in consideration for the later rounds of Fantasy drafts.
OKC (G, PG)
G
77
Min
25.7
FPTS
983.0
REB
210.0
AST
349.0
STL
69.0
BLK
11.0
TO
184.0
FGM
415.0
FGA
934.0
FTM
171.0
FTA
201.0
After Schroder expressed his disinterest in being a part of a rebuilding effort, the Hawks began shopping him, eventually finding a suitor in Oklahoma City. Schroder was the focal point of the Atlanta’s offense last season, leading the team in scoring (19.4 PPG) and dishing 6.2 assists across 31.0 minutes per game. He struggled with efficiency, shooting just 43.6 percent from the field and 29.0 percent from distance. However, that could be chalked up to his overall workload, as he saw the highest usage rate of his career (30.4 percent) and shot a combined 33.6 percent from three over the previous three campaigns when he wasn't relied upon as heavily. If that’s the case, we might see Schroder improve his shooting during his first year on a new team, as he'll presumably come off the bench and see sixth-man minutes behind starter Russell Westbrook. Still, Schroder’s overall production will undoubtedly decline. In the 22 instances he saw between 20 and 29 minutes last season, the point guard averaged 16.2 points and 4.5 assists, possibly indicative of the kind of numbers we'll see from him in 2018-19.
After Schroder expressed his disinterest in being a part of a rebuilding effort, the Hawks began shopping him, eventually finding a suitor in Oklahoma City. Schroder was the focal point of the Atlanta’s offense last season, leading the team in scoring (19.4 PPG) and dishing 6.2 assists across 31.0 minutes per game. He struggled with efficiency, shooting just 43.6 percent from the field and 29.0 percent from distance. However, that could be chalked up to his overall workload, as he saw the highest usage rate of his career (30.4 percent) and shot a combined 33.6 percent from three over the previous three campaigns when he wasn't relied upon as heavily. If that’s the case, we might see Schroder improve his shooting during his first year on a new team, as he'll presumably come off the bench and see sixth-man minutes behind starter Russell Westbrook. Still, Schroder’s overall production will undoubtedly decline. In the 22 instances he saw between 20 and 29 minutes last season, the point guard averaged 16.2 points and 4.5 assists, possibly indicative of the kind of numbers we'll see from him in 2018-19.
POR (F, PF, SF)
G
73
Min
29.7
FPTS
978.0
REB
549.0
AST
88.0
STL
83.0
BLK
42.0
TO
83.0
FGM
248.0
FGA
609.0
FTM
61.0
FTA
84.0
Aminu ended up starting 67 out of 69 games last season, averaging 9.3 points, 7.6 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.1 steals across a career-high 30 minutes per contest. While the 27-year-old did see a slight improvement in his three-point accuracy (36.9 percent, up from 2016-17’s 32.9 percent), his overall shooting success rate disappointingly remained under 40.0 percent for the second straight season. Aminu exceeded 47.0 percent in two straight seasons during the 2012-13 and 2013-14 campaigns, so the downturn is concerning to an extent. On the plus side, Aminu’s work on the glass was superior, with his rebounding figure checking in as the second highest of his career. Looking ahead to the coming season, Aminu projects for a similar workload, although 2017 first-round pick Caleb Swanigan could certainly push for significantly more time than the 7.0 minutes he averaged during his rookie campaign. Aminu still projects as the fourth scoring option on the Blazers’ offense, but his all-around production and relatively secure role keeps his Fantasy stock steady heading into the 2018-19 season.
Aminu ended up starting 67 out of 69 games last season, averaging 9.3 points, 7.6 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.1 steals across a career-high 30 minutes per contest. While the 27-year-old did see a slight improvement in his three-point accuracy (36.9 percent, up from 2016-17’s 32.9 percent), his overall shooting success rate disappointingly remained under 40.0 percent for the second straight season. Aminu exceeded 47.0 percent in two straight seasons during the 2012-13 and 2013-14 campaigns, so the downturn is concerning to an extent. On the plus side, Aminu’s work on the glass was superior, with his rebounding figure checking in as the second highest of his career. Looking ahead to the coming season, Aminu projects for a similar workload, although 2017 first-round pick Caleb Swanigan could certainly push for significantly more time than the 7.0 minutes he averaged during his rookie campaign. Aminu still projects as the fourth scoring option on the Blazers’ offense, but his all-around production and relatively secure role keeps his Fantasy stock steady heading into the 2018-19 season.
BRO (G, PG, SG)
G
65
Min
29.5
FPTS
968.0
REB
273.0
AST
353.0
STL
56.0
BLK
26.0
TO
229.0
FGM
410.0
FGA
980.0
FTM
153.0
FTA
204.0
Russell was expected to take on a more featured role after being dealt from the Lakers to the Nets ahead of the 2017-18 campaign, but injuries once again decimated his value and he was only a participant in 48 total games because of a lingering left knee issue. Even when he returned to the court in mid-January, the Nets took a cautious approach with his workload and he ended up averaging just 25.7 minutes despite running with the starters most of the time. Russell was a bit rusty overall and his efficiency was noticeably bad, as he shot just 41.4 percent from the field and 32.4 percent from beyond the arc. That said, he still provided 15.5 points, 5.2 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 1.9 three-pointers, so he carried value in the bulk of Fantasy formats when on the floor. If Russell is able to put together a healthy campaign, it's feasible that his workload will increase by more than a handful of minutes, which would in turn add to his all-around production. He has fantastic size for the point guard position and is a natural offensive weapon, so if he could stay on the court and develop some consistency, there's reason to believe Russell continues to build his Fantasy profile. While his defense is suspect and his efficiency needs some work, Russell's improvement as a passer and his impressive offensive upside could bring him into consideration for a top-75 pick in what will be a make-or-break year for the former No. 2 overall pick. Depending on his play, the Nets will be deciding whether or not to give him a lucrative extension.
Russell was expected to take on a more featured role after being dealt from the Lakers to the Nets ahead of the 2017-18 campaign, but injuries once again decimated his value and he was only a participant in 48 total games because of a lingering left knee issue. Even when he returned to the court in mid-January, the Nets took a cautious approach with his workload and he ended up averaging just 25.7 minutes despite running with the starters most of the time. Russell was a bit rusty overall and his efficiency was noticeably bad, as he shot just 41.4 percent from the field and 32.4 percent from beyond the arc. That said, he still provided 15.5 points, 5.2 assists, 3.9 rebounds and 1.9 three-pointers, so he carried value in the bulk of Fantasy formats when on the floor. If Russell is able to put together a healthy campaign, it's feasible that his workload will increase by more than a handful of minutes, which would in turn add to his all-around production. He has fantastic size for the point guard position and is a natural offensive weapon, so if he could stay on the court and develop some consistency, there's reason to believe Russell continues to build his Fantasy profile. While his defense is suspect and his efficiency needs some work, Russell's improvement as a passer and his impressive offensive upside could bring him into consideration for a top-75 pick in what will be a make-or-break year for the former No. 2 overall pick. Depending on his play, the Nets will be deciding whether or not to give him a lucrative extension.
PHO (F, SF, PF)
G
77
Min
28.6
FPTS
965.0
REB
395.0
AST
152.0
STL
90.0
BLK
39.0
TO
164.0
FGM
444.0
FGA
1,049.0
FTM
205.0
FTA
314.0
Jackson had a solid, but not spectacular rookie campaign in Phoenix after being selected with the fourth overall pick of the 2017 NBA Draft. He played in 77 games, including 35 starts, and averaged 13.1 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.0 steal across 25.4 minutes. Struggles with his efficiency was really the biggest concern, as Jackson shot just 41.7 percent from the field, 26.3 percent from deep and 63.4 percent from the free-throw line. His shot is clearly a work in progress, though the hope is that it's at least slightly improved after having a full offseason to work with the coaching staff. Looking forward to the upcoming season, Jackson should slot into the backup small forward slot to T.J. Warren once again, but the Suns will likely look to get their youngster a few more minutes per game after a strong finish to last season -- in his final 12 showings in 2017-18, Jackson averaged 21.8 points, 5.8 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.0 steals across 34.5 minutes. While the additions of Trevor Ariza and first-round draft pick Mikal Bridges pose a few hurdles to get over for big minutes, Jackson is still a candidate to see added run considering his upside and flashes of brilliance last year. If he improves as expected, Jackson should flirt with top-100 value and makes for an intriguing mid-to-late round pick in most standard drafts. Of course, Fantasy owners will have to prepare to deal with the repercussions of his efficiency woes.
Jackson had a solid, but not spectacular rookie campaign in Phoenix after being selected with the fourth overall pick of the 2017 NBA Draft. He played in 77 games, including 35 starts, and averaged 13.1 points, 4.6 rebounds, 1.5 assists and 1.0 steal across 25.4 minutes. Struggles with his efficiency was really the biggest concern, as Jackson shot just 41.7 percent from the field, 26.3 percent from deep and 63.4 percent from the free-throw line. His shot is clearly a work in progress, though the hope is that it's at least slightly improved after having a full offseason to work with the coaching staff. Looking forward to the upcoming season, Jackson should slot into the backup small forward slot to T.J. Warren once again, but the Suns will likely look to get their youngster a few more minutes per game after a strong finish to last season -- in his final 12 showings in 2017-18, Jackson averaged 21.8 points, 5.8 rebounds, 2.8 assists and 2.0 steals across 34.5 minutes. While the additions of Trevor Ariza and first-round draft pick Mikal Bridges pose a few hurdles to get over for big minutes, Jackson is still a candidate to see added run considering his upside and flashes of brilliance last year. If he improves as expected, Jackson should flirt with top-100 value and makes for an intriguing mid-to-late round pick in most standard drafts. Of course, Fantasy owners will have to prepare to deal with the repercussions of his efficiency woes.
SAC (G, PG)
G
77
Min
30.5
FPTS
945.0
REB
236.0
AST
370.0
STL
104.0
BLK
23.0
TO
200.0
FGM
389.0
FGA
922.0
FTM
169.0
FTA
228.0
After being selected to the First Team All-SEC during his freshman year at Kentucky, Fox was selected by the Kings with the fifth overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft. He proceeded to start 60 of his 73 appearances for the team, but failed to crack 30 minutes per night. The rookie struggled scoring the ball, averaging 11.6 points while shooting 41.2 percent from the field, 30.7 percent from deep and 72.3 percent from the line. Fox was also a subpar distributor and defender, posting 4.4 assists compared with 2.4 turnovers, and swiping only 1.0 steal per contest. It wasn't all underwhelming, however, as he still managed to flash the upside the Kings were hoping for. Fox posted five games with at least 20 points, four games with double-digit assists, and seven games with three-plus steals. Entering his age 21 season, Fox will likely be handed a similar, if not expanded, role.
After being selected to the First Team All-SEC during his freshman year at Kentucky, Fox was selected by the Kings with the fifth overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft. He proceeded to start 60 of his 73 appearances for the team, but failed to crack 30 minutes per night. The rookie struggled scoring the ball, averaging 11.6 points while shooting 41.2 percent from the field, 30.7 percent from deep and 72.3 percent from the line. Fox was also a subpar distributor and defender, posting 4.4 assists compared with 2.4 turnovers, and swiping only 1.0 steal per contest. It wasn't all underwhelming, however, as he still managed to flash the upside the Kings were hoping for. Fox posted five games with at least 20 points, four games with double-digit assists, and seven games with three-plus steals. Entering his age 21 season, Fox will likely be handed a similar, if not expanded, role.
CLE (C, C)
G
80
Min
23.4
FPTS
945.0
REB
615.0
AST
58.0
STL
28.0
BLK
30.0
TO
63.0
FGM
227.0
FGA
410.0
FTM
72.0
FTA
138.0
Thompson's 2017-18 campaign was arguably the worst of his career. To begin with, injuries seemed to pile up for the veteran, as a left calf strain and a right ankle sprain limited him to just 53 total games. Thompson had previously missed four or less games in each of the prior five seasons, so that appeared to be more of an aberration than anything. Still, the Cavaliers pivoted to smaller, more athletic players at center for much of the year anyway, which resulted in a significant dip in Thompson's playing time. After averaging 29.9 minutes in 2016-17, his per game number fell to just 20.2, and he started just 22 of the 53 games he took part in. Thompson's lack of court time resulted in a career-low 5.8 points, as well as just 6.6 rebounds and a meager 0.3 blocks. He shot 56.2 percent from the field, but shot just 54.4 percent from the free-throw line, which was yet another negative to his value. Overall, Thompson was nothing more than a rebound specialist in the deepest of leagues. He does have a chance to have somewhat of a bounce-back showing heading into 2018-19. The Cavaliers were unable to retain superstar LeBron James, who instead signed with the Lakers. With such a high usage player leaving, Thompson is sure to see a few more minutes per game and his numbers should trend upwards overall, even if he continues to come off the bench for the bulk of the time. That said, Kevin Love was re-upped to a four-year, $120 million extension and the Cavaliers apparently like what they in athletic big man Larry Nance, both of whom could see time at center and cut into Thompson's workload. As a result, Thompson's expected improvements may only be minor overall.
Thompson's 2017-18 campaign was arguably the worst of his career. To begin with, injuries seemed to pile up for the veteran, as a left calf strain and a right ankle sprain limited him to just 53 total games. Thompson had previously missed four or less games in each of the prior five seasons, so that appeared to be more of an aberration than anything. Still, the Cavaliers pivoted to smaller, more athletic players at center for much of the year anyway, which resulted in a significant dip in Thompson's playing time. After averaging 29.9 minutes in 2016-17, his per game number fell to just 20.2, and he started just 22 of the 53 games he took part in. Thompson's lack of court time resulted in a career-low 5.8 points, as well as just 6.6 rebounds and a meager 0.3 blocks. He shot 56.2 percent from the field, but shot just 54.4 percent from the free-throw line, which was yet another negative to his value. Overall, Thompson was nothing more than a rebound specialist in the deepest of leagues. He does have a chance to have somewhat of a bounce-back showing heading into 2018-19. The Cavaliers were unable to retain superstar LeBron James, who instead signed with the Lakers. With such a high usage player leaving, Thompson is sure to see a few more minutes per game and his numbers should trend upwards overall, even if he continues to come off the bench for the bulk of the time. That said, Kevin Love was re-upped to a four-year, $120 million extension and the Cavaliers apparently like what they in athletic big man Larry Nance, both of whom could see time at center and cut into Thompson's workload. As a result, Thompson's expected improvements may only be minor overall.
CHR (G, SF, SG)
G
76
Min
23.4
FPTS
936.0
REB
293.0
AST
168.0
STL
55.0
BLK
29.0
TO
84.0
FGM
337.0
FGA
752.0
FTM
160.0
FTA
188.0
Lamb saw a career-high 24.6 minutes per game last season, setting career highs in many statistical categories as a result. He also appeared in 80 games, marking the first time he made more than 66 appearances since the 2013-14 campaign. The sixth-year man averaged 12.9 points, 4.1 rebounds and 2.3 assists. He also hit 1.2 threes per game and shot 45.7 percent from the field. Lamb’s expanded role could be in jeopardy this season, however. The Hornets ended up with Miles Bridges, who is expected to play small forward, in the 2018 Draft. And, the team signed Tony Parker, which could push Malik Monk to play more shooting guard. Lamb, who saw all of his run at either shooting guard or small forward last season, will be feeling competition from both sides. Given the situation, his upside is limited, and he can likely go undrafted in most standard Fantasy formats.
Lamb saw a career-high 24.6 minutes per game last season, setting career highs in many statistical categories as a result. He also appeared in 80 games, marking the first time he made more than 66 appearances since the 2013-14 campaign. The sixth-year man averaged 12.9 points, 4.1 rebounds and 2.3 assists. He also hit 1.2 threes per game and shot 45.7 percent from the field. Lamb’s expanded role could be in jeopardy this season, however. The Hornets ended up with Miles Bridges, who is expected to play small forward, in the 2018 Draft. And, the team signed Tony Parker, which could push Malik Monk to play more shooting guard. Lamb, who saw all of his run at either shooting guard or small forward last season, will be feeling competition from both sides. Given the situation, his upside is limited, and he can likely go undrafted in most standard Fantasy formats.
WAS (G, SF, SG)
G
80
Min
25.4
FPTS
936.0
REB
331.0
AST
110.0
STL
73.0
BLK
32.0
TO
82.0
FGM
310.0
FGA
720.0
FTM
179.0
FTA
214.0
Oubre saw the most extensive playing time of his three-year career in 2017-18, resulting in career-high production across the board. The 22-year-old averaged 11.8 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.0 steal across 27.5 minutes, all up from 6.3 points, 3.3 rebounds, 0.6 assists and 0.7 steals across 20.3 minutes a year prior. Some of that can be attributed to John Wall missing 41 games and opening up more time in the rotation, but either way, it was a decent showing for the reserve wing. In addition to his increased production, Oubre took a step forward with his three-point shooting. He hit 1.6 deep balls at a 34.1 percent clip. While that may not be an overly efficient number, it was a night and day improvement compared to his 28.7 percent three-point shooting in 2016-17. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, Oubre should reclaim his role as the top backup to Otto Porter at small forward. However, the Wizards did select wing Troy Brown in the draft and added Jeff Green during free agency, so Oubre will at least have some competition for reserve minutes. That likely keeps Oubre off the radar in anything but deeper leagues, though he should still have plenty of incentive to play well considering he's heading into the final year of his rookie deal and will be a restricted free agent next offseason.
Oubre saw the most extensive playing time of his three-year career in 2017-18, resulting in career-high production across the board. The 22-year-old averaged 11.8 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 1.0 steal across 27.5 minutes, all up from 6.3 points, 3.3 rebounds, 0.6 assists and 0.7 steals across 20.3 minutes a year prior. Some of that can be attributed to John Wall missing 41 games and opening up more time in the rotation, but either way, it was a decent showing for the reserve wing. In addition to his increased production, Oubre took a step forward with his three-point shooting. He hit 1.6 deep balls at a 34.1 percent clip. While that may not be an overly efficient number, it was a night and day improvement compared to his 28.7 percent three-point shooting in 2016-17. Looking forward to the upcoming campaign, Oubre should reclaim his role as the top backup to Otto Porter at small forward. However, the Wizards did select wing Troy Brown in the draft and added Jeff Green during free agency, so Oubre will at least have some competition for reserve minutes. That likely keeps Oubre off the radar in anything but deeper leagues, though he should still have plenty of incentive to play well considering he's heading into the final year of his rookie deal and will be a restricted free agent next offseason.
SAN (C, C)
G
67
Min
20.1
FPTS
931.0
REB
460.0
AST
177.0
STL
18.0
BLK
59.0
TO
80.0
FGM
216.0
FGA
466.0
FTM
118.0
FTA
155.0
Despite his age and coach Gregg Popovich's propensity to rest his veterans, Gasol saw action in 77 games this past season, which was his most since the 2015-16 campaign. His workload did take a slight hit, though, averaging 23.5 minutes compared to 25.4 minutes a year prior. Still, when Gasol saw extended minutes he was fairly effective and he chipped in across the box score with 10.1 points, 8.0 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.0 block. His rebound and block totals kept him as an asset in some Fantasy leagues, though the inconsistencies in his playing time were extremely frustrating. There were 10 games where Gasol played 15 minutes or less and 13 games where he played 30 minutes or more, so it was tough to know when to keep him in lineups and when to sit him. Looking forward to Gasol's 18th NBA season, Fantasy owners can likely expect more of the same. He should see another slight decline in his minutes and coach Popovich will certainly vary his veteran's workload on a night-to-night basis depending on when he wants to ease the strain on his legs. As a result, Gasol will be tough to rely on in many Fantasy formats. It's also worth it to note that the Spurs traded superstar Kawhi Leonard, who missed all but nine games last season, to the Raptors in exchange for DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl. DeRozan will be the co-No. 1 option alongside LaMarcus Aldridge, while Poeltl could cut into Gasol's court time if he has a strong camp and adjusts quickly to his new team.
Despite his age and coach Gregg Popovich's propensity to rest his veterans, Gasol saw action in 77 games this past season, which was his most since the 2015-16 campaign. His workload did take a slight hit, though, averaging 23.5 minutes compared to 25.4 minutes a year prior. Still, when Gasol saw extended minutes he was fairly effective and he chipped in across the box score with 10.1 points, 8.0 rebounds, 3.1 assists and 1.0 block. His rebound and block totals kept him as an asset in some Fantasy leagues, though the inconsistencies in his playing time were extremely frustrating. There were 10 games where Gasol played 15 minutes or less and 13 games where he played 30 minutes or more, so it was tough to know when to keep him in lineups and when to sit him. Looking forward to Gasol's 18th NBA season, Fantasy owners can likely expect more of the same. He should see another slight decline in his minutes and coach Popovich will certainly vary his veteran's workload on a night-to-night basis depending on when he wants to ease the strain on his legs. As a result, Gasol will be tough to rely on in many Fantasy formats. It's also worth it to note that the Spurs traded superstar Kawhi Leonard, who missed all but nine games last season, to the Raptors in exchange for DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl. DeRozan will be the co-No. 1 option alongside LaMarcus Aldridge, while Poeltl could cut into Gasol's court time if he has a strong camp and adjusts quickly to his new team.
BRO (C, C)
G
76
Min
20.1
FPTS
921.0
REB
597.0
AST
42.0
STL
33.0
BLK
54.0
TO
69.0
FGM
180.0
FGA
303.0
FTM
71.0
FTA
115.0
After struggling with health a year prior, Davis missed just four games in 2017-18, but continued to play a minor role off the bench. The 29-year-old impressively averaged 7.4 rebounds across just 18.9 minutes per game, while also chipping in with 5.3 points and a 58.2 percent clip from the field. However, he was a poor free-throw shooter at just 66.7 percent from the charity stripe and he also had no semblance of a three-point game, which certainly didn't help him become Fantasy relevant in most formats. Davis does have the chance to improve his numbers across the board after joining the Nets this offseason. Brooklyn let the likes of Quincy Acy, Dante Cunningham and Jahlil Okafor all walk during free agency. Davis and Kenneth Faried were really the only two guys brought in as replacements, with Davis currently being the more likely contributor. While Davis is set to come off the bench, he should be the first big man behind Rondae Hollis-Jefferson and Jarrett Allen at power forward and center, respectively. DeMarre Carroll also gets extended run at the four when the Nets are going small, so Davis will likely still spend most of his time as the backup center. Depending on just how big of a jump his workload takes, Davis could become a great source of boards, as well as a solid option for blocks and field goal percentage.
After struggling with health a year prior, Davis missed just four games in 2017-18, but continued to play a minor role off the bench. The 29-year-old impressively averaged 7.4 rebounds across just 18.9 minutes per game, while also chipping in with 5.3 points and a 58.2 percent clip from the field. However, he was a poor free-throw shooter at just 66.7 percent from the charity stripe and he also had no semblance of a three-point game, which certainly didn't help him become Fantasy relevant in most formats. Davis does have the chance to improve his numbers across the board after joining the Nets this offseason. Brooklyn let the likes of Quincy Acy, Dante Cunningham and Jahlil Okafor all walk during free agency. Davis and Kenneth Faried were really the only two guys brought in as replacements, with Davis currently being the more likely contributor. While Davis is set to come off the bench, he should be the first big man behind Rondae Hollis-Jefferson and Jarrett Allen at power forward and center, respectively. DeMarre Carroll also gets extended run at the four when the Nets are going small, so Davis will likely still spend most of his time as the backup center. Depending on just how big of a jump his workload takes, Davis could become a great source of boards, as well as a solid option for blocks and field goal percentage.
HOU (G, SG, SF)
G
67
Min
32.3
FPTS
916.0
REB
171.0
AST
155.0
STL
44.0
BLK
27.0
TO
131.0
FGM
411.0
FGA
969.0
FTM
201.0
FTA
242.0
For the second straight year, Gordon slotted in as the Rockets' sixth man, providing an elite scoring presence off the bench when James Harden or Chris Paul came out for a breather. Despite Paul's addition and his designation as a bench player, Gordon received a starter's workload most nights and averaged 31.2 minutes per game. That allowed him to once again up his scoring to 18.0 points per game, which marked his highest number since the 2011-12 season. Gordon's ability to knock down three-pointers at a very high rate helped him continue to excel in the Rockets' fast-paced offense and his 3.2 deep balls per game wound up placing him third in the entire league, behind only Stephen Curry and teammate Harden. With averages of just 2.5 rebounds and 2.2 assists, Gordon's Fantasy value clearly lies in his scoring and three-point production. However, the Rockets' offseason addition of Carmelo Anthony does threaten those numbers. Anthony is primarily prided for his offense and the potential for the Rockets to bring him off the bench alongside Gordon could cut into the latter's usage and shot attempts. Gordon will still be in consideration for a selection in most standard leagues due to his elite three-point totals, but with a player like Anthony, who averaged a whopping 15.0 shot attempts, potentially soaking up touches, Gordon's numbers could take a hit overall.
For the second straight year, Gordon slotted in as the Rockets' sixth man, providing an elite scoring presence off the bench when James Harden or Chris Paul came out for a breather. Despite Paul's addition and his designation as a bench player, Gordon received a starter's workload most nights and averaged 31.2 minutes per game. That allowed him to once again up his scoring to 18.0 points per game, which marked his highest number since the 2011-12 season. Gordon's ability to knock down three-pointers at a very high rate helped him continue to excel in the Rockets' fast-paced offense and his 3.2 deep balls per game wound up placing him third in the entire league, behind only Stephen Curry and teammate Harden. With averages of just 2.5 rebounds and 2.2 assists, Gordon's Fantasy value clearly lies in his scoring and three-point production. However, the Rockets' offseason addition of Carmelo Anthony does threaten those numbers. Anthony is primarily prided for his offense and the potential for the Rockets to bring him off the bench alongside Gordon could cut into the latter's usage and shot attempts. Gordon will still be in consideration for a selection in most standard leagues due to his elite three-point totals, but with a player like Anthony, who averaged a whopping 15.0 shot attempts, potentially soaking up touches, Gordon's numbers could take a hit overall.
NOR (G, SG, SF)
G
80
Min
31.1
FPTS
907.0
REB
229.0
AST
180.0
STL
76.0
BLK
12.0
TO
98.0
FGM
386.0
FGA
801.0
FTM
48.0
FTA
65.0
With a hamstring injury sidelining Solomon Hill for the majority of the season, Moore was afforded the opportunity to move into the starting five at small forward. He grabbed that chance and ran with it, putting up career-high numbers in scoring, rebounding, steals and three-pointers. Perhaps most impressive was, despite the increased playing time and shot attempts, Moore managed to shoot a career-best 50.8 percent from the field. Moore finished the year as close to a top-100 player in some formats and should return in a similar, if not slightly reduced, role in 2018-19. A healthy Hill could cut into Moore's minutes -- and it remains to be seen how much time Nikola Mirotic will spend at the three -- but if he can manage to sustain his high efficiency and improved defensive play, Moore will be a role player worth a look late in drafts.
With a hamstring injury sidelining Solomon Hill for the majority of the season, Moore was afforded the opportunity to move into the starting five at small forward. He grabbed that chance and ran with it, putting up career-high numbers in scoring, rebounding, steals and three-pointers. Perhaps most impressive was, despite the increased playing time and shot attempts, Moore managed to shoot a career-best 50.8 percent from the field. Moore finished the year as close to a top-100 player in some formats and should return in a similar, if not slightly reduced, role in 2018-19. A healthy Hill could cut into Moore's minutes -- and it remains to be seen how much time Nikola Mirotic will spend at the three -- but if he can manage to sustain his high efficiency and improved defensive play, Moore will be a role player worth a look late in drafts.
IND (F, SF, SG)
G
81
Min
28.0
FPTS
906.0
REB
249.0
AST
110.0
STL
51.0
BLK
7.0
TO
98.0
FGM
364.0
FGA
785.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
189.0
Joining a Pacers team that lost both Paul George and Darren Collison, Bogdanovic was able to earn a spot in the top unit right away with his new organization, starting all 80 games he played in. The 29-year-old didn't provide much ancillary production with averages of just 3.4 rebounds and 1.5 assists. However, he gave the team a spark offensively on a night-to-night basis and had the ability to spread the floor with a consistent three-point stroke. In 30.8 minutes per game, Bogdanovic finished with a career-high 14.3 points, while hitting 1.9 three-pointers at a 40.2 percent clip. In the offseason, the Pacers extended fairly sizable contracts to both Doug McDermott and Tyreke Evans, both of whom have the ability to play small forward and could cut into Bogdanovic's workload. At this point, Bogdanovic's starting role appears to be safe, though that could change at any point in the season if he falls into a lull. Look for Bogdanovic to remain relevant in deeper leagues due to his spectacular percentages and ability to rack up points and three-pointers. That said, Fantasy owners still may want to temper expectations a bit due to the team's offseason signings.
Joining a Pacers team that lost both Paul George and Darren Collison, Bogdanovic was able to earn a spot in the top unit right away with his new organization, starting all 80 games he played in. The 29-year-old didn't provide much ancillary production with averages of just 3.4 rebounds and 1.5 assists. However, he gave the team a spark offensively on a night-to-night basis and had the ability to spread the floor with a consistent three-point stroke. In 30.8 minutes per game, Bogdanovic finished with a career-high 14.3 points, while hitting 1.9 three-pointers at a 40.2 percent clip. In the offseason, the Pacers extended fairly sizable contracts to both Doug McDermott and Tyreke Evans, both of whom have the ability to play small forward and could cut into Bogdanovic's workload. At this point, Bogdanovic's starting role appears to be safe, though that could change at any point in the season if he falls into a lull. Look for Bogdanovic to remain relevant in deeper leagues due to his spectacular percentages and ability to rack up points and three-pointers. That said, Fantasy owners still may want to temper expectations a bit due to the team's offseason signings.
BRO (G, SG, PG)
G
77
Min
21.9
FPTS
906.0
REB
189.0
AST
383.0
STL
50.0
BLK
17.0
TO
94.0
FGM
249.0
FGA
613.0
FTM
157.0
FTA
196.0
After playing a complementary role in his first season with Brooklyn, Dinwiddie was thrust into an expanded opportunity this past year and capitalized with a breakout performance. Nets' starting point guard, D'Angelo Russell, missed 34 games with an injury, which allowed Dinwiddie to average 28.8 minutes per game and also pick up starts in 58 of the 80 contests he played in. The fourth-year guard ended up being a fantastic facilitator and averaged 6.6 assists per game, which tied him with All-Star Damian Lillard for 12th best in the NBA. In addition, Dinwiddie posted career highs of 12.6 points, 3.2 rebounds and 1.8 three-pointers, all up from 7.3, 2.8 and 0.6, respectively. The hefty increase in shot attempts didn't bode well for Dinwiddie's efficiency, as he shot just 38.7 percent from the field and 32.6 percent from three-point land. However, considering his lack of production in previous years and quick transition into one of the better facilitators in the league, Dinwiddie found himself in the conversation to earn the league's Most Improved Player award. He ultimately finished third in the running behind Victor Oladipo and Clint Capela, but it was still a good representation of the progress he made. Unfortunately for Dinwiddie's value, Russell is back to full strength and ready to reclaim the starting point guard role. In addition, the likes of Allen Crabbe, Joe Harris and Caris LeVert are all back as well, so there won't be many minutes available at shooting guard. As a result, look for Dinwiddie's playing time to take a significant hit and that means a drop in production can be expected. Considering Russell's injury history, Dinwiddie will be someone to monitor as he waits in the shadows for another opportunity for extended work. In the meantime, however, he'll have a tough time coming near his totals from the 2017-18 season.
After playing a complementary role in his first season with Brooklyn, Dinwiddie was thrust into an expanded opportunity this past year and capitalized with a breakout performance. Nets' starting point guard, D'Angelo Russell, missed 34 games with an injury, which allowed Dinwiddie to average 28.8 minutes per game and also pick up starts in 58 of the 80 contests he played in. The fourth-year guard ended up being a fantastic facilitator and averaged 6.6 assists per game, which tied him with All-Star Damian Lillard for 12th best in the NBA. In addition, Dinwiddie posted career highs of 12.6 points, 3.2 rebounds and 1.8 three-pointers, all up from 7.3, 2.8 and 0.6, respectively. The hefty increase in shot attempts didn't bode well for Dinwiddie's efficiency, as he shot just 38.7 percent from the field and 32.6 percent from three-point land. However, considering his lack of production in previous years and quick transition into one of the better facilitators in the league, Dinwiddie found himself in the conversation to earn the league's Most Improved Player award. He ultimately finished third in the running behind Victor Oladipo and Clint Capela, but it was still a good representation of the progress he made. Unfortunately for Dinwiddie's value, Russell is back to full strength and ready to reclaim the starting point guard role. In addition, the likes of Allen Crabbe, Joe Harris and Caris LeVert are all back as well, so there won't be many minutes available at shooting guard. As a result, look for Dinwiddie's playing time to take a significant hit and that means a drop in production can be expected. Considering Russell's injury history, Dinwiddie will be someone to monitor as he waits in the shadows for another opportunity for extended work. In the meantime, however, he'll have a tough time coming near his totals from the 2017-18 season.
DAL (C, C)
G
78
Min
19.5
FPTS
902.0
REB
404.0
AST
83.0
STL
61.0
BLK
29.0
TO
54.0
FGM
220.0
FGA
391.0
FTM
126.0
FTA
168.0
Powell was in and out of the starting lineup all year for the Mavericks in 2017-18, as the frontcourt rotation changed on a night-to-night basis depending on the opposing matchup. That said, it still allowed Powell to put together the most productive season of his career. The 6-foot-11 big man averaged 8.5 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.2 steals across 21.2 minutes, while shooting 59.3 percent from the field. That didn't put him on the radar in the majority of Fantasy leagues, but for basketball purposes alone, he was a solid option for Dallas that could play multiple frontcourt spots. Despite his efforts, Powell's potential upside took a significant hit this offseason, with the Mavericks opting to sign star center DeAndre Jordan in free agency. Jordan will immediately slot into the starting five, which means Powell will translate back into a full-time reserve role. Look for Powell's workload to take a slight hit as he works behind the likes of Jordan, Dirk Nowitzki and Harrison Barnes, so he can once again be avoided in the bulk of leagues.
Powell was in and out of the starting lineup all year for the Mavericks in 2017-18, as the frontcourt rotation changed on a night-to-night basis depending on the opposing matchup. That said, it still allowed Powell to put together the most productive season of his career. The 6-foot-11 big man averaged 8.5 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.2 steals across 21.2 minutes, while shooting 59.3 percent from the field. That didn't put him on the radar in the majority of Fantasy leagues, but for basketball purposes alone, he was a solid option for Dallas that could play multiple frontcourt spots. Despite his efforts, Powell's potential upside took a significant hit this offseason, with the Mavericks opting to sign star center DeAndre Jordan in free agency. Jordan will immediately slot into the starting five, which means Powell will translate back into a full-time reserve role. Look for Powell's workload to take a slight hit as he works behind the likes of Jordan, Dirk Nowitzki and Harrison Barnes, so he can once again be avoided in the bulk of leagues.
SAC (G, SG)
G
70
Min
28.4
FPTS
901.0
REB
210.0
AST
245.0
STL
84.0
BLK
15.0
TO
118.0
FGM
329.0
FGA
725.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
122.0
Bogdanovic, the 27th overall pick in 2014, played his first year in the NBA last season after spending time overseas. During the first year of a three-year, $27 million contract, the 25-year-old appeared in 78 games and drew 53 starts. He essentially played a sixth-man role, garnering 27.9 minutes per night. In that time, Bogdanovic averaged 11.8 points, 3.3 assists and 2.9 rebounds per game. Notably, he was a quality three-point shooter, hitting 1.7 threes per contest at 39.2 percent. In addition to his upside as a scorer (eight performances with at least 20 points), Bogdanovic showed potential as a passer. He posted 18 games with at least five dimes, including a 10-assist effort. And, though he averaged less than a steal, he managed to rack up five contests with 3-plus swipes. His play would suggest he’s worthy of more run this season, though with Buddy Hield and Justin Jackson still in the mix, it’s unclear how each player’s role will shake out. The idea of No. 2 overall pick Marvin Bagley playing small forward has also been publicly thrown around, which would complicate things further for Bogdanovic.
Bogdanovic, the 27th overall pick in 2014, played his first year in the NBA last season after spending time overseas. During the first year of a three-year, $27 million contract, the 25-year-old appeared in 78 games and drew 53 starts. He essentially played a sixth-man role, garnering 27.9 minutes per night. In that time, Bogdanovic averaged 11.8 points, 3.3 assists and 2.9 rebounds per game. Notably, he was a quality three-point shooter, hitting 1.7 threes per contest at 39.2 percent. In addition to his upside as a scorer (eight performances with at least 20 points), Bogdanovic showed potential as a passer. He posted 18 games with at least five dimes, including a 10-assist effort. And, though he averaged less than a steal, he managed to rack up five contests with 3-plus swipes. His play would suggest he’s worthy of more run this season, though with Buddy Hield and Justin Jackson still in the mix, it’s unclear how each player’s role will shake out. The idea of No. 2 overall pick Marvin Bagley playing small forward has also been publicly thrown around, which would complicate things further for Bogdanovic.
BOS (G, PG, SG)
G
81
Min
22.2
FPTS
893.0
REB
327.0
AST
202.0
STL
70.0
BLK
17.0
TO
70.0
FGM
281.0
FGA
696.0
FTM
101.0
FTA
130.0
Rozier proved in 2018 that he’s a more than capable NBA starting point guard. When Kyrie Irving went down with a knee injury in March, Rozier responded with 15 points, five assists and five rebounds per game over 34 regular season and playoff contests. Unfortunately, Rozier’s end-of-season run was marred by a dud performance in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals. The silver lining of that miserable Game 7 is it reminded everyone that Rozier is still a far cry from a star of Irving's caliber, who is expected to return, fully healthy for the 2018-19 season. That means Rozier will sink back into his reserve role, though he’s leapfrogged fellow-reserve Marcus Smart on the point guard depth chart. Assuming Irving can stay healthy, expect Rozier’s workload to hover in the 20-25 minutes per game range as Boston’s first guard off the bench. Between the Celtics' championship aspirations and Rozier’s upcoming restricted free agency next summer, the 2018-19 campaign will be one that holds major implications for Rozier's future in the league.
Rozier proved in 2018 that he’s a more than capable NBA starting point guard. When Kyrie Irving went down with a knee injury in March, Rozier responded with 15 points, five assists and five rebounds per game over 34 regular season and playoff contests. Unfortunately, Rozier’s end-of-season run was marred by a dud performance in Game 7 of the Eastern Conference Finals. The silver lining of that miserable Game 7 is it reminded everyone that Rozier is still a far cry from a star of Irving's caliber, who is expected to return, fully healthy for the 2018-19 season. That means Rozier will sink back into his reserve role, though he’s leapfrogged fellow-reserve Marcus Smart on the point guard depth chart. Assuming Irving can stay healthy, expect Rozier’s workload to hover in the 20-25 minutes per game range as Boston’s first guard off the bench. Between the Celtics' championship aspirations and Rozier’s upcoming restricted free agency next summer, the 2018-19 campaign will be one that holds major implications for Rozier's future in the league.
BRO (G, SG, SF)
G
79
Min
26.9
FPTS
891.0
REB
280.0
AST
138.0
STL
38.0
BLK
22.0
TO
98.0
FGM
318.0
FGA
668.0
FTM
91.0
FTA
112.0
In his second season with the Nets, Harris' contributions became more significant and he found himself in a prominent rotation role. He came off the bench for much of the year, but was the next guy up to jump into the top unit when either starting wing, Allen Crabbe or DeMarre Carroll, missed a contest. As a result, Harris picked up 14 starts across 78 games and found himself averaging a career-high 25.3 minutes per game. The 26-year-old's ability to open the floor with his three-point shooting is his main calling card. He shot a scorching hot 41.9 percent from deep and dropped 1.9 three-pointers per game. He also shot just under 50 percent from the field and 82.7 percent from the free-throw, so to say he was efficient would be an understatement. However, Harris added just 10.8 points, 3.3 rebounds and 1.6 assists, so his contributions for Fantasy purposes lied for the most part in his three-point totals. Still, the Nets liked his overall development and opted to re-sign him to a two-year, $16 million extension this offseason. With Crabbe and Carroll back, Harris should slot into his reserve wing role to start the year once again and he'll battle Caris LeVert for the backup wing minutes. Look for Harris to be a deep league option as a deep ball specialist, but his lack of contributions elsewhere will limit his utility in shallower leagues.
In his second season with the Nets, Harris' contributions became more significant and he found himself in a prominent rotation role. He came off the bench for much of the year, but was the next guy up to jump into the top unit when either starting wing, Allen Crabbe or DeMarre Carroll, missed a contest. As a result, Harris picked up 14 starts across 78 games and found himself averaging a career-high 25.3 minutes per game. The 26-year-old's ability to open the floor with his three-point shooting is his main calling card. He shot a scorching hot 41.9 percent from deep and dropped 1.9 three-pointers per game. He also shot just under 50 percent from the field and 82.7 percent from the free-throw, so to say he was efficient would be an understatement. However, Harris added just 10.8 points, 3.3 rebounds and 1.6 assists, so his contributions for Fantasy purposes lied for the most part in his three-point totals. Still, the Nets liked his overall development and opted to re-sign him to a two-year, $16 million extension this offseason. With Crabbe and Carroll back, Harris should slot into his reserve wing role to start the year once again and he'll battle Caris LeVert for the backup wing minutes. Look for Harris to be a deep league option as a deep ball specialist, but his lack of contributions elsewhere will limit his utility in shallower leagues.
CHR (F, SF, PF)
G
77
Min
24.5
FPTS
891.0
REB
421.0
AST
86.0
STL
52.0
BLK
33.0
TO
55.0
FGM
283.0
FGA
569.0
FTM
124.0
FTA
174.0
Though Kidd-Gilchrist has started in all but four of his 357 appearances with the Hornets, he remains a project offensively. Last year, he posted 9.2 points per game for the second straight season, though managed to set a career-high 50.4 field-goal percentage (aside from the 2015-16 campaign, where he played seven games). While he’s rightly touted as a great defender, it often doesn't translate into stats, as he averaged just a combined 1.1 steals/blocks in 2017-18. His rebounding also took a dip last year with a career-low 4.1 boards per game. However, that can probably be chalked up to the presence of Dwight Howard, who will not be with the team for the upcoming campaign. History would suggest Kidd-Gilchrist will continue starting for Charlotte, though the hiring of new coach James Borrego could be a sign of a rotational shake-up for a team that’s had minimal success recently. Regardless, there’s little to suggest the Kentucky product is due for a breakout year.
Though Kidd-Gilchrist has started in all but four of his 357 appearances with the Hornets, he remains a project offensively. Last year, he posted 9.2 points per game for the second straight season, though managed to set a career-high 50.4 field-goal percentage (aside from the 2015-16 campaign, where he played seven games). While he’s rightly touted as a great defender, it often doesn't translate into stats, as he averaged just a combined 1.1 steals/blocks in 2017-18. His rebounding also took a dip last year with a career-low 4.1 boards per game. However, that can probably be chalked up to the presence of Dwight Howard, who will not be with the team for the upcoming campaign. History would suggest Kidd-Gilchrist will continue starting for Charlotte, though the hiring of new coach James Borrego could be a sign of a rotational shake-up for a team that’s had minimal success recently. Regardless, there’s little to suggest the Kentucky product is due for a breakout year.
SAN (F, PF, SF)
G
64
Min
24.4
FPTS
891.0
REB
338.0
AST
93.0
STL
58.0
BLK
48.0
TO
99.0
FGM
327.0
FGA
688.0
FTM
146.0
FTA
184.0
After spending just over three years in Sacramento, Gay decided to join a playoff contender in the Spurs and took a fairly significant pay cut in doing so. Even with the change of scenery, injuries once again crept into the picture and Gay ended up missing a stretch of 23 games while dealing with bursitis in his left heel. That marked his second straight season playing less than 60 games. In addition to the the extended absence, Gay also saw his workload take a significant hit. The veteran averaged just 21.6 minutes, which was far-and-away a career low -- Gay averaged 33.8 minutes in his final season with Sacramento in 2016-17. He finished the campaign averaging 11.5 points, 5.1 rebounds and 1.3 assists, while knocking down just 31.4 percent of his three-pointers. That kept him out of the picture in all but deeper Fantasy leagues, though his contributions as a mentor and as a reliable bench presence still made him a valuable basketball player for the Spurs. Looking forward to the upcoming season, Gay should have a chance at a bounce-back showing. The Spurs dealt superstar Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors in exchange for DeMar DeRozan. DeRozan should slot into the starting lineup at shooting guard, but Leonard's absence, as well as the departure of Kyle Anderson in free agency, means Gay has a clearer path to playing time at the two forward positions and seems destined to see a bump in his playing time. It will likely only be a slight jump considering the 31-year-old is coming off of two straight injury-plagued seasons, but it's encouraging nonetheless. All of that said, owners still may want to temper expectations a bit because of Gay's injury history and coach Gregg Popovich's propensity to rest his veterans at random points throughout the season.
After spending just over three years in Sacramento, Gay decided to join a playoff contender in the Spurs and took a fairly significant pay cut in doing so. Even with the change of scenery, injuries once again crept into the picture and Gay ended up missing a stretch of 23 games while dealing with bursitis in his left heel. That marked his second straight season playing less than 60 games. In addition to the the extended absence, Gay also saw his workload take a significant hit. The veteran averaged just 21.6 minutes, which was far-and-away a career low -- Gay averaged 33.8 minutes in his final season with Sacramento in 2016-17. He finished the campaign averaging 11.5 points, 5.1 rebounds and 1.3 assists, while knocking down just 31.4 percent of his three-pointers. That kept him out of the picture in all but deeper Fantasy leagues, though his contributions as a mentor and as a reliable bench presence still made him a valuable basketball player for the Spurs. Looking forward to the upcoming season, Gay should have a chance at a bounce-back showing. The Spurs dealt superstar Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors in exchange for DeMar DeRozan. DeRozan should slot into the starting lineup at shooting guard, but Leonard's absence, as well as the departure of Kyle Anderson in free agency, means Gay has a clearer path to playing time at the two forward positions and seems destined to see a bump in his playing time. It will likely only be a slight jump considering the 31-year-old is coming off of two straight injury-plagued seasons, but it's encouraging nonetheless. All of that said, owners still may want to temper expectations a bit because of Gay's injury history and coach Gregg Popovich's propensity to rest his veterans at random points throughout the season.
LAL (G, SG, SF)
G
77
Min
25.5
FPTS
887.0
REB
353.0
AST
115.0
STL
63.0
BLK
22.0
TO
63.0
FGM
248.0
FGA
526.0
FTM
106.0
FTA
139.0
Hart, after four seasons at Villanova, was the 30th overall pick in last year’s draft. During his senior campaign, he was given the Julius Erving (Best Small Forward) Award, averaging 18.7 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.6 steals. He also flashed impressive range, hitting 2.1 threes per tilt at 40.4 percent. Hart posted 7.9 points, 4.2 rebounds and 1.3 assists per contest for the Lakers during his rookie campaign, but was especially impressive towards the end of the year. During his final 18 appearances (13 starts), he averaged 14.1 points (50.6 FG%, 44.0 3P%), 7.3 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.0 steal across 33.3 minutes -- showing off the potential he demonstrated in college. However, he was given that workload largely due to a myriad of injuries on the Lakers. That factor, combined with LeBron James (plus other veterans) joining the team, could result in Hart trending closer to 20 minutes per game rather than 30. Assuming that’s the case, the second-year man can probably be avoided in most standard Fantasy formats.
Hart, after four seasons at Villanova, was the 30th overall pick in last year’s draft. During his senior campaign, he was given the Julius Erving (Best Small Forward) Award, averaging 18.7 points, 6.4 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.6 steals. He also flashed impressive range, hitting 2.1 threes per tilt at 40.4 percent. Hart posted 7.9 points, 4.2 rebounds and 1.3 assists per contest for the Lakers during his rookie campaign, but was especially impressive towards the end of the year. During his final 18 appearances (13 starts), he averaged 14.1 points (50.6 FG%, 44.0 3P%), 7.3 rebounds, 2.1 assists and 1.0 steal across 33.3 minutes -- showing off the potential he demonstrated in college. However, he was given that workload largely due to a myriad of injuries on the Lakers. That factor, combined with LeBron James (plus other veterans) joining the team, could result in Hart trending closer to 20 minutes per game rather than 30. Assuming that’s the case, the second-year man can probably be avoided in most standard Fantasy formats.
MIL (F, SF, PF, C)
G
73
Min
23.7
FPTS
883.0
REB
412.0
AST
90.0
STL
61.0
BLK
26.0
TO
72.0
FGM
272.0
FGA
613.0
FTM
103.0
FTA
135.0
Between Atlanta and Philadelphia, Ilyasova appeared in 69 games last season, averaging 25.1 minutes per game. He continued to be a consistent source of points, threes and rebounds. Since 2014-15, Ilyasova has posted at least 10.4 points, 1.3 threes and 4.8 rebounds per game. New coach Mike Budenholzer, who coached Ilyasova for 46 games last season, has a several directions he can take the starting lineup, which could allow the 31-year-old to start at power forward from Day 1. Even if Ilyasova comes off the bench, he should be a lock for sixth-man minutes in the frontcourt. While Ilyasova doesn't rein in as many rebounds as he used to, the veteran is still a candidate for some big games, as he recorded 10 games with at least 10 rebounds last season, plus 11 games with at least 20 points.
Between Atlanta and Philadelphia, Ilyasova appeared in 69 games last season, averaging 25.1 minutes per game. He continued to be a consistent source of points, threes and rebounds. Since 2014-15, Ilyasova has posted at least 10.4 points, 1.3 threes and 4.8 rebounds per game. New coach Mike Budenholzer, who coached Ilyasova for 46 games last season, has a several directions he can take the starting lineup, which could allow the 31-year-old to start at power forward from Day 1. Even if Ilyasova comes off the bench, he should be a lock for sixth-man minutes in the frontcourt. While Ilyasova doesn't rein in as many rebounds as he used to, the veteran is still a candidate for some big games, as he recorded 10 games with at least 10 rebounds last season, plus 11 games with at least 20 points.
SAN (C, C)
G
78
Min
19.5
FPTS
882.0
REB
392.0
AST
57.0
STL
39.0
BLK
100.0
TO
85.0
FGM
247.0
FGA
381.0
FTM
60.0
FTA
101.0
In his second NBA season, Poeltl played in all 82 games, upping his averages to 6.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.2 blocks across 18.6 minutes. He struggled mightily as a free-throw shooter at 59.4 percent, but he did finish at a solid 65.9 percent from the field. He showed plenty of improvement with his all-around game and provided the rim-protection that the Raptors coveted when selecting him with the ninth overall pick in the 2016 NBA Draft. However, with Toronto getting knocked out of the playoffs by the Cavaliers once again, the organization opted to make some significant roster moves. One of those was acquiring superstar Kawhi Leonard, which sent DeMar DeRozan and Poeltl to the Spurs in the corresponding move. Look for Poeltl to have a slightly increased role following the move considering he's joining a San Antonio squad that doesn't have a ton of depth at center outside of LaMarcus Aldridge and an aging Pau Gasol. More minutes means added production, though Poeltl will still likely struggle to be anything more than a block specialist in the deepest of leagues.
In his second NBA season, Poeltl played in all 82 games, upping his averages to 6.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.2 blocks across 18.6 minutes. He struggled mightily as a free-throw shooter at 59.4 percent, but he did finish at a solid 65.9 percent from the field. He showed plenty of improvement with his all-around game and provided the rim-protection that the Raptors coveted when selecting him with the ninth overall pick in the 2016 NBA Draft. However, with Toronto getting knocked out of the playoffs by the Cavaliers once again, the organization opted to make some significant roster moves. One of those was acquiring superstar Kawhi Leonard, which sent DeMar DeRozan and Poeltl to the Spurs in the corresponding move. Look for Poeltl to have a slightly increased role following the move considering he's joining a San Antonio squad that doesn't have a ton of depth at center outside of LaMarcus Aldridge and an aging Pau Gasol. More minutes means added production, though Poeltl will still likely struggle to be anything more than a block specialist in the deepest of leagues.
ORL (G, PG)
G
75
Min
26.3
FPTS
881.0
REB
179.0
AST
322.0
STL
61.0
BLK
0.0
TO
138.0
FGM
264.0
FGA
605.0
FTM
183.0
FTA
212.0
Augustin’s leap into Fantasy relevance began once Magic brass opted to deal starting point guard Elfrid Payton to the Suns in exchange for a second-round pick. Post All-Star break, Augustin started all 25 games he appeared in and averaged 12.8 points, 5.0 assists and 2.7 rebounds while shooting 48.9 percent from the field and drilling 1.9 threes per game at 45.3 percent. While Augustin being 30 years old doesn't quite fit Orlando’s rebuild, the only other point guard the Magic acquired over the offseason is Jerian Grant, a 25-year-old who saw 22.8 minutes per contest with the Bulls last season. As a result, it’s possible that the two split time during the 2018-19 campaign, unless Grant takes a significant leap. Considering the situation, drafting Augustin in standard Fantasy leagues is ill-advised, though he might be worth a flier in late rounds of deeper leagues as a consistent and efficient source of stats.
Augustin’s leap into Fantasy relevance began once Magic brass opted to deal starting point guard Elfrid Payton to the Suns in exchange for a second-round pick. Post All-Star break, Augustin started all 25 games he appeared in and averaged 12.8 points, 5.0 assists and 2.7 rebounds while shooting 48.9 percent from the field and drilling 1.9 threes per game at 45.3 percent. While Augustin being 30 years old doesn't quite fit Orlando’s rebuild, the only other point guard the Magic acquired over the offseason is Jerian Grant, a 25-year-old who saw 22.8 minutes per contest with the Bulls last season. As a result, it’s possible that the two split time during the 2018-19 campaign, unless Grant takes a significant leap. Considering the situation, drafting Augustin in standard Fantasy leagues is ill-advised, though he might be worth a flier in late rounds of deeper leagues as a consistent and efficient source of stats.
NY (G, PG, SF, PF)
G
75
Min
24.5
FPTS
876.0
REB
312.0
AST
118.0
STL
90.0
BLK
34.0
TO
95.0
FGM
306.0
FGA
684.0
FTM
98.0
FTA
116.0
The fifth overall selection in the 2015 NBA Draft, Hezonja put together a few very pedestrian seasons to start his career, which prompted the Magic to decline his fourth-year option prior to the 2017-18 campaign. As expected, Hezonja started the year off as a minor contributor and over the first 20 games of the season, he averaged just 2.9 points and 1.8 rebounds across 9.8 minutes. However, in mid-December the Magic finally started to get him integrated into the rotation more and 23-year-old eventually became a significant piece of the rotation, mainly due to the fact that star power forward Aaron Gordon was dealing with injuries. In the final 55 games of the year, Hezonja nearly tripled his workload with 26.5 minutes and went on to average 12.1 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.7 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.5 three-pointers. That prompted him to have plenty of suitors this offseason and likely made the Magic regret declining his option. Hezonja now heads to New York where he'll likely operate as one of the first bigs off the bench. There's a chance the Knicks opt to throw Kevin Knox, the team's ninth overall pick this year, into the fire early and give him rights to the starting power forward job. Still, the rookie will likely deal with some growing pains, which should allow Hezonja to get on the court quite a bit at both small forward and power forward. A workload in the mid-to-low 20's seems realistic, which should keep his numbers fairly close to the stat line he posted in his final year with Orlando. That means Hezonja is likely worth a look in the later rounds of deeper leagues as a player that can contribute solid, but not spectacular numbers across the box score.
The fifth overall selection in the 2015 NBA Draft, Hezonja put together a few very pedestrian seasons to start his career, which prompted the Magic to decline his fourth-year option prior to the 2017-18 campaign. As expected, Hezonja started the year off as a minor contributor and over the first 20 games of the season, he averaged just 2.9 points and 1.8 rebounds across 9.8 minutes. However, in mid-December the Magic finally started to get him integrated into the rotation more and 23-year-old eventually became a significant piece of the rotation, mainly due to the fact that star power forward Aaron Gordon was dealing with injuries. In the final 55 games of the year, Hezonja nearly tripled his workload with 26.5 minutes and went on to average 12.1 points, 4.5 rebounds, 1.7 assists, 1.3 steals and 1.5 three-pointers. That prompted him to have plenty of suitors this offseason and likely made the Magic regret declining his option. Hezonja now heads to New York where he'll likely operate as one of the first bigs off the bench. There's a chance the Knicks opt to throw Kevin Knox, the team's ninth overall pick this year, into the fire early and give him rights to the starting power forward job. Still, the rookie will likely deal with some growing pains, which should allow Hezonja to get on the court quite a bit at both small forward and power forward. A workload in the mid-to-low 20's seems realistic, which should keep his numbers fairly close to the stat line he posted in his final year with Orlando. That means Hezonja is likely worth a look in the later rounds of deeper leagues as a player that can contribute solid, but not spectacular numbers across the box score.
LAL (G, PG)
G
70
Min
24.4
FPTS
875.0
REB
263.0
AST
449.0
STL
70.0
BLK
10.0
TO
151.0
FGM
222.0
FGA
495.0
FTM
28.0
FTA
46.0
Rondo signing with the Lakers marks his sixth team in five years. He spent last season with the Pelicans, starting all but two of his 65 appearances. Seeing 26.2 minutes per game, the veteran averaged 8.3 points, 4.0 rebounds, 8.2 assists and 1.1 steals while shooting 46.8 percent from the field -- his highest clip since 2012-13. However, in joining LA, Rondo's role as a starter may not continue. Lonzo Ball was the Lakers' starter last season, but it's not immediately clear how the signing of LeBron James will affect coach Luke Walton's mindset for a starting five. The situation may ultimately come down to a training camp battle, in which the goal is to find out who fits best next to LeBron. Still, considering Rondo's contract is worth $9 million, the intent is probably for him to hover around sixth-man minutes. Assuming that's the case, he should have enough Fantasy relevance to be worth a late-round selection in deeper formats.
Rondo signing with the Lakers marks his sixth team in five years. He spent last season with the Pelicans, starting all but two of his 65 appearances. Seeing 26.2 minutes per game, the veteran averaged 8.3 points, 4.0 rebounds, 8.2 assists and 1.1 steals while shooting 46.8 percent from the field -- his highest clip since 2012-13. However, in joining LA, Rondo's role as a starter may not continue. Lonzo Ball was the Lakers' starter last season, but it's not immediately clear how the signing of LeBron James will affect coach Luke Walton's mindset for a starting five. The situation may ultimately come down to a training camp battle, in which the goal is to find out who fits best next to LeBron. Still, considering Rondo's contract is worth $9 million, the intent is probably for him to hover around sixth-man minutes. Assuming that's the case, he should have enough Fantasy relevance to be worth a late-round selection in deeper formats.
CHR (C, C)
G
65
Min
15.9
FPTS
873.0
REB
436.0
AST
55.0
STL
40.0
BLK
34.0
TO
83.0
FGM
224.0
FGA
389.0
FTM
155.0
FTA
213.0
An early-season elbow injury and late-season Achilles injury limited the veteran to 64 games during his 10th season. While he was still able to provide all-around production -- 11.6 points, 5.5 assists, 4.8 rebounds, 1.4 threes, 1.0 steals -- each of those categories, except for steals, represented his lowest marks since joining the Hornets in 2015-16. Fantasy owners who are optimistic about Batum can likely chalk up the down year to injuries and the presence of Dwight Howard. Pessimists can point to the fact that Batum is turning 30 and hasn't shot better than 42.6 percent from the field since 2013-14 -- what are the odds he’s getting better? Regardless, Howard’s departure without significant replacement should vault Batum’s usage up to the levels we saw during previous campaigns with Charlotte, where he posted 15.0 points, 6.2 rebounds, 5.8 assists, 1.9 threes and 1.0 steals per tilt.
An early-season elbow injury and late-season Achilles injury limited the veteran to 64 games during his 10th season. While he was still able to provide all-around production -- 11.6 points, 5.5 assists, 4.8 rebounds, 1.4 threes, 1.0 steals -- each of those categories, except for steals, represented his lowest marks since joining the Hornets in 2015-16. Fantasy owners who are optimistic about Batum can likely chalk up the down year to injuries and the presence of Dwight Howard. Pessimists can point to the fact that Batum is turning 30 and hasn't shot better than 42.6 percent from the field since 2013-14 -- what are the odds he’s getting better? Regardless, Howard’s departure without significant replacement should vault Batum’s usage up to the levels we saw during previous campaigns with Charlotte, where he posted 15.0 points, 6.2 rebounds, 5.8 assists, 1.9 threes and 1.0 steals per tilt.
TOR (F, PF, C)
G
81
Min
20.7
FPTS
871.0
REB
364.0
AST
159.0
STL
62.0
BLK
42.0
TO
67.0
FGM
253.0
FGA
498.0
FTM
54.0
FTA
87.0
After playing just 55 games as a rookie, Siakam saw his role grow in his second season in Toronto. He averaged a career-high 20.7 minutes, while adding 7.3 points, 4.5 rebounds and 2.0 assists across 81 games. He finished with a 50.8 percent clip from the field and while he attempted to extend his range (29 attempts), the experiment didn't exactly go well and he shot just 22.0 percent from three-point land. Still, Siakam provided plenty of energy and has a ton of athleticism, so the Raptors could try and tap into that more during the upcoming season. The third-year big man does appear to have an opportunity for more playing time following the organization's big offseason. DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl were traded to the Spurs in exchange for superstar Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. Poeltl's departure, specifically, should afford Siakam more frontcourt minutes considering the Raptors didn't bring any bigs back in the deal. While Siakam will need to continue to develop his shot and become a much more productive three-point shooter, the added workload could boost his numbers elsewhere across the stat sheet and he'll have every chance to take the next step forward in his development. However, his Fantasy expectations shouldn't be too high and he'll still likely be avoidable in all but the deepest of leagues.
After playing just 55 games as a rookie, Siakam saw his role grow in his second season in Toronto. He averaged a career-high 20.7 minutes, while adding 7.3 points, 4.5 rebounds and 2.0 assists across 81 games. He finished with a 50.8 percent clip from the field and while he attempted to extend his range (29 attempts), the experiment didn't exactly go well and he shot just 22.0 percent from three-point land. Still, Siakam provided plenty of energy and has a ton of athleticism, so the Raptors could try and tap into that more during the upcoming season. The third-year big man does appear to have an opportunity for more playing time following the organization's big offseason. DeMar DeRozan and Jakob Poeltl were traded to the Spurs in exchange for superstar Kawhi Leonard and Danny Green. Poeltl's departure, specifically, should afford Siakam more frontcourt minutes considering the Raptors didn't bring any bigs back in the deal. While Siakam will need to continue to develop his shot and become a much more productive three-point shooter, the added workload could boost his numbers elsewhere across the stat sheet and he'll have every chance to take the next step forward in his development. However, his Fantasy expectations shouldn't be too high and he'll still likely be avoidable in all but the deepest of leagues.
PHO (F, SF, PF)
G
67
Min
27.3
FPTS
868.0
REB
286.0
AST
69.0
STL
49.0
BLK
35.0
TO
73.0
FGM
381.0
FGA
774.0
FTM
166.0
FTA
218.0
Warren took the court for just 65 games during the 2017-18 season, marking the fourth straight year where he's been limited to 66 or less contests due to injuries. Despite the injury concerns, the 24-year-old put together his best season to date, most notably upping his scoring to a career-high 19.6 points per game after finishing the prior campaign with just 14.4 points. Warren also chipped in with 5.1 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.0 steal, while playing 33.0 minutes per outing. However, Warren once again struggled to make an impact as a three-point shooter, hitting a total of 20 deep balls at a brutal rate of just 22.2 percent from beyond the arc. That was a second straight season of shooting well below 30 percent and at this point, there's no indication that number is going to tick upwards. With the Suns selecting Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft, there are some concerns that Warren's usage drops with another outstanding player to battle with for touches in the frontcourt. In addition, the Suns also brought in veteran Trevor Ariza as a free agent, who is another player that could steal some minutes at the forward positions from Warren. Considering his three-point struggles and lack of significant cross-category production already, a potential drop in scoring due to the aforementioned additions would be devastating to his Fantasy value in most leagues. Look for Warren's numbers to potentially fall back to the production he had in 2016-17 rather than what he finished with this past season.
Warren took the court for just 65 games during the 2017-18 season, marking the fourth straight year where he's been limited to 66 or less contests due to injuries. Despite the injury concerns, the 24-year-old put together his best season to date, most notably upping his scoring to a career-high 19.6 points per game after finishing the prior campaign with just 14.4 points. Warren also chipped in with 5.1 rebounds, 1.3 assists and 1.0 steal, while playing 33.0 minutes per outing. However, Warren once again struggled to make an impact as a three-point shooter, hitting a total of 20 deep balls at a brutal rate of just 22.2 percent from beyond the arc. That was a second straight season of shooting well below 30 percent and at this point, there's no indication that number is going to tick upwards. With the Suns selecting Deandre Ayton with the No. 1 overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft, there are some concerns that Warren's usage drops with another outstanding player to battle with for touches in the frontcourt. In addition, the Suns also brought in veteran Trevor Ariza as a free agent, who is another player that could steal some minutes at the forward positions from Warren. Considering his three-point struggles and lack of significant cross-category production already, a potential drop in scoring due to the aforementioned additions would be devastating to his Fantasy value in most leagues. Look for Warren's numbers to potentially fall back to the production he had in 2016-17 rather than what he finished with this past season.
PHI (G, PG, SG)
G
72
Min
24.6
FPTS
865.0
REB
281.0
AST
304.0
STL
84.0
BLK
28.0
TO
119.0
FGM
311.0
FGA
740.0
FTM
110.0
FTA
166.0
A stellar freshman season at Washington earned Fultz the No. 1 overall selection in the 2017 NBA Draft and immediately made him one of the more intriguing rookies to consider drafting for Fantasy leagues. However, the season didn't turn out like most had hoped and a handful of different issues kept Fultz off the floor for all but 14 games. Most notably was a sore right shoulder, which impacted his ability to shoot consistently and make plays for his teammates. Adding on to that, those issues also impacted Fultz's confidence and that mental hurdle itself was also a contributor in the youngster's extended stay on the sidelines. While it was essentially a lost season, there were at least a few things put on tape that Fultz will be able to build on, including a surprising 13-point, 10-rebound, 10-assist triple-double that he notched in the final game of the regular season. With an offseason to clear his mind and essentially start over, look for Fultz to become a regular contributor in the Sixers' rotation. He's reportedly rebuilt his jumper from scratch, which is always concerning for those considering taking a risk on him before seeing the final product. That said, the Sixers don't necessarily have a ton of quality depth in the backcourt, so Fultz seems likely to take over backup point guard duties right away if T.J. McConnell doesn't somehow hold him off. Look for Fultz to be a late-round flier in most Fantasy formats due to his overall upside, but there's definitely concerns about him staying on the court and having any sort of consistency while debuting a brand new shooting stroke.
A stellar freshman season at Washington earned Fultz the No. 1 overall selection in the 2017 NBA Draft and immediately made him one of the more intriguing rookies to consider drafting for Fantasy leagues. However, the season didn't turn out like most had hoped and a handful of different issues kept Fultz off the floor for all but 14 games. Most notably was a sore right shoulder, which impacted his ability to shoot consistently and make plays for his teammates. Adding on to that, those issues also impacted Fultz's confidence and that mental hurdle itself was also a contributor in the youngster's extended stay on the sidelines. While it was essentially a lost season, there were at least a few things put on tape that Fultz will be able to build on, including a surprising 13-point, 10-rebound, 10-assist triple-double that he notched in the final game of the regular season. With an offseason to clear his mind and essentially start over, look for Fultz to become a regular contributor in the Sixers' rotation. He's reportedly rebuilt his jumper from scratch, which is always concerning for those considering taking a risk on him before seeing the final product. That said, the Sixers don't necessarily have a ton of quality depth in the backcourt, so Fultz seems likely to take over backup point guard duties right away if T.J. McConnell doesn't somehow hold him off. Look for Fultz to be a late-round flier in most Fantasy formats due to his overall upside, but there's definitely concerns about him staying on the court and having any sort of consistency while debuting a brand new shooting stroke.
PHO (F, SF, PF)
G
77
Min
31.7
FPTS
862.0
REB
316.0
AST
142.0
STL
108.0
BLK
14.0
TO
56.0
FGM
253.0
FGA
627.0
FTM
78.0
FTA
96.0
Ariza has spent the last four seasons operating as a 3-and-D wing for the Rockets. During the 2017-18 campaign specifically, the veteran knocked down 2.5 three-pointers per game at a 36.8 percent clip, while chipping in with 1.5 steals defensively. He added 11.7 points, 4.4 rebounds and 1.6 assists as well, thriving in an uptempo offense alongside superstars James Harden and Chris Paul. However, Ariza elected to go for a big payday this offseason, rather than rejoining a championship contender in Houston, so he's set to head to Phoenix on a one-year, $14 million contract. Ariza won't be playing alongside guys with the talent level of Harden or Paul, but Devin Booker is an established up-and-coming star and the Suns also just drafted No. 1 overall pick Deandre Ayton back in June. What Ariza's role will be in Phoenix is somewhat unclear at this point in time, but his main expectation will likely be to provide veteran leadership to a young roster and also a defensive intensity that rubs off on his teammates. Considering the Suns youth and the fact that they aren't competing for a championship, there's a chance the staff opts to turn towards developing those players at points during the season rather than giving Ariza extended workloads, so that could negatively impact the veteran's Fantasy value. Still, his ability to open the floor and make an impact on defense could earn him a starting role at one of the forward spots from the get go. Ariza is unlikely to flirt with top-100 value, so he's likely only someone to consider late in drafts as a steals and three-pointer specialist with strong percentages.
Ariza has spent the last four seasons operating as a 3-and-D wing for the Rockets. During the 2017-18 campaign specifically, the veteran knocked down 2.5 three-pointers per game at a 36.8 percent clip, while chipping in with 1.5 steals defensively. He added 11.7 points, 4.4 rebounds and 1.6 assists as well, thriving in an uptempo offense alongside superstars James Harden and Chris Paul. However, Ariza elected to go for a big payday this offseason, rather than rejoining a championship contender in Houston, so he's set to head to Phoenix on a one-year, $14 million contract. Ariza won't be playing alongside guys with the talent level of Harden or Paul, but Devin Booker is an established up-and-coming star and the Suns also just drafted No. 1 overall pick Deandre Ayton back in June. What Ariza's role will be in Phoenix is somewhat unclear at this point in time, but his main expectation will likely be to provide veteran leadership to a young roster and also a defensive intensity that rubs off on his teammates. Considering the Suns youth and the fact that they aren't competing for a championship, there's a chance the staff opts to turn towards developing those players at points during the season rather than giving Ariza extended workloads, so that could negatively impact the veteran's Fantasy value. Still, his ability to open the floor and make an impact on defense could earn him a starting role at one of the forward spots from the get go. Ariza is unlikely to flirt with top-100 value, so he's likely only someone to consider late in drafts as a steals and three-pointer specialist with strong percentages.
SAN (G, PG, SG)
G
81
Min
23.8
FPTS
861.0
REB
171.0
AST
254.0
STL
61.0
BLK
12.0
TO
118.0
FGM
322.0
FGA
755.0
FTM
111.0
FTA
131.0
With Tony Parker getting older and also playing in just 55 games due to injury, Mills saw his most extensive action since joining the NBA in 2009. He wound up starting 36-of-82 games, while averaging a career-high 25.7 minutes. That translated to 10.0 points, 2.8 assists and 1.9 rebounds, though it was his three-point shooting that kept him on the radar in Fantasy leagues. Mills recorded 1.9 three-pointers per game and hit at a 37.2 percent clip. Still, the Spurs turned to promising rookie Dejounte Murray to work with the top unit over the final few months of the season, which resulted in Mills becoming a fixture in the second unit. San Antonio has clearly committed to Murray as the point guard of the future, so Mills is set for backup duties once again heading into 2018-19. He'll provide a reliable scorer and a ball-handler with the reserves, though he's unlikely to see much more court time than the 25.7 minutes he averaged a year prior, even with Parker signing elsewhere in free agency. As a result, Mills will simply be a three-point specialist for those in deeper leagues looking for a boost in that category.
With Tony Parker getting older and also playing in just 55 games due to injury, Mills saw his most extensive action since joining the NBA in 2009. He wound up starting 36-of-82 games, while averaging a career-high 25.7 minutes. That translated to 10.0 points, 2.8 assists and 1.9 rebounds, though it was his three-point shooting that kept him on the radar in Fantasy leagues. Mills recorded 1.9 three-pointers per game and hit at a 37.2 percent clip. Still, the Spurs turned to promising rookie Dejounte Murray to work with the top unit over the final few months of the season, which resulted in Mills becoming a fixture in the second unit. San Antonio has clearly committed to Murray as the point guard of the future, so Mills is set for backup duties once again heading into 2018-19. He'll provide a reliable scorer and a ball-handler with the reserves, though he's unlikely to see much more court time than the 25.7 minutes he averaged a year prior, even with Parker signing elsewhere in free agency. As a result, Mills will simply be a three-point specialist for those in deeper leagues looking for a boost in that category.
ATL (F, SG, SF)
G
71
Min
26.4
FPTS
853.0
REB
262.0
AST
206.0
STL
105.0
BLK
47.0
TO
165.0
FGM
296.0
FGA
709.0
FTM
161.0
FTA
211.0
Bazemore was one of the top candidates to see a significant uptick in production when Paul Millsap, Dwight Howard and Tim Hardaway Jr. all departed last offseason. He ended up averaging a career-high 12.9 points, but that was only a minor increase in scoring and he didn't take as much of a step forward as most expected. Still, Bazemore chipped in across the box score with 3.8 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.5 steals, while knocking down 1.7 three-pointers at a career-best 39.4 percent clip. That occasionally made him a viable DFS option, as well as a productive all-around contributor in deeper season-long leagues. Most notably, Bazemore's 1.5 steals per contest placed him 14th in the league. The Hawks roster underwent some changes once again this offseason. Starting point guard Dennis Schroder was traded to the Thunder, while the Hawks added Jeremy Lin and selected both Trae Young and Kevin Huerter with the fifth and 19th overall picks, respectively, in the 2018 NBA Draft. Young figures to start at point guard right away and Lin is likely to operate as the team's sixth man, so look for Bazemore to reclaim the starting shooting guard role. He'll likely have no trouble reaching the 27.5 minutes he averaged last year, which means a similar stat line seems doable. That said, it is worth it to note that the Hawks could try and get a guy like Huerter more minutes as the season moves along, which could potentially cut into Bazemore's playing time late in the year. Either way, Bazemore's steal and three-point totals should continue to earn him a selection in the mid-to-late rounds of most drafts, so keep him on the Fantasy radar.
Bazemore was one of the top candidates to see a significant uptick in production when Paul Millsap, Dwight Howard and Tim Hardaway Jr. all departed last offseason. He ended up averaging a career-high 12.9 points, but that was only a minor increase in scoring and he didn't take as much of a step forward as most expected. Still, Bazemore chipped in across the box score with 3.8 rebounds, 3.5 assists and 1.5 steals, while knocking down 1.7 three-pointers at a career-best 39.4 percent clip. That occasionally made him a viable DFS option, as well as a productive all-around contributor in deeper season-long leagues. Most notably, Bazemore's 1.5 steals per contest placed him 14th in the league. The Hawks roster underwent some changes once again this offseason. Starting point guard Dennis Schroder was traded to the Thunder, while the Hawks added Jeremy Lin and selected both Trae Young and Kevin Huerter with the fifth and 19th overall picks, respectively, in the 2018 NBA Draft. Young figures to start at point guard right away and Lin is likely to operate as the team's sixth man, so look for Bazemore to reclaim the starting shooting guard role. He'll likely have no trouble reaching the 27.5 minutes he averaged last year, which means a similar stat line seems doable. That said, it is worth it to note that the Hawks could try and get a guy like Huerter more minutes as the season moves along, which could potentially cut into Bazemore's playing time late in the year. Either way, Bazemore's steal and three-point totals should continue to earn him a selection in the mid-to-late rounds of most drafts, so keep him on the Fantasy radar.
ORL (G, PG)
G
75
Min
23.6
FPTS
841.0
REB
181.0
AST
359.0
STL
66.0
BLK
8.0
TO
93.0
FGM
223.0
FGA
529.0
FTM
155.0
FTA
197.0
With the Bulls both tanking and dealing with injuries last season, Grant was able to set a career high in minutes per game in 2017-18 (22.8). He significantly improved his skills as a distributor, seeing his assists per 36 minutes rise from 4.7 over his first two seasons to 7.3 last year. However, his scoring ability remains a work in progress, as he shot only 41.5 percent from the field, 32.4 percent from deep and 74.5 percent from the free-throw line, marking a decline in true shooting percentage from 2016-17. This year, the Notre Dame product should have another shot at seeing significant run, as he was traded to Orlando -- a team that dealt away starting point guard Elfrid Payton at last season’s trade deadline. Grant’s only other real competition on the rebuilding Magic is veteran D.J. Augustin, whose workload could fall by the wayside late in the season if it becomes clear the Magic are out of the playoff picture. Where Grant will end up in Fantasy drafts will likely be determined by owners’ optimism regarding his workload. If there’s a belief he will see around 30 minutes per night, selecting him with a late-round flier in a standard league could be justified. Otherwise, it may be best to utilize a wait-and-see approach, keeping an eye on Grant while he’s on the waiver wire. For reference, per 36 minutes last season, he averaged 13.2 points, 7.3 assists, 3.7 rebounds, 1.3 steals and 1.3 threes.
With the Bulls both tanking and dealing with injuries last season, Grant was able to set a career high in minutes per game in 2017-18 (22.8). He significantly improved his skills as a distributor, seeing his assists per 36 minutes rise from 4.7 over his first two seasons to 7.3 last year. However, his scoring ability remains a work in progress, as he shot only 41.5 percent from the field, 32.4 percent from deep and 74.5 percent from the free-throw line, marking a decline in true shooting percentage from 2016-17. This year, the Notre Dame product should have another shot at seeing significant run, as he was traded to Orlando -- a team that dealt away starting point guard Elfrid Payton at last season’s trade deadline. Grant’s only other real competition on the rebuilding Magic is veteran D.J. Augustin, whose workload could fall by the wayside late in the season if it becomes clear the Magic are out of the playoff picture. Where Grant will end up in Fantasy drafts will likely be determined by owners’ optimism regarding his workload. If there’s a belief he will see around 30 minutes per night, selecting him with a late-round flier in a standard league could be justified. Otherwise, it may be best to utilize a wait-and-see approach, keeping an eye on Grant while he’s on the waiver wire. For reference, per 36 minutes last season, he averaged 13.2 points, 7.3 assists, 3.7 rebounds, 1.3 steals and 1.3 threes.
DET (G, PG)
G
81
Min
22.0
FPTS
839.0
REB
196.0
AST
314.0
STL
56.0
BLK
17.0
TO
94.0
FGM
326.0
FGA
699.0
FTM
71.0
FTA
101.0
For the second straight season, Smith was forced into an expanded workload because of an injury to starting point guard Reggie Jackson. The latter ended up sitting out 37 games, which allowed Smith some run with the top unit once again. Smith finished with 35 starts across 82 games and essentially duplicated his numbers from a year prior with averages of 10.9 points, 2.7 rebounds and 4.4 assists across 24.9 minutes. He also showed improvement as a three-point shooter, going 34.7 percent from beyond the arc compared to the brutal 26.7 percent clip he posted in 2016-17. However, with Jackson reportedly back to full strength and set to reclaim his spot with the starting five, Smith should shift back to a permanent bench role ahead of the upcoming campaign. A drop in playing time and production should be expected, so Smith's already lacking Fantasy profile will likely only get worse. Look for him to serve as the backup point guard and provide a reliable insurance policy behind the oft-injured Jackson, though he isn't going to be relevant in the majority of leagues.
For the second straight season, Smith was forced into an expanded workload because of an injury to starting point guard Reggie Jackson. The latter ended up sitting out 37 games, which allowed Smith some run with the top unit once again. Smith finished with 35 starts across 82 games and essentially duplicated his numbers from a year prior with averages of 10.9 points, 2.7 rebounds and 4.4 assists across 24.9 minutes. He also showed improvement as a three-point shooter, going 34.7 percent from beyond the arc compared to the brutal 26.7 percent clip he posted in 2016-17. However, with Jackson reportedly back to full strength and set to reclaim his spot with the starting five, Smith should shift back to a permanent bench role ahead of the upcoming campaign. A drop in playing time and production should be expected, so Smith's already lacking Fantasy profile will likely only get worse. Look for him to serve as the backup point guard and provide a reliable insurance policy behind the oft-injured Jackson, though he isn't going to be relevant in the majority of leagues.
MIA (G, PG, SG)
G
74
Min
27.1
FPTS
837.0
REB
242.0
AST
161.0
STL
59.0
BLK
33.0
TO
79.0
FGM
307.0
FGA
695.0
FTM
101.0
FTA
126.0
As a result of Dion Waiters being limited to 30 games last season prior to undergoing ankle surgery, Johnson started 39 of his 72 appearances and saw 28.5 minutes per contest. Though he made an improvement of 1.4 percent to his true shooting, Johnson averaged 2.0 fewer points per game last season compared to 2016-17 as a result of fewer field-goal and free-throw attempts. The fifth-year guard out of Fresno State also saw his rebounds (3.4), assists (2.3) and steals (0.8) per game fall, despite averaging only 1.3 fewer minutes than in 2016-17. Things don't seem likely to improve, either, as Josh Richardson emerged as a legitimate starter for the Heat last season and Waiters will be returning from his injury. With uncertainty surrounding his role, Johnson can probably be avoided until the latest rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
As a result of Dion Waiters being limited to 30 games last season prior to undergoing ankle surgery, Johnson started 39 of his 72 appearances and saw 28.5 minutes per contest. Though he made an improvement of 1.4 percent to his true shooting, Johnson averaged 2.0 fewer points per game last season compared to 2016-17 as a result of fewer field-goal and free-throw attempts. The fifth-year guard out of Fresno State also saw his rebounds (3.4), assists (2.3) and steals (0.8) per game fall, despite averaging only 1.3 fewer minutes than in 2016-17. Things don't seem likely to improve, either, as Josh Richardson emerged as a legitimate starter for the Heat last season and Waiters will be returning from his injury. With uncertainty surrounding his role, Johnson can probably be avoided until the latest rounds of most Fantasy drafts.
MEM (F, SF, PF)
G
61
Min
31.8
FPTS
837.0
REB
466.0
AST
79.0
STL
32.0
BLK
25.0
TO
77.0
FGM
233.0
FGA
490.0
FTM
85.0
FTA
112.0
Green continued his trend of improving his year-over-year numbers last season, averaging a career-best 10.3 points (on a career-high 8.9 shot attempts), 8.4 rebounds and 1.4 assists across 28.0 minutes over 55 games. Green also attempted to space the floor slightly more than in prior years, establishing a new high-water mark on three-point tries (2.3). The 28-year-old big man improved his presence on the defensive glass as well (5.8 defensive rebounds per contest), and despite battling knee concerns that cost him the last six games of the season, he finished the campaign on a strong note – seven double-digit scoring efforts, including five double-doubles, in his last 11 games. However, with the investment of a fourth overall pick in Michigan State product Jaren Jackson this past June, Green appears destined to head back to a rotational role that comprised his first two-plus pro seasons. That should still equate to a solid allotment of minutes, considering Green’s ability to also fill in at small forward and his valuable scoring and rebounding contributions.
Green continued his trend of improving his year-over-year numbers last season, averaging a career-best 10.3 points (on a career-high 8.9 shot attempts), 8.4 rebounds and 1.4 assists across 28.0 minutes over 55 games. Green also attempted to space the floor slightly more than in prior years, establishing a new high-water mark on three-point tries (2.3). The 28-year-old big man improved his presence on the defensive glass as well (5.8 defensive rebounds per contest), and despite battling knee concerns that cost him the last six games of the season, he finished the campaign on a strong note – seven double-digit scoring efforts, including five double-doubles, in his last 11 games. However, with the investment of a fourth overall pick in Michigan State product Jaren Jackson this past June, Green appears destined to head back to a rotational role that comprised his first two-plus pro seasons. That should still equate to a solid allotment of minutes, considering Green’s ability to also fill in at small forward and his valuable scoring and rebounding contributions.
MIA (F, PG, SF, PF)
G
72
Min
26.2
FPTS
837.0
REB
414.0
AST
166.0
STL
61.0
BLK
37.0
TO
86.0
FGM
236.0
FGA
548.0
FTM
75.0
FTA
117.0
Winslow, who played 18 games due to injury in 2016-17, appeared in 68 games (25 starts) last season -- his third year in the league. While he managed to make 38.0 percent of his threes on 1.9 attempts, his shooting remains somewhat of a concern, as he has yet to shoot better than 43 percent from the field and 69 percent from the charity stripe in a given season. Shooting woes aside, Winslow has been solid rebounder, passer and defender, giving him Fantasy value in deeper formats. Per 36 minutes over the past two seasons (86 games), the Duke product is averaging 7.2 rebounds, 3.3 assists and a combined 1.8 steals/blocks. He played 24.7 minutes per tilt last season -- a number that will be difficult to top given the presence of Josh Richardson, Kelly Olynyk, Dion Waiters and the overall deep Heat bench.
Winslow, who played 18 games due to injury in 2016-17, appeared in 68 games (25 starts) last season -- his third year in the league. While he managed to make 38.0 percent of his threes on 1.9 attempts, his shooting remains somewhat of a concern, as he has yet to shoot better than 43 percent from the field and 69 percent from the charity stripe in a given season. Shooting woes aside, Winslow has been solid rebounder, passer and defender, giving him Fantasy value in deeper formats. Per 36 minutes over the past two seasons (86 games), the Duke product is averaging 7.2 rebounds, 3.3 assists and a combined 1.8 steals/blocks. He played 24.7 minutes per tilt last season -- a number that will be difficult to top given the presence of Josh Richardson, Kelly Olynyk, Dion Waiters and the overall deep Heat bench.
ORL (G, PG, SG, SF)
G
72
Min
28.5
FPTS
835.0
REB
242.0
AST
173.0
STL
59.0
BLK
16.0
TO
148.0
FGM
353.0
FGA
770.0
FTM
188.0
FTA
244.0
Simmons, who went undrafted out of Houston in 2012, wrapped up his first campaign outside of the Spurs’ organization last season. In joining Orlando, he saw his role expand from 17.8 minutes per game and eight starts to 29.4 minutes per game and 50 starts. As a result, he had a career year, averaging 13.9 points, 3.5 rebounds and 2.5 assists while shooting a solid 46.5 percent from the field and making 1.0 three per tilt at 33.8 percent. Simmons was also able to put together 13 efforts of at least 20 points -- two of which were 30-point games. Improved playmaking ability was on display as well, with Simmons recording nine performances with between five and nine assists. Despite the breakout campaign, minutes may be harder to come by for Simmons this season. The Magic dealt with a myriad of injuries across all positions last season, allowing Simmons to see extra run. Still, Simmons’ versatility to play shooting guard, small forward and even some point guard should allow him to maintain a sixth-man role. That said, given his relatively low-volume role, he can probably be avoided in most standard Fantasy drafts.
Simmons, who went undrafted out of Houston in 2012, wrapped up his first campaign outside of the Spurs’ organization last season. In joining Orlando, he saw his role expand from 17.8 minutes per game and eight starts to 29.4 minutes per game and 50 starts. As a result, he had a career year, averaging 13.9 points, 3.5 rebounds and 2.5 assists while shooting a solid 46.5 percent from the field and making 1.0 three per tilt at 33.8 percent. Simmons was also able to put together 13 efforts of at least 20 points -- two of which were 30-point games. Improved playmaking ability was on display as well, with Simmons recording nine performances with between five and nine assists. Despite the breakout campaign, minutes may be harder to come by for Simmons this season. The Magic dealt with a myriad of injuries across all positions last season, allowing Simmons to see extra run. Still, Simmons’ versatility to play shooting guard, small forward and even some point guard should allow him to maintain a sixth-man role. That said, given his relatively low-volume role, he can probably be avoided in most standard Fantasy drafts.
MIL (C, C)
G
71
Min
21.1
FPTS
829.0
REB
390.0
AST
87.0
STL
34.0
BLK
83.0
TO
64.0
FGM
212.0
FGA
376.0
FTM
72.0
FTA
120.0
Henson started 69 of 76 appearances with the Bucks last season -- a role that he is highly unlikely to occupy this season due to the signing of Brook Lopez. Though Henson will presumably be the first man off the bench, that could fluctuate depending on Thon Maker’s development. To project Henson’s production, it may be best to look at his stats from 2016-17, when he saw 19.4 minutes per game. Then, he averaged 6.8 points, 5.1 rebounds and 1.3 blocks. As a result, Henson should only be considered in deep Fantasy formats.
Henson started 69 of 76 appearances with the Bucks last season -- a role that he is highly unlikely to occupy this season due to the signing of Brook Lopez. Though Henson will presumably be the first man off the bench, that could fluctuate depending on Thon Maker’s development. To project Henson’s production, it may be best to look at his stats from 2016-17, when he saw 19.4 minutes per game. Then, he averaged 6.8 points, 5.1 rebounds and 1.3 blocks. As a result, Henson should only be considered in deep Fantasy formats.
CHI (F, PF, C)
G
60
Min
26.0
FPTS
828.0
REB
380.0
AST
95.0
STL
38.0
BLK
18.0
TO
79.0
FGM
286.0
FGA
600.0
FTM
89.0
FTA
120.0
Portis continued to build on his game last season -- his third year in the league. The former 22nd overall pick saw a career-high 22.5 minutes per contest and averaged 13.2 points on 47.1 percent shooting from the field, 6.8 rebounds and 1.7 assists. He also recorded 12 double-doubles, nine 20-plus-point performances, and two games with at least 15 rebounds. Despite the emergence of Lauri Markkanen, the signing of Jabari Parker and the drafting of Wendell Carter, Portis’ ability to play both power forward and center should keep affording him opportunities to see the floor. In addition to his impressive rebounding, he’s turned into a passable floor spacer (1.1 threes at 35.9 percent) and free-throw shooter (76.9 percent) -- key aspects for big men in garnering playing time. While it’s ill-advised to assume an uptick in production from Portis given the situation, his overall upside still gives him Fantasy value as a late-round flyer.
Portis continued to build on his game last season -- his third year in the league. The former 22nd overall pick saw a career-high 22.5 minutes per contest and averaged 13.2 points on 47.1 percent shooting from the field, 6.8 rebounds and 1.7 assists. He also recorded 12 double-doubles, nine 20-plus-point performances, and two games with at least 15 rebounds. Despite the emergence of Lauri Markkanen, the signing of Jabari Parker and the drafting of Wendell Carter, Portis’ ability to play both power forward and center should keep affording him opportunities to see the floor. In addition to his impressive rebounding, he’s turned into a passable floor spacer (1.1 threes at 35.9 percent) and free-throw shooter (76.9 percent) -- key aspects for big men in garnering playing time. While it’s ill-advised to assume an uptick in production from Portis given the situation, his overall upside still gives him Fantasy value as a late-round flyer.
DEN (F, SF, PF)
G
73
Min
19.4
FPTS
821.0
REB
339.0
AST
93.0
STL
31.0
BLK
35.0
TO
62.0
FGM
267.0
FGA
560.0
FTM
104.0
FTA
148.0
In his first campaign with Denver, Lyles had trouble finding a bigger role than he occupied during the previous two seasons in Utah. He came off the bench to see 19.1 minutes per game and averaged 9.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.2 assists. The Kentucky product did see a significant boost in efficiency, however, shooting 49.1 percent from the field, 38.1 percent from deep and 69.7 percent from the charity stripe, raising his true shooting percentage to 59.0 compared to 49.1 percent over his first two years. That said, as is the case with all Nuggets frontcourt players not named Nikola Jokic or Paul Millsap, it’s hard to imagine Lyles seeing a much bigger role come 2018-19. His best chance at finding time might be if he can find a way to play at small forward, considering the departure of Wilson Chandler. However, Lyles has only played power forward and center across his first three years as a pro.
In his first campaign with Denver, Lyles had trouble finding a bigger role than he occupied during the previous two seasons in Utah. He came off the bench to see 19.1 minutes per game and averaged 9.9 points, 4.8 rebounds and 1.2 assists. The Kentucky product did see a significant boost in efficiency, however, shooting 49.1 percent from the field, 38.1 percent from deep and 69.7 percent from the charity stripe, raising his true shooting percentage to 59.0 compared to 49.1 percent over his first two years. That said, as is the case with all Nuggets frontcourt players not named Nikola Jokic or Paul Millsap, it’s hard to imagine Lyles seeing a much bigger role come 2018-19. His best chance at finding time might be if he can find a way to play at small forward, considering the departure of Wilson Chandler. However, Lyles has only played power forward and center across his first three years as a pro.
TOR (G, PG, SG)
G
75
Min
21.8
FPTS
810.0
REB
226.0
AST
228.0
STL
82.0
BLK
38.0
TO
89.0
FGM
224.0
FGA
493.0
FTM
107.0
FTA
133.0
Wright was in consideration for the backup point guard role to start the 2017-18 campaign following the departure of Cory Joseph. However, it was Fred VanVleet that stepped up and secured that role. That left Wright to fight for the bulk of his playing time at the shooting guard position, where he did ultimately find some success. In a career-high 20.8 minutes, Wright finished the season with averages of 8.0 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.0 steal. He also upped his efficiency across the board, shooting 46.5 percent from the field, 36.6 percent from three-point land and 82.9 percent from the charity stripe. Wright's most notable outing of the year came Jan. 3 against the Bulls, when he posted a whopping 25-point, 13-rebound double-double. That shows his overall upside, but it's unclear if the minutes will be there once again during the upcoming campaign. The Raptors dealt DeMar DeRozan to the Spurs, but brought back superstar Kawhi Leonard and seasoned veteran Danny Green. Both players have the ability to play shooting guard, which blocks Wright's path to a bigger workload. At this point, Wright seems likely to fit into a similar role, providing steady defense off the bench and solid, but not spectacular, contributions across the box score. That will limit his Fantasy utility to only the deepest of leagues.
Wright was in consideration for the backup point guard role to start the 2017-18 campaign following the departure of Cory Joseph. However, it was Fred VanVleet that stepped up and secured that role. That left Wright to fight for the bulk of his playing time at the shooting guard position, where he did ultimately find some success. In a career-high 20.8 minutes, Wright finished the season with averages of 8.0 points, 2.9 rebounds, 2.9 assists and 1.0 steal. He also upped his efficiency across the board, shooting 46.5 percent from the field, 36.6 percent from three-point land and 82.9 percent from the charity stripe. Wright's most notable outing of the year came Jan. 3 against the Bulls, when he posted a whopping 25-point, 13-rebound double-double. That shows his overall upside, but it's unclear if the minutes will be there once again during the upcoming campaign. The Raptors dealt DeMar DeRozan to the Spurs, but brought back superstar Kawhi Leonard and seasoned veteran Danny Green. Both players have the ability to play shooting guard, which blocks Wright's path to a bigger workload. At this point, Wright seems likely to fit into a similar role, providing steady defense off the bench and solid, but not spectacular, contributions across the box score. That will limit his Fantasy utility to only the deepest of leagues.
CHI (C, C)
G
78
Min
23.1
FPTS
805.0
REB
309.0
AST
132.0
STL
15.0
BLK
57.0
TO
114.0
FGM
323.0
FGA
614.0
FTM
72.0
FTA
96.0
Lopez, who started all 64 games he appeared in, stayed healthy for the vast majority of the year. However, the 30-year-old began sitting out games following the All-Star break in a tanking effort so blatant that the NBA issued a formal warning to the Bulls. However, that didn't stop Chicago, as Lopez played only seven of the final 19 games after the warning. League dynamics aside, Lopez put together a solid season with the Bulls, scoring a career-high 11.8 points per game on 53.0 percent shooting. His rebounding (4.5) and shot-blocking (0.9) took dips, however, the former being his lowest mark since 2011-12 and the latter being his lowest clip since 2010-11. Heading into 2018-19, Lopez looks to be in store for a smaller role, as Chicago drafted center Wendell Carter out of Duke with the seventh overall pick. If Carter’s impressive summer league play is any indication, he appears to be NBA ready. As a result, Lopez can probably be avoided in most standard Fantasy drafts.
Lopez, who started all 64 games he appeared in, stayed healthy for the vast majority of the year. However, the 30-year-old began sitting out games following the All-Star break in a tanking effort so blatant that the NBA issued a formal warning to the Bulls. However, that didn't stop Chicago, as Lopez played only seven of the final 19 games after the warning. League dynamics aside, Lopez put together a solid season with the Bulls, scoring a career-high 11.8 points per game on 53.0 percent shooting. His rebounding (4.5) and shot-blocking (0.9) took dips, however, the former being his lowest mark since 2011-12 and the latter being his lowest clip since 2010-11. Heading into 2018-19, Lopez looks to be in store for a smaller role, as Chicago drafted center Wendell Carter out of Duke with the seventh overall pick. If Carter’s impressive summer league play is any indication, he appears to be NBA ready. As a result, Lopez can probably be avoided in most standard Fantasy drafts.
BOS (F, SF, PF)
G
78
Min
22.2
FPTS
804.0
REB
346.0
AST
86.0
STL
42.0
BLK
14.0
TO
78.0
FGM
294.0
FGA
696.0
FTM
146.0
FTA
184.0
Last year’s arrival of Morris was met with mixed reviews in Boston, given that it meant parting ways with Avery Bradley. But Morris was an ideal complement to fellow-bigs Al Horford and Aron Baynes, allowing Stevens to mix and match lineups based on opponent weaknesses. Fantasy-wise, leaving Detroit’s thin roster meant a slight dip in minutes for Morris. But the reduced playing time also led to better shooting percentages, including a 37 percent success rate from behind the arc. The return of a healthy Gordon Hayward means Morris will almost certainly shift to the bench, and his production is likely to suffer, as a result. Morris can still be a factor in deeper leagues, but his contributions in points and rebounds may not be significant enough to warrant high ownership in some standard formats.
Last year’s arrival of Morris was met with mixed reviews in Boston, given that it meant parting ways with Avery Bradley. But Morris was an ideal complement to fellow-bigs Al Horford and Aron Baynes, allowing Stevens to mix and match lineups based on opponent weaknesses. Fantasy-wise, leaving Detroit’s thin roster meant a slight dip in minutes for Morris. But the reduced playing time also led to better shooting percentages, including a 37 percent success rate from behind the arc. The return of a healthy Gordon Hayward means Morris will almost certainly shift to the bench, and his production is likely to suffer, as a result. Morris can still be a factor in deeper leagues, but his contributions in points and rebounds may not be significant enough to warrant high ownership in some standard formats.
CLE (G, PG)
G
79
Min
27.5
FPTS
804.0
REB
229.0
AST
300.0
STL
71.0
BLK
24.0
TO
213.0
FGM
325.0
FGA
790.0
FTM
187.0
FTA
239.0
In just one year of college ball, Sexton was able to generate national attention with his play at Alabama. He started 32-of-33 games despite being a freshman and wound up with averages of 19.2 points, 3.8 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 0.9 steals across 29.9 minutes. He wasn't the most efficient player when considering his position and shot just 44.7 percent from the field, 33.6 percent from beyond the arc and 77.8 percent from the free-throw line. Still, his athleticism, aggressiveness and passion, as well as his impressive ability to create for himself as a scorer, won over the Cavaliers and ultimately earned him a selection with the eighth overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. His situation with Cleveland should be a positive when considering his Fantasy value. George Hill and Jordan Clarkson currently present some potential roadblocks to playing time, but with superstar LeBron James leaving in free agency, it wouldn't be surprising if the team turned their attention to Sexton and his development. While it may take some to get accustomed to the NBA level and gain the trust with his teammates, look for Sexton to become a relevant Fantasy option as the season progresses. There are some concerns with his size (6-foot-2) and his ability to act as a facilitator rather than just a scorer, but again, the Cavaliers could throw him in the fire early considering his upside. While efficiency issues and turnovers could hurt his value at times, look for Sexton to be an intriguing dynasty draft pick and also a potential high-risk, high-reward type of player in later rounds of other standard drafts.
In just one year of college ball, Sexton was able to generate national attention with his play at Alabama. He started 32-of-33 games despite being a freshman and wound up with averages of 19.2 points, 3.8 rebounds, 3.6 assists and 0.9 steals across 29.9 minutes. He wasn't the most efficient player when considering his position and shot just 44.7 percent from the field, 33.6 percent from beyond the arc and 77.8 percent from the free-throw line. Still, his athleticism, aggressiveness and passion, as well as his impressive ability to create for himself as a scorer, won over the Cavaliers and ultimately earned him a selection with the eighth overall pick in the 2018 NBA Draft. His situation with Cleveland should be a positive when considering his Fantasy value. George Hill and Jordan Clarkson currently present some potential roadblocks to playing time, but with superstar LeBron James leaving in free agency, it wouldn't be surprising if the team turned their attention to Sexton and his development. While it may take some to get accustomed to the NBA level and gain the trust with his teammates, look for Sexton to become a relevant Fantasy option as the season progresses. There are some concerns with his size (6-foot-2) and his ability to act as a facilitator rather than just a scorer, but again, the Cavaliers could throw him in the fire early considering his upside. While efficiency issues and turnovers could hurt his value at times, look for Sexton to be an intriguing dynasty draft pick and also a potential high-risk, high-reward type of player in later rounds of other standard drafts.
NY (G, PG, SG)
G
68
Min
22.4
FPTS
801.0
REB
138.0
AST
305.0
STL
47.0
BLK
8.0
TO
83.0
FGM
309.0
FGA
666.0
FTM
81.0
FTA
112.0
Burke struggled to make much of an impact with the Wizards in 2016-17, which resulted in a lack of suitors when he joined the free agent market in the summer of 2017. After failing to make an opening night roster, Burke joined the G-League and ended up dominating his competition there, averaging 26.6 points and 5.4 assists. As a result, the Knicks, who were dealing with some depth issues in the backcourt, opted to give him a look and signed him for the rest of the season. Burke wound up being a nice surprise in 36 games (nine starts) for New York, posting averages of 12.8 points, 4.7 assists, 2.0 rebounds and 1.1 three-pointers across 21.8 minutes. He also shot 50.3 percent from the field and 36.2 percent from deep, both being more than respectable numbers despite the shortened campaign. After an impressive finish to the season, including a late March game against the Hornets where Burke put up a 42-point, 12-assist double-double, he now comes into the year with a safe spot on the roster. While the Knicks will likely prioritize developing fellow backcourt mate Frank Ntilikina, Burke should still see a fairly significant role and he could even earn a spot in the top unit with a strong camp. Look for him to push for minutes in the mid-20's, which will give him some utility as a late-round option in deeper leagues. He'll also be someone to look out for in DFS contests if he's expected to see an elevated role when considering the massive aforementioned outburst that Burke posted late last season.
Burke struggled to make much of an impact with the Wizards in 2016-17, which resulted in a lack of suitors when he joined the free agent market in the summer of 2017. After failing to make an opening night roster, Burke joined the G-League and ended up dominating his competition there, averaging 26.6 points and 5.4 assists. As a result, the Knicks, who were dealing with some depth issues in the backcourt, opted to give him a look and signed him for the rest of the season. Burke wound up being a nice surprise in 36 games (nine starts) for New York, posting averages of 12.8 points, 4.7 assists, 2.0 rebounds and 1.1 three-pointers across 21.8 minutes. He also shot 50.3 percent from the field and 36.2 percent from deep, both being more than respectable numbers despite the shortened campaign. After an impressive finish to the season, including a late March game against the Hornets where Burke put up a 42-point, 12-assist double-double, he now comes into the year with a safe spot on the roster. While the Knicks will likely prioritize developing fellow backcourt mate Frank Ntilikina, Burke should still see a fairly significant role and he could even earn a spot in the top unit with a strong camp. Look for him to push for minutes in the mid-20's, which will give him some utility as a late-round option in deeper leagues. He'll also be someone to look out for in DFS contests if he's expected to see an elevated role when considering the massive aforementioned outburst that Burke posted late last season.
HOU (F, PF, SF)
G
81
Min
27.8
FPTS
796.0
REB
451.0
AST
76.0
STL
77.0
BLK
26.0
TO
73.0
FGM
177.0
FGA
435.0
FTM
44.0
FTA
59.0
After inking a four-year, $31.9 million contract with the Rockets prior to the 2017-18 campaign, Tucker immediately became a reliable defender with his new team, pairing with the likes of Chris Paul, Luc Richard Mbah a Moute and Corey Brewer to provide the Rockets with a defensive presence that the team sorely lacked previously. That tenacious defense kept Tucker in a significant role for the entire season and even earned him 34 starts across 82 games. While his 6.2 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.0 steal didn't necessarily scream Fantasy upside, he did improve as a three-point shooter while playing in one of the league's fastest-paced offenses. Tucker wound up hitting a career-high 1.4 three-pointers, while also upping his efficiency from beyond the arc to 37.1 percent, which was likely due to the number of uncontested looks he received while playing alongside elite play-makers like James Harden and Chris Paul. Already an improved 3-and-D player, Tucker could transition into a full-time starter for the Rockets during the upcoming campaign. Houston lost fellow defensive players Brewer and Mbah a Moute during free agency, and also indicated that newly-acquired Carmelo Anthony could come off the bench. That would leave Tucker to start at either small forward or power forward. Still, even if Tucker does open the year with the top unit, his minutes will likely only increase by a little bit and his value is still more intriguing in reality than in Fantasy.
After inking a four-year, $31.9 million contract with the Rockets prior to the 2017-18 campaign, Tucker immediately became a reliable defender with his new team, pairing with the likes of Chris Paul, Luc Richard Mbah a Moute and Corey Brewer to provide the Rockets with a defensive presence that the team sorely lacked previously. That tenacious defense kept Tucker in a significant role for the entire season and even earned him 34 starts across 82 games. While his 6.2 points, 5.6 rebounds and 1.0 steal didn't necessarily scream Fantasy upside, he did improve as a three-point shooter while playing in one of the league's fastest-paced offenses. Tucker wound up hitting a career-high 1.4 three-pointers, while also upping his efficiency from beyond the arc to 37.1 percent, which was likely due to the number of uncontested looks he received while playing alongside elite play-makers like James Harden and Chris Paul. Already an improved 3-and-D player, Tucker could transition into a full-time starter for the Rockets during the upcoming campaign. Houston lost fellow defensive players Brewer and Mbah a Moute during free agency, and also indicated that newly-acquired Carmelo Anthony could come off the bench. That would leave Tucker to start at either small forward or power forward. Still, even if Tucker does open the year with the top unit, his minutes will likely only increase by a little bit and his value is still more intriguing in reality than in Fantasy.
NY (F, SF, PF)
G
76
Min
27.8
FPTS
793.0
REB
328.0
AST
91.0
STL
53.0
BLK
17.0
TO
175.0
FGM
382.0
FGA
899.0
FTM
207.0
FTA
266.0
In just one year of college ball at Kentucky, Knox immediately grabbed national attention for his ability to score the ball. In 37 starts, the forward posted an average of 15.8 points, while shooting 44.5 percent from the field and 34.1 percent from the three-point line. He demonstrated the ability to knock down shots from all levels of the court and that should translate well to the NBA game. Knox also has fantastic size and athleticism for the forward positions, which should allow him to get on the court right away and matchup with opposing players at the position without much issue. That potential for early playing time is further magnified by the fact that he's joining a Knicks team who will be without the services of superstar big man Kristaps Porzingis for at least the first few months of the season. That immediately suggests the Knicks won't be in playoff contention and could push the staff to give Knox big minutes out of the gate. While Knox is only 19 years old and will likely make plenty of mistakes early on, his potential to develop into an explosive scorer and a solid rebounder brings him into contention for dynasty leagues, as well as a riskier late-round guy in standard leagues for those betting on a quick transition. Still, with a lack of defensive statistics and the fact that he's almost guaranteed to struggle during stretches of the season considering his age, Fantasy owners will likely need to be patient with Knox.
In just one year of college ball at Kentucky, Knox immediately grabbed national attention for his ability to score the ball. In 37 starts, the forward posted an average of 15.8 points, while shooting 44.5 percent from the field and 34.1 percent from the three-point line. He demonstrated the ability to knock down shots from all levels of the court and that should translate well to the NBA game. Knox also has fantastic size and athleticism for the forward positions, which should allow him to get on the court right away and matchup with opposing players at the position without much issue. That potential for early playing time is further magnified by the fact that he's joining a Knicks team who will be without the services of superstar big man Kristaps Porzingis for at least the first few months of the season. That immediately suggests the Knicks won't be in playoff contention and could push the staff to give Knox big minutes out of the gate. While Knox is only 19 years old and will likely make plenty of mistakes early on, his potential to develop into an explosive scorer and a solid rebounder brings him into contention for dynasty leagues, as well as a riskier late-round guy in standard leagues for those betting on a quick transition. Still, with a lack of defensive statistics and the fact that he's almost guaranteed to struggle during stretches of the season considering his age, Fantasy owners will likely need to be patient with Knox.
ATL (C, C)
G
69
Min
17.1
FPTS
792.0
REB
438.0
AST
69.0
STL
23.0
BLK
52.0
TO
66.0
FGM
170.0
FGA
317.0
FTM
139.0
FTA
195.0
Len has struggled to live up to expectations since being taken with the No. 5 overall pick in the 2013 NBA Draft, but that didn't stop the Suns from extending him a qualifying offer ahead of the 2017-18 campaign in what was a last ditch effort to get some value out of him. However, the 7-foot-1 big man ultimately provided more of the same, operating as a solid backup center that was strong on the boards. Len averaged 8.5 points, 7.5 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 0.9 blocks across 20.2 minutes, while knocking down a career-high 56.6 percent of his field goal attempts. Still, it wasn't enough to earn an extension from the Suns, who drafted fellow center Deandre Ayton with No. 1 overall pick in this year's draft. Atlanta had the cap space and roster flexibility to bring in Len on a short term deal this offseason, inking the 25-year-old to a low risk two-year, $8.5 million contract with the hope of reaching his untapped upside. The expectation is that Len will slot in as Dewayne Dedmon's backup right away, battling for reserve minutes with Miles Plumlee. That would likely keep Len's minutes similar to the 20.2 he averaged a season ago. Considering Len is still fairly young, he could push Dedmon for playing time if he shows some improvement as a whole, so he's still someone to keep a close eye on heading into training camp. Len will be an intriguing DFS option when an injury allows him a start or extended minutes, but otherwise, he'll merely be a solid source for rebounds in deeper leagues. It's also worth it to note that Len has averaged just 67 games across his first five years in the league, so health is a concern.
Len has struggled to live up to expectations since being taken with the No. 5 overall pick in the 2013 NBA Draft, but that didn't stop the Suns from extending him a qualifying offer ahead of the 2017-18 campaign in what was a last ditch effort to get some value out of him. However, the 7-foot-1 big man ultimately provided more of the same, operating as a solid backup center that was strong on the boards. Len averaged 8.5 points, 7.5 rebounds, 1.2 assists and 0.9 blocks across 20.2 minutes, while knocking down a career-high 56.6 percent of his field goal attempts. Still, it wasn't enough to earn an extension from the Suns, who drafted fellow center Deandre Ayton with No. 1 overall pick in this year's draft. Atlanta had the cap space and roster flexibility to bring in Len on a short term deal this offseason, inking the 25-year-old to a low risk two-year, $8.5 million contract with the hope of reaching his untapped upside. The expectation is that Len will slot in as Dewayne Dedmon's backup right away, battling for reserve minutes with Miles Plumlee. That would likely keep Len's minutes similar to the 20.2 he averaged a season ago. Considering Len is still fairly young, he could push Dedmon for playing time if he shows some improvement as a whole, so he's still someone to keep a close eye on heading into training camp. Len will be an intriguing DFS option when an injury allows him a start or extended minutes, but otherwise, he'll merely be a solid source for rebounds in deeper leagues. It's also worth it to note that Len has averaged just 67 games across his first five years in the league, so health is a concern.
ORL (F, SF, PF)
G
65
Min
27.2
FPTS
790.0
REB
342.0
AST
81.0
STL
114.0
BLK
102.0
TO
89.0
FGM
213.0
FGA
507.0
FTM
64.0
FTA
82.0
The sixth overall pick in the 2017 Draft out of Florida State, where he made the ACC All-Freshman Team, Isaac had his rookie campaign dampened by a lingering ankle injury. He struggled offensively during his 27 appearances, averaging just 5.4 points across 19.9 minutes while shooting 37.9 percent from the field. However, Isaac shot an encouraging 76.0 percent from the free throw line and was able to show off his defensive potential by averaging a combined 4.2 steals/blocks per 36 minutes. Heading into 2018-19, Isaac should see his role increase, likely starting alongside Aaron Gordon at forward. At the very least, Isaac is probably worth a late-round flier in Fantasy simply due to his upside as a defender and solid rebounding. How early he gets drafted is heavily dependent on Fantasy owners’ optimism about his scoring ability, both in volume and percentage, and overall workload.
The sixth overall pick in the 2017 Draft out of Florida State, where he made the ACC All-Freshman Team, Isaac had his rookie campaign dampened by a lingering ankle injury. He struggled offensively during his 27 appearances, averaging just 5.4 points across 19.9 minutes while shooting 37.9 percent from the field. However, Isaac shot an encouraging 76.0 percent from the free throw line and was able to show off his defensive potential by averaging a combined 4.2 steals/blocks per 36 minutes. Heading into 2018-19, Isaac should see his role increase, likely starting alongside Aaron Gordon at forward. At the very least, Isaac is probably worth a late-round flier in Fantasy simply due to his upside as a defender and solid rebounding. How early he gets drafted is heavily dependent on Fantasy owners’ optimism about his scoring ability, both in volume and percentage, and overall workload.
PHI (F, SF, PF)
G
75
Min
26.2
FPTS
789.0
REB
333.0
AST
134.0
STL
36.0
BLK
33.0
TO
77.0
FGM
247.0
FGA
544.0
FTM
75.0
FTA
95.0
Chandler moved back into a full-time starting role after coming off the bench for much of the previous campaign. While that helped boost his playing time up to 31.6 minutes per game, Chandler was still playing alongside some talented players and his production actually fell across the board while operating as a complementary scorer. Chandler averaged just 10.0 points per game, which was his lowest output since the 2011-12 season, and he also added 5.4 rebounds and 2.1 assists. The 31-year-old was able to play both forward positions and was primarily prided for his floor stretching ability, knocking down 1.2 three-pointers per game at a 35.8 percent clip. After publicly stating his displeasure with his role in the organization, the Nuggets opted to trade him to the 76ers this offseason. Despite the change in scenery, however, Chandler is likely looking at a tougher path to playing time. Both Robert Covington and Dario Saric should be locked into starting roles at small forward and power forward, respectively, resulting in Chandler shifting back to the bench. He'll likely operate as the team's sixth man, though with less minutes, his production could suffer a bit. Consider Chandler as a later round option in deeper leagues for now.
Chandler moved back into a full-time starting role after coming off the bench for much of the previous campaign. While that helped boost his playing time up to 31.6 minutes per game, Chandler was still playing alongside some talented players and his production actually fell across the board while operating as a complementary scorer. Chandler averaged just 10.0 points per game, which was his lowest output since the 2011-12 season, and he also added 5.4 rebounds and 2.1 assists. The 31-year-old was able to play both forward positions and was primarily prided for his floor stretching ability, knocking down 1.2 three-pointers per game at a 35.8 percent clip. After publicly stating his displeasure with his role in the organization, the Nuggets opted to trade him to the 76ers this offseason. Despite the change in scenery, however, Chandler is likely looking at a tougher path to playing time. Both Robert Covington and Dario Saric should be locked into starting roles at small forward and power forward, respectively, resulting in Chandler shifting back to the bench. He'll likely operate as the team's sixth man, though with less minutes, his production could suffer a bit. Consider Chandler as a later round option in deeper leagues for now.
SAN (G, SG, SF)
G
78
Min
23.5
FPTS
789.0
REB
141.0
AST
139.0
STL
62.0
BLK
11.0
TO
88.0
FGM
328.0
FGA
718.0
FTM
134.0
FTA
152.0
Belinelli opened the 2017-18 campaign with the rebuilding Hawks and was expected to serve as a mentor for the team's younger players. However, he ended up becoming a significant contributor and averaged 11.4 points, 2.0 assists and 1.9 rebounds across 23.3 minutes. In addition, the sharp-shooter hit 1.8 three-pointers at a 37.2 percent clip. That strong of showing in the first half of the season made him a hot item at the trade deadline and he was ultimately dealt to the playoff contending 76ers. In 28 games with Philadelphia, Belinelli actually upped his scoring production and averaged 13.6 points, 1.8 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 2.0 three-pointers across 26.3 minutes. Between the two teams combined, it was one of Belinelli's most productive seasons to date and resulted in a plethora of interest during free agency this offseason. The 32-year-old opted for a reunion with the Spurs and received a two-year, $12 million deal. He heads into a surprisingly strong situation in regards to his potential workload. The Spurs unloaded Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors and also let Kyle Anderson walk in free agency, which means there's going to be a ton of minutes available at the small forward position. Newly-acquired DeMar DeRozan is locked into the starting shooting guard spot, but Belinelli will still see plenty of time at that position as well. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising if he was able to put up a similar stat line to last year's combined averages between Atlanta and Philadelphia. Belinelli will only be on the radar in deeper Fantasy leagues, but his three-point totals and impressive percentages while playing in a favorable situation with the Spurs could get him selected in the later rounds.
Belinelli opened the 2017-18 campaign with the rebuilding Hawks and was expected to serve as a mentor for the team's younger players. However, he ended up becoming a significant contributor and averaged 11.4 points, 2.0 assists and 1.9 rebounds across 23.3 minutes. In addition, the sharp-shooter hit 1.8 three-pointers at a 37.2 percent clip. That strong of showing in the first half of the season made him a hot item at the trade deadline and he was ultimately dealt to the playoff contending 76ers. In 28 games with Philadelphia, Belinelli actually upped his scoring production and averaged 13.6 points, 1.8 rebounds, 1.6 assists and 2.0 three-pointers across 26.3 minutes. Between the two teams combined, it was one of Belinelli's most productive seasons to date and resulted in a plethora of interest during free agency this offseason. The 32-year-old opted for a reunion with the Spurs and received a two-year, $12 million deal. He heads into a surprisingly strong situation in regards to his potential workload. The Spurs unloaded Kawhi Leonard to the Raptors and also let Kyle Anderson walk in free agency, which means there's going to be a ton of minutes available at the small forward position. Newly-acquired DeMar DeRozan is locked into the starting shooting guard spot, but Belinelli will still see plenty of time at that position as well. As a result, it wouldn't be surprising if he was able to put up a similar stat line to last year's combined averages between Atlanta and Philadelphia. Belinelli will only be on the radar in deeper Fantasy leagues, but his three-point totals and impressive percentages while playing in a favorable situation with the Spurs could get him selected in the later rounds.
DAL (F, PF, C)
G
66
Min
23.8
FPTS
785.0
REB
293.0
AST
92.0
STL
33.0
BLK
67.0
TO
39.0
FGM
252.0
FGA
582.0
FTM
74.0
FTA
83.0
Playing in his 20th NBA season, Nowitzki's workload continued to regress as the Mavericks did everything they could to keep their future Hall of Famer healthy. While he played in a surprising 77 games, his minutes per game dipped to 24.7 and was a new career low. Nowitzki was still as reliable as ever with his floor stretching ability. He knocked down a total of 138 three-pointers (1.8 per game), while finishing with a 40.9 percent clip from deep. That total was a new career high and helped keep him as a potential Fantasy contributor in deeper leagues. In addition to the aforementioned averages, Nowitzki added 12.0 points, 5.7 rebounds and 1.6 assists. Now 40 years old, look for the Mavericks to once again scale back his workload heading into the upcoming campaign. Nowitzki will likely get a few days off to ease the burden on his legs and his minutes should take a hit again. There's also been some talk about potentially bringing him off the bench, which is only another negative hit to his value. Along with concerns over Nowitzki's court time, the Mavericks also brought in DeAndre Jordan this offseason, who's going to immediately jump into the top unit at center. Nowitzki spent the bulk of 2017-18 at that position, so Jordan's addition should mean more time at power forward. With all that said, Nowitzki is likely set for another fairly significant dip in production across the board in his 21st season.
Playing in his 20th NBA season, Nowitzki's workload continued to regress as the Mavericks did everything they could to keep their future Hall of Famer healthy. While he played in a surprising 77 games, his minutes per game dipped to 24.7 and was a new career low. Nowitzki was still as reliable as ever with his floor stretching ability. He knocked down a total of 138 three-pointers (1.8 per game), while finishing with a 40.9 percent clip from deep. That total was a new career high and helped keep him as a potential Fantasy contributor in deeper leagues. In addition to the aforementioned averages, Nowitzki added 12.0 points, 5.7 rebounds and 1.6 assists. Now 40 years old, look for the Mavericks to once again scale back his workload heading into the upcoming campaign. Nowitzki will likely get a few days off to ease the burden on his legs and his minutes should take a hit again. There's also been some talk about potentially bringing him off the bench, which is only another negative hit to his value. Along with concerns over Nowitzki's court time, the Mavericks also brought in DeAndre Jordan this offseason, who's going to immediately jump into the top unit at center. Nowitzki spent the bulk of 2017-18 at that position, so Jordan's addition should mean more time at power forward. With all that said, Nowitzki is likely set for another fairly significant dip in production across the board in his 21st season.
CHR (F, PF, C)
G
77
Min
22.4
FPTS
783.0
REB
271.0
AST
121.0
STL
34.0
BLK
18.0
TO
62.0
FGM
292.0
FGA
673.0
FTM
142.0
FTA
182.0
For the second season in a row, and his third year in the league, Kaminsky was given a sixth-man role with Charlotte. He saw about three fewer minutes per game, resulting in lower counting stats essentially across the board, but was able to become a more efficient player. The Wisconsin product set career-highs in field-goal percentage (42.9), three-point percentage (38.0) and free-throw percentage (79.9). While he only posted 11.1 points, 3.6 boards and 1.6 assists per contest on the year, he was impressive when given extra run, able to average 17.8 points, 6.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists in the four games that he was given 30-plus minutes. Considering his ability to play both power forward and center given his height and three-point shooting, Kaminsky shouldn't have issues garnering sixth-man run again this season. Assuming that’s the case, he'll likely once again be on the fringes of Fantasy relevance in standard formats.
For the second season in a row, and his third year in the league, Kaminsky was given a sixth-man role with Charlotte. He saw about three fewer minutes per game, resulting in lower counting stats essentially across the board, but was able to become a more efficient player. The Wisconsin product set career-highs in field-goal percentage (42.9), three-point percentage (38.0) and free-throw percentage (79.9). While he only posted 11.1 points, 3.6 boards and 1.6 assists per contest on the year, he was impressive when given extra run, able to average 17.8 points, 6.0 rebounds and 2.3 assists in the four games that he was given 30-plus minutes. Considering his ability to play both power forward and center given his height and three-point shooting, Kaminsky shouldn't have issues garnering sixth-man run again this season. Assuming that’s the case, he'll likely once again be on the fringes of Fantasy relevance in standard formats.
UTA (F, PF, SF)
G
75
Min
27.4
FPTS
781.0
REB
270.0
AST
97.0
STL
63.0
BLK
21.0
TO
73.0
FGM
306.0
FGA
728.0
FTM
115.0
FTA
146.0
Crowder, who was dealt to the Cavaliers during the summer of 2017 in the trade that sent Kyrie Irving to Boston, had an underwhelming 2017-18 campaign. His Cleveland tenure didn't last the whole season, as he was dealt to Utah during the Cavs’ flurry of deadline moves. After averaging 14.0 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 1.4 steals during his final two years with the Celtics, Crowder regressed to 9.7 points, 3.4 rebounds, 1.2 assists and fewer than a steal per game last season. He also saw his three-point percentage drop from 39.8 percent two years ago to 32.3 percent last year. Considering his Fantasy relevance was heavily contingent on his overall volume, Crowder’s move into a sixth-man role will likely result in him going undrafted in most standard leagues this season. That said, he still remains someone to keeps tabs on if Derrick Favors and/or Rudy Gobert miss time.
Crowder, who was dealt to the Cavaliers during the summer of 2017 in the trade that sent Kyrie Irving to Boston, had an underwhelming 2017-18 campaign. His Cleveland tenure didn't last the whole season, as he was dealt to Utah during the Cavs’ flurry of deadline moves. After averaging 14.0 points, 5.4 rebounds, 2.0 assists and 1.4 steals during his final two years with the Celtics, Crowder regressed to 9.7 points, 3.4 rebounds, 1.2 assists and fewer than a steal per game last season. He also saw his three-point percentage drop from 39.8 percent two years ago to 32.3 percent last year. Considering his Fantasy relevance was heavily contingent on his overall volume, Crowder’s move into a sixth-man role will likely result in him going undrafted in most standard leagues this season. That said, he still remains someone to keeps tabs on if Derrick Favors and/or Rudy Gobert miss time.
DEN (G, PG)
G
68
Min
24.0
FPTS
780.0
REB
127.0
AST
285.0
STL
28.0
BLK
6.0
TO
180.0
FGM
333.0
FGA
797.0
FTM
209.0
FTA
232.0
In a situation that has reached “saga” status, Thomas signed a one-year, $2 million contract with the Nuggets nearly two weeks after the beginning of free agency. To recap, Thomas was a significant part of the trade that sent Kyrie Irving to Boston, but was dealing with a hip injury that ended up affecting his play more than anticipated. In Cleveland, he appeared in 15 games before being dealt to the Lakers, where he played 17 games, in a massive deadline frenzy by Cavaliers’ General Manager Koby Altman. Overall, Thomas averaged 15.2 points on 37.3 percent shooting from the field and 29.3 percent from three, 4.8 assists and 2.1 rebounds across 26.9 minutes. In what is a prove-it deal, Thomas looks locked in to be Denver’s backup point guard behind Jamal Murray, and should have a chance to see around 20 minutes per game. With the possibility of re-injury and/or poor efficiency, selecting Thomas at any point in standard Fantasy draft is a risk.
In a situation that has reached “saga” status, Thomas signed a one-year, $2 million contract with the Nuggets nearly two weeks after the beginning of free agency. To recap, Thomas was a significant part of the trade that sent Kyrie Irving to Boston, but was dealing with a hip injury that ended up affecting his play more than anticipated. In Cleveland, he appeared in 15 games before being dealt to the Lakers, where he played 17 games, in a massive deadline frenzy by Cavaliers’ General Manager Koby Altman. Overall, Thomas averaged 15.2 points on 37.3 percent shooting from the field and 29.3 percent from three, 4.8 assists and 2.1 rebounds across 26.9 minutes. In what is a prove-it deal, Thomas looks locked in to be Denver’s backup point guard behind Jamal Murray, and should have a chance to see around 20 minutes per game. With the possibility of re-injury and/or poor efficiency, selecting Thomas at any point in standard Fantasy draft is a risk.
IND (G, PG, SG)
G
81
Min
25.3
FPTS
780.0
REB
244.0
AST
241.0
STL
74.0
BLK
17.0
TO
81.0
FGM
245.0
FGA
560.0
FTM
67.0
FTA
87.0
The always reliable Joseph played in all 82 games during his first year in Indiana, marking his fourth straight season of missing less than four total contests. As expected, Joseph was locked into a backup role behind Darren Collison for much of the year, but still saw plenty of court time (27.0 MPG) and actually picked up 17 starts when Collison dealt with some injuries. The 26-year-old averaged just 8.6 points, 4.5 rebounds and 3.4 assists across 32.3 minutes when working with the top unit, which was only slightly better than his numbers as a reserve. For the entire season, Joseph managed per game numbers of 7.9 points, 3.2 rebounds and 3.2 assists across 27.0 minutes, while also playing solid defense with a career-high 1.0 steal per game. Joseph also finished just over 35 percent from deep for a second straight season. Heading into the 2018-19 campaign, Joseph is the favorite for backup duties once again, but the Pacers brought in a couple of other backcourt pieces that threaten some of his workload. Point guard Aaron Holiday was selected in the first round of the draft and most notably, Tyreke Evans was signed during free agency. Holiday will likely be groomed behind Joseph and Collison, who are both on expiring deals, but Evans poses a significant threat considering he is more than capable of handling the ball is coming off a bounce-back season where he averaged 19.4 points across 30.9 minutes. That will likely make it hard for Joseph to match his workload from a season ago, so Fantasy owners in deeper leagues considering a late-round selection may want to temper expectations.
The always reliable Joseph played in all 82 games during his first year in Indiana, marking his fourth straight season of missing less than four total contests. As expected, Joseph was locked into a backup role behind Darren Collison for much of the year, but still saw plenty of court time (27.0 MPG) and actually picked up 17 starts when Collison dealt with some injuries. The 26-year-old averaged just 8.6 points, 4.5 rebounds and 3.4 assists across 32.3 minutes when working with the top unit, which was only slightly better than his numbers as a reserve. For the entire season, Joseph managed per game numbers of 7.9 points, 3.2 rebounds and 3.2 assists across 27.0 minutes, while also playing solid defense with a career-high 1.0 steal per game. Joseph also finished just over 35 percent from deep for a second straight season. Heading into the 2018-19 campaign, Joseph is the favorite for backup duties once again, but the Pacers brought in a couple of other backcourt pieces that threaten some of his workload. Point guard Aaron Holiday was selected in the first round of the draft and most notably, Tyreke Evans was signed during free agency. Holiday will likely be groomed behind Joseph and Collison, who are both on expiring deals, but Evans poses a significant threat considering he is more than capable of handling the ball is coming off a bounce-back season where he averaged 19.4 points across 30.9 minutes. That will likely make it hard for Joseph to match his workload from a season ago, so Fantasy owners in deeper leagues considering a late-round selection may want to temper expectations.
BRO (F, PF, SF)
G
70
Min
27.3
FPTS
779.0
REB
286.0
AST
110.0
STL
52.0
BLK
26.0
TO
90.0
FGM
280.0
FGA
687.0
FTM
165.0
FTA
213.0
After a couple of average seasons with Toronto, the Raptors opted to ship Carroll, and the final two years of his four-year, $58 million deal, to the Nets in order to open up some cap space. Despite what appeared to be a team getting rid of an ugly contract, the Nets got plenty of value out of Carroll in his first season with the team. He started all 73 games he played in and became a potential standard league pickup due to his solid multi-category production. Carroll finished with career-high averages of 13.5 points per game, 6.6 rebounds and 2.0 assists, while he was also given free reign to launch from beyond the arc. The 32-year-old tallied yet another career high of 2.0 three-pointers made and posted a respectable 37.1 percent clip from downtown. His role doesn't appear to be in too much danger heading into the 2017-18 campaign. The Nets did add both Ed Davis and Kenneth Faried in free agency, who could be added to the mix at the power forward position. Despite starting at small forward, Carroll saw a ton of action at the four last year, so those two additions could get in the way of him matching his workload from a season ago. With all that said, expect Carroll to put up numbers similar to, or slightly down from, last year's output.
After a couple of average seasons with Toronto, the Raptors opted to ship Carroll, and the final two years of his four-year, $58 million deal, to the Nets in order to open up some cap space. Despite what appeared to be a team getting rid of an ugly contract, the Nets got plenty of value out of Carroll in his first season with the team. He started all 73 games he played in and became a potential standard league pickup due to his solid multi-category production. Carroll finished with career-high averages of 13.5 points per game, 6.6 rebounds and 2.0 assists, while he was also given free reign to launch from beyond the arc. The 32-year-old tallied yet another career high of 2.0 three-pointers made and posted a respectable 37.1 percent clip from downtown. His role doesn't appear to be in too much danger heading into the 2017-18 campaign. The Nets did add both Ed Davis and Kenneth Faried in free agency, who could be added to the mix at the power forward position. Despite starting at small forward, Carroll saw a ton of action at the four last year, so those two additions could get in the way of him matching his workload from a season ago. With all that said, expect Carroll to put up numbers similar to, or slightly down from, last year's output.
NOR (F, SF, PF)
G
81
Min
22.2
FPTS
762.0
REB
338.0
AST
103.0
STL
26.0
BLK
16.0
TO
54.0
FGM
202.0
FGA
450.0
FTM
53.0
FTA
62.0
Miller played in all 82 games last season and even started three contests. Across his 23.7 minutes per game, Miller was able to deliver 7.8 points on 44 percent shooting, including 1.8 made three-pointers per game. The addition of Julius Randle adds another body in the frontcourt, so expect Miller to once again spend the bulk of his time as a reserve wing. Regardless, Miller is mostly a three-point streamer in typical formats, given that he failed to make meaningful contributions in other categories last season.
Miller played in all 82 games last season and even started three contests. Across his 23.7 minutes per game, Miller was able to deliver 7.8 points on 44 percent shooting, including 1.8 made three-pointers per game. The addition of Julius Randle adds another body in the frontcourt, so expect Miller to once again spend the bulk of his time as a reserve wing. Regardless, Miller is mostly a three-point streamer in typical formats, given that he failed to make meaningful contributions in other categories last season.
CLE (G, SG, PG)
G
80
Min
22.1
FPTS
762.0
REB
203.0
AST
124.0
STL
54.0
BLK
6.0
TO
119.0
FGM
391.0
FGA
893.0
FTM
145.0
FTA
178.0
With the selection of Lonzo Ball, as well as the return of Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Clarkson opened the 2017-18 campaign in a bench role for the Lakers. He primarily was tasked with providing a scoring presence in the second unit, but was eventually sent to the Cavaliers at the trade deadline in what was a deal that netted the Lakers Isaiah Thomas. Clarkson would go on to play in 28 games with the Cavaliers and saw his numbers take a slight hit across the board with averages of 12.6 points, 2.0 rebounds and 1.7 assists across 22.6 minutes. He did, however, prove to me a much better shooter and hit 40.7 percent of his three-point attempts with Cleveland compared to just 32.4 percent with Los Angeles. Looking forward to the upcoming season, the Cavaliers no longer have superstar LeBron James on the roster. That creates a huge void in the rotation, so Clarkson could see a few extra minutes on the wing. Still, the Cavaliers selected promising point guard Collin Sexton with the eighth overall pick in the 2018 Draft and also bring back George Hill, J.R. Smith and Kyle Korver, so there's still a bit of a log jam in the backcourt. If Clarkson's role does increase, it would likely only be minor in nature.
With the selection of Lonzo Ball, as well as the return of Kentavious Caldwell-Pope, Clarkson opened the 2017-18 campaign in a bench role for the Lakers. He primarily was tasked with providing a scoring presence in the second unit, but was eventually sent to the Cavaliers at the trade deadline in what was a deal that netted the Lakers Isaiah Thomas. Clarkson would go on to play in 28 games with the Cavaliers and saw his numbers take a slight hit across the board with averages of 12.6 points, 2.0 rebounds and 1.7 assists across 22.6 minutes. He did, however, prove to me a much better shooter and hit 40.7 percent of his three-point attempts with Cleveland compared to just 32.4 percent with Los Angeles. Looking forward to the upcoming season, the Cavaliers no longer have superstar LeBron James on the roster. That creates a huge void in the rotation, so Clarkson could see a few extra minutes on the wing. Still, the Cavaliers selected promising point guard Collin Sexton with the eighth overall pick in the 2018 Draft and also bring back George Hill, J.R. Smith and Kyle Korver, so there's still a bit of a log jam in the backcourt. If Clarkson's role does increase, it would likely only be minor in nature.
POR (F, SG, SF)
G
80
Min
26.0
FPTS
759.0
REB
270.0
AST
206.0
STL
48.0
BLK
30.0
TO
101.0
FGM
260.0
FGA
589.0
FTM
91.0
FTA
109.0
Much of the top half of the Trail Blazers’ roster remains unchanged heading into next season, leaving Turner in a battle with Maurice Harkless for the starting small forward role. The 29-year-old’s numbers saw another downturn last season, the second consecutive campaign that’s occurred since his arrival from Boston following the 2015-16 season. Turner averaged a modest 8.2 points, 3.1 rebounds and 2.2 assists across 79 games (40 starts), although the news wasn't necessarily all bad. Turner’s overall shooting percentage saw a bump from 42.6 to 44.7 percent over the prior season. Additionally, he snapped a three-season streak of sub-30-percent three-point percentage tallies by draining 31.8 percent of his tries from distance, and he shot a career-best 85.0 percent from the free-throw line. However, given that he shares the floor with a trio of high-usage teammates in Damian Lillard, C.J. McCollum and Jusuf Nurkic, Turner put up only 7.3 shot attempts per contest, limiting his overall Fantasy utility. The Trail Blazers’ offense is once again expected to largely run through the aforementioned stars barring injury, which likely leaves Turner with a usage rate similar to the 15.6 percent he logged last season.
Much of the top half of the Trail Blazers’ roster remains unchanged heading into next season, leaving Turner in a battle with Maurice Harkless for the starting small forward role. The 29-year-old’s numbers saw another downturn last season, the second consecutive campaign that’s occurred since his arrival from Boston following the 2015-16 season. Turner averaged a modest 8.2 points, 3.1 rebounds and 2.2 assists across 79 games (40 starts), although the news wasn't necessarily all bad. Turner’s overall shooting percentage saw a bump from 42.6 to 44.7 percent over the prior season. Additionally, he snapped a three-season streak of sub-30-percent three-point percentage tallies by draining 31.8 percent of his tries from distance, and he shot a career-best 85.0 percent from the free-throw line. However, given that he shares the floor with a trio of high-usage teammates in Damian Lillard, C.J. McCollum and Jusuf Nurkic, Turner put up only 7.3 shot attempts per contest, limiting his overall Fantasy utility. The Trail Blazers’ offense is once again expected to largely run through the aforementioned stars barring injury, which likely leaves Turner with a usage rate similar to the 15.6 percent he logged last season.
GS (C, C)
G
45
Min
23.9
FPTS
742.0
REB
312.0
AST
123.0
STL
38.0
BLK
47.0
TO
124.0
FGM
213.0
FGA
466.0
FTM
184.0
FTA
244.0
Cousins was in the midst of a dominant campaign and was one of the top Fantasy players in the league before tearing his Achilles in late January. One of the most dynamic big men in the league, Cousins averaged 25.2 points on 47.0 percent from the field, which was his highest mark since 2013-14. He also drilled a career-high 2.2 threes per tilt at 35.4 percent, and shot 74.6 percent from the charity stripe. Boogie also got his teammates involves, dishing out career-high 5.4 dimes per contest. His work on the glass also remained impressive, as he set a career-high 12.9 rebounding average. Cousins’ play wasn't just on the offensive end, either, as he racked up a combined 3.2 steals/blocks per game. Though he only appeared in 48 games, his diverse skillset allowed him to post 38 double-doubles, plus three triple-doubles. Three 40-point games, five 20-rebound games, three 10-plus assist efforts, four games with at least five blocks and three games with at least five steals were on his resume in 2017-18 as well. All of that being said, it’s not clear what kind of player Cousins will be less than one year removed from a devastating injury, as the history of players returning to full strength following an Achilles tear is incredibly slim. At the very least, his improved proficiency as a shooter should keep him in the running for several three-point attempts per game, though it’s not exactly clear how many minutes he'll garner. Ultimately, it’s a significant risk to draft Cousins in Fantasy this season, though it’s hard to argue with gambling on the four-time All-Star in a later round.
Cousins was in the midst of a dominant campaign and was one of the top Fantasy players in the league before tearing his Achilles in late January. One of the most dynamic big men in the league, Cousins averaged 25.2 points on 47.0 percent from the field, which was his highest mark since 2013-14. He also drilled a career-high 2.2 threes per tilt at 35.4 percent, and shot 74.6 percent from the charity stripe. Boogie also got his teammates involves, dishing out career-high 5.4 dimes per contest. His work on the glass also remained impressive, as he set a career-high 12.9 rebounding average. Cousins’ play wasn't just on the offensive end, either, as he racked up a combined 3.2 steals/blocks per game. Though he only appeared in 48 games, his diverse skillset allowed him to post 38 double-doubles, plus three triple-doubles. Three 40-point games, five 20-rebound games, three 10-plus assist efforts, four games with at least five blocks and three games with at least five steals were on his resume in 2017-18 as well. All of that being said, it’s not clear what kind of player Cousins will be less than one year removed from a devastating injury, as the history of players returning to full strength following an Achilles tear is incredibly slim. At the very least, his improved proficiency as a shooter should keep him in the running for several three-point attempts per game, though it’s not exactly clear how many minutes he'll garner. Ultimately, it’s a significant risk to draft Cousins in Fantasy this season, though it’s hard to argue with gambling on the four-time All-Star in a later round.
DET (G, SG, SF)
G
68
Min
27.3
FPTS
738.0
REB
218.0
AST
153.0
STL
54.0
BLK
16.0
TO
85.0
FGM
262.0
FGA
575.0
FTM
82.0
FTA
94.0
After being selected with the 12th overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft, Kennard immediately jumped into a rotation role off the bench for the Pistons. His most notable contribution came as a deep ball threat, as Kennard hit 1.1 three-pointers per game while finishing with a superb 41.5 percent clip from outside. However, the 22-year-old also showed off the ability to create open looks for himself and act as a facilitator at times, so he wasn't simply just a floor spacer. Kennard finished his rookie season with averages of 7.6 points, 2.4 rebounds and 1.7 assists across 20.0 minutes. Considering his solid NBA debut, Kennard could be in line for an increased role during the upcoming campaign. He's certainly in consideration for a spot in the top unit, though it seems likely he'll remain in a bench role to start the year behind some combination of Reggie Bullock, Stanley Johnson and/or Glenn Robinson. Still, the Pistons have already stated their intention of getting the ball in Kennard's hands more often offensively and he's likely going to be asked to take on some ball-handling duties in the second unit. The Pistons reportedly wanted to have Kennard work at point guard during summer league before an injury ruled him out of the session, but it still gives a glimpse of what the staff may have planned for their young wing. He appears to have a bright future in the Association, but with a handful of other bodies on the wing making it hard for Kennard to get big minutes, he'll likely just be a three-point specialist for those in deeper leagues.
After being selected with the 12th overall pick in the 2017 NBA Draft, Kennard immediately jumped into a rotation role off the bench for the Pistons. His most notable contribution came as a deep ball threat, as Kennard hit 1.1 three-pointers per game while finishing with a superb 41.5 percent clip from outside. However, the 22-year-old also showed off the ability to create open looks for himself and act as a facilitator at times, so he wasn't simply just a floor spacer. Kennard finished his rookie season with averages of 7.6 points, 2.4 rebounds and 1.7 assists across 20.0 minutes. Considering his solid NBA debut, Kennard could be in line for an increased role during the upcoming campaign. He's certainly in consideration for a spot in the top unit, though it seems likely he'll remain in a bench role to start the year behind some combination of Reggie Bullock, Stanley Johnson and/or Glenn Robinson. Still, the Pistons have already stated their intention of getting the ball in Kennard's hands more often offensively and he's likely going to be asked to take on some ball-handling duties in the second unit. The Pistons reportedly wanted to have Kennard work at point guard during summer league before an injury ruled him out of the session, but it still gives a glimpse of what the staff may have planned for their young wing. He appears to have a bright future in the Association, but with a handful of other bodies on the wing making it hard for Kennard to get big minutes, he'll likely just be a three-point specialist for those in deeper leagues.
DET (G, SG, SF)
G
70
Min
28.4
FPTS
735.0
REB
177.0
AST
109.0
STL
54.0
BLK
15.0
TO
54.0
FGM
296.0
FGA
627.0
FTM
45.0
FTA
56.0
Bullock started the 2017-18 campaign on a five-game suspension and then struggled to stay in the rotation for roughly the first two months of the season before finally being given a chance for extended run. By mid-December, Bullock earned a starting role and ended up working with the top unit in 52 of the career-high 62 games he played in. His workload would become even more secure following the Blake Griffin addition, as that sent Avery Bradley to Los Angeles in the corresponding move and opened up a much clearer path to playing time on the wing. As a result, Bullock nearly doubled his time on the court with 27.9 minutes per game compared to 15.1 a year prior. The added time on the court allowed Bullock to up his production across the board and he finished the year with averages of 11.3 points, 2.5 rebounds and 1.4 assists. Most notably, however, was his work as a three-point threat, as Bullock knocked down 2.0 deep balls per game at a blistering 44.5 percent clip. Heading into the upcoming season, Bullock appears primed to reclaim his role in the top unit, though it's unclear if that will be alongside Stanley